Super Typhoon Haiyan From Ground Zero: a New Video Record

By: Josh Morgerman , 3:47 PM GMT on December 02, 2013

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This guest post and video is from veteran storm chaser Josh Morgerman of West Hollywood, California, who rode out Super Typhoon Haiyan in Tacoloban in the Philippines. Josh is the founder of of iCyclone.com, and has been chasing tropical cyclones since 1991.

Super Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda to the Filipinos) is one of the biggest weather catastrophes of the past decade. A Category-5 storm making a direct hit on a city of 220,000 is going to make news.

I chased Haiyan to ground zero--Tacloban City--where I rode out the cyclone with fellow storm chasers James Reynolds and Mark Thomas. Our location: Hotel Alejandro, a four-story, solid-concrete building in the heart of downtown, 26 feet above sea level. (Coordinates:11.2414N 125.0036E.)

A safe place. Or so we thought.

I just released this short video that tells the story of that terrible morning--in graphic, frightening detail.



As the wind rose to a scream, as windows exploded and doors blew off, as the building trembled from the impact of flying debris and as children became hysterical, a massive storm surge swept the entire downtown, inundating the hotel and sending guests scrambling for their lives. My fellow chasers and I had to throw down our cameras and pull elderly and disabled guests out through the smashed windows of flooded rooms.

And we were the lucky ones in Tacloban City.

While whole blocks were reduced to rubble, our building stayed standing. And while thousands died--including people on our very block--I’m very happy to say that everyone in our hotel (and everyone you see in my video) survived. This includes the family you see struggling across the storm surge to reach our hotel. (One of the most serious injuries was actually on our own team: while trying to rescue a trapped guest, Mark tore open his leg on underwater wreckage, and weeks later he’s making a very slow recovery at home in Taipei.)

Video as Meteorological Record
My video’s many viewers have reacted strongly to the raw power of the storm and the spectacle of ordinary people trying to survive a life-and-death situation. This is understandable.

But I want to also point out that my video is a useful meteorological record.

When I chase, I always stamp my video footage with the exact local time, so afterward I can compare conditions on the ground with other data--to try and understand what happened.

So my Super Typhoon Haiyan video serves as detailed chronology of the event. Combining it with air-pressure and storm-surge data I collected during the event, we can learn a lot about this unique and ferocious cyclone.

Haiyan Video Chronology
First off, here are some important events and details to notice in the video:

6:47 am. The eyewall sweeps into the city. Winds rapidly increase and rain becomes very heavy. Notice the trees are full and green.

7:08 am. In narration, I note the pressure is 962 mb. This was close to the lowest values my devices recorded (960.8 mb and 960.3 mb at 7:12 am and 7:20 am, respectively)--meaning the center was passing just south of the city and making its closest approach about this time.

7:13-7:25 am. The winds reach a peak. Tornado-like conditions engulf downtown. We never experience a calm--meaning the eye misses us to the south.

7:44 am. The storm surge sweeps in suddenly. The street is completely flooded, whereas just minutes earlier, we hadn’t noticed any water.

8:00-8:30 am. Water is up to the first-floor door handles and windows. (You can see this in the rescue shot--donated by Earth Uncut TV--that follows 7:57 am. It’s not time-stamped but certainly occurred between 8 and 8:30 am.)

8:45-8:46 am. The storm is dying down. Winds are slacking and the water is already noticeably receding--it’s much lower against the doors and windows.

8:57-9:00 am. All deciduous trees across the city are completely stripped--with no leaves. (Palms performed a little better.)


Figure 1. Haiyan, the aftermath: extreme storm surge damage in Tacloban. Image credit: Josh Morgerman, iCyclone.com.

