Over 500 Killed in India's Monsoon Floods

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 4:25 PM GMT on June 21, 2013

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Earth's deadliest natural disaster so far in 2013 is the deadly flooding in India's Himalayan Uttarakhand region, where torrential monsoon rains have killed at least 556 people, with hundreds more feared dead. At least 5,000 people are missing. According to the Indian Meteorological Department, Uttarakhand received more than three times (329%) of its normal June rainfall from June 1 - 21, and rainfall was 847% of normal during the week June 13 - 19. Satellite estimates indicate that more than 20" (508 mm) or rain fell in a 7-day period from June 11 - 17 over some regions of Uttarakhand, which lies just to the west of Nepal in the Himalayas. Dehradun, the capital of Uttarakhand, received 14.57" (370 mm) of rain in 24 hours on June 16 - 17. This was the highest 24-hour rainfall in city history, according to an official from the India Meteorological Department. Dr. Dave Petley's Landslide Blog details that the torrential rains triggered a massive landslide that hit Uttarakhand's Hindu shrine in Kedarnath, which lies just a short distance from the snout of two mountain glaciers. The shrine is an important pilgrimage destination this time of year, and was packed with visitors celebrating the char-dham yatra: a pilgrimage to the four holy sites of Gangotri, Kedarnath, Yamnotri and Badrinath. Apparently, heavy rainfall triggered a collapse event on the mountain above Kedarnath, which turned into a debris flow downstream that struck the town. The main temple was heavily damaged, and numerous buildings in the town were demolished. It was Earth's deadliest landslide since the August 2010 Zhouqu landslide in China.

According to Aon Benfield's May Catastrophe Report, Earth's deadliest natural disasters of 2013 so far:

Winter weather, India, Bangladesh, Nepal, 1/1 - 1/20, 329 deaths
Earthquake, China, 4/20, 196 deaths
Flooding, Southern Africa, 1/10 - 2/28, 175 deaths
Flooding, Argentina, 4/2 - 4/4, 70 deaths
Flooding, Kenya, 3/10 - 4/30, 66 deaths


Figure 1. Indo-Tibetan Border Police (ITBP) arrive to rescue stranded Sikh devotees from Hemkunt Sahib Gurudwara, a religious Sikh temple, to a safe place in Chamoli district, in northern Indian state of Uttarakhand, India, Monday, June 17, 2013. AP photo.


Figure 2. Satellite-estimated rainfall for the 7-day period June 11 - 17, 2013, from NASA's TRMM satellite exceeded 20 inches (508 mm) over portions of India's Uttarakhand province, leading to catastrophic floods. Image credit: NASA.

A record early arrival of the monsoon
The June 2013 monsoon rains in Uttarakhand were highly unusual, as the monsoon came to the region two weeks earlier than normal. The monsoon started in South India near the normal June 1 arrival date, but then advanced across India in unusually rapid fashion, arriving in Pakistan along the western border of India on June 16, a full month earlier than normal. This was the fastest progression of the monsoon on record. The previous record for fastest monsoon progression occurred in 1961, when all of India was under monsoon conditions by June 21. Reliable monsoon records go back to 1961, and are patchy before then. Fortunately, no more heavy rain is expected in Uttarakhand over the next few days, as the monsoon will be active only in eastern India. Heavy rains are expected again in the region beginning on June 24. Wunderblogger Lee Grenci's post, Summer Monsoon Advances Rapidly across India: Massive Flooding Ensues, has more detail on the meteorology of this year's monsoon. There is criticism from some that the devastating floods were not entirely a natural disaster--human-caused deforestation, dam building, and mining may have contributed. "Large-scale construction of dams and absence of environmental regulations has led to the floods," said Sunita Narian, director general of Delhi based advocacy group Centre for Science and Environment (CSE).


