Earth has its 5th Warmest June on Record

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 4:11 PM GMT on July 18, 2013

June 2013 was the globe's 5th warmest June since records began in 1880, according to NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). NASA rated it the 2nd warmest June on record. The year-to-date period of January - June has been the 7th warmest such period on record. June 2013 global land temperatures were the 3rd warmest on record, and global ocean temperatures were the 10th warmest on record. June 2013 was the 340th consecutive month with global temperatures warmer than the 20th century average. Global satellite-measured temperatures in June 2013 for the lowest 8 km of the atmosphere were 5th or 4th warmest in the 35-year record, according to Remote Sensing Systems and the University of Alabama Huntsville (UAH), respectively. Wunderground's weather historian, Christopher C. Burt, has a comprehensive post on the notable weather events of June 2013 in his June 2013 Global Weather Extremes Summary.


Figure 1. Departure of temperature from average for June 2013, the 5th warmest June for the globe since record keeping began in 1880. Record warmth was observed over much of northern Canada, far northwestern Russia, southern Japan, the Philippines, part of southwestern China, and central southern Africa. It was cooler than average across part of central Asia, central India, western Europe, and far northeastern Canada. No record cold was observed over land areas during the month. Image credit: National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) .

Five billion-dollar weather disasters in June
At least five billion-dollar weather disasters hit Earth during June. The most damaging of these was the historic $22 billion flood disaster that killed at least 23 people in Central Europe in late May and early June--the 5th costliest non-U.S. weather disaster in world history. Record flooding unprecedented since the Middle Ages hit major rivers in Austria, the Czech Republic, Germany, Poland and Slovakia; the Danube River in Passau, Germany hit its highest level since 1501, and the Saale River in Halle, Germany was the highest in its 400-year period of record. Numerous cities recorded their highest flood waters in more than a century, although in some locations the great flood of 2002 was higher.

The world-wide tally of billion-dollar weather disasters so far in 2013 is sixteen, and the U.S. total is four, according to the June 2013 Catastrophe Report from insurance broker Aon Benfield:

1) Flooding, Central Europe, 5/30 - 6/6, $22 billion
2) Drought, Brazil, 1/1 - 5/31, $8.3 billion
3) Tornado, Moore, OK, and associated U.S. severe weather, 5/18 - 5/22, $4.5 billion
4) Drought, Central and Eastern China, 1/1 - 4/30, $4.2 billion
5) Flooding, Calgary, Alberta Canada, 6/19 - 6/24, $3.8 billion
6) Flooding, Indonesia, 1/20 - 1/27, $3.31 billion
7) Flooding, Australia, 1/21 - 1/30, $2.5 billion
8) Tornadoes and severe weather, U.S., 5/26 - 6/2, $2 billion
9) Severe weather, Midwest U.S., 3/18 - 3/20, $2 billion
10) Winter weather, Europe, 3/12 - 3/31, $1.8 billion
11) Drought, New Zealand, 1/1 - 5/10, $1.6 billion
12) Flooding, Sichuan Province, China, 7/7 - 7/11, $1.6 billion
13) Flooding, China, 6/29 - 7/3, $1.4 billion
14) Flooding, Argentina, 4/2 - 4/4, $1.3 billion
15) Flooding, India and Nepal, 6/14 - 6/18, $1.1 billion
16) Winter weather, Plains, Midwest, Northeast U.S., 2/24 - 2/27, $1.0 billion

The $8.3 billion cost of the 2013 drought in Brazil makes it by far the costliest natural disaster in Brazil's history, according to the international disasters database EM-DAT. Their 2nd most costly disaster was the drought of 1978 ($2.3 billion in 1978 dollars.)


Figure 2. The Danube River in Passau, Germany hit its highest level since 1501 during the June 2013 flood. Image credit: Stefan Penninger.


Figure 3. The $22 billion price tag of the June - June 2013 Central European floods puts that disaster in 5th place on the list of most expensive non-U.S. weather-related disasters.