Conclusions
Using the above video events and details—along with other data—we can draw a few conclusions about Super Typhoon Haiyan when it made landfall in Leyte, just south of Tacloban City:

The typhoon’s core was small. As per the video, the storm didn’t last long. Winds in the city didn’t become violent until only 30 minutes before the center’s closest approach, and really destructive winds lasted only 2 hours (~6:45 - 8:45 am). Even taking into account Haiyan’s fast forward motion, it’s clear the storm was on the small side--despite news reports to the contrary. It’s a testament to Haiyan’s incredible ferocity that it was able to completely devastate Tacloban City in such a short time.

The northeast eyewall was strongest. The storm was moving west-northwest and the highest winds seemed to occur during and after the lowest pressure. This is consistent with the radar imagery, which showed the strongest convection in the northeast quad.

Tacloban City experienced extremely high winds--at least Cat 3 and possibly Cat 4, since we saw complete defoliation and evidence of debarking of deciduous trees. This is especially impressive given that the highest winds didn’t last long--and I should point out that it’s exceedingly unusual for an urban area to experience such intense winds. While Haiyan was a Cat-5 storm and Tacloban City was squarely in its north eyewall, we believe the RMW (radius of maximum winds) passed just south of downtown.

The storm surge was tremendous, fast-moving, and short-duration. USGS data and other sources indicate the elevation at our location was 26 feet. Since the hotel flooded to a depth of 4 feet, that suggests the surge may have been an incredible 30 feet! (Even if we’ve overestimated our elevation by 10 feet, that’s still a huge 20-foot surge.) But it didn’t last long. It swept in very suddenly around 7:45 am and was already receding by 8:45--meaning it did its deadly work with incredible speed. This is very different than Hurricane Ike, a large storm that caused large-scale inundation more than a day before landfall.

Josh Morgerman, iCyclone.com

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611. DonnieBwkGA
9:31 PM GMT on December 04, 2013
Quite a bit warmer today. Upper 70s inland and mid 70s on islands. Temps beginning to fall with a sea breeze. Already down in 60s on islands. JAX discussion says a foggy night and I believe it.
Member Since: June 29, 2013 Posts: 12 Comments: 1681
610. WunderAlertBot (Admin)
1:44 AM GMT on December 04, 2013
JeffMasters has created a new entry.
609. bappit
1:42 AM GMT on December 04, 2013
Alarmist?
Member Since: May 18, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 5561
608. Dakster
1:36 AM GMT on December 04, 2013
Quoting 607. bappit:

Actually they burp it up from their stomachs.


Remind me not to get to close to a cows mouth then.

And are they going to measure human methane emissions too? So if eat more beans I get taxed more?
Member Since: March 10, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 9720
607. bappit
1:35 AM GMT on December 04, 2013
Quoting 605. Dakster:


Farmers will have to put methane measuring devices on the backside of their cows?

Actually they burp it up from their stomachs.
Member Since: May 18, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 5561
606. bappit
1:31 AM GMT on December 04, 2013
"One, scientists don't believe that climate change is likely to shut down the Atlantic jetstream, a possibility that had been discussed in some scientific research."

Really? God bless Kate Sheppard. I bet she really tries.
Member Since: May 18, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 5561
605. Dakster
1:30 AM GMT on December 04, 2013
Quoting 604. CycloneOz:


It's important that they keep up with monitoring trends, but this "anything can go wrong in the future" vagueness is one of the things I do not even consider.

I am done considering hurricane season forecasts, too.

**ANYTHING MEASURABLE, SUCH AS CO2 EMISSIONS, CAN BE TAXED.**


Farmers will have to put methane measuring devices on the backside of their cows?
Member Since: March 10, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 9720
604. CycloneOz
1:27 AM GMT on December 04, 2013
Quoting 600. Patrap:
Climate Change's Biggest Threats Are Those We Aren't Ready For: Report
Posted: 12/03/2013 2:30 pm EST


Kate SheppardBecome
kate.sheppard@huffingtonpost.com




WASHINGTON -- Climatic changes -- and the results of those changes -- could occur within decades or even sooner, and they are becoming a greater concern for scientists, according to a new paper from the National Academy of Sciences.

