Category 3 Tropical Cyclone Phailin Rapidly Intensifying, Headed Towards India

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:22 PM GMT on October 10, 2013

Share this Blog
48
+

Very dangerous Tropical Cyclone Phailin, in the North Indian Ocean's Bay of Bengal, has put on an impressive burst of rapid intensification, going from a tropical storm with 65 mph winds to a formidable Category 3 storm with 115 mph winds in just twelve hours. Satellite estimates of Phailin's strength at 8 am EDT ranged as high as 135 mph. Satellite images show that Phailin, whose name means "a sapphire" in Thai, continues to intensify. The cloud tops of the very intense thunderstorms in the eyewall are expanding and cooling, showing that their updrafts are growing stronger and pushing the clouds higher into the atmosphere. Water temperatures are warm, 28 - 29°C, and the ocean heat content is very high, 80 - 100 kJ/cm^2--a level often associated with rapid intensification. With wind shear low, Phailin should be able to continue to intensify until an eyewall replacement cycle begins. It is very difficult for a tropical cyclone to maintain an eye diameter less than ten miles across before the inner core grows unstable and the eyewall collapses, with a new, larger-diameter eyewall forming from an outer spiral band. This process typically weakens the top winds of a tropical cyclone by 5 - 15 mph, but spreads hurricane-force winds over a larger area of ocean, resulting a larger storm surge, but less wind damage. With Phailin's eye diameter already down to a tiny 9 miles, an eyewall replacement cycle is likely to occur by Friday morning.


Figure 1. MODIS satellite image of Tropical Cyclone Phailin, taken at approximately 07:30 UTC on October 10, 2013. At the time, Phailin had top winds of 75 mph. Image credit: NASA.

Forecast for Phailin
The models are in tight agreement that Phailin will track northwest into the northeast coast of India, with landfall expected to occur between 06 - 12 UTC on Saturday. The 11 am EDT Thursday forecast from the Joint Typhoon Warning Center predicts that Phailin will peak as a top-end Category 4 storm with 155 mph winds 12 hours before landfall. The India Meteorological Department (IMD) is predicting that Phailin will be a borderline Category 2/Category 3 storm at landfall. The 06Z Thursday run of the HWRF model predicted that Phailin would be a strong Category 3 storm with 130 mph winds at landfall on Saturday.


Figure 2. Storm surge forecast for Tropical Cyclone Phailin, made on October 10, 2013. The peak surge was predicted to be 87 cm (2.9'). This forecast is likely to be a considerable underestimate of the surge, given Phailin's recent rapid intensification. Image credit: IMD.

The Bay of Bengal is notorious for deadly tropical cyclones
There is good reason to be concerned when a major tropical cyclone forms in the Bay of Bengal. Twenty-six of the thirty-five deadliest tropical cyclones in world history have been Bay of Bengal storms. During the past two centuries, 42% of Earth's tropical cyclone-associated deaths have occurred in Bangladesh, and 27% have occurred in India (Nicholls et al., 1995.) Phailin is likely to be the strongest tropical cyclone to affect India in fourteen years, since the great 1999 Odisha Cyclone. That terrible storm hit Northeast India in the Indian state of Odisha (formerly called Orissa) near the city of Bhubaneswar, as a Category 4 storm with 155 mph winds on October 29, 1999. The mighty cyclone, which peaked at Category 5 strength with 160 mph winds and a 912 mb central pressure shortly before landfall, drove a storm surge of 26 feet (8 meters) onto the coast. The storm stalled just inland, dumping torrential rains on portions of India already saturated from the landfall of Category 4 Tropical Cyclone 04B just twelve days before. The catastrophe killed 9,658 people and left $2.5 billion in damage (1999 dollars), India's most expensive and fourth deadliest tropical cyclone in the past 100 years. Although Phailin is expected to hit the same province of India that the great 1999 Odisha Cyclone hit, Phailin's landfall location is predicted to fall about 100 miles farther to the south, in a region where the coast is not as low-lying. This should keep the death toll due to storm surge much lower compared to the 1999 Odisha Cyclone, where more than 70% of the deaths occurred due to the storm surge. The latest storm surge forecast from IMD (Figure 2) predicts a peak surge under 3', but this is much too low, considering Phailin's recent round of rapid intensification. Phailin's heavy rains will be capable of causing great destruction, as did the rains from the 1999 Odisha cyclone. More than 2,000 of the deaths from that storm occurred due to fresh water flooding in the town of Padmapur, located more than 150 miles from the coast. Deforestation was cited as a contributing cause to these destructive floods that killed 36% of the town's population.

