Brrrr! -135.8°F Measured at Earth's New Coldest Spot

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 4:23 PM GMT on December 10, 2013

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I’m in San Francisco this week for the annual meeting of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), the world’s largest climate science conference. Over five thousand of the world’s top climate scientists are here, giving a staggering 10,000 talks and poster presentations. It’s total information overload, and I will only be able to offer this week but a small sampling of the incredible amount of science being presented here.

What is the coldest place in the world? It is a high ridge above 13,000 feet in Antarctica on the East Antarctic Plateau where temperatures in several hollows can dip below minus 135.8 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 92.2 degrees Celsius) on a clear winter night, announced polar scientist Ted Scambos of the National Snow and Ice Data Center, at a Monday press conference at the AGU conference. The official world cold record of minus 128.6 F (minus 89.2 C), set in 1983 at the Russian Vostok Research Station in East Antarctica will remain intact, though, since official records have to be measured by ground-based instruments. How cold is -135.8°F? That’s so cold that it would hurt to breathe, said Dr. Scambos in an AP interview. That’s also well below the -109°F temperature that dry ice (frozen carbon dioxide) begins to sublimate into gaseous carbon dioxide. But don’t get your hopes up that we can use the newly-found record cold spot to take CO2 out of the air and solve global warming—you need a temperature of -220°F (-140°C) to freeze CO2 out the air into dry ice “snow” at the concentrations that CO2 exists at in our atmosphere (about 398 ppm.) Still, it is an intriguing concept to build giant refrigerators in Antarctica to do just that—something that has been proposed by Purdue climate scientist Ernest Agee, in a research paper titled, CO2 Snow Deposition in Antarctica to Curtail Anthropogenic Global Warming, published earlier this year in the Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology .


Figure 1. With remote-sensing satellites, scientists have found the coldest places on Earth, just off a ridge in the East Antarctic Plateau. The coldest of the cold temperatures dropped to minus 135.8 F (minus 93.2 C)--several degrees colder than the previous record. Image Credit: Ted Scambos, National Snow and Ice Data Center.


Video 1. The coldest place on earth. Data from NASA-USGS Landsat 8 satellite, and NASA's MODIS sensor on the Aqua satellite. Image Credit:  NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Figure 2. In this spectacular photo from Antarctica taken by a NASA scientist on November 24, 2013, we see a lenticular cloud over a pressure ridge in the Antarctic sea ice. Lenticular clouds are a type of wave cloud. They usually form when a layer of air near the surface encounters a topographic barrier, gets pushed upward, and flows over it as a series of atmospheric gravity waves. Lenticular clouds form at the crest of the waves, where the air is coolest and water vapor is most likely to condense into cloud droplets. The bulging sea ice in the foreground is a pressure ridge, which formed when separate ice floes collided and piled up on each other. Image credit: NASA Earth Observatory.

Follow this week’s talks at AGU via the Internet
You can watch live streaming and recorded talks at this week’s AGU meeting—nearly 100 sessions (almost 600 presentations in total)--will be available live and on demand. Register here, and be sure to use code AGU13 for free access. You can also browse thousands of poster presentations at the poster site.
 
Amusing story: Metallica Has Officially Rocked on Every Continent Following Antarctica Gig on Sunday

Jeff Masters

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Quoting 107. ncstorm:


this is the 12z CMC at 90 hours





That is a little better..at least it shows some parts of NC getting something. Doesn't help you and I here on the coast though lol...oh well...just gotta keep reminding myself it is not until Jan and Feb for our best chances here on the coast.
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Quoting 130. Bluestorm5:


