Super Typhoon Haiyan's Intensification and Unusually Warm Sub-Surface Waters

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 6:25 PM GMT on November 13, 2013

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A remarkable warming of the sub-surface Pacific waters east of the Philippines in recent decades, due to a shift in atmospheric circulation patterns and ocean currents that began in the early 1990s, could be responsible for the rapid intensification of Super Typhoon Haiyan. Hurricanes are heat engines, which means they take heat energy out of the ocean, and convert it to kinetic energy in the form of wind. It's well-known that tropical cyclones need surface water temperatures of at least 26.5°C (80°F) to maintain themselves, and that the warmer the water, and the deeper the warm water is, the stronger the storm can get. Deep warm water is important, since as a tropical cyclone tracks over the ocean, it stirs up cooler water from the depths, potentially reducing the intensity of the storm. When both Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita exploded into Category 5 hurricanes as they crossed over a warm eddy in the Gulf of Mexico with a lot of deep, warm water, the concept of the total heat energy available to fuel a hurricane--the Tropical Cyclone Heat Potential (TCHP)--became one that gained wide recognition. The Pacific Ocean east of the Philippines has the largest area of deep, warm water of anywhere on Earth, and these waters have historically fueled the highest incidence of Category 5 storms of anywhere on the planet. Super Typhoon Haiyan tracked over surface waters that were of near-average warmth, 29.5 - 30.5°C (85 - 87°F.) However, the waters at a depth of 100 meters (328 feet) beneath Haiyan during its rapid intensification phase were a huge 3°C above average, according to Professor I-I Lin of the Department of Atmospheric Science at the National Taiwan University. An analysis by the Japan Meteorological Agency for October showed ocean temperatures 4 - 5°C (7 - 9°F) above average during October (Figure 1). This analysis was from a model. When looking at actual measurements made by the Argo float data in early November, the temperatures in the layer 100 meters below the surface under Haiyan were about 3°C above average, not 4 - 5°C, according to Dr. Lin. As the typhoon stirred this unusually warm water to the surface, the storm was likely able to feed off the heat, allowing Haiyan to intensify into one of the strongest tropical cyclones ever observed.


Figure 1. Modeled departure of temperature from average at a depth of 100 meters in the West Pacific Ocean during October 2013, compared to a 1986 - 2008 average. The track and intensity of Super Typhoon Haiyan are overlaid. Haiyan passed directly over large areas of sub-surface water that were much above average in temperature, which likely contributed to the storm's explosive deepening. While this model showed 4 - 5°C departures from average in October, the actual values were closer to 3°C in early November, according to Argo float data. Image credit: Japan Meteorological Agency.

Why was there such unusually warm sub-surface water?
The sub-surface waters east of the Philippines have warmed dramatically over the past twenty years. According to Pun et al. (2013), "Recent increase in high tropical cyclone heat potential area in the Western North Pacific Ocean", the depth to where ocean temperatures of at least 26°C (79°F) penetrates has increased by 17% since the early 1990s, and the Tropical Cyclone Heat Potential has increased by 13%. The warm-up is due to an increase in the surface winds blowing across the region--the trade winds--which have caused a southward migration and strengthening of the North Equatorial Current (NEC) and the North Equatorial Counter Current (NECC). The strong trade winds have pushed a large amount of water up against the east coast of the Philippines in the past twenty years, resulting in a rate of sea level rise of 10 mm per year--more than triple the global average of 3.1 mm/yr (Figure 2.) This extra sea level rise contributed to the storm surge damage from Super Typhoon Haiyan. Sea level rise data from Legaspi in the Eastern Philippines shows a rise of about 305 mm (12 inches) since 1949. For comparison, global average sea level rose 7.5" (190 mm) since 1901. Part of the rise along the eastern Philippine coast is from tectonic processes--the subsidence of the Philippine plate under the Eurasian plate--but most of it is due to the stronger trade winds piling up warm water along the coast, and the fact that warmer waters expand, raising sea level.