Wunderground's weather historian Christopher C. Burt has a detailed post on India's tropical cyclone history.

References
Nicholls, R.J.N., N. Mimura, J.C. Topping, 1995, "Climate change in south and south-east Asia: some implications for coastal areas," J Glob Environ Eng 1995;1:137–54.



98L in the Eastern Atlantic more organized
A tropical wave (Invest 98L) located about 400 miles southwest of the Cape Verde Islands is headed west to west-northwest at about 10 mph. Satellite loops show that 98L has a modest area of heavy thunderstorms with a substantial amount of spin. The disturbance is under a moderate 10 - 20 knots of wind shear today, but the shear is expected to rise to the high range, 20 - 30 knots, Friday - Monday, making Thursday the most likely day for development. The UKMET model develops the disturbance into a tropical depression this week, but the European and GFS models do not. In their 8 am EDT Thursday Tropical Weather Outlook, NHC gave the disturbance 2-day development odds of 50%, and 5-day odds of 50%. 98L's projected west-northwest track is expected take it several hundred miles northeast of the Northern Lesser Antilles Islands by the middle of next week, according to the 00Z Thursday morning runs of the GFS and European models.

Typhoon Nari headed towards the Philippines
In the Western Pacific, Category 1 Typhoon Nari is expected to intensify into a Category 2 storm with 100 mph winds and make landfall on Luzon Island in the Philippines near 12 UTC Friday. Nari will then make a second landfall in Vietnam around 00 UTC on Tuesday.

Jeff Masters

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 523 - 473

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19Blog Index

98L has really organized on the 850 vorticity charts.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS ASSOCIATED WITH A BROAD AREA OF LOW
PRESSURE IN THE EASTERN TROPICAL ATLANTIC...LOCATED ABOUT 600 MILES
WEST-SOUTHWEST OF THE CAPE VERDE ISLANDS...CONTINUE TO SHOW SIGNS
OF ORGANIZATION. THIS LOW COULD STILL BECOME A TROPICAL DEPRESSION
TONIGHT OR FRIDAY BEFORE UNFAVORABLE UPPER-LEVEL WINDS INHIBIT
DEVELOPMENT OVER THE WEEKEND. THIS SYSTEM HAS A MEDIUM CHANCE...
50 PERCENT...OF BECOMING A TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT
48 HOURS...AND A MEDIUM CHANCE...50 PERCENT...OF BECOMING A TROPICAL
CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT 5 DAYS WHILE IT MOVES WESTWARD TO WEST-
NORTHWESTWARD AT AROUND 10 MPH.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 514. wxgeek723:
Amazing.
Mother Nature proving her power.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 501. Patrap:


I bet those winds are sustained at 165 mph right now with gust to 195 mph.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 515. Articuno:

Duel eyewall?

One eyewall. I think what you're seeing is just spiral banding extending out in all four quadrants.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32024
Cyclone Phailin intensifies, high alert for Andhra Pradesh, Odisha

Edited by Surabhi Malik (With inputs from PTI) | Updated: October 10, 2013 14:37 IST
Ads by Google

Cyclone Phailin expected to hit coasts of Andhra Pradesh, Odisha with winds raging at 175-185 kms per hour. Heavy rainfall likely in many areas of Odisha during the next 24 hours. (AFP)

Here are the 10 big developments in this story:

Experts describe the storm as "very severe" with a wind speed that will touch 175-185 kms per hour.