"The most challenging changes are the abrupt ones," said James White, a professor of geological sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder and chair of the report committee. White and several coauthors of the paper spoke at a press conference Tuesday morning.

The paper focuses on those impacts due to climate change that can happen most quickly. Among these are the rapid decline in Arctic sea ice that scientists have seen in the last decade and increased extinction pressure on plants and animals caused by the rapidly warming climate.

Many such changes, according to Tony Barnosky, a professor in the Department of Integrative Biology at the University of California, Berkeley, are "things that people in this room will be around to see." He emphasized that scientists are "really worried about what's going to happen in the next several years or decades."

"The planet is going to be warmer than most species living on Earth today have seen it, including humans," said Barnosky. "The pace of change is orders of magnitude higher than what species have experienced in the last tens of millions of years."

Other, more gradually occurring changes can still have abrupt impacts on the ecosystem and human systems, such as the loss of fisheries or shifts in where certain crops can be cultivated. Rapid loss of ice, for example, would mean that sea levels rise at a much faster rate than the current trend, which would have a significant effect on coastal regions. A 3-foot rise in the seas is easier to prepare for if it happens on a 100-year horizon than if it happens within 30 years.

"If you think about gradual change, you can see where the road is and where you're going," said Barnosky. "With abrupt changes and effects, the road suddenly drops out from under you."

The paper did offer two bits of good news. One, scientists don't believe that climate change is likely to shut down the Atlantic jetstream, a possibility that had been discussed in some scientific research. They also don't believe that large, rapid emissions of methane from ice and Arctic soil will pose a serious threat in the short term, as had been considered previously.

"Giant methane belches are not a big worry," said Richard Alley, a professor of geosciences at Pennsylvania State University and committee member. "These really are systems that will affect us in the future, but they don't look like they're going to jump really fast."

The paper recommends increased investment in an early-warning system for monitoring abrupt impacts, such as surveillance programs to facilitate closer tracking of melting ice and methane releases, for example. Right now, investment in those systems is lacking in the U.S., and monitoring programs have been cut in recent years.

"The time has come for us to quit talking and actually take some action," said White. He noted that in the modern age, there are cameras everywhere, yet "remarkably very few of those watching devices are pointed at the environment."

"We ought to be watching that with the same zeal we watch banks and other precious things."


It's important that they keep up with monitoring trends, but this "anything can go wrong in the future" vagueness is one of the things I do not even consider.

I am done considering hurricane season forecasts, too.

**ANYTHING MEASURABLE, SUCH AS CO2 EMISSIONS, CAN BE TAXED.**
Member Since: August 26, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 3420
603. barbamz
1:27 AM GMT on December 04, 2013


One last post about Argentina:

At least 4 dead in Argentina storm
03 de diciembre de 2013

Buenos Aires, Dec 3 (EFE).- At least four people died in a storm that lashed parts of Argentina with heavy rains and winds of more than 100 kph (62 mph), authorities said Tuesday.

Two of the dead were workers who lost their lives when the building they were working in collapsed in Banfield, Buenos Aires province.

The other two fatalities occurred in Villa del Rosario, in the central province of Cordoba, "as a consequence of the heavy rain and hail," town Mayor Roberto Herrera said. ...
Member Since: October 25, 2008 Posts: 43 Comments: 5020
602. CybrTeddy
1:22 AM GMT on December 04, 2013
Meanwhile, at SpaceX..
Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 23012
601. StormTrackerScott
1:21 AM GMT on December 04, 2013
Quoting 582. pottery:
The recent heavy rains for a couple of weeks is changing the Ecology in my garden.
Found a Caiman about 18'' long in the concrete pond this afternoon.