Figure 2. Trend in sea level from satellite altimeter measurements in 1993 - 2010. Black lines are the Sea Surface Height (SSH) in cm from Rio et al. (2009.) Image credit: Qiu, B., and S. Chen, 2012, "Multidecadal sea level and gyre circulation variability in the northwestern tropical Pacific Ocean", Journal of Physical Oceanography 42.1 (2012): 193-206.

Why have the trade winds sped up?
The surface trade winds in the equatorial Pacific are part of the Walker Circulation--a pattern of rising and sinking air along the Equator that the El Nino/La Nina cycle influences. A strong Walker circulation means there is lower pressure over Indonesia, which pulls in more air at the surface along the Equator from the east, increasing the easterly trade winds. As these trade winds strengthen, they pull surface ocean waters away from South America, allowing cold water to upwell to the surface. This is a La Niña-like situation, which takes heat energy out of the atmosphere, putting it into the ocean, keeping global surface temperatures cooler than they would otherwise be. A weakened Walker circulation is the reverse, resulting in weaker trade winds, and a more El Niño-like situation with higher global surface temperatures. As long as the stronger Walker circulation that has been in place since the early 1990s holds, global surface temperatures should stay cooler than they otherwise would be, prolonging the slow-down in global surface warming that has received much attention this year. There may also be a greater chance of super typhoons and higher storm surges affecting the Philippines, due to the warmer sub-surface waters and re-arranged ocean currents. A 2013 paper by L’Heureux et al. notes that the climate models predict that the Walker circulation should weaken (a more El Niño-like situation)--the reverse of what has been observed the past twenty years. The researchers took the observed pressure patterns over the Pacific in recent decades and removed the atmospheric response to the El Niño/La Niña cycle. The resulting pattern they found showed a steady strengthening of the Walker circulation, in concert with global rising temperatures. So, are we seeing a failure of the climate models? Or is the recent speed-up of the Walker circulation a decades-long temporary "speed bump" in the climate system? Time will tell. It is worth pointing out that a just-released paper by British and Canadian researchers shows that the global surface temperature rise of the past 15 years has been greatly underestimated. As discussed at realclimate.org, "The reason is the data gaps in the weather station network, especially in the Arctic. If you fill these data gaps using satellite measurements, the warming trend is more than doubled in the widely-used HadCRUT4 data, and the much-discussed “warming pause” has virtually disappeared."

I appeared on PBS Newshour last night to discuss the linkages between stronger tropical cyclones and climate change, video here.

References
L’Heureux, Michelle L., Sukyoung Lee, and Bradfield Lyon, 2013, "Recent multidecadal strengthening of the Walker circulation across the tropical Pacific", Nature Climate Change 3.6 (2013): 571-576.

Pun, Iam‐Fei, I‐I. Lin, and Min‐Hui Lo, 2013, "Recent increase in high tropical cyclone heat potential area in the Western North Pacific Ocean", Geophysical Research Letters (2013).

Qiu, B., and S. Chen, 2012, "Multidecadal sea level and gyre circulation variability in the northwestern tropical Pacific Ocean", Journal of Physical Oceanography 42.1 (2012): 193-206.

Jeff Masters

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236. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
though JTWC dropped development for 90W..

Japan Meteorological Agency
Tropical Cyclone Advisory #34
Gale Warning
TROPICAL DEPRESSION 36
6:00 AM JST November 14 2013
======================================

South China Sea

At 21:00 PM UTC, Tropical Depression (1004 hPa) located at 12.3N 114.8E has 10 minute sustained winds of 30 knots. The depression is reported as moving west at 16 knots.