A high alert has been declared for all nine coastal districts of Andhra Pradesh. Evacuation plans are being worked out. (Track Live Updates)

The National Disaster Management Authority's head, M. Sasidhar Reddy, has said that Phailin has been categorised as a severe cyclone (only super cylcones are considered more powerful), its impact will be felt on the entire coast.

The Andhra Pradesh government says it has asked the navy, army and air force that their assistance may be required for emergency and relief operations.

"The system would intensify into a severe cyclonic storm during the next 12 hours. It would continue to move northwestwards and cross north Andhra Pradesh and Odisha coast by the night of October 12," said the Met department.

In the wake of the cyclone alert, thousands of power sector employees from the Seemandhra region of Andhra Pradesh, who were on strike to protest against the Centre's decision to split the state, have decided to return to work, for now. The employees have agreed to start work from 6 am tomorrow but have warned that their strike is not over. (Seemandhra power strike ends - temporarily, warn unions)

The breakthrough came reportedly after the workers held yet another round of talks with Chief Minister Kiran Kumar Reddy today after three failed attempts.

The decision comes as a respite for residents of Seemandhra who have been facing acute power shortage for six days in a row.

The Visakhapatnam Cyclone Warning Centre has forecast heavy rainfall, and warned fishermen against venturing into sea.

A super-cyclone had struck 14 coastal districts of Odisha in October 1999. Nearly 10,000 people were killed as winds raging at 300 kms per hour tore through the coast.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
You would think this is April by looking at the SPC maps for this weekend. Dryline looks like it want to get active starting tomorrow.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 514. wxgeek723:
Amazing.

Duel eyewall?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Amazing.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:


I don't think this going out to sea folks.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
It was very eery this morning in western NC...low 40s with nothing on radar but a heavy wind driven mist through much of the day. Eastern NC has seen 15" of rain!


Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Link

The "Odisha Cyclone" of 1999 currently holds the record for strongest cyclone IN THE INDIAN OCEAN, will Phailin beat that? I think it def has a chance, considering how MASSIVE it is, it should have a strong chance of making it, that, however, is if it can do it before doing the potential EWRC.
The "Odisha Cyclone" had a pressure of 912 mb. As of the last advisory, Phailin has a pressure of ?924.6?mb.
about 12.6 mbs to go, and it will break the record. Guys, we can be looking at a record breaker.
Certainly looks like one.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
This might be the one bringing all that rain to Texas next week.......
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 505. CybrTeddy:


Bad mojo when that happens..

IF there is an ERC now... thats a good bit of time to regain strength afterwards
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
98L is turning a lot of atmosphere out in the Central Atlantic. Looking more and more that Lorenzo is on the way.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Extremely worried about Phailin, looks like it'll more than likely be a Category 4/5 cyclone when it strikes India and will be a catastrophe. I know someone from that area, so I'm rather worried about that too.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 460. Patrap:
The Eye has shrunk some more.



Bad mojo when that happens..
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

18Z GFS cold for FL but it is 300HR out lol
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 371. TropicalAnalystwx13:
I'm not sure if you guys saw this article earlier...

'Phailin' will not be a super cyclone: IMD

Super cyclone starts at 120 knots (140 mph)

I have no words.



Really? That's just irresponsible of them. I'm glad we have the NHC, you won't see something that ridiculous from the NHC.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: July 21, 2011 Posts: 83 Comments: 7167
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 424 Comments: 128261
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 424 Comments: 128261
Quoting 488. PlazaRed:
On the world storm map there are 6 storms in direct line at about the northern tropic region.
So much for bust,(but then its only the Atlantic region which is of general interest!)
I'm sat here with matchsticks propping open my eyes, 1.30am, I hope everybody stays safe until these conditions pass.
Good night from a calm warm, (20/C) southern Europe.
Stay safe.