Neutral El Niño conditions continue in the equatorial Pacific
For the 15th month in row, neutral El Niño conditions existed in the equatorial Pacific during June 2013. NOAA's Climate Prediction Center (CPC) expects neutral El Niño conditions to last through summer and into the fall, and the large majority of the El Niño models also predict that neutral conditions will last through the fall of 2013. Temperatures in the equatorial Eastern Pacific need to be 0.5°C below average or cooler for three consecutive months for a La Niña episode to be declared; sea surface temperatures were 0.4°C below average as of July 15, and have been +0.1 to -0.4°C from average since April 1, 2013.

Arctic sea ice falls to 11th lowest June extent on record
Arctic sea ice extent during June was 11th lowest in the 35-year satellite record, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). The relatively high coverage was due to wind patterns that helped spread the ice out over a larger area. During the first two weeks of July, Arctic ice extent has fallen to the 5th lowest level on record.

Quiet in the Atlantic
There are no tropical cyclone threat areas in the Atlantic to discuss today, and none of the reliable models for tropical cyclone formation is predicting development during the coming seven days. If the Atlantic stays quiet, I plan on making my next post on Saturday.

Jeff Masters

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1290. Patrap
One, can make a difference.

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1289. wetrain
Hi Nigel, nice to meet you I am Nevada from Jamaica, I am presently attending G.C Foster College, in Spanish Town. I am An avid weather fan and I follow the weather keenly. Hope to hear from you soon so we can talk weather.
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Quoting 1286. HondosGirl:
We can't hold any more water! We have been under flood warnings for two weeks now. "Rain, Rain, go away" ..... Texas needs you!


y'all in s. fla dont need the rain but along the panhandle, mobile, and mississippi can use the rain.....the yards in mobile are screaming for rain....it has been a very dry spring and summer for the most part this year......
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Quoting 1251. indianrivguy:


That drought, which Fay ended actually saved the lake. It was in a full bore collapse from nutrient overload and the drought fixed that by exposing littoral zones to the air, and plants grew there who's roots reached down into the sediment and burned up nitrogen and phosphorus. There is some 190,000 TONS of phosphorus in the sediments of Okeechobee lake.. enough for hundreds of years of farming. It is this P load, that makes it illegal to send the water into the Florida everglades until it is cleansed.


I know the lake level and water discharge is a touchy issue. I'm currently living in Ft. Myers, which deals with lake discharged down the Caloosahatchee River. Locals don't like discharge from the lake because its blamed for algee growth, red tide, etc.
Member Since: September 16, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 12154
Quoting 1220. weathermanwannabe:
The Northern Coast of Florida and Panhandle are going to get the bulk of that rain from the low.......Another potential washout for the weekend fishing plans.... :(
We can't hold any more water! We have been under flood warnings for two weeks now. "Rain, Rain, go away" ..... Texas needs you!
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Quoting 1252. AussieStorm:


Stormhunter-NL
No words needed, shelf cloud over Chantelle-la-Vieille, France
18.07.2013

Source; infoclimat.fr



i swear the aliens keep hiding their cool looking spaceships behind the clouds.....we are seeing more and more cloud formations like this nowadays.... lol j/k :)
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1284. rco3
I had a pretty good view of the Atlas launch this morning, although as SkyePony said the cloud cover was low and the vehicle disappeared quickly...

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1283. 62901IL
Quoting 1282. Thrawst:
,

.
Member Since: June 14, 2013 Posts: 3 Comments: 3192
1282. Thrawst
,
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1281. Patrap

Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station in Plymouth uses water from Cape Cod Bay to cool the water circulating around its reactor. The current heat wave is making that difficult.
Cape Cod Times File/Merrily Cassidy


Seawater temps too high for Pilgrim cooling

By CHRISTINE LEGERE
clegere@capecodonline.com
July 18, 2013


PLYMOUTH — The ongoing heat wave could force Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station to shut down, as soaring temperatures continue to warm the Cape Cod Bay waters that the plant relies on to cool key safety systems.