Dvorak Intensity: T2.0

Forecast and Intensity
=======================
24 HRS: 12.3N 109.9E - 40 knots (CAT 1/Tropical Storm) South China Sea
Member Since: May 24, 2006 Posts: 50 Comments: 45235
Quoting 232. Tornado6042008X:

Did you see any snowflakes yesterday, I didn't.:( 
Nope not here either.
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Quoting 233. Bluestorm5:
They noted:

"This landfall point is ~15 natural miles S of downtown Tacloban City. The city was in the N eyewall and just a couple of miles from the edge of the eye"


Thanks! Would a pressure of 960 mb 15 miles from the eye support a Cat 5 rating?
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Quoting 231. DonnieBwkGA:


How far were they from the eye?
They noted:

"This landfall point is ~15 natural miles S of downtown Tacloban City. The city was in the N eyewall and just a couple of miles from the edge of the eye"
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Quoting 227. washingtonian115:
Good evening T6058.I call it spring part two because temp wise it has been that way.Good to see more reinforcing shots of cold coming along.
Did you see any snowflakes yesterday, I didn't.:( 
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Quoting 216. Bluestorm5:
I thought iCyclone did a great job collecting the data.



More on iCyclone's data from Haiyan

Note: This is Device 1 at first floor of hotel 26 feet above sea that got flooded. Device 2 on 4th floor that didn't get hit by water measured the pressure at 960.3 mb which is .5 mb lower than Device 1.


How far were they from the eye?
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More "knee jerk" reaction on Haiyan

Link
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One more thing... the data came from Kestrel 4500s, which is handheld measuring device for almost everything. Very expensive stuff at like $300-400, but I got to play with it while doing weather observations around campus back in September and I thought it was the coolest thing ever. I want to buy one of those cheaper versions (Kestrel 2000, 2500, 3000, or 3500) one day.

You can see the list of what it can do below:

Kestrel 4500

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Vast Antarctic iceberg 'could threaten shipping'
By Mark Kinver Environment reporter, BBC News, 13 November 2013 Last updated at 00:11 GMT



With this icy/melting outlook for the southern hemisphere good night from Germany.
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Quoting 221. Tornado6042008X:
Spring part two??? Never mind...

Good evening Washi. It looks like after the warm temps this weekend we will see another blast of just as cold if not even colder air by Tuesday/Wednesday of next week.
Good evening T6058.I call it spring part two because temp wise it has been that way.Good to see more reinforcing shots of cold coming along.
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226. VR46L
Looks like the winter pattern is setting up!

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Got to 35 deg. this morning here in the FL Panhandle!
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Quoting 216. Bluestorm5:
I thought iCyclone did a great job collecting the data.



More on iCyclone's data from Haiyan

Note: This is Device 1 at first floor of hotel 26 feet above sea that got flooded. Device 2 on 4th floor that didn't get hit by water measured the pressure at 960.3 mb which is .5 mb lower than Device 1.

I thought it was funny that they released these graphs on their Facebook page yesterday but covered up the y-axis:

Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31917
Quoting 205. Levi32:


Well, we're assuming that Emanuel's formula for maximum potential intensity (MPI) is without significant errors, and since few storms actually reach their MPI, we have a small sample size, and it could be that Haiyan did strengthen that much due to its thermodynamic environment alone.

I have a hypothesis, though. I think two things helped Haiyan significantly. One is the abnormally strong local Hadley cell (as far as typhoon environments go), due to Haiyan managing to form south of the subtropical ridge at such a late time in the year, within the rising flank of the cell.

The second is Haiyan's very low latitude. I would have to do a formal investigation, but I have gotten the feeling before that, although TCs rarely form south of 10N - when they do, they seem to do very well for themselves. The reason could lie in the weaker Coriolis force, which increases the time necessary for winds to reach gradient balance, and causes a greater radial component to the wind (across isobars as opposed to tangent to them). This could promote eyewall health by increasing low-level convergence and resisting formation of concentric eyewalls that lead to replacement cycles. Haiyan seemed to resist a true replacement cycle right before peaking in intensity. It was during this time that the eye roughly tripled in diameter, but there was no preceding weakening phase.