"general interest" for those in the general US maybe...but I think all the attention many regular bloggers have been giving it, show at least the core isn't ATLcentric all the time. Which is heartening for someone who follows all basins. And seeing this storm, amazing as it is...would folkes really want that barreling down on FL or TX etc?!

I was on this morning when it was showing as 50 or 55 knot winds at the update...and def agreed that it surely was stronger than that with a well formed eye already. they're catching up some anyway.

And as for India being a rich country...well, some...but it's one of those places the rich is with the rich...and there's A LOT of space between them and a lot of the population. But even with the rich, doesn't mean building codes are up to par for cyclones. It is a very corrupt country amongst the rich and politicians (as if a rarity LOL) and that never bodes well for things like building codes to safeguard rich, poor or regular folkes.

Anyway, so much going on non-ATL wise anyway, hardly boring (ok, except for Cariboy who really wants rain LOL I do understand, was the same when in Palm Springs...would watch storms build, only to see them never give anything until well towards or into AZ!) So I do understand your annoyance. I was lucky enough to move to wetter climes a few times since though LOL
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 467. MrMixon:


Well, the area affected spans a pretty large portion of the eastern coast of India. Certainly at the mouths of some of the rivers there are probably mudflats, but there is also some pretty sharp terrain along that coast. I went to Google Maps and turned on the "Photos" layer to get an idea of what some of the infrastructure near the predicted landfall location looks like. This is a small sampling of what you'll find:













As you can see, the quality of the infrastructure in the landfall zone varies dramatically, from posh modern resorts to older thatched-roof buildings that probably wouldn't hold up well to a major.

Clearly, there isn't one word or phrase to describe the infrastructure in this area. Some is good. Some is old and likely vulnerable. Always gotta be careful painting with those broad brushes...


Well, I hope everyone in the evacuation zones evacuates. I'm not sure how they do it in India though.
Member Since: October 20, 2012 Posts: 7 Comments: 2873
The lower 98L stays the more chance it has for survival and as of now its moving due west.
Member Since: April 29, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 7862
TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOK
NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL
500 PM PDT THU OCT 10 2013

FOR THE EASTERN NORTH PACIFIC...EAST OF 140 DEGREES WEST LONGITUDE..

SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS ASSOCIATED WITH A BROAD AREA OF LOW
PRESSURE...LOCATED SEVERAL HUNDRED MILES SOUTH OF MANZANILLO MEXICO
...REMAIN POORLY ORGANIZED. HOWEVER...ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS
APPEAR TO BE CONDUCIVE FOR DEVELOPMENT...AND THIS SYSTEM COULD
STILL BECOME A TROPICAL DEPRESSION DURING THE NEXT DAY OR TWO.
THIS SYSTEM HAS A MEDIUM CHANCE...50 PERCENT...OF BECOMING A
TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS...AND A HIGH CHANCE...60
PERCENT...OF BECOMING A TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT 5 DAYS
WHILE IT MOVES WEST-NORTHWESTWARD OR NORTHWESTWARD AT ABOUT 10 MPH.
Member Since: July 21, 2011 Posts: 83 Comments: 7167
TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOK
NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL
800 PM EDT THU OCT 10 2013

FOR THE NORTH ATLANTIC...CARIBBEAN SEA AND THE GULF OF MEXICO...

SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS ASSOCIATED WITH A BROAD AREA OF LOW
PRESSURE IN THE EASTERN TROPICAL ATLANTIC...LOCATED ABOUT 600 MILES
WEST-SOUTHWEST OF THE CAPE VERDE ISLANDS...CONTINUE TO SHOW SIGNS
OF ORGANIZATION. THIS LOW COULD STILL BECOME A TROPICAL DEPRESSION
TONIGHT OR FRIDAY BEFORE UNFAVORABLE UPPER-LEVEL WINDS INHIBIT
DEVELOPMENT OVER THE WEEKEND. THIS SYSTEM HAS A MEDIUM CHANCE...
50 PERCENT...OF BECOMING A TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT
48 HOURS...AND A MEDIUM CHANCE...50 PERCENT...OF BECOMING A TROPICAL
CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT 5 DAYS WHILE IT MOVES WESTWARD TO WEST-
NORTHWESTWARD AT AROUND 10 MPH.
Member Since: July 21, 2011 Posts: 83 Comments: 7167
494. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
Quoting 491. KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
910 record low pressure no yes