Wasn't suggesting global is cooling. I do remember that record that was found by satellite as well. To be honest, it's less of surprise they found a hotter area than colder area of the planet. I'm sure a record 160 F or more will be broken in near future.
Don't pay no mind to that.If you believe in something there is no need to explain it.There was a time back in February when I said that it was cold outside and snowing and a crowed of pro GW was downtown.Then I was accused of being a denier and trying to cease all talk of Climate change.It's actually really funny when I look back on it.I'm laughing while typing this BTW.
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131. jpsb
Quoting 122. ricderr:
Maybe I'm crazy but I am much more afraid of mile high ice sheets advancing on NYC that I am a few meters rise in sea levels


yep....cus we all saw what a few meter storm surge did to nyc and neighbors during sandy
Yeah a 1 mile high ice sheet ain't jack compared to a long over due cat 2 hurricane. BTW back in the 50's hurricanes were quite common in the NYC area. I personally went thru 2 of them. Maybe it not a good idea to build homes on low lying coastal plains? Just a thought. Here more food for thought Long Island is merely the debere left by one advancing ice sheet. The Great Lakes are just the melt water from the last ice sheet. Should such an event occur again half the USA and perhaps more will be unfit for human habitation. Given a choice I'll take a little warming over a little cooling any day.
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Quoting 123. Neapolitan:
I suppose--though if that were to become the new official record, the 159.3F (70.7C) measured by satellite in Iran's Dasht-e Lut Desert in 2005 would have to become the new record highest tempera-holder by more than 20F.


Wasn't suggesting global is cooling. I do remember that record that was found by satellite as well. To be honest, it's less of surprise they found a hotter area than colder area of the planet. I'm sure a record 160 F or more will be broken in near future.
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Just shoveled the driveway. If there is anything I don't like about winter thats it.
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Quoting 121. georgevandenberghe:


It was a dud for College Park Md. 2" maybe being generous on snow boards and little accumulation on roads.

But the potential for really bad commuting conditions was there if we had gotten a band of heavy snow. These are presently (only slightly) beyond our capability to deterministically initialize and forecast. So I concur with the decision to close schools and federal offices.
I got three inches at my house,so that brings this year snow total at my house to 6 inches for the winter so far (3 inches from Sunday and 3 inches from today).Not bad..not bad..
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Climate Science

The Battle Over Global Warming Is All in Your Head


Despite the fact that more people now acknowledge that climate change represents a significant threat to human well-being, this has yet to translate into any meaningful action. Psychologists may have an answer as to why this is

Today the scientific community is in almost total agreement that the earth’s climate is changing as a result of human activity, and that this represents a huge threat to the planet and to us. According to a Pew survey conducted in March, however, public opinion lags behind the scientific conclusion, with only 69% of those surveyed accepting the view that the earth is warming — and only 1 in 4 Americans see global warming as a major threat. Still, 69% is a solid majority, which begs the question, Why aren’t we doing anything about it?

This political inertia in the face of unprecedented threat is the most fundamental challenge to tackling climate change. Climate scientists and campaigners have long debated how to better communicate the message to nonexperts so that climate science can be translated into action. According to Christopher Rapley, professor of climate science at University College London, the usual tactic of climate experts to provide the public with information isn’t enough because “it does not address key underlying causes.” We are all bombarded with the evidence of climate change on an almost a daily basis, from new studies and data to direct experiences of freakish weather events like last year’s epic drought in the U.S. The information is almost unavoidable.

If it’s not a data deficit that’s preventing people from doing more on global warming, what is it? Blame our brains. Renee Lertzman, an applied researcher who focuses on the psychological dimensions of sustainability, explains that the kind of systemic threat that climate change poses to humans is “unique both psychologically and socially.” We face a minefield of mental barriers and issues that prevent us from confronting the threat.


(MORE: As Temperatures Rise, Empires Fall: Heat and Human Behavior)

For some, the answer lies in cognitive science. Daniel Gilbert, a professor of psychology at Harvard, has written about why our inability to deal with climate change is due in part to the way our mind is wired. Gilbert describes four key reasons ranging from the fact that global warming doesn’t take a human form — making it difficult for us to think of it as an enemy — to our brains’ failure to accurately perceive gradual change as opposed to rapid shifts. Climate change has occurred slowly enough for our minds to normalize it, which is precisely what makes it a deadly threat, as Gilbert writes, “because it fails to trip the brain’s alarm, leaving us soundly asleep in a burning bed.”