It seems I may have thrown you off a bit by my use of excellent upper air environment, which I would define as non-detrimental (such as negligible shear). You do bring up some great points though. I too had at least alluded to the strength of the Hadley cell in the past, particularly in reference to the depth of the troposphere where Haiyan was located.

The particularly interesting bit is your hypothesis on the lessar degree of coriolis and the effects it had on Haiyan (and other latitude low riders). I don't necessarily agree with you that Haiyan did not undergo true eyewall replacement or that there wasn't any weakening prior to peak strength, but you do raise very, very interesting thinking points.
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Chilly sunny day with an afternoon high of 52. Our first winter-like day!

The seas built amazingly fast last night from 1 foot to 11 feet in 5 hours. Subsiding quickly, now down to 6 feet. Unusual.
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Quoting 217. washingtonian115:
At least I have more cold to look forward to in spring part two..
Spring part two??? Never mind...

Good evening Washi. It looks like after the warm temps this weekend we will see another blast of just as cold if not even colder air by Tuesday/Wednesday of next week.
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Haiyan puts locals on edge


A Sonora woman is awaiting word from her brother, former Sonora resident Philip Valenzuela, who she has not talked to since Typhoon Haiyan devastated the Philippines, where he lives part-time.

Lisa Jones, of Sonora, has been in touch with the Sonora branch of the American Red Cross to see if they could help locate Valenzuela. They have not found him so far.

Haiyan struck the Philippines on Friday, destroying numerous cities and possibly killing up to 10,000 people. About 600,000 more people have been displaced.

Valenzuela has a home and business about 80 miles from Tacloban — the most severely hit city — in the small village of Caibiran.

Jones remains optimistic, however, as Valenzuela’s son, Philip Jr., has family about 10 miles away from Caibiran and they survived.

“Their roof was torn off, but people from their church came and put it back on for them,” she said.

Valenzuela Jr. had only gotten through after calling over and over to an emergency contact number, she said.

His family didn’t know the fate of Valenzuela Sr.’s family.

“He had just opened a seaside store to sell supplies to fishermen,” Jones said of her brother. “That’s probably destroyed.”

She noted, hopefully, that his house is made of cinderblocks, so was sturdier than many other structures destroyed.

Jones is not the only area resident impacted by Haiyan.

Joe Gamboa, owner of the Jamestown Asian Market, has family on the edge of the typhoon area, in the province of Negros Occidental.

“But my family is safe,” he said. “They were pretty much prepared, but they had to evacuate to a shelter.”

Gamboa was able to reach his brother via text message, and his brother confirmed the family was safe.

“Some of their friends’ families were not as lucky,” Gamboa said.

He has been coordinating with Philippine officials and was on his way to the Bay Area to meet with the president of the Philippine Nurses Association of America on Tuesday afternoon to discuss relief efforts.

Ulysses Verceles, of Sonora, was born and raised in the Philippines and still has relatives living on the island nation.

He said his family was much farther south than where the typhoon hit. They’re alive.

However, the family of his late friend, Edison Navarra, remains unreachable in Tacloban.

Navarra was a boy who immigrated to the U.S. in 2000 to get medical care and surgery at the Shriners Hospital for Children in Sacramento. Verceles offered his home to Navarra after seeing him with severe burns in an orphanage in the Philippines. Navarra died in June in Sacramento at 23 after having a seizure.

Verceles has not been able to contact Navarra’s father in Tacloban.

Members of a local nonprofit, Seeds of Dignity, returned to the U.S. just days before the typhoon struck.

Founders Kathy and Tim Atchley, of Cedar Ridge, and five other Seeds of Dignity members spent 15 days in the country, offering medical clinics and early childhood education.

The group works in Mindanao, at the very south of the Philippines, which wasn’t directly hit by the typhoon.

“Everyone is praying for them,” Kathy Atchley said, “We hope we can go back next year.”

The group plans to collect clothes, shoes and vitamins for typhoon victims soon and is collecting money now, guaranteeing 100 percent of funds go to victims.