Pilgrim's license from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission requires the water being drawn from the bay to be no warmer than 75 degrees. On Tuesday night, the temperature in the saltwater system reached 75.3 degrees and remained above the 75-degree limit for about 90 minutes.


If water temperatures rise and show no sign of lowering, the plant has 24 hours to completely shut down.

"The water temperature will be closely monitored as the heat wave persists," NRC spokesman Neil Sheehan wrote in an email.

The temperature of seawater being drawn from the bay must be low enough to cool the water circulating around the reactor and transform steam from the system back to liquid water.

Although the seawater is warmer when it is discharged back into the bay, it must not be so warm it affects the ecosystem.

The plant produces 680 megawatts of electricity, according to Carol Wightman, spokeswoman for Pilgrim's owner-operator, Entergy Corp.

"That is enough to provide power to about 680,000 homes and about 15 percent of the electricity used in Massachusetts," Wightman said.

When asked whether Pilgrim has ever been forced to shut down because of rising water temperatures in the bay, Wightman said, "I don't recall ever having to shut the plant down for this."

Sheehan said Millstone Unit 2 nuclear power plant in Connecticut was forced to shut down for several days last summer when ocean water from Long Island Sound became too warm.

"Like Pilgrim, it is limited to 75 degrees," Sheehan said.

The owners of Millstone Unit 2 and Unit 3 have since submitted a request to amend plant licenses to permit water temperature up to 80 degrees, Sheehan said.

"We are in the process of reviewing that request," he said.

Wightman was unable to confirm Wednesday afternoon whether the temperatures have stayed below the 75-degree limit since Tuesday night.

Asked about the dollar impact of a shutdown at Pilgrim, Wightman would not provide specifics.

"It's our policy not to comment on financials," she said. "Anytime we have to power down the plant or shut it down, it affects our opportunity in a competitive market."

Meanwhile, Pilgrim officials declared the "unusual event" — related to Monday's failure of the control room alarms, known as annunciators — terminated just before midnight Tuesday.

"The exact cause of the annunciator failure has not yet been identified," Sheehan said.

"We will continue to evaluate Entergy's efforts to identify the root cause. Meanwhile the system has been checked and tested and is currently functioning properly."

Mary Lampert, chairwoman of the Duxbury Nuclear Advisory Committee and director of the anti-nuclear group Pilgrim Watch, fired off a letter to NRC officials Wednesday, urging the agency to shut down the Pilgrim plant until the cause of the alarm system failure is found.

"Until that is done, we fail to see how the NRC can provide reasonable assurance for public health and safety," Lampert wrote.

Lampert jokingly called the rising temperatures in the bay and possibility of a shutdown "a sign from God that they should shut down, find out what's wrong with the annunciators and fix them, and fix anything else on the to-do list."
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1280. no1der
Offshore permafrost decay and massive seabed methane escape in water depths >20m at the South Kara Sea shelf


Abstract: Since the Last Glacial Maximum (~19ka), coastal inundation from sea-level rise has been thawing thick subsea permafrost across the Arctic. Although subsea permafrost has been mapped on several Arctic continental shelves, permafrost distribution in the South Kara Sea and the extent to which it is acting as an impermeable seal to seabed methane escape remains poorly understood. Here we use >1300km of high-resolution seismic (HRS) data to map hydroacoustic anomalies, interpreted to record seabed gas release, on the West Yamal shelf. Gas flares are widespread over an area of at least 7,500km2 in water depths >20m. We propose that continuous subsea permafrost extends to water depths of ~20m offshore and creates a seal through which gas cannot migrate. This Arctic shelf region where seafloor gas release is widespread suggests that permafrost has degraded more significantly than previously thought.

To be published soon in Geophysical Research Letters
With greatly reduced sea ice cover, high SSTs are more readily mixed to depth over the shallow shelves N. of Siberia. The small Kara Sea study area referenced above has a setup similar to the whole East Siberian shelf.