Robert Gifford, a professor of psychology and environmental studies at the University of Victoria in Canada, also picks up on the point about our brains’ difficulty in grasping climate change as a threat. Gifford refers to this and other psychological barriers to mitigating climate change as “dragons of inaction.” Since authoring a paper on the subject in 2011 in which he outlined seven main barriers, or dragons, he has found many more. “We’re up to around 30,” he notes. “Now it’s time to think about how we can slay these dragons.” Gifford lists factors such as limited cognition or ignorance of the problem, ideologies or worldviews that may prevent action, social comparisons with other people and perceived inequity (the “Why should we change if X corporation or Y country won’t?”) and the perceived risks of changing our behavior.

Gifford is reluctant to pick out one barrier as being more powerful or limiting than another. “If I had to name one, I would nominate the lack of perceived behavioral control; ‘I’m only one person, what can I do?’ is certainly a big one.” For many, the first challenge will be in recognizing which dragons they have to deal with before they can overcome them. “If you don’t know what your problem is, you don’t know what the solution is,” says Gifford.

Yet this approach can only work if people are prepared to acknowledge that they have a problem. But for those of us who understand that climate change is a problem yet make little effort to cut the number of overseas trips we make or the amount of meat we consume, neither apathy nor denial really explains the dissonance between our actions and beliefs. Lertzman has come to the conclusion that this is not because of apathy — a lack of feeling — but because of the simple fact that we care an overwhelming amount about both the planet and our way of life, and we find that conflict too painful to bear. Our apparent apathy is just a defense mechanism in the face of this psychic pain.

(MORE: The Evil Brain: What Lurks Inside a Killer’s Mind)

“We’re reluctant to come to terms with the fact that what we love and enjoy and what gives us a sense of who we are is also now bound up with the most unimaginable devastation,” says Lertzman. “When we don’t process the pain of that, that’s when we get stuck and can’t move forward.” Lertzman refers to this inability to mourn as “environmental melancholia,” and points to South Africa’s postapartheid Truth and Reconciliation Commission as an example of how to effectively deal with this collective pain. “I’m not saying there should be one for climate or carbon, but there’s a lot to be said for providing a means for people to talk together about climate change, to make it socially acceptable to talk about it.”

Rosemary Randall, a trained psychotherapist, has organized something close to this. She runs the U.K.-based Carbon Conversations, a program that brings people together to talk in a group setting about ways of halving their personal carbon footprint. Writing in Aeon, an online magazine, Randall suggests that climate change is such a disturbing subject, that “like death, it can raise fears and anxieties that people feel have no place in polite conversation.” Randall acknowledges that while psychology and psychoanalysis aren’t the sole solutions to tackling climate change, “they do offer an important way of thinking about the problem.”

Lertzman says the mainstream climate-change community has been slow to register the value of psychology and social analysis in addressing global warming. “I think there’s a spark of some interest, but also a wariness of what this means, what it might look like,” she notes. Gifford says otherwise, however, explaining that he has never collaborated with other disciplines as much as he does now. “I may be a little biased because I’m invested in working in it, but in my view, climate change, and not mental health, is the biggest psychological problem we face today because it affects 100% of the global population.”

Despite the pain, shame, difficulty and minefield of other psychological barriers that we face in fully addressing climate change, both Lertzman and Gifford are still upbeat about our ability to face up to the challenge. “It’s patronizing to say that climate change is too big or abstract an issue for people to deal with,” says Lertzman. “There can’t be something about the human mind that stops us grappling with these issues given that so many people already are — maybe that’s what we should be focusing on instead.”

MORE: The Psychology of Environmentalism: How the Mind Can Save the Planet


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Quoting 107. ncstorm:


this is the 12z CMC at 90 hours



That is the CMC..,But the models have been trending colder with Saturday's event..I can only hope...
Anywho
Cold as the northern winds
In December mornings,
Cold is the cry that rings
From this far distant shore.