Checks can be made out to Seeds of Dignity, marked for “Typhoon Relief” and sent to 17076 Carriage Road, Sonora, CA 95370.

Donations can also be made through the American Red Cross, which has a Philippine unit in the country now.

Donations to the Red Cross can be handled by phone at 533-1513 or at www.redcross.org

Link
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Quoting 217. washingtonian115:
At least I have more cold to look forward to in spring part two..
Its not Spring , its Wummer
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Quoting 165. bappit:

I wouldn't mention those two in the same sentence. JB makes grotesque errors and pretends to be an expert. Cantore is just a TV weatherman and doesn't make the same pretentious claims of expertise.


Cantore actually backs sound science, everyone makes mistakes on camera, but my experience is that he has been the sharpest meteorologist on camera at the TWC outside of Dr. Greg Forbes and the other experts. I definitely wouldn't compare JB and Cantore...
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At least I have more cold to look forward to in spring part two..
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I thought iCyclone did a great job collecting the data.



More on iCyclone's data from Haiyan

Note: This is Device 1 at first floor of hotel 26 feet above sea that got flooded. Device 2 on 4th floor that didn't get hit by water measured the pressure at 960.3 mb which is .5 mb lower than Device 1.
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Umm, Levi post #2o5: Earlier posts hint to a Rossby gravitiy wave, Kelvin wave --- and now something like a Hadley cell: I'm really looking forward to some overview explanation for dump people like me to explain what they all (if) contribute to form Haiyan, and if it's going to happen more often in this region ;).
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Hit it boyz'

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Quoting 207. Patrap:
Haiyan seemed to resist a true replacement cycle right before peaking in intensity. It was during this time that the eye roughly tripled in diameter, but there was no preceding weakening phase.

Definitely, for me, this obs was/is the worm in the Tequila.

It should make for a excellent thesis for someone.


I'm going to use this picture for my homescreen on my smart phone.
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cimss mtsat

Note the meso Vortices

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Quoting 208. Neapolitan:
I was hoping for more specifics and fewer aspersions. Again, please show where I quoted JB inaccurately or "made it appear" JB said something he didn't. Or if that's too much trouble, just please explain how the deep waters east of the Philippines could possibly remained unstirred for five years in the presence of the West Pacific North Equatorial Current. Thanks!



You really wanna go down this road?
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Quoting 205. Levi32:


Well, we're assuming that Emanuel's formula for maximum potential intensity (MPI) is without significant errors, and since few storms actually reach their MPI, it could be that Haiyan did strengthen that much due to its thermodynamic environment alone.

I have a hypothesis, though. I think two things helped Haiyan significantly. One is the abnormally strong local Hadley cell (as far as typhoon environments go), due to Haiyan managing to form south of the subtropical ridge at such a late time in the year, within the rising flank of the cell.

The second is Haiyan's very low latitude. I would have to do a formal investigation, but I have gotten the feeling before that, although hurricanes rarely form south of 10N, when they do, they seem to do very well for themselves. The reason could lie in the weaker Coriolis force, which increases the time necessary for winds to reach gradient balance, and causes a greater radial component to the wind (across isobars as opposed to tangent to them). This could promote eyewall health by increasing low-level convergence and resisting formation of concentric eyewalls leading to replacement cycles. Haiyan seemed to resist a true replacement cycle right before peaking in intensity. It was during this time that the eye roughly tripled in diameter, but there was no preceding weakening phase.
Very good explanation of Haiyan Levi. I have just one question. What does MPI stand for?
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Quoting 205. Levi32:




The second is Haiyan's very low latitude. I would have to do a formal investigation, but I have gotten the feeling before that, although TCs rarely form south of 10N - when they do, they seem to do very well for themselves. The reason could lie in the weaker Coriolis force, which increases the time necessary for winds to reach gradient balance, and causes a greater radial component to the wind (across isobars as opposed to tangent to them). This could promote eyewall health by increasing low-level convergence and resisting formation of concentric eyewalls leading to replacement cycles. Haiyan seemed to resist a true replacement cycle right before peaking in intensity. It was during this time that the eye roughly tripled in diameter, but there was no preceding weakening phase.