I wonder if it will hang around, and what it will eat when it gets to be 7 feet long.


your foot or maybe your hand. Take your pick.
Member Since: February 28, 2013 Posts: 1 Comments: 934
600. Patrap
1:17 AM GMT on December 04, 2013
Climate Change's Biggest Threats Are Those We Aren't Ready For: Report
Posted: 12/03/2013 2:30 pm EST


Kate SheppardBecome
kate.sheppard@huffingtonpost.com




WASHINGTON -- Climatic changes -- and the results of those changes -- could occur within decades or even sooner, and they are becoming a greater concern for scientists, according to a new paper from the National Academy of Sciences.

"The most challenging changes are the abrupt ones," said James White, a professor of geological sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder and chair of the report committee. White and several coauthors of the paper spoke at a press conference Tuesday morning.

The paper focuses on those impacts due to climate change that can happen most quickly. Among these are the rapid decline in Arctic sea ice that scientists have seen in the last decade and increased extinction pressure on plants and animals caused by the rapidly warming climate.

Many such changes, according to Tony Barnosky, a professor in the Department of Integrative Biology at the University of California, Berkeley, are "things that people in this room will be around to see." He emphasized that scientists are "really worried about what's going to happen in the next several years or decades."

"The planet is going to be warmer than most species living on Earth today have seen it, including humans," said Barnosky. "The pace of change is orders of magnitude higher than what species have experienced in the last tens of millions of years."

Other, more gradually occurring changes can still have abrupt impacts on the ecosystem and human systems, such as the loss of fisheries or shifts in where certain crops can be cultivated. Rapid loss of ice, for example, would mean that sea levels rise at a much faster rate than the current trend, which would have a significant effect on coastal regions. A 3-foot rise in the seas is easier to prepare for if it happens on a 100-year horizon than if it happens within 30 years.

"If you think about gradual change, you can see where the road is and where you're going," said Barnosky. "With abrupt changes and effects, the road suddenly drops out from under you."

The paper did offer two bits of good news. One, scientists don't believe that climate change is likely to shut down the Atlantic jetstream, a possibility that had been discussed in some scientific research. They also don't believe that large, rapid emissions of methane from ice and Arctic soil will pose a serious threat in the short term, as had been considered previously.

"Giant methane belches are not a big worry," said Richard Alley, a professor of geosciences at Pennsylvania State University and committee member. "These really are systems that will affect us in the future, but they don't look like they're going to jump really fast."

The paper recommends increased investment in an early-warning system for monitoring abrupt impacts, such as surveillance programs to facilitate closer tracking of melting ice and methane releases, for example. Right now, investment in those systems is lacking in the U.S., and monitoring programs have been cut in recent years.

"The time has come for us to quit talking and actually take some action," said White. He noted that in the modern age, there are cameras everywhere, yet "remarkably very few of those watching devices are pointed at the environment."

"We ought to be watching that with the same zeal we watch banks and other precious things."
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 414 Comments: 125613
599. pottery
1:02 AM GMT on December 04, 2013
Have a great evening all, and stay safe.

Pott is out>>>>>>>>>>>>
Member Since: October 24, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 23080
598. barbamz
1:02 AM GMT on December 04, 2013
Quoting 588. pcola57:


Xavier now..



Xavier Thurs. forecast..



Friday 958mb..



Thanks Marvin, great! I've copied one of the maps into my new blog with the recent stuff about "Xaver", although it will be a lonely place (*sniff*).
Will be interesting to look at the maps tomorrow.
Good night everybody! Barb.
Member Since: October 25, 2008 Posts: 43 Comments: 5020
597. pcola57
1:00 AM GMT on December 04, 2013

Member Since: August 13, 2009 Posts: 13 Comments: 6650
596. pottery
12:59 AM GMT on December 04, 2013
Quoting Dakster:


And you better watch out for fluffy...

LOL, and in the meantime I'm going to increase the insurance coverage on my wife.
She does not know about it. Yet.

heheheheheh

(I'm just kidding here, we went looking for it together a while ago with a light. Could not find it. Lots of hiding places in there%u2026)
Member Since: October 24, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 23080
595. Bluestorm5
12:58 AM GMT on December 04, 2013
Quoting 594. Dakster:


They can stay in the swamps, it's my backyard I have an issue with. I didn't realize that gators were as high up as North Carolina. Thought it got too cold for them that far north.