Winter has come too late
Too close beside me.
How can I chase away
All these fears deep inside?

Link
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G'day and thanks Dr Jeff.
Ah yes, the annual AGU meeting of the minds. Look forward to your informative reports.

So this is where you and Anthony Watts get together, belt back a few beers late into the evening and plot topic strategy in the year ahead for respective readers, right?

;)
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124. jpsb
Quoting 118. georgevandenberghe:


I learn much more from the former while hopefully contributing to their knowledge also.


totally agree, the only thing that keeps me from going total AGW Denier is the intelligent and thoughtful debate here at WU. I'm skeptical but I know I could be wrong.
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Quoting 69. Bluestorm5:
I knew a satellite will find a colder spot than recorded, so it didn't surprise me when I heard about it. It's a shame it's not recorded...
I suppose--though if that were to become the new official record, the 159.3F (70.7C) measured by satellite in Iran's Dasht-e Lut Desert in 2005 would have to become the new record highest tempera-holder by more than 20F.
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Maybe I'm crazy but I am much more afraid of mile high ice sheets advancing on NYC that I am a few meters rise in sea levels


yep....cus we all saw what a few meter storm surge did to nyc and neighbors during sandy
Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 673 Comments: 21639
Quoting 117. Hurricane614:
Good afternoon. Just had a huge burst of snow that brought a quick 2-3 inches. I'm officially satisfied with this storm.


It was a dud for College Park Md. 2" maybe being generous on snow boards and little accumulation on roads.

But the potential for really bad commuting conditions was there if we had gotten a band of heavy snow. These are presently (only slightly) beyond our capability to deterministically initialize and forecast. So I concur with the decision to close schools and federal offices.
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120. jpsb
Quoting 115. biff4ugo:


the frozen CO2 sequestration idea is awesome, but where would you put it to stay frozen once you collected it? Frozen methane could currently be stored in the bottom of the ocean, right?

I think a better idea to sequester CO2 would be to plant long lived trees. CO2 is after all plant (tree) food.
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Quoting 72. FunnelVortex:


Winter begins when the weather says it does.


Even more appropriate to define the first day of "Spring".
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Quoting 114. Patrap:
Emerging Technology From the arXiv

November 29, 2013

How to Burst the "Filter Bubble" that Protects Us from Opposing Views

Computer scientists have discovered a way to number-crunch an individuals own preferences to recommend content from others with opposing views. The goal? To burst the filter bubble that surrounds us with people we like and content that we agree with.




The term filter bubble entered the public domain back in 2011 when the internet activist Eli Pariser coined it to refer to the way recommendation engines shield people from certain aspects of the real world.

Pariser used the example of two people who googled the term BP. One received links to investment news about BP while the other received links to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, presumably as a result of some recommendation algorithm.

This is an insidious problem. Much social research shows that people prefer to receive information that they agree with instead of information that challenges their beliefs. This problem is compounded when social networks recommend content based on what users already like and on what people similar to them also like.

This is the filter bubble being surrounded only by people you like and content that you agree with.

And the danger is that it can polarise populations creating potentially harmful divisions in society.

Today, Eduardo Graells-Garrido at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona as well as Mounia Lalmas and Daniel Quercia, both at Yahoo Labs, say they've hit on a way to burst the filter bubble. Their idea that although people may have opposing views on sensitive topics, they may also share interests in other areas. And they've built a recommendation engine that points these kinds of people towards each other based on their own preferences.

The result is that individuals are exposed to a much wider range of opinions, ideas and people than they would otherwise experience. And because this is done using their own interests, they end up being equally satisfied with the results (although not without a period of acclimitisation). We nudge users to read content from people who may have opposite views, or high view gaps, in those issues, while still being relevant according to their preferences, say Graells-Garrido and co.