IMD is not using the ADT pressures so unsure how low they will go with that 910 reading

961 hPa was T5.0 and they used 966 hPa

Member Since: May 24, 2006 Posts: 50 Comments: 45301
137.4kt x 1.15= 158.01 mph. That would still be what is called a category 5 hurricane in the Atlantic,Central Pacific and Eastern Pacific basins.
The east coast of India better be preparing for this one. It could be a very bad one, especially with some buildings not as strong there as they are in the US.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2013OCT10 200000 7.4 910.7 152.0 7.4 7.4 7.4 NO LIMIT OFF OFF 4.64 -79.76 EYE 16 IR 81.0 15.67 -89.20 COMBO MET7 41.1
2013OCT10 203000 7.4 910.7 152.0 7.4 7.5 7.5 NO LIMIT OFF OFF 6.44 -79.90 EYE 15 IR 81.0 15.62 -89.11 COMBO MET7 41.0
2013OCT10 210000 7.4 910.7 152.0 7.4 7.4 7.4 NO LIMIT OFF OFF 4.04 -79.83 EYE 15 IR 81.0 15.65 -89.05 COMBO MET7 40.9
2013OCT10 213000 7.4 910.7 152.0 7.4 7.4 7.4 NO LIMIT OFF OFF 2.84 -80.04 EYE 14 IR 81.0 15.68 -88.99 COMBO MET7 40.9
2013OCT10 220000 7.4 910.7 152.0 7.4 7.4 7.4 NO LIMIT OFF OFF 5.24 -79.60 EYE 13 IR 81.0 15.71 -89.03 COMBO MET7 40.9
2013OCT10 223000 7.4 910.7 152.0 7.4 7.4 7.4 NO LIMIT OFF OFF 3.44 -79.88 EYE 13 IR 81.0 15.74 -88.97 COMBO MET7 40.9
2013OCT10 230000 7.4 910.7 152.0 7.4 7.4 7.4

if you look at this, you will see that the pressure has stayed the same for 3 hours... not weaking or strengthening
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 486. HadesGodWyvern:
2013OCT10 230000 6.6 910.8 +0.0 129.6 6.6 7.2 7.3 1.7T/6hr OFF OFF 4.04 -79.34 EYE 15 IR 85.8 15.79 -88.95

6.5 from New Delphi ADT

125-130 knots
910 record low pressure no yes
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 171 Comments: 53815
Typhoon 02B

UW-CIMSS Automated Satellite-Based
Advanced Dvorak Technique (ADT)
Version 8.1.5
Tropical Cyclone Intensity Estimation Algorithm

Current Intensity Analysis



UW - CIMSS
ADVANCED DVORAK TECHNIQUE
ADT-Version 8.1.5
Tropical Cyclone Intensity Algorithm

----- Current Analysis -----
Date : 10 OCT 2013 Time : 223000 UTC
Lat : 15:44:14 N Lon : 88:58:26 E


CI# /Pressure/ Vmax
6.9 / 924.6mb/137.4kt


Final T# Adj T# Raw T#
6.9 6.9 6.9

Estimated radius of max. wind based on IR : 12 km

Center Temp : 3.4C Cloud Region Temp : -79.9C

Scene Type : EYE

Positioning Method : RING/SPIRAL COMBINATION

Ocean Basin : INDIAN
Dvorak CI > MSLP Conversion Used : PACIFIC

Tno/CI Rules : Constraint Limits : NO LIMIT
Weakening Flag : OFF
Rapid Dissipation Flag : OFF

C/K/Z MSLP Estimate Inputs :
- Average 34 knot radii : 82km
- Environmental MSLP : 1006mb