Figure 3. The summer monsoon arrived in southwest India right on schedule (June 1) in South India, but it spread northward much faster than usual, reaching Pakistan a full month earlier than normal. Solid green contours indicate the progress of the 2013 summer monsoon (each contour is labeled with a date). You can compare this year's rapid advance to a "normal" progression, which is represented by the dashed, red contours (also labeled with dates).

Monsoons in India: a primer
Disastrous monsoon floods are common in India and surrounding nations, and 60,000 people--an average of 500 people per year--died in India due to monsoon floods between 1900 - 2012, according to EM-DAT, the International Disaster Database. EM-DAT lists sixteen flood disasters which killed 1,000 or more people in India since records began in 1950. Here are the number of people killed in these events, along with the month and year of occurrence and locales affected:

4892, Jul 1968, Rajasthan, Gujara
3800, Jul 1978, North, Northeast
2001, May - Oct, 1994, Assam, Arunachal Pradesh
2000, Jul 1961, North
1811, Aug 1998, Assam, Arunachal, Bihar
1600, Aug 1980, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar
1591, Jul 28, 1989, Maharashtra, Andhra Prade
1479, Sep 1995, Bihar, Haryana, Punjab
1442, Aug 1997, Andhra Pradesh, Arunachal
1200, Jul 24 - Aug 5, 2005 Gujarat, Madhya Pradesh
1200, Aug 1987, Assam, Bihar, West Bengal
1103, Jul 3 - Sep 22, 2007, Bihar, Uttar Pradesh
1063, Jun 11 - Jul 21, 2008 West Bengal, Orissa
1023, Jun 1971, North
1000, Sep 22 - Oct 9, 1988, Punjab, Himachal Pradesh
1000, Oct 1961

The monsoon occurs in summer, when the sun warms up land areas more strongly than ocean areas. This happens because wind and ocean turbulence mix the ocean's absorbed heat into a "mixed layer" approximately 50 meters deep, whereas on land, the sun's heat penetrates at a slow rate to a limited depth. Furthermore, due to its molecular properties, water has the ability to absorb more heat than the solid materials that make up land. As a result of this summertime differential heating of land and ocean, a low pressure region featuring rising air develops over land areas. Moisture-laden ocean winds blow towards the low pressure region and are drawn upwards once over land. The rising air expands and cools, condensing its moisture into some of the heaviest rains on Earth--the monsoon. Monsoons operate via the same principle as the familiar summer afternoon sea breeze, but on a grand scale. Each summer, monsoons affect every continent on Earth except Antarctica, and are responsible for life-giving rains that sustain the lives of billions of people. In India, home for over 1.1 billion people, the monsoon provides 80% of the annual rainfall. The most deadly flooding events usually come from monsoon depressions (also known as monsoon lows.) A monsoon depression is similar to (but larger than) a tropical depression. Both are spinning storms hundreds of kilometers in diameter with sustained winds of 50 - 55 kph (30 - 35 mph), nearly calm winds at their center, and generate very heavy rains. Typically, 6 - 7 monsoon depressions form each summer over the Bay of Bengal and track westwards across India.

The future of monsoons in India
A warming climate loads the dice in favor of heavier extreme precipitation events. This occurs because more water vapor can evaporate into a warmer atmosphere, increasing the chances of record heavy downpours. In a study published in Science in 2006, Goswami et al. found that the level of heavy rainfall activity in the monsoon over India had more than doubled in the 50 years since the 1950s, leading to an increased disaster potential from heavy flooding. Moderate and weak rain events decreased during those 50 years, leaving the total amount of rain deposited by the monsoon roughly constant. The authors commented, "These findings are in tune with model projections and some observations that indicate an increase in heavy rain events and a decrease in weak events under global warming scenarios." We should expect to see an increased number of disastrous monsoon floods in coming decades if the climate continues to warm as expected. Since the population continues to increase at a rapid rate in the region, death tolls from monsoon flooding disasters are likely to climb dramatically in coming decades. However, my greater concern for India is drought. The monsoon rains often fail during El Niño years, and more than 4.2 million people died in India due to droughts between 1900 - 2012. Up until the late 1960s, it was common for the failure of the monsoon rains to kill millions of people in India. The drought of 1965 - 1967 killed at least 1.5 million people. However, since the Green Revolution of the late 1960s--a government initiative to improve food self-sufficiency using new technology and high-yield grains--failure of the monsoon rains has not led to mass starvation in India. It is uncertain whether of not the Green Revolution can keep up with India's booming population, and the potential that climate change might bring more severe droughts. Climate models show a wide range of possibilities for the future of the Indian monsoon, and it is unclear at present what the future might hold. However, the fact that one of the worst droughts in India's history occurred in 2009 shows that serious droughts have to be a major concern for the future. The five worst Indian monsoons along with the rainfall deficits for the nation:

1) 1877, -33%
2) 1899, -29%
3) 1918, -25%
4) 1972, -24%
5) 2009, -22%

References
Goswami, et al., 2006, " Increasing Trend of Extreme Rain Events Over India in a Warming Environment", Science, 1 December 2006:Vol. 314. no. 5804, pp. 1442 - 1445 DOI: 10.1126/science.1132027

Wunderground's climate change blogger Dr. Ricky Rood wrote a nice 3-part series about the challenges India faces due to climate change after he completed a 2009 trip there.


Video 1. Flood waters claim a multi-story apartment building in Uttarakhand province, India, on June 17, 2013.

Historic flooding in Calgary, Alberta
Torrential rainfall on Wednesday night and Thursday has resulted in the most extensive flooding in Alberta Province, Canada in at least 8 years, with some 100,000 people facing evacuations in the city of Calgary. Wunderblogger Christopher C. Burt has a look at the disaster in his latest post. The floods are due, in part to the "stuck" jet stream pattern that brought record heat to Alaska this week.

Jeff Masters

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Everyone have a great weekend; I am going to do some fishing this weekend with no disturbances in the Gulf and nothing spinning up on the models on the Atlantic end. Speaking of the models, and I missed this from May15th, big improvements coming to the GFS model from supplemental funding to NOAA from the TS Sandy relief package improve forecasting.

Here is an excerpt from the article and the full link is below.

The $23.7 million in improvements to NWS’s forecasting systems from the Sandy supplemental will facilitate a more than ten-fold increase in the capacity of the supercomputer running the GFS model.

“This is an extraordinarily positive development and will give the National Weather Service the potential to lead the world in numerical weather prediction,” Mass said in an email Tuesday.

In technical terms, the computing capacity will ramp up from 213 teraflops to 2,600 teraflops by the 2015 fiscal year according to the NWS. (Teraflops are simply a measure of the number of trillion calculations the computer can perform per second.) The NWS expects ECWMF’s supercomputer to have a capacity of 2,217 teraflops at that same time.


Link

See Yall on Monday...................WW
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Quoting HurricaneAndre:
SPECIAL HURRICANE SEASON FORECAST
19-23 storms
13-15 hurricanes
9-13 major hurricanes


woah woah woah.

Is this your forecast? Or someone elses?

Also are you expecting a record number of major hurricanes? On what basis?
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Quoting WxGeekVA:


Curious to see what happens when that T-wave analyzed on OPC interacts with our AOI off the SE coast.



That wave is supposed to cross Florida and enter the NE Gulf.

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Quoting CybrTeddy:


I consider "la la" land to be over 240 hours out, this is just the "long range" for me and it's showing development occurring by 6-7 days. Something to watch.


Anytime the resolution in the model decreases, I start to consider it la-la land.

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Quoting MississippiWx:
It's GFS la la land, but the anticyclonic flow over the Gulf at the time of the projected storm is very impressive.