These guys have tested this approach by focusing on the topic of abortion as discussed by people in Chile in August and September this year. Chile has some of the most restrictive anti-abortion laws on the planet it was legalised here in 1931 and then made illegal again in 1989. With presidential elections in November, a highly polarised debate was raging in the country at that time.

They found over 40,000 Twitter users who had expressed an opinion using the hashtags such as #pro-life and #pro-choice. They trimmed this group by choosing only those who gave their location as Chile and by excluding those who tweeted rarely. That left over 3000 Twitter users.

The team then computed the difference in the views of these users on this and other topics using the regularity with which they used certain other keywords. This allowed them to create a kind of wordcloud for each user that acted like a kind of data portrait.

They then recommended tweets to each person based on similarities between their word clouds and especially when they differed in their views on the topic of abortion.

The results show that people can be more open than expected to ideas that oppose their own. It turns out that users who openly speak about sensitive issues are more open to receive recommendations authored by people with opposing views, say Graells-Garrido and co.

They also say that challenging people with new ideas makes them generally more receptive to change. That has important implications for social media sites. There is good evidence that users can sometimes become so resistant to change than any form of redesign dramatically reduces the popularity of the service. Giving them a greater range of content could change that.

%u201CWe conclude that an indirect approach to connecting people with opposing views has great potential,%u201D say Graells-Garrido and co.

It%u2019s certainly a start. But whether it can prevent the herding behaviour in which users sometimes desert social media sites overnight, is debatable. But the overall approach is admirable. Connecting people is important when they share similar interests but arguably even more so when their views clash.

Ref: arxiv.org/abs/1311.4658 : Data Portraits: Connecting People of Opposing Views


One part of this does not require computers or search engine algorithms. It is to simply cultivate the idea that exposure to and confrontation of opposing views is beneficial to knowledge discovery of both sides. I personally prefer to surround myself with educated people who disagree with me rather than those who agree and find I learn much more from the former while hopefully contributing to their knowledge also.

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Good afternoon. Just had a huge burst of snow that brought a quick 2-3 inches. I'm officially satisfied with this storm.
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116. jpsb
Quoting 110. AGWcreationists:


And when severe winters instead became commonplace in Britian a decade later? Why, AGW became the cause for that instead.

AGW - no matter which way you turn it, it goes in.

Yes that was quite a nice trick to blame Global Warming for a cooling Earth. I was very impressed they pulled it off even without the requisite Gulf Steam shutdown. I thought the argument that AGW could in fact lead to greater snow falls had some merit but I never did nor do follow the argument that AGW leads to a cooler Earth since the warmth is now trapped at some mysterious place deep in our oceans. Still scratching my head over that one.

Maybe I'm crazy but I am much more afraid of mile high ice sheets advancing on NYC that I am a few meters rise in sea levels.
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It would be great if there were a difference between remotely sensed data and directly measured data. There is obviously no way to calibrate satellite sensor readings to record setting temperatures where there is no direct measurement.
These temperatures would more accurately be called estimates not measurements, since the temperature is extrapolated from radiation measured miles up in space.
They might be correct but we have NO WAY to know.

the frozen CO2 sequestration idea is awesome, but where would you put it to stay frozen once you collected it? Frozen methane could currently be stored in the bottom of the ocean, right?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Emerging Technology From the arXiv

November 29, 2013

How to Burst the "Filter Bubble" that Protects Us from Opposing Views

Computer scientists have discovered a way to number-crunch an individuals own preferences to recommend content from others with opposing views. The goal? To burst the filter bubble that surrounds us with people we like and content that we agree with.




The term filter bubble entered the public domain back in 2011 when the internet activist Eli Pariser coined it to refer to the way recommendation engines shield people from certain aspects of the real world.

Pariser used the example of two people who googled the term BP. One received links to investment news about BP while the other received links to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, presumably as a result of some recommendation algorithm.

This is an insidious problem. Much social research shows that people prefer to receive information that they agree with instead of information that challenges their beliefs. This problem is compounded when social networks recommend content based on what users already like and on what people similar to them also like.

This is the filter bubble being surrounded only by people you like and content that you agree with.