DMI Satellite SST Analysis

Member Since: June 5, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 668
1279. 62901IL
Here's a funny TWO

ZCZC MIATWOAT ALL
TTAA00 KNHC DDHHMM

TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOK
NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL
800 AM EDT FRI JUL 19 2013

FOR THE NORTH ATLANTIC...CARIBBEAN SEA AND THE GULF OF MEXICO...

TROPICAL CYCLONE FORMATION IS EXPECTED IN ONE HOUR

$$
FORECASTER BEVEN

NNNN
Member Since: June 14, 2013 Posts: 3 Comments: 3192
1278. barbamz
Well, this article on the TRMM page caught me by surprise. I somehow got the impression, nearly whole China is already flooded, lol. But China is huge ...

Tropical Storm Cimaron Brings Beneficial Rain To China
Thursday July 18, 2013
The image on the left used data captured by the TRMM satellite when it passed above tropical storm Cimaron on July 18, 2013 at 1132 UTC (~7:32 PM Local) just before it hit southeastern China. Rainfall was measured by TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) instruments to be falling at a rate of over 183mm/hr (~7.2 inches) in a small area near Cimaron's center of circulation. TRMM PR found some radar reflectivity values greater than 55dBZ in these heavy rainshowers. Cimaron's track took it to the south of Taiwan yesterday.

The rainfall anomaly analysis on the right was made by comparing rainfall data compiled during the twelve year period from 2001-2012 to "near real-time" TRMM calibrated Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) data collected during the last thirty days. This analysis shows that Cimaron's rainfall may be very beneficial to China. Even with the recent precipitation from typhoon soulik, rainfall would have to increase by an average of over 10mm/day to bring totals back to normal in large areas of southern China.


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1277. DFWdad
Quoting 1262. WoodyFL:
Here's the complete paragraph of the article on an earlier entry from Wiki


The melt zone, where summer warmth turns snow and ice into slush and melt ponds of meltwater, has been expanding at an accelerating rate in recent years. When the meltwater seeps down through cracks in the sheet, it accelerates the melting and, in some areas, allows the ice to slide more easily over the bedrock below, speeding its movement to the sea. Besides contributing to global sea level rise, the process adds freshwater to the ocean, which may disturb ocean circulation and thus regional climate.[6] In July 2012, this melt zone covered 97 percent of the ice cover.[12] Ice cores show that events such as this occur approximately every 150 years on average. The last time a melt this large happened was in 1889. This particular melt may be part of cyclical behavior; however, Lora Koenig, a Goddard glaciologist suggested that "...if we continue to observe melting events like this in upcoming years, it will be worrisome."[13]


Why do people only print the portions they like in something and leave out the points they don't like?

i don't take a side in any of this but at least be fair. yah its a cycle but maybe we're helping it along


Well I agree with the what you posted. What is happening has happened before. 'IF' it continues beyond what has happened before, then it is worrisome. That is what I read out it.

But this is in response to, 'what happens if we melt the entire Greenland and Ant-Artic ice caps', which has not happened in the recorded, or observable past.



Member Since: November 5, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 257
Quoting 1270. Patrap:
irg is a living History Book of His area and I consider Him a National Treasure


Thank you Pat, very kind words indeed.
Member Since: September 23, 2006 Posts: 1 Comments: 2920
Quoting 1267. Patrap:

The United Artists Theater in Detroit. (Yves Marchand and Romain Meffre)

The artifacts of a Oil Dependent society in slow decline.


Haunting, beautiful, looks like a great location for a punk rock show to me!
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Quoting 1268. Dakster:


It's been 25 years since my grandfather passed away - you sure do remind me of him. He told me a bunch of things that you are now blogging about.



That is a complement of the highest order, I am humbled, thank you for such kind words.
Member Since: September 23, 2006 Posts: 1 Comments: 2920
1273. Dakster
Quoting 1270. Patrap:
irg is a living History Book of His area and I consider Him a National Treasure


I can tell - I have roots that go back to the area of Florida he lives in. They faced the same issues he faces today.
Member Since: March 10, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 12170
Quoting 1259. Dakster:


It is elevated now....