I consider "la la" land to be over 240 hours out, this is just the "long range" for me and it's showing development occurring by 6-7 days. Something to watch.
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SPECIAL HURRICANE SEASON FORECAST
19-23 storms
13-15 hurricanes
9-13 major hurricanes
Member Since: June 11, 2013 Posts: 19 Comments: 2584
Quoting WxGeekVA:


Curious to see what happens when that T-wave analyzed on OPC interacts with our AOI off the SE coast.



Forecasters seem to be having some difficulty with it, our rain chances (Lantana) are all over the place.
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It's GFS la la land, but the anticyclonic flow over the Gulf at the time of the projected storm is very impressive.

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Quoting Jedkins01:


You'd rather be in the snow? Sick! Sounds like you are one of those classic grass is greener on the other side Floridians. Go ahead and leave, you'll be begging to get away from the cold and be back to Florida in no time :)

Uh...the grass IS greener on the other side. Of course, it is Astroturf...
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Great Lakes - Rainbow Loop

click image for Loop

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Curious to see what happens when that T-wave analyzed on OPC interacts with our AOI off the SE coast.

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#194 -

Well, at least something's working...
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Quoting GTcooliebai:
Perfect timing too! This one might be the strongest yet.


well that would be interesting I'll check back in soon like in about 30min-an hour
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Welcome to the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) spacecraft status page. This site provides up to date status information on each spacecraft and its various subsystems.

Active Spacecraft and Operational Status
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Operational Status
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GOES 12

South America GREEN

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Operational East GREEN

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Operational West GREEN
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Quoting MississippiWx:
The vorticity at 850mb has consolidated since the last update on CIMSS.

-3hr:



Current:

What are you talking about.
Member Since: June 11, 2013 Posts: 19 Comments: 2584
12z CMC is also showing a cyclone off the Yucatan, different time and different path however. We'll see what the 18z GFS shows.
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The vorticity at 850mb in association with the SE coast trough split has consolidated since the last update on CIMSS.

-3hr:



Current:

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189. whitewabit (Mod)
Quoting MrMixon:


Kevan Yaets swims after his cat Momo to safety in High River, Alta. on Thursday June 20, 2013. (Jordan Verlage / THE CANADIAN PRESS)




(Jordan Verlage / THE CANADIAN PRESS)


I was tryna' break my stream crossing record. Put me down! I'll kill you!!




Very un-happy cat !!
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Quoting wunderkidcayman:
hey guys sorry I was not able to get back to you till now just got internet I see we had TS Barry and we may get the next one soon by that time I'll be back home in Cayman
Perfect timing too! This one might be the strongest yet.
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Didn't mind them wuppin' up on the baby bears at all, tougher stretch coming up Rangers to finish home stand, then after Houston on to A's, then Albert & Anaheim. Trying to get you wet on commute, almost to Soy City/72. Have a good hot, humid C IL weekend!
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Quoting barbamz:


No, I don't think those supercells are a new phenomena in Europe/Germany.


For yonzabam: I just see that for the UK this question already has been discussed in several blogs, f.e. here:

Link

The UK sometimes gets them too.

Quite a long video:


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hey guys sorry I was not able to get back to you till now just got internet I see we had TS Barry and we may get the next one soon by that time I'll be back home in Cayman
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I have to admit one of the more surprising things I've learned in the last year or two reading this blog is how much more catastrophic droughts are (in both dollars and lives) than hurricanes and tornadoes combined.

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New Orleans
NEXRAD Radar

Base Reflectivity 0.50° Elevation
Range 124 NMI

Another T storm Gust Front inbound to the S Shore almost exactly like yesterday.

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For many the ECMWF is the best model for tropical cyclones for me its the GFS it has always been,I had been a fan of the gfs since ever in its rights and wrongs.
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Quoting JasonWins33:

Nice spin off SOUTH CAROLINA !!

Though weak it does have a nice spin
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Quoting Dakster:
I just love weather. It is snowing in Montana and we are burning up in Miami....