And the danger is that it can polarise populations creating potentially harmful divisions in society.

Today, Eduardo Graells-Garrido at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona as well as Mounia Lalmas and Daniel Quercia, both at Yahoo Labs, say they've hit on a way to burst the filter bubble. Their idea that although people may have opposing views on sensitive topics, they may also share interests in other areas. And they've built a recommendation engine that points these kinds of people towards each other based on their own preferences.

The result is that individuals are exposed to a much wider range of opinions, ideas and people than they would otherwise experience. And because this is done using their own interests, they end up being equally satisfied with the results (although not without a period of acclimitisation). We nudge users to read content from people who may have opposite views, or high view gaps, in those issues, while still being relevant according to their preferences, say Graells-Garrido and co.

These guys have tested this approach by focusing on the topic of abortion as discussed by people in Chile in August and September this year. Chile has some of the most restrictive anti-abortion laws on the planet it was legalised here in 1931 and then made illegal again in 1989. With presidential elections in November, a highly polarised debate was raging in the country at that time.

They found over 40,000 Twitter users who had expressed an opinion using the hashtags such as #pro-life and #pro-choice. They trimmed this group by choosing only those who gave their location as Chile and by excluding those who tweeted rarely. That left over 3000 Twitter users.

The team then computed the difference in the views of these users on this and other topics using the regularity with which they used certain other keywords. This allowed them to create a kind of wordcloud for each user that acted like a kind of data portrait.

They then recommended tweets to each person based on similarities between their word clouds and especially when they differed in their views on the topic of abortion.

The results show that people can be more open than expected to ideas that oppose their own. It turns out that users who openly speak about sensitive issues are more open to receive recommendations authored by people with opposing views, say Graells-Garrido and co.

They also say that challenging people with new ideas makes them generally more receptive to change. That has important implications for social media sites. There is good evidence that users can sometimes become so resistant to change than any form of redesign dramatically reduces the popularity of the service. Giving them a greater range of content could change that.

%u201CWe conclude that an indirect approach to connecting people with opposing views has great potential,%u201D say Graells-Garrido and co.

It%u2019s certainly a start. But whether it can prevent the herding behaviour in which users sometimes desert social media sites overnight, is debatable. But the overall approach is admirable. Connecting people is important when they share similar interests but arguably even more so when their views clash.

Ref: arxiv.org/abs/1311.4658 : Data Portraits: Connecting People of Opposing Views
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Quoting 109. Bluestorm5:
I'm pretty excited about going to Atlanta in February for 2014 American Meteorological Society student conference! It's too bad I am only staying Saturday & Sunday and not go Monday to Thursday because I'm still a freshman. I'm just lucky UNCA is letting us freshmen and sophomores go because it's in our backyard :)



Hey, maybe you'll see my presentation there. :D

Actually a co-worker will be doing the presentation since I'll be too busy to attend myself.
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The November Map will be out in the next few days,if not later today.



Global Surface Temperature Anomalies

Background Information - FAQ

What is a temperature anomaly?

1. The term temperature anomaly means a departure from a reference value or long-term average. A positive anomaly indicates that the observed temperature was warmer than the reference value, while a negative anomaly indicates that the observed temperature was cooler than the reference value.

2.What can the mean global temperature anomaly be used for?

This product is a global-scale climate diagnostic tool and provides a big picture overview of average global temperatures compared to a reference value.
What datasets are used in calculating the average global temperature anomaly?

Land surface temperatures are available from the Global Historical Climate Network-Monthly (GHCN-M). Sea surface temperatures are determined using the extended reconstructed sea surface temperature (ERSST) analysis. ERSST uses the most recently available International Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (ICOADS) and statistical methods that allow stable reconstruction using sparse data. The monthly analysis begins January 1854, but due to very sparse data, no global averages are computed before 1880. With more observations after 1880, the signal is stronger and more consistent over time.

3.What version of the GHCN-M analysis is currently being used?