Water flows freely for at least part of the trail.


When I was down in Coral Gables for the Everglades Coalition Meeting in January, there was a field trip out to visit the new bridge.. Most of my friends, and my predecessor went out there. I wanted to go, as I grew up stomping the Glades, but, I went out on Biscayne Bay because that's the Biscayne Baykeeper Alexis Segal's responsibility, and I wanted to see her and discuss her work.
Member Since: September 23, 2006 Posts: 1 Comments: 2920
1271. wxmod
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1270. Patrap
irg is a living History Book of His area and I consider Him a National Treasure
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1269. DFWdad
Quoting 1243. no1der:
110,000yr is spelled with 4 zeroes not 7.
The Greenland Ice Sheet is a post-Pliocene feature. (ca. 3 million years).
Our atmospheric composition is now Pliocene (400ppm CO2).





Corrected, thanks.
Member Since: November 5, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 257
1268. Dakster
Quoting 1263. indianrivguy:


It's actually not nearly enough to handle the volume of water a storm could produce "if" we could send it south. Right now, everything defaults to sugar. In the last twenty years, they have had exactly the amount of water they wanted, with less than half of one percent variation, whether we are in a drought, or flood. The entire system south of Orlando, including Okeechobee Lake is being manipulated as a "reservoir" for agricultural uses, and not a natural lake and ecosystem.


It's been 25 years since my grandfather passed away - you sure do remind me of him. He told me a bunch of things that you are now blogging about.

Member Since: March 10, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 12170
1267. Patrap

The United Artists Theater in Detroit. (Yves Marchand and Romain Meffre)

The artifacts of a Oil Dependent society in slow decline.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1266. Dakster
Quoting 1262. WoodyFL:
Here's the complete paragraph of the article on an earlier entry from Wiki


The melt zone, where summer warmth turns snow and ice into slush and melt ponds of meltwater, has been expanding at an accelerating rate in recent years. When the meltwater seeps down through cracks in the sheet, it accelerates the melting and, in some areas, allows the ice to slide more easily over the bedrock below, speeding its movement to the sea. Besides contributing to global sea level rise, the process adds freshwater to the ocean, which may disturb ocean circulation and thus regional climate.[6] In July 2012, this melt zone covered 97 percent of the ice cover.[12] Ice cores show that events such as this occur approximately every 150 years on average. The last time a melt this large happened was in 1889. This particular melt may be part of cyclical behavior; however, Lora Koenig, a Goddard glaciologist suggested that "...if we continue to observe melting events like this in upcoming years, it will be worrisome."[13]


Why do people only print the portions they like in something and leave out the points they don't like?

i don't take a side in any of this but at least be fair. yah its a cycle but maybe we're helping it along


It's called SPIN. Remember the figures never lie, by liars always figure.
Member Since: March 10, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 12170
1265. Grothar
Quoting 1260. Tropicsweatherpr:
Hi Grothar. El Yunque rain forest got much less rain than the San Juan area.

See the July 18 rain event report here with graphic


Wow. That's hard to believe. I was trying to find out about el Yunque last night and found nothing.
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 74 Comments: 29896
1264. Kumo
Quoting 1162. GrandCaymanMed:
I fail to understand why people can't get past out-dated disproved beliefs and delusions.

AGW is happening. This shouldn't even be debated. Denying AGW is like claiming the Earth is flat. There is overwhelming scientific evidence!

I can't believe people are still so ignorant and delusional in THIS DAY and AGE, as to deny AGW. Are you kidding me????


The vast majority of people don't look up the data for themselves. These are also the kind of people that take political commentary for truth. I am not singling out any particular political party, because these kinds of people are on both sides of the spectrum. One thing that does not help is when we have a prominent Meteorologist state on Americas largest news network that he believes the climate to be cooling and that global warming is bad science. Unfortunately a great many of our people do not learn by being proactive, but instead by consequence. One thing that is certain in this world, is that we cannot force people to think a specific way or believe in something when they are already set in their ways.