Only problem is that I am in Miami and right now I'd rather be in snow in Montana.



You'd rather be in the snow? Sick! Sounds like you are one of those classic grass is greener on the other side Floridians. Go ahead and leave, you'll be begging to get away from the cold and be back to Florida in no time :)
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Quoting Patrap:
Bragg Creek Alberta Floods 6-20-2013



This is exactly what you are warned not to do. This was very stupid and could have gotten them both killed.
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Quoting yonzabam:


That first photo is a classic US Midwest supercell. I didn't think we got them in Europe. We certainly don't get them in the UK. Anyone know how rare these systems are in Europe?


No, I don't think those supercells are a new phenomena in Europe/Germany. But those spectacular views get stronger attention now - because of the new tools in the age of internet and digital photography and because of the leading example of the US. A lot of people are stormchasing now in Germany, too. And when some years back Germans were shy to speak of a "tornado" in Germany, using vocabs like "whirlwind", they are now more confident to name it. Our weather is not as boring as some may think, lol.

Selection of the best user photos from the storms in Germany yesterday.
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#169 Mr.Mixon -
You're a good man Mr. Kevan Yaets. And Momo does appreciate your efforts, or will, as soon as she's done blaming you for letting it happen in the first place.
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Quoting Dakster:
I just love weather. It is snowing in Montana and we are burning up in Miami....


Only problem is that I am in Miami and right now I'd rather be in snow in Montana.



Ah yes, a day or two - perhaps a week - enjoying the chill, the frostyness...then I can't wait to get back to the heat. Florida boy, through and through.
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Quoting mikatnight:


FYI - the odds of that happening are 321,732,466.257964 to 1 Against.

Also - 78.7% of all statistics are made up on the spot.


And 4 out of every 3 people have problems with fractions.
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I just love weather. It is snowing in Montana and we are burning up in Miami....


Only problem is that I am in Miami and right now I'd rather be in snow in Montana.

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Quoting cynyc2:
No, it doesn't vaporize, it emerges off of the west coast of Africa as a wave and starts the cycle all over again...


FYI - the odds of that happening are 321,732,466.257964 to 1 Against.

Also - 78.7% of all statistics are made up on the spot.
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Toll now 556 in Uttarakhand; after rain, hunger begins to kill

HT Correspondents, Agencies Dehradun/Haridwar/New Delhi, June 21, 2013

First Published: 12:28 IST(21/6/2013)


It truly is a Himalayan tragedy, the scale of which is unfolding as rescuers begin to reach areas that had remained inaccessible so far. But as Uttarakhand comes to terms with one calamity, another tragedy seems to be in the making - there are reports of flood victims dying of hunger.

As feared the death toll in the flash floods and landslides that ravaged the Himalayan state on June 16 went up on Friday. Official figures put the dead at 556.

As many as 48 bodies were found floating on the Ganges in Haridwar district.

Survivors are bringing with them tales of horror and desperation. Lalit Pant, a football coach from Meerut who with his family trekked through a dense forest for six days, said there were around 1,000 corpses lying along the jungle route from Kedarnath to Ukhimath. Most of them, he said, had died of hunger and dehydration.

"We too would've met the same fate had we been late even by a few hours in reaching here", the 47-year-old told HT over the phone from Ukhimath in Rudraprayag district.

Pant said he was forced to push 300 corpses into the swollen Mandakini along his route as the bodies had begun to decay and there was a fear of epidemic. As many as 15,000-20,000 people are still stranded in the Kedar valley.

Speaking to HT, SSP Rajeev Swaroop said, "In all about 48 bodies have been traced at different locations in Ganga. We have recovered 15 bodies so far including one of a woman and the process of recovering bodies is still on. These have been kept at Rishikul ayurvedic college morchery. Identification of these bodies is a challenge since they are swollen up, and badly damaged."