Effective September 2012, the GHCN-M version 3.2.0 dataset of monthly mean temperature replaced the GHCN-M version 3.1.0 monthly mean temperature dataset. Beginning with the August 2012 Global monthly State of the Climate Report, released on September 17, 2012, GHCN-M version 3.2.0 is used for NCDC climate monitoring activities, including calculation of global land surface temperature anomalies and trends. For more information about this newest version, please see the GHCN-M version 3.2.0 Technical Report.
*The GHCN-M version 3.1.0 Technical Report was revised on September 5, 2012 to accurately reflect the changes incorporated in that version. Previously that report incorrectly included discussion of changes to the Pairwise Homogeneity Algorithm (PHA). Changes to the PHA are included in version 3.2.0 and described in the version 3.2.0 Technical Report. Please see the Frequently Asked Questions to learn more about this update.
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111. jpsb
Quoting 102. MisterPerfect:
its fun to tease children



good job, Greenpeace
Too funny, loved it and shared it on my FB page.
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Quoting 106. jpsb:


March 20, 2000 According to Dr David Viner, a senior research scientist at the climatic research unit (CRU) of the University of East Anglia, within a few years winter snowfall will become “a very rare and exciting event
.


And when severe winters instead became commonplace in Britian a decade later? Why, AGW became the cause for that instead.

AGW - no matter which way you turn it, it goes in.
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I'm pretty excited about going to Atlanta in February for 2014 American Meteorological Society student conference! It's too bad I am only staying Saturday & Sunday and not go Monday to Thursday because I'm still a freshman. I'm just lucky UNCA is letting us freshmen and sophomores go because it's in our backyard :)

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Australia has seen a record Warm year and longer


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Historic heat wave brings Australia its hottest average temperature on record

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Quoting 103. air360:


I agree..let Florida keep its warm temps. I want some winter here in NC. The rest of the country is hitting records...all we are doing here is hitting our heads against the walls.

A few days ago the Euro had the system this coming weekend giving us some good snow..but obviously that has changed...as usual.


this is the 12z CMC at 90 hours



Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 15300
106. jpsb
Quoting 77. Xandra:

Many people would be shocked to hear that snow has fallen near the start of the Australian summer, but it isn't as rare as most people think. Snow falls on the New South Wales ranges once during most December's as there is usually available cold air lingering south of Australia.


Yes but ....

March 20, 2000 According to Dr David Viner, a senior research scientist at the climatic research unit (CRU) of the University of East Anglia, within a few years winter snowfall will become “a very rare and exciting event.

But summer snowfall is common? I am confused!
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Quoting 102. MisterPerfect:
its fun to tease children



good job, Greenpeace


LOL!!!
Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 15300
if Dec really is colder then March
That might depend on where one lives and if one has a climate with four true seasons...

Bye now. I must remove my wonderful presence from wu and get to work.
Add:
Quoting 98. jpsb:

Hmmmm, interesting thanks I had to look that up since I always thought winter was winter. How foolish of me, I will note that there does not appear to be a reliable metric to the start of Meteorological winter just some arbitrarily convenient date, Dec 1. It would be interesting to see if Dec 1-Dec 20 is in fact consistently and measurably colder than March 1-March 20. In general I dislike changing long established, commonly used definitions are are based on easily observed and understood physical phenomena such as the Earth orbit around the Sun. But if Dec really is colder then March then maybe I'll buy into a Meteorological winter as opposed to the old Astronomical winter.
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Quoting 95. Bluestorm5:
C'mon Mother Nature... you're killing us here in NC.


I agree..let Florida keep its warm temps. I want some winter here in NC. The rest of the country is hitting records...all we are doing here is hitting our heads against the walls.