Fixing our carbon pollution problem may not be as difficult as some might think, but I really think we need to stop looking at government to lay down the rules and regulations for us, because it is not working. If we really want to go forward with this, what is needed is to work within the system and have a working business model for CCS (Carbon Capture and Sequestration). Atmospheric CO2 can actually be recycled back into liquid hydrocarbons, used in a variety of manufacturing applications or stored for future use. Even though the technology is fairly new and expensive, it will get cheaper with R&D just like everything else.

We should get away from the notion of implementing carbon taxes and instead lobby for tax breaks to energy corporations that pursue CCS. As the technology improves, becomes cheaper and is miniaturized, manufacture a consumer sized "carbon capture tree" (contains bio-plastic material that absorbs CO2) that folks could set up on their own property. Scrubbed CO2 could then be sold to a manufacturer, energy corporation or turned into a recycling center in exchange for a tax write off.

The sooner we get to treating CO2 like a recyclable material, the closer we get to fixing our atmospheric CO2 imbalance.

I just wish that I was "Bill Gates rich", I'd get the ball rolling on this in a heartbeat.

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Quoting 1259. Dakster:


It is elevated now....

Water flows freely for at least part of the trail.


It's actually not nearly enough to handle the volume of water a storm could produce "if" we could send it south. Right now, everything defaults to sugar. In the last twenty years, they have had exactly the amount of water they wanted, with less than half of one percent variation, whether we are in a drought, or flood. The entire system south of Orlando, including Okeechobee Lake is being manipulated as a "reservoir" for agricultural uses, and not a natural lake and ecosystem.
Member Since: September 23, 2006 Posts: 1 Comments: 2920
1262. WoodyFL
Here's the complete paragraph of the article on an earlier entry from Wiki


The melt zone, where summer warmth turns snow and ice into slush and melt ponds of meltwater, has been expanding at an accelerating rate in recent years. When the meltwater seeps down through cracks in the sheet, it accelerates the melting and, in some areas, allows the ice to slide more easily over the bedrock below, speeding its movement to the sea. Besides contributing to global sea level rise, the process adds freshwater to the ocean, which may disturb ocean circulation and thus regional climate.[6] In July 2012, this melt zone covered 97 percent of the ice cover.[12] Ice cores show that events such as this occur approximately every 150 years on average. The last time a melt this large happened was in 1889. This particular melt may be part of cyclical behavior; however, Lora Koenig, a Goddard glaciologist suggested that "...if we continue to observe melting events like this in upcoming years, it will be worrisome."[13]


Why do people only print the portions they like in something and leave out the points they don't like?

i don't take a side in any of this but at least be fair. yah its a cycle but maybe we're helping it along
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1261. Morgana
Landcanes? Link
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Hi Grothar. El Yunque rain forest got much less rain than the San Juan area.

See the July 18 rain event report here with graphic
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1259. Dakster
Quoting 1256. indianrivguy:


One of the issues about sending water south, which we can't because it is too polluted, is that storm events volume would overtop Tamiami Trail. We did not understand, or realize the problems the Trail would create when it was built. The entire thing should have been built on pilings to allow unimpeded sheet flow to the south. Anyone driving on the Trail can easily observe how the south side is dead, and full is exotics in between the present culverts.


It is elevated now....

Water flows freely for at least part of the trail.
Member Since: March 10, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 12170
1258. ncstorm
CMC





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1257. Dakster
Quoting 1254. Grothar:


What do you think the crows eat?


Rotting flesh. Oh wait - you aren't bringing politicians...
Member Since: March 10, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 12170
Quoting 1246. Dakster:
Wondering how the new Tamiami Trail 'bridge'to reflood the everglades is going to work out with all this water. Will it be a good thing or a bad thing?

The Canals around me are all very high - and got higher because of the rains the past couple of days.