Chief minister Vijay Bahuguna, who gave the updated death toll, said 556 bodies were recovered from under the debris. He told CNN-IBN "556 bodies have been recovered and there were reports that more could be buried under the debris."

He also said it would take another 15 days to complete the evacuation, adding "this kind of disaster has never happened in the Himalayan history".

Earlier, the Union home minister Sushilkumar Shinde put the official death count at 207 and expressed fears that the figure might go up as the army carried on clearing the debris.


A survivor pleads with a soldier to allow him to board a helicopter Badrinath in Uttarakhand. (Reuters)


So far, the agencies have rescued 34,000 people, Shine said and announced appointment of former Union home secretary VK Duggal as the nodal officer to coordinate relief and rescue operations.

About 50,000-odd people are still trapped, he said. Rescuing them is the biggest challenge in the face of apprehensions that there could be another bout of nonstop rain anytime, sources said.

The number of dead is suspected to be much higher. Locals and those involved in rescue say many thousands of people remain unaccounted for. More than 32,000 people are still stranded.

Thirteen more Indian Air Force helicopters joined the rescue operations on Friday, taking to 43 the number of choppers rescuing people. Ten private helicopters are also in use.

Air Marshal SB Deo, Director General Air (Operations), said in Delhi that they were stepping up rescue and relief operations as there were indications of inclement weather after next 48 hours.

"We have a window of 48 hours to do rescue and relief work," he said.
While admitting that difficult terrain was posing a challenge, the Centre said IAF choppers had conducted 241 sorties so far.

After a briefing by the group of ministers (GoM) in the afternoon, government's chief spokesperson Neelam Kapur held a second briefing in the evening to give an update on rescue operations.

The IAF has moved to forward bases, including Guptkashi and Pitthoragarh, to evacuate stranded people while the Border Roads Organization had also stepped up efforts to restore access to some of the worst-affected regions.

The IAF deployed 13 more aircraft for relief and rescue work, taking to 43 the total number of planes in operation.

The aircraft including IAF's heavylift Mi-26 helicopters -- the world's largest chopper -- for transporting fuel and heavy equipment required by the Border Roads Organisation (BRO) to clear roads closed due to landslide and also set up an airbridge in one affected area to pull out stranded persons.
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Kevan Yaets swims after his cat Momo to safety in High River, Alta. on Thursday June 20, 2013. (Jordan Verlage / THE CANADIAN PRESS)




(Jordan Verlage / THE CANADIAN PRESS)


I was tryna' break my stream crossing record. Put me down! I'll kill you!!


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Quoting 62901IL:

lol. It would go from the atlantic to the caribean, to the epac, to the cpac, to the wpac, to the indian ocean and it would end its journey where it started if it wasn't vaporized by the desert in Africa.
No, it doesn't vaporize, it emerges off of the west coast of Africa as a wave and starts the cycle all over again...
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The CMC is agreeing the GFS.
Member Since: June 11, 2013 Posts: 19 Comments: 2584
Quoting barbamz:
BBC weather video about Canada: Deluge causes devastation

Shortage of different crazy weather news? No way!

BBC weather video: Winter storm batters New Zealand
21 June 2013 Last updated at 13:45 Help
As parts of New Zealand see their worst winter weather for decades, BBC Weather's Phil Avery has more on just how bad it's been.

Who needs hurricanes any longer to get very severe weather? ;)

I do. I loooooooooove tracking hurricanes.
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165. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
Japan Meteorological Agency
Tropical Cyclone Advisory #17
TROPICAL STORM BEBINCA (T1305)
3:00 AM JST June 22 2013
=====================================

SUBJECT: Category One Typhoon Named Cyclone In South China Sea

At 18:00 PM UTC, Tropical Storm Bebinca (994 hPa) near 19.0N 112.5E has 10 minute sustained winds of 35 knots with gusts of 50 knots. The cyclone is reported as moving west at 13 knots.