Seen them myself whenever I go fishing on Cape Fear near Wilmington. Also...

http://www.herpsofnc.org/herps_of_NC/crocodilians /Allmis/All_mis.html
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 23 Comments: 7466
594. Dakster
12:54 AM GMT on December 04, 2013
Quoting 592. Bluestorm5:


You can sometimes find gators under the bridge at a campground south of Myrtle Beach. Sometimes gators can be seen in North Carolina as well. Got to watch out for them in swamps.


They can stay in the swamps, it's my backyard I have an issue with. I didn't realize that gators were as high up as North Carolina. Thought it got too cold for them that far north.
Member Since: March 10, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 9720
593. ricderr
12:52 AM GMT on December 04, 2013

I wonder if it will hang around, and what it will eat when it gets to be 7 feet long.






you
Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 668 Comments: 20163
592. Bluestorm5
12:51 AM GMT on December 04, 2013
Quoting 587. pottery:

They get to about 6'-8' long.
Not something I want to encourage to take up residence in my garden%u2026..

They move around a lot in rainy weather, and the youngsters seem to like following watercourses upstream.

Anywhere there is a pond, you will eventually find them.

People keep getting bitten on the leg here, while working in the rice fields.
Not a good idea to step on one%u2026...


You can sometimes find gators under the bridge at a campground south of Myrtle Beach. Sometimes gators can be seen in North Carolina as well. Got to watch out for them in swamps

EDIT: They can be found as far inland as my county in SE area of Triangle. I hear stories.
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 23 Comments: 7466
591. Dakster
12:49 AM GMT on December 04, 2013
Pottery you live on the Caiman Islands, right?
Member Since: March 10, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 9720
590. pcola57
12:47 AM GMT on December 04, 2013

Member Since: August 13, 2009 Posts: 13 Comments: 6650
589. Dakster
12:45 AM GMT on December 04, 2013
Quoting 587. pottery:

They get to about 6'-8' long.
Not something I want to encourage to take up residence in my garden…..

They move around a lot in rainy weather, and the youngsters seem to like following watercourses upstream.

Anywhere there is a pond, you will eventually find them.

People keep getting bitten on the leg here, while working in the rice fields.
Not a good idea to step on one…...


And you better watch out for fluffy...
Member Since: March 10, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 9720
588. pcola57
12:44 AM GMT on December 04, 2013

Member Since: August 13, 2009 Posts: 13 Comments: 6650
587. pottery
12:42 AM GMT on December 04, 2013
Quoting pcola57:


Ugly little sucker Pot..
From a quick read, they grow LARGE..
Maybe it will find it's way back to where ever it came from..
Good luck.. :)


They get to about 6'-8' long.
Not something I want to encourage to take up residence in my garden…..

They move around a lot in rainy weather, and the youngsters seem to like following watercourses upstream.

Anywhere there is a pond, you will eventually find them.

People keep getting bitten on the leg here, while working in the rice fields.
Not a good idea to step on one…...
Member Since: October 24, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 23080
586. Dakster
12:37 AM GMT on December 04, 2013
Pcola - Obviously you found a picture of a baby one.
Member Since: March 10, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 9720
585. pcola57
12:34 AM GMT on December 04, 2013

Member Since: August 13, 2009 Posts: 13 Comments: 6650
584. Dakster
12:33 AM GMT on December 04, 2013
Quoting 582. pottery:
The recent heavy rains for a couple of weeks is changing the Ecology in my garden.
Found a Caiman about 18'' long in the concrete pond this afternoon.

I wonder if it will hang around, and what it will eat when it gets to be 7 feet long.