Satellite Name : MET7
Satellite Viewing Angle : 40.9 degrees


Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 424 Comments: 128261
sunrise in the far east

Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 171 Comments: 53815
On the world storm map there are 6 storms in direct line at about the northern tropic region.
So much for bust,(but then its only the Atlantic region which is of general interest!)
I'm sat here with matchsticks propping open my eyes, 1.30am, I hope everybody stays safe until these conditions pass.
Good night from a calm warm, (20/C) southern Europe.
Stay safe.
Member Since: January 21, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2079
Quoting 479. Tornado6042008X:
Looking at Phailin right now, I see quite a couple of similarities to Wilma.....*shivers*..... By the way what are the current maximum sustained winds on Phailin?

185 mph or nearly 300 kph
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
486. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
2013OCT10 230000 6.6 910.8 +0.0 129.6 6.6 7.2 7.3 1.7T/6hr OFF OFF 4.04 -79.34 EYE 15 IR 85.8 15.79 -88.95

6.5 from New Delphi ADT

125-130 knots
Member Since: May 24, 2006 Posts: 50 Comments: 45301
Quoting 470. KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
all of the most powerful cyclones on earth have formed in these regions
And deadliest
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 481. MrMixon:


Excellent question. I know this looks like a nice building, but I wouldn't want to be anywhere near that rats-nest of powerlines when the winds kick up to cat 3+ strength. And I wonder how strong those top floors were built...




we are going to find out shortly

T.C.F.W.
02B/MH/P/C5
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 171 Comments: 53815
Quoting 464. TropicalAnalystwx13:
Let's not forget about Nari. It's an 85kt cyclone headed for the Philippines.



Nari reminds me a lot of Typhoon Mirinae of 2009

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 471. whitewabit:


but even in the posh areas are the building codes strong enough for a major typhoon ??


Excellent question. I know this looks like a nice enough building, but I wouldn't want to be anywhere near that rats-nest of powerlines when the winds kick up to cat 3 strength. And I wonder how strong those top floors were built...

Member Since: March 26, 2006 Posts: 44 Comments: 1520


heres a elevation map of india
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Looking at Phailin right now, I see quite a couple of similarities to Wilma.....*shivers*..... By the way what are the current maximum sustained winds on Phailin?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Looking at Google Map Terrain, it appear that most of land in East India is nowhere as widespread lowland as Bangladesh. In fact, there are already 100 m lines not far from coastline so this tell me that there is a steady rise in elevation from the sea unlike Bangladesh which is flat less than 10 m for miles. The problem is... the northern side of storm is predicted to impact Brahmapur to Chilika Lake. That area is lot flatter than where the southern side is forecast to impact.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 471. whitewabit:


but even in the posh areas are the building codes strong enough for a major typhoon ??

We spent ages going over this a while ago and as Grother pointed out with "Andrew," Girders can be twisted like spaghetti, and concrete can be thrown hundreds of yards.
Who's to know what can be the result of well over 100mph sustained winds.
I like to think I could design something to withstand the cyclones but the truth of the design will always be in the survivors!
Its not who you are, its where you are in these anomalies?
Member Since: January 21, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2079
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 171 Comments: 53815
Quoting 471. whitewabit:


but even in the posh areas are the building codes strong enough for a major typhoon ??


This. "Posh" for them maybe, but still not good enough compared against Phailin.

Also, I have a question. An old geographical map that I have next to me (a big book) says that the sea floor rises sharply from the depths and that there is a narrow slice of shallow in this section of India (compared against the width of Bangladesh's shallows).

What are the effects of a narrow slice of shallows versus a wide slice on storm surge capabilities?
Member Since: July 2, 2012 Posts: 100 Comments: 10277
what happern to invest 98L
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Severe Weather starting to pop in Oklahoma, Nebraska and Kansas! Watch yourselves out there in the plains tonite. Could be a rough one!

Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Viewing: 523 - 473

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.