A few days ago the Euro had the system this coming weekend giving us some good snow..but obviously that has changed...as usual.
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its fun to tease children



good job, Greenpeace
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Hi Wundergrounders. We’ve been hard at work trying to introduce more clarity, depth, and data to our forecast page. We know how passionate you are about the weather, and we know you choose us because we offer more information, less hype, and numerous opportunities to nerd out about weather. That’s why I’m excited to tell you about the progress we’re making, starting with a behind-the-scenes look at our approach. We understand that change can be an adjustment, but we think you’ll appreciate a cleaner, more modern, more data-rich Weather Underground.

We’re getting ready to launch a beta version of the new forecast page in a few weeks’ time. In the meantime, I’ll turn it over to our User Interaction Lead, Matt Schaefer, to give you a sneak peak at what our process has been like, and what you can expect to see on the beta site.

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Quoting 96. eddye:
fl needs the cold weather plz bring it out let it snow let it snow let it snow

It's very chilly in the Panhandle right now. Moving East..
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Quoting 82. PalmBeachWeather:
Barefoot... I lived in North Pole Alaska for 2 years.... No joke.
Know that world well. I spent 14 winters in Alaska, two of those in Fairbanks. Have visited SE and Southcentral since from time to time. I'd like to drive the "north slope haul road" one day, or let me say one summer. Was not open to public when I lived up there. Always wanted to see the Brooks Range, especially village of Anatuvuk Pass.
...

Have a fun day, bloggahs. I got to TCB.
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98. jpsb
Quoting 70. Barefootontherocks:
Meteorological winter begins Dec 1.
:)

Hmmmm, interesting thanks I had to look that up since I always thought winter was winter. How foolish of me, I will note that there does not appear to be a reliable metric to the start of Meteorological winter just some arbitrarily convenient date, Dec 1. It would be interesting to see if Dec 1-Dec 20 is in fact consistently and measurably colder than March 1-March 20. In general I dislike changing long established, commonly used definitions are are based on easily observed and understood physical phenomena such as the Earth orbit around the Sun. But if Dec really is colder then March then maybe I'll buy into a Meteorological winter as opposed to the old Astronomical winter.
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Quoting 86. Skyepony:
Madi was brutally decoupled in the night by a wall..


Pulled a Karen. "Sighs".....
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fl needs the cold weather plz bring it out let it snow let it snow let it snow
Member Since: August 12, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 1272
C'mon Mother Nature... you're killing us here in NC.

24 hr snowfall 12z 12/14 to 12z 12/15 via 12z Euro.

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Quoting 85. sar2401:

Let me whip this out...:-)
Well, my name is Jim, but some people call me....Jim
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Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 171 Comments: 53841
Quoting sts100launch:
All this snow, record lows, 3rd highest global sea ice. Must be all that GW that we keep hearing about.

Boy, you've been a member here almost as long as me, and this your sixth post? You must lurk a lot. I'm still waiting for a link to the story about the thirds largest ice thing.
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Quoting 90. PedleyCA:
Did you say Mungo
I remember that...
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Did you say Mungo
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Quoting Skyepony:
Madi was brutally decoupled in the night by a wall..


Sounds incredibly painful...
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Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
I was referencing BFOTR post regarding Friday being warm

Ah, OK, maybe by Friday, we'll see 60 down here again. From thanksgiving until now, we've set two all-time low temperature records and three all-time high temperature records. I just wish it would make up it's mind. I'm getting really tired switching from shorts to a parka and back to shorts....and back to a parka. Supposed to hit 27 here tonight. :-)
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Quoting 85. sar2401:

Let me whip this out...:-)
Mongo
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86. Skyepony (Mod)
Madi was brutally decoupled in the night by a wall..

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Quoting PalmBeachWeather:
Speaking of methane...Blazing Saddles was on last weekend... So funny , but oh so crude

Let me whip this out...:-)
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All this snow, record lows, 3rd highest global sea ice. Must be all that GW that we keep hearing about.
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Quoting 81. sar2401:

Southwest Mexico maybe. It's 49 in Phoenix, 36 in Vegas, and 48 here in SE Alabama. South Florida looks like the only place to go to get warm today. :-)
I was referencing BFOTR post regarding Friday being warm
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 171 Comments: 53841

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.