Wow... Not something I really want around me, personally.
Member Since: March 10, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 9720
583. pcola57
12:29 AM GMT on December 04, 2013

Member Since: August 13, 2009 Posts: 13 Comments: 6650
582. pottery
12:27 AM GMT on December 04, 2013
The recent heavy rains for a couple of weeks is changing the Ecology in my garden.
Found a Caiman about 18'' long in the concrete pond this afternoon.

I wonder if it will hang around, and what it will eat when it gets to be 7 feet long.
Member Since: October 24, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 23080
581. barbamz
12:17 AM GMT on December 04, 2013
Quoting 403. cRRKampen:
Major Elbe/Hamburg storm surge coming up. This pattern is classic.
Also very high winds, comparable with the St Jude storm of 28th of October.


(See also post #567 above).

Hi fellow bloggers, calling in late night from Germany which indeed is going to see a very severe wind and winter storm at Thursday and Friday. Not so much at my place in the mid of the country but at its northern parts, especially in the islands and particularily in those regions with bayous of the Northern Sea. "Xaver", as the future storm will be named in Berlin, could be especially dangerous, as its winds with up to 180 kmh = 112 mph will coincide with a spring tide (tidal wave), creating a huge sturm surge in these bayous (City of Hamburg is at the end of one of them).

These weather conditions are somehow traumatic for (elderly) people in Germany as they remember the storm surge of 1962 which caused the death of 340 people (315 in the region of Hamburg).


Wilhelmsburg 1962 (Source wikipedia)

Of course, levees are built up higher now than in 1962 and weather forecasts improved a lot. Nevertheless its dangerous, and the storm may cause severe flooding and erosion in the islands and coastal regions of Germany and Denmark, apart from devastating winds which could reach far inland.

We'll see how it pans out, as those storms usually develop only a few hours before they hit.

Unfortunately I won't have much/any time to stick around here in the next days and weeks. So I hope I get some help from our fellow bloggers in Europe and from you all to cover this development, in case it becomes a significant one.

BBC published a little weather video today, but it's mostly focused on the British Islands.

This is the latest GFS pressure map (500 hpa), posted on a German weatherblog:



This is the alert map from wetteronline.de for Thursday (I'm in the not dangerous green zone):



WRF wind forecast (850hpa) for Thursday in knots:


(Saved image)


Forecast map published on German Spiegel Online.


I keep on looking to find some more decent stuff, but have to go to bed soon, sigh.
Member Since: October 25, 2008 Posts: 43 Comments: 5020
580. Patrap
12:11 AM GMT on December 04, 2013
We don't like SPAM
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 414 Comments: 125613
579. Bluestorm5
12:08 AM GMT on December 04, 2013
Well, I had a nice surprise when I came to do 2nd forecast for Grand Rapids. I'm ranked 20th in nation out of 1,500 or so college students, professors, grad students, broadcasters, and few NOAA employees. This is for the city of Grand Rapids, not the semester (I'm ranked 400th in that, which is not bad for freshman). I got to keep this up for 7 more days and hopefully I get the #1 ranking for the city which wins the trophy and another thing to add to my resume. Keep in mind, Day 1 in Grand Rapids isn't over for 7 more hours. Max temperature will rise as well as more rain so my ranking is likely to drop some... but I've never been ranked this high for a city before.

Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 23 Comments: 7466
578. KORBIN
12:06 AM GMT on December 04, 2013
Hey guys, I am a long time blogger and figured since it was a bit slow weather wise that i could enlist some help with a marketing class. I appreciate if anyone could take a brief survey for my Marketing Research Class. It's about grocery habits! I appreciate and please don't ban me i am just trying to enlist my friends that I blog with opinions!

Link
Member Since: November 19, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 18
577. TropicalAnalystwx13
11:58 PM GMT on December 03, 2013
Quoting 566. Sfloridacat5:


Pretty amazing that the local government wasn't warning locals to move inland.

They hardly have the means to do such. Technology in the Philippines is not the same as technology in the United States.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 108 Comments: 30257
576. AussieStorm
11:54 PM GMT on December 03, 2013
Quoting Sfloridacat5:


Pretty amazing that the local government wasn't warning locals to move inland.