Yeah, I noticed you tweeting about that during Haiyan. I thought that was very interesting for someone to study.
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Quoting 173. PensacolaDoug:



The "malfunction " is when you paraphrase in accurately to make it appear he said something he didn't . Quote accurately and then rip apart whatever you don't like about what he says and I won't say a word.
I was hoping for more specifics and fewer aspersions. Again, please show where I quoted JB inaccurately or "made it appear" JB said something he didn't. Or if that's too much trouble, just please explain how the deep waters east of the Philippines could possibly remained unstirred for five years in the presence of the West Pacific North Equatorial Current. Thanks!
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13509
Haiyan seemed to resist a true replacement cycle right before peaking in intensity. It was during this time that the eye roughly tripled in diameter, but there was no preceding weakening phase.

Definitely, for me, this obs was/is the worm in the Tequila.

It should make for a excellent thesis for someone.


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So glad to hear from Levi..... Getting cold up your way I'm sure.
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Quoting 184. 1900hurricane:

I am very aware of that jet streak, but it's influence on the situation is somewhat diminished by two things. First, the core of Haiyan is over 10* latitude from the jet streak. Additionally, upper level riding (the same upper level ridge that was slightly shearing Haiyan the day before) is separating Haiyan's outflow from the right entrance region of the jet streak. Your chart above even features convergent streamlines along the ridge and between the features. The divergent area associated with the jet streak doesn't even start until about the latitude of Taiwan, and the cyclonic curvature of the jet streak somewhat compromises the amount of divergence associated with it as well (not as much as in the image below, but you get the picture).



Yes, an excellent upper air environment is needed in addition to an excellent thermodynamic environment in order to produce and sustain a tropical cyclone of Haiyan's caliber. You're not getting such a storm without either. However, the influence that jet streak had on Haiyan's upper level environment was very small.

Interesting note on Raymond by the way. I remember you mentioning that very thing earlier. I look forward to what that study concludes.


Well, we're assuming that Emanuel's formula for maximum potential intensity (MPI) is without significant errors, and since few storms actually reach their MPI, we have a small sample size, and it could be that Haiyan did strengthen that much due to its thermodynamic environment alone.

I have a hypothesis, though. I think two things helped Haiyan significantly. One is the abnormally strong local Hadley cell (as far as typhoon environments go), due to Haiyan managing to form south of the subtropical ridge at such a late time in the year, within the rising flank of the cell.

The second is Haiyan's very low latitude. I would have to do a formal investigation, but I have gotten the feeling before that, although TCs rarely form south of 10N - when they do, they seem to do very well for themselves. The reason could lie in the weaker Coriolis force, which increases the time necessary for winds to reach gradient balance, and causes a greater radial component to the wind (across isobars as opposed to tangent to them). This could promote eyewall health by increasing low-level convergence and resisting formation of concentric eyewalls that lead to replacement cycles. Haiyan seemed to resist a true replacement cycle right before peaking in intensity. It was during this time that the eye roughly tripled in diameter, but there was no preceding weakening phase.
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Quoting 202. PalmBeachWeather:
Trying to overcome this root canal.... Whatever works


I just figured you would have started a little lighter than those at first.
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Quoting 142. hydrus:

A very nice, informative post. The only thing I will note is that the following graph doesn't continue to present day.



Current CO2 is around 400ppm, not 280ppm. Likewise, the temperature is higher, too. Neither of those take away from your post, I just wanted to make sure that those facts are stated.
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Quoting 201. Dakster:


Starting early with the Jager bombs are we?
Trying to overcome this root canal.... Whatever works
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Quoting 198. PalmBeachWeather:
I saw Richard Nixon in person April 1974... He needed a shave.