Dvorak Intensity: T2.5

Gale Force Winds
================
150 NM from the center in east quadrant
120 NM from the center in west quadrant

Forecast and Intensity
=======================
24 HRS: 20.0N 108.9E - 35 knots (CAT 1/Tropical Storm) Gulf Of Tonkin
48 HRS: 21.2N 107.7E - 35 knots (CAT 1/Tropical Storm) Gulf Of Tonkin
72 HRS: 23.4N 107.6E - Tropical Depression Overland Southern China

Additional Information
=======================
In this forecast BEBINCA is close to making landfall over Hainan Island as it moves towards the west.
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Quoting hurricanes2018:
DO YOU SEE A SPIN OFF THE EAST COAST HERE.


Its a weak upper low associated with the coastal trough thats parked just offshore. It will be retrograding inland this weekend, so no possiblity for anything to develop.
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BBC weather video about Canada: Deluge causes devastation

Shortage of different crazy weather news? No way!

BBC weather video: Winter storm batters New Zealand
21 June 2013 Last updated at 13:45 Help
As parts of New Zealand see their worst winter weather for decades, BBC Weather's Phil Avery has more on just how bad it's been.

Who needs hurricanes any longer to get very severe weather? ;)
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Quoting Patrap:
Published on Jun 21, 2013



Calgary Flooding June 21,2013 from Scots man's hill overlooking Stampede Ground. 1 in 200 year event for the 2nd time in 7 years. The co fluency of the Elbow and Bow is a kilometre or so from here.



Yes. The 2005 floods were bad but this is the worst flood in the cities modern history. The Glenmore Reservoir is straining capacity. I'm worried about the old dam but it seems to be holding up well so far.

Thankfully the city never allowed anyone to build in the city owned wetlands and overflow areas of the reservoir. And the rest of the wetlands are on native lands so no dense buildings / roads there either.
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real question is do they have more bugs than people who dont spray? idont think so. stopping the runoff is impossible so the only answer is no spray.
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Quoting ILwthrfan:


And a competent coach would not hurt as well...lol. He will have to sit out a year, but this year will be rough. We just have absolutely no line whatsoever.

Cliff Alexander visited Groce and company today. #4 recruit in the country according to rivals. We are one in ten on his list, most have us pegged as No. 3 currently behind MSU and Kansas, but I would not be surprised if Groce reeled him in for 2014.

I'm sitting here in Decatur, and they still have no rain in the forecast for this evening and that was updated at 3pm. Storms are grinding to a halt though, should be interesting evening for me, I'll take all the rain I can get.

I see the Cardinals are still reigning over everyone in baseball. Unreal the run they have had over the last decade or so.


Yup! Go Cardinals! I miss going to games at Busch Stadium III, though...
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Summer solstice..................... snow


ADMINISTRATIVE MESSAGE
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MISSOULA MT
935 AM MDT FRI JUN 21 2013

TO ALL WFOS SURROUNDING WFO MSO
FM WFO MSO

WFO MSO HAS ISSUED A HEADS-UP EMAIL TO OUR EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT
COMMUNITY AND OTHER PARTNERS.

EMAIL TOPIC...NWS MISSOULA - LIGHT SNOW TONIGHT OVER LOST TRAIL PASS

...REASONING IN EMAIL...
1-3 INCHES OF SNOW IS LIKELY ABOVE 6500 FEET THIS EVENING THROUGH
SATURDAY MORNING. ROAD SURFACES COULD BECOME SNOW COVERED AND ICY
FOR A TIME, IMPACTING THE TRAVELING PUBLIC.
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158. whitewabit (Mod)
Quoting islander101010:
neighbors use pesticide companys to spray their lawns first good rain most of it washes off into the mosquito lagoon. i can see this being forbidden in the future.


What are they spraying for ?? Most lawn company's spray a herbicide on but haven't heard of the spraying for pests that would fall under Pest Control !
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About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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