That's what it's like there. PAGASA has a "small" area of responsibility. I give friends and relatives sometimes 5 days in advance warning yet PAGASA gives 36-48hrs and didn't give strong enough warning about storm surge which killed most people. People there don't know what storm surge is. If the Govt or PAGASA said it's like a tsunami then 10,000's more people would of evacuated or moved to higher ground instead of trying to ride out the typhoon a few 100 yards from the shoreline. And as Jim points out, there was 225 people inside church a few 100 yards from the shore and it had 15ft of water through it. More needs to be done about education.
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15749
575. Tornado6042008X
11:53 PM GMT on December 03, 2013
Quoting 569. washingtonian115:
If you live in the DMV area do not get your hopes high..It will likely be another pathetic rain storm that will go unremembered the next day amounting to nothing much but perhaps a puddle or two on the ground.Oh the excitement..Where was this rain during spring when my allergies were running amok?.Oh yeah..no where to be found.And that pathetic arctic front won't even be significant it's practically laughable.Arctic..Yeah right.I've met people colder than that.Haha!
You, ma'am, have a bad case of winter withdrawal. Just get some rest from tracking these storms, go to your very happy place for a little while, then come back ;) 

As for Sunday, if ;) we see anything wintry, it will most likely be in the form of freezing rain.
Member Since: March 29, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 232
574. GTstormChaserCaleb
11:52 PM GMT on December 03, 2013
I tell you what NASA satellites has taken some great pictures over the years.



Member Since: June 30, 2013 Posts: 9 Comments: 6689
573. hydrus
11:47 PM GMT on December 03, 2013
Hope this is wrong.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 19537
572. CycloneOz
11:42 PM GMT on December 03, 2013
Quoting 565. AussieStorm:
Storm Chaser Jim Edds was on Jay Leno talking about Super Typhoon Haiyan Part 1


I do not know what it was about Pensacola back when we were kids, but I personally know many guys that are fearless, but smart about it.

I know women from Pensacola the very same way.

Whatever it was, it was catching.

Pensacola back in the 60s, 70s, & 80s was amazing.

Not so much now...from what I can see.
Member Since: August 26, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 3420
571. Patrap
11:40 PM GMT on December 03, 2013


Spaceflight Now's Justin Ray captured this amazing view of the Falcon 9's contrail and staging.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 414 Comments: 125613
570. GTstormChaserCaleb
11:32 PM GMT on December 03, 2013
Quoting 569. washingtonian115:
If you live in the DMV area do not get your hopes high..It will likely be another pathetic rain storm that will go unremembered the next day amounting to nothing much but perhaps a puddle or two on the ground.Oh the excitement..Where was this rain during spring when my allergies were running amok?.Oh yeah..no where to be found.And that pathetic arctic front won't even be significant it's practically laughable.Arctic..Yeah right.I've met people colder than that.Haha!
Watch you all get an ice storm instead.

Member Since: June 30, 2013 Posts: 9 Comments: 6689
569. washingtonian115
11:29 PM GMT on December 03, 2013
If you live in the DMV area do not get your hopes high..It will likely be another pathetic rain storm that will go unremembered the next day amounting to nothing much but perhaps a puddle or two on the ground.Oh the excitement..Where was this rain during spring when my allergies were running amok?.Oh yeah..no where to be found.And that pathetic arctic front won't even be significant it's practically laughable.Arctic..Yeah right.I've met people colder than that.Haha!
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 15710
568. GTstormChaserCaleb
11:25 PM GMT on December 03, 2013
Something I think you all will like.

Hello Faculty and Students,

I will be giving a dry-run talk on Thursday, Dec. 5, to practice for the presentation I am giving at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting. My AGU talk is only 10 minutes, so my practice run-through will be similarly short, but with maybe a little more time for questions/discussion and/or explanation and background. The title of my talk at AGU is %u201CAn Analysis of Unique Aerial Photographs of Atmospheric Eddies in Marine Stratocumulus Clouds Downwind of Complex Terrain Along the California Coast%u201D by B.M. Muller, C. G. Herbster, and F. R. Mosher. All are invited to procrastinate from your end-of-semester responsibilities and give me some feedback on the talk to get ready for the real thing!