Starting early with the Jager bombs are we?
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Quoting 195. VR46L:


Tip

don't look in the Doc Rood Blog .....

Never
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“In all the frenzy, there is no mention about the fate of persons with disabilities who are undoubtedly the most vulnerable of the affected populations. My contacts in the National Council on Disability Affairs (NCDA) attached to the Department of Social Welfare and Development, lead agency in the ongoing rescue and relief operations, cannot provide any disability-specific information. I am not at all surprised. The Philippines has a long way to go in the effort to really include persons with disabilities in disaster preparedness, response and similar activities. I tried to reach out by sending text messages to my colleagues with disabilities in the affected areas. No response. I hope it is just that they can’t reply because of communications infrastructure is down. My worst fear is to no longer be able to hear from some or many of them.”

Venus ILAGAN, Secretary General, Rehabilitation International


Portlight will be putting together a shipment of durable medical equipment to be sent to the affected areas

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Quoting 174. Dakster:


Would be nice, but I doubt it will happen in my lifetime. And I would love to see them in person, even if it is just from a space craft.
I saw Richard Nixon in person April 1974... He needed a shave.
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Quoting 193. Climate175:
Next chance of snow or flurries next WED
Where do you live?
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Quoting 171. JupiterKen:
Apologies if this has been previously posted. Before and after pics Tacloban.
Link

Amazing!
Thank you for posting those links.
Makes the heart bleed to think of what it might look like at ground level?
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195. VR46L
Quoting 180. PalmBeachWeather:
Still kinda numb... Going through a root canal... Last week the killing of the nerve and pulp...This afternoon the temporary crown, Dec. 9th the real crown.... This freekin' sucks... I need a "Long Island Iced Tea"


Tip

don't look in the Doc Rood Blog .....

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I had a hangover (the movie) moment the last time I went out with friends and Jager Bombs were involved at Scarlets Night Club in Miami.
Member Since: February 28, 2013 Posts: 4 Comments: 2807
Next chance of snow or flurries next WED
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Quoting 191. PalmBeachWeather:
I'm game Scott


My kinda girl or woman!
Member Since: February 28, 2013 Posts: 4 Comments: 2807
Quoting 190. StormTrackerScott:


Jager Bomb sounds more like it.

I'm game Scott
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Quoting 180. PalmBeachWeather:
Still kinda numb... Going through a root canal... Last week the killing of the nerve and pulp...This afternoon the temporary crown, Dec. 9th the real crown.... This freekin' sucks... I need a "Long Island Iced Tea"


Jager Bomb sounds more like it.

Member Since: February 28, 2013 Posts: 4 Comments: 2807
Quoting 188. PalmBeachWeather:
Thanks Dak.... Not really what I wanted to do today.


Not one of the things I would sign up for either. Although I have had to have one.
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Quoting 187. Dakster:


After that root canal, I believe you earned the right to some.
Thanks Dak.... Not really what I wanted to do today.
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Quoting 185. PalmBeachWeather:
That was my problem when I was young....


After that root canal, I believe you earned the right to some.
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Quoting 169. StormTrackerScott:


Hey buddy I thought you were mad at me. I really like what you post and I love hearing info about your current location.

No worries!
I am genetically incapable of getting mad at anybody, after all I used to be "married!"
I, along with a lot of people on here only want to get to the bottom of what is going on and will be going on shortly?
Individuals will and can only ever have their opinions but at the end of the day, its the collective future of humanity which must be our prime concern.
Having cast the ashes of our 2 co-posters of this blog into the sea, I wish only to state what not only comes into our minds but what might come to pass, so to speak in the future.
These storms which to us are fascinating, are death to a lot of people and WE must never forget that!
If we annoy some people? Then please put us on "ignore," We won't mind and if they ban us for posting what we see as truths; then its not a loss to us but a gain to the overhaul dominant democracy; no!
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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