Just worried that the mad rush to release water will do more harm than good - in the short and long term. I don't mind some draining, it is the knee jerk overkill reaction that worries me the most.


One of the issues about sending water south, which we can't because it is too polluted, is that storm events volume would overtop Tamiami Trail. We did not understand, or realize the problems the Trail would create when it was built. The entire thing should have been built on pilings to allow unimpeded sheet flow to the south. Anyone driving on the Trail can easily observe how the south side is dead, and full of exotics in between the present culverts.
Member Since: September 23, 2006 Posts: 1 Comments: 2920
Quoting Dakster:


Can you swat the two mosquitos this time?


and the 2 cockroaches and 2 cane toads too
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1254. Grothar
Quoting 1253. Dakster:


Can you swat the two mosquitos this time?


What do you think the crows eat?
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 74 Comments: 29896
1253. Dakster
Quoting 1250. Grothar:


I'll just remember to bring more crows this time.


Can you swat the two mosquitos this time?
Member Since: March 10, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 12170


Stormhunter-NL
No words needed, shelf cloud over Chantelle-la-Vieille, France
18.07.2013

Source; infoclimat.fr
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1251. indianrivguy
3:07 PM GMT on July 19, 2013
Quoting 1241. Sfloridacat5:


I remember a few years ago when the water level was extremely low and you couldn't even use docks, boat ramps, etc on the lake.
Now there's too much water in the lake.
That's been the pattern for the past 15 years I've been living in S. Fl.


That drought, which Fay ended actually saved the lake. It was in a full bore collapse from nutrient overload and the drought fixed that by exposing littoral zones to the air, and plants grew there who's roots reached down into the sediment and burned up nitrogen and phosphorus. There is some 190,000 TONS of phosphorus in the sediments of Okeechobee lake.. enough for hundreds of years of farming. It is this P load, that makes it illegal to send the water into the Florida everglades until it is cleansed.
Member Since: September 23, 2006 Posts: 1 Comments: 2920
1250. Grothar
3:07 PM GMT on July 19, 2013
Quoting 1247. KEEPEROFTHEGATE:





build a boat a summon them two by two


I'll just remember to bring more crows this time.
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 74 Comments: 29896
1249. StormTrackerScott
3:06 PM GMT on July 19, 2013
Very deep convection rolling toward the Tampa Bay area.
Member Since: February 28, 2013 Posts: 24 Comments: 10851
1248. OracleDeAtlantis
3:00 PM GMT on July 19, 2013
Quoting 1153. LargoFl:
A: Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey estimate that If all of the ice sitting on land in Greenland and Antarctica melted it would cause global sea levels to rise by about 215 feet, or about 65 meters.
In other words, more than just Detroit would go bankrupt if there appeared, even a small fraction of this melting.

Can we afford to build 50' sea walls now, around all the major cities of our coasts? If the answer is no, then all this "fracking" we're doing needs to be changed to another word. We'll be energy independent, but totally screwed by Mother Nature, because the child conceived will be deformed by un-natural selection.

Is it impossible for the human condition to have a collective mind or brain? Is the proverbial Tower of Babel a real curse, acknowledged in myth thousands of years ago, but still inescapable today? "Mystery Babylon" is a good name for it, because even Forest Gump could figure this one out, but perhaps that magic isn't afforded to U.S. as a species. How is she destroyed in myth? Think about it, because the story says she does it to herself.

If not by a miracle, then who can doubt the needless deaths of millions, hundreds of millions, and even perhaps billions is staring U.S. in the face?

So I raise my cup today to the myth of suicide by fire, written thousands of years ago, because it was correct, in every sense of the word.


Member Since: August 27, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 571
1247. KEEPEROFTHEGATE
3:00 PM GMT on July 19, 2013
Quoting 1235. Grothar:


At a great cost. The everglades is already at a high level. The effect on the wildlife can be catastrophic. The deer need dry ground or they get hoof rot. Many birds nest on the ground and the eggs could become covered in water. It is a far for delicate ecosystem than people realize. If a "wet" storm were to come over the area it could be very serious.