These eddy photographs were sent to me by former ERAU student and flight instructor Capt. Peter Weiss of Skywest Airlines, and have led to a research article being submitted to the scholarly journal, Monthly Weather Review. Despite the fact that similar eddies are seen quite frequently in satellite imagery, these apparently are the first close-up aerial photographs of such features taken from an airplane to appear in publication. This illustrates that pilots get a unique view of the atmosphere on a daily basis, that not even most meteorologists get to see. Hope to see you there.

Dr. Bradley M. Muller
Associate Professor of Meteorology
Applied Aviation Sciences Department
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
Member Since: June 30, 2013 Posts: 9 Comments: 6689
567. schiedam
11:21 PM GMT on December 03, 2013
The world is changing…
“…no individual weather event is due one-on-one to climate change…”
But the signs are not good. There’s more humidity in the atmosphere. Feeding energy into weather systems. Storms become more intense.
A small harvest of impressive video’s since the end of October:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5nDeABTz0yw (Vlieland 2810 Steffan Jansen)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wrgrJwYdy8 (Tacloban 0811 Josh Morgerman)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HFrgSVoJi1U (Illinois 1711 Marc Wells)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=93ZDzQ5wnPI (Sardinia 1911 BBC)
While severe weather used to coincide on earth’s surface over about 1%, that share is rising…
North-west Europe seems to be target of another lash next Thursday. The 48 hour prognosis by ECMWF shows a large stormfield over the North Sea in white (+140 km/h). Around spring-tide…
 photo ECMWFSLP850Mbwindtue0312201348hsmall_zpse88b0294.jpg
Member Since: May 20, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 3
566. Sfloridacat5
11:21 PM GMT on December 03, 2013
Quoting 565. AussieStorm:
Storm Chaser Jim Edds was on Jay Leno talking about Super Typhoon Haiyan Part 1


Pretty amazing that the local government wasn't warning locals to move inland.
Member Since: September 16, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 4785
565. AussieStorm
11:06 PM GMT on December 03, 2013
Storm Chaser Jim Edds was on Jay Leno talking about Super Typhoon Haiyan Part 1
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15749
564. Dakster
11:05 PM GMT on December 03, 2013
Glad Space X got off without a hitch. I can't wait until they start doing launches with humans on board.
Member Since: March 10, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 9720
563. Patrap
10:57 PM GMT on December 03, 2013
SpaceX 8 had a successful climb to Orbit,up and over the Hill.



Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 414 Comments: 125613
562. hydrus
10:57 PM GMT on December 03, 2013
Quoting 548. GeorgiaStormz:


I know in Ga it's rain...

I guess the first wave is rain and ice and other stuff comes mainly after.

Toward the plains is where the first wave is winter.
If it does turn into an ice storm, there will be some problems. If it turns into a major ice storm, not only will there be major problems, but damage and possibly deaths.

2 inches of ice on a twig, illustrating the impact.

A tree covered in ice from the Northeastern Ice Storm of 2008.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 19537
561. CycloneOz
10:56 PM GMT on December 03, 2013
Speaking of "Star Trek Into Darkness," my friend and I went to see the 1st Star Trek and discussed the movie afterwards.

My point was they were going to have to address the "Khan Issue" at some point in the mission, but I was clueless as to how...because Kahn and crew were still frozen in space and undiscovered.

Now, I know how they solved the Khan Issue. It was creative...but they screwed up with the actor on just the point of "how he looked."

Mantalban did a very good job as the 1st Khan. I guess the writers did not want this character to be so overly dramatic this time around.
Member Since: August 26, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 3420

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About JeffMasters

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.