Link





build a boat a summon them two by two
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 195 Comments: 61095
1246. Dakster
2:59 PM GMT on July 19, 2013
Wondering how the new Tamiami Trail 'bridge'to reflood the everglades is going to work out with all this water. Will it be a good thing or a bad thing?

The Canals around me are all very high - and got higher because of the rains the past couple of days.

Just worried that the mad rush to release water will do more harm than good - in the short and long term. I don't mind some draining, it is the knee jerk overkill reaction that worries me the most.
Member Since: March 10, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 12170
1245. CybrTeddy
2:55 PM GMT on July 19, 2013
Quoting 1239. Mikla:

I used to live on the Banana River in Merritt Island and watch the Shuttle, Delta and Atlas launches from my porch. Nothing like the sound of the Shuttle or Delta IV Heavy lifting off and rattling the doors and windows...


I was there last year for the Delta IV Heavy launch at KARS park, and the sound was insane, by far louder than any space shuttle launch I'd been to. It moved so slow too, so the sound just kept going for a good 4-5 minutes. What a way to celebrate the 44th anniversary of Apollo 11.
Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 25342
1244. weathermanwannabe
2:54 PM GMT on July 19, 2013
Quoting 1236. indianrivguy:


We pray for a drought.. it is the only way the St. Lucie estuary gets a chance to recover... and we lose biodiversity every time.. less and less comes back.


Same issue up here for Appalachee Bay Oysters; too much rain and water releases from the River dams and you loose that salty "sweetness" due to the normal balance between the fresh and saltwater.

However, in the big scheme of things, Mother Nature has been doing these cycles for decades and the estuaries are still there. The problem is Man altering the natural flows whether by dam or canal or polluting them with waste water, other pollutants and agricultural runoff.
Member Since: August 8, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 12004
1243. no1der
2:53 PM GMT on July 19, 2013
110,000yr is spelled with 4 zeroes not 7.
The Greenland Ice Sheet is a post-Pliocene feature. (ca. 3 million years).
Our atmospheric composition is now Pliocene (400ppm CO2).



Quoting 1233. DFWdad:


According to this Wiki Article, the ice in Greenland is as old as 110 million years, in other words is has not ever completed melted.

Member Since: June 5, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 668
1242. Skyepony
2:51 PM GMT on July 19, 2013
Quoting 1234. CybrTeddy:


Such a shame, I was out there with a nice gentlemen fishing at KARS park. We saw it light up from the pad (set off a few fires too by the looks of it, though it might have been hydrogen being burnt off). That's pretty much the go-to place for unmanned launches for locals. It's by far the best view you can get without paying. The view I thought was a lot like the shuttle, brought a tear to my eye.

That's one of my favorite local camping spots. Thanks for the pictures.
Member Since: August 10, 2005 Posts: 365 Comments: 42559
1241. Sfloridacat5
2:51 PM GMT on July 19, 2013
Quoting 1219. StormTrackerScott:
Some scary reports coming from S FL in regards to Lake Okeechobee water levels as they are the highest they have been in decades. There is a mad rush to drain some of the water out into the Everglades but at what cost will this happen.
Quoting 1219. StormTrackerScott:
Some scary reports coming from S FL in regards to Lake Okeechobee water levels as they are the highest they have been in decades. There is a mad rush to drain some of the water out into the Everglades but at what cost will this happen.


I remember a few years ago when the water level was extremely low and you couldn't even use docks, boat ramps, etc on the lake.
Now there's too much water in the lake.
That's been the pattern for the past 15 years I've been living in S. Fl.
Member Since: September 16, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 12154
1240. hydrus
2:50 PM GMT on July 19, 2013
Quoting 1237. Grothar:


I think he was being "facashious."
He was being like bread.? Edit..an attempt at humor..:)
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 26897

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Dr. Masters (r) co-founded wunderground in 1995. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters 1986-1990. Co-blogging with him: Bob Henson, @bhensonweather

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