Tropical Storm Barry Forms

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 7:49 PM GMT on June 19, 2013

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Data from the Air Force Hurricane Hunters this afternoon indicates that Tropical Storm Barry has formed in the extreme southern Gulf of Mexico. The aircraft measured winds at their flight level of 1000 feet as high as 47 mph, which implies winds of at least 40 mph at the surface, using the usual 10% reduction rule for winds measured at 1000 feet. Barry has a small but growing area of heavy thunderstorms, as seen on satellite loops. The thunderstorms are steadily showing more organization this afternoon, and low-level spiral bands have begun to appear. Wind shear was a moderate 15 knots on Wednesday afternoon, but is expected to fall to the light range, 5 - 10 knots, during the 12 hours before landfall. Barry is taking a very similar track Tropical Storm Marco of 2008. That storm spun up quickly in the Bay of Campeche and developed sustained winds of 65 mph before making landfall in Veracruz State of Mexico. Small storms like Barry and Marco (which was the smallest tropical storm ever recorded in the Atlantic) can experience very rapid fluctuations in intensity. The Bay of Campeche is a region where the topography aids the spin-up of tropical cyclones, and I expect Barry will have time to attain sustained winds of 65 mph before making landfall late Thursday morning or early Thursday afternoon near Veracruz, Mexico. However, since the storm is so small, these winds would affect only a very small portion of the coast. Heavy rain will be the main threat from Barry, regardless of whether or not it makes landfall as a weak or strong tropical storm. A ridge of high pressure over the Gulf of Mexico should keep any of Barry's rains from reaching the U.S. Elsewhere in the tropical Atlantic, none of the reliable computer models is showing tropical cyclone development in the next seven days.


Figure 1. MODIS satellite image of Tropical Storm Barry at 12:40 pm EDT June 19, 2013. Image credit: NASA.

Barry's place in history
Barry is the second named storm of June 2013, and its formation date of June 19 is a full six weeks earlier than the usual August 1 date of formation of the season's second storm. Only two hurricane seasons since 1851 have had as many as three tropical storms form in June: 1936 and 1968. The formation of two Gulf of Mexico storms so early in the year does not necessarily suggest that we will have an active hurricane season. June storms forming in the Caribbean and Tropical Atlantic are typically a harbinger of an active hurricane season, though.

The formation of Tropical Storm Andrea and now Tropical Storm Barry in June continues a pattern of an unusually large number of early-season Atlantic named storms we've seen in recent years. Climatologically, June is the second quietest month of the Atlantic hurricane season, behind November. During the period 1870 - 2012, we averaged one named storm every two years in June, and 0.7 named storms per year during May and June. In the nineteen years since the current active hurricane period began in 1995, there have been sixteen June named storms (if we include 2013's Tropical Storm Andrea and Tropical Storm Barry.) June activity has nearly doubled since 1995, and May activity has more than doubled (there were seventeen May storms in the 75-year period 1870 - 1994, compared to six in the nineteen-year period 1995 - 2013.) Some of this difference can be attributed to observation gaps, due to the lack of satellite data before 1966. However, even during the satellite era, we have seen an increase in both early season (May - June) and late season (November - December) Atlantic tropical storms. Dr. Jim Kossin of the University of Wisconsin looked at the reasons for this in a 2008 paper titled, "Is the North Atlantic hurricane season getting longer?" He concluded that there is a "apparent tendency toward more common early- and late-season storms that correlates with warming Sea Surface Temperature but the uncertainty in these relationships is high." He found that hurricane season for both the period 1950-2007 and 1980-2007 got longer by 5 - 10 days per decade (see my blog post on the paper.)

Portlight receives $25K grant to help victims of Oklahoma tornadoes
The disaster relief charity founded by members of the wunderground community, Portlight.org, announced this week that they had received a $25,000 grant from Americares.org to replace wheelchairs, scooters, ramps and other equipment lost or damaged in the May and June 2013 storms in Oklahoma. About 200 Oklahomans with mobility issues are expected to benefit over the next 45 days. The program is an extension of a partnership that began earlier this year to install ramps for New Jersey residents affected by Superstorm Sandy. It was also announced earlier this month that Portlight and the American Red Cross have signed a Letter of Agreement to work together in disaster response, in order to improve shelter accessibility and share resources and information.Visit Portlight's wunderground blog to learn more or to donate to this worthy cause.


Figure 2. Portlight volunteers hard at work in Moore, Oklahoma, after the devastating May 20, 2013 tornado.

Jeff Masters

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Barry went from 10mph to 6mph in it's forward speed, somewhat of a slow down.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
The last three center passes...with an hour between each pass...have been within 5 miles of each other. Barry has hit the brakes...and hard.


I'm going to be honest, initially when you were calling for than TD2 to become Barry i was quite skeptical. At that time, TD2 appeared to be dying slowly in the interior of the Yucatan Peninsula, and it was drifting WNW. However after a surprising and subtle jog to the NNW and some tightening of the circulation as it left the coastline, i must say that you called this correctly. I am going to give credit where credit is due, i was correct about Andrea going into the Big Bend, although i didn't expect it to intensify that quickly and get that strong. But in my mind although not portrayed by my neutral posts i was clearly wrong about this system, i did not expect nothing more than a Tropical Depression. So i guess, you may serve me my fried crow.

If what you say is true, and Barry really is slowing down, it may just have a chance of becoming our first hurricane. It has already proved me and many others wrong once.
Member Since: May 1, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 776
Quoting Tazmanian:
this is not going too be a vary good season bret was olny 40mph and made landfall in the same place if BARRY is really has 45mph winds that means it has this sure pass bret in 2005 wish means this year storms are looking stronger then the ones in 2005

Link

I just looked to see how strong Bret got :P
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118. yoboi
Quoting Tazmanian:
this is not going too be a vary good season bret was olny 40mph and made landfall in the same place if BARRY is really has 45mph winds that means it has this sure pass bret in 2005 wish means this year storms are looking stronger then the ones in 2005

Link



Taz I am on pace with my numbers........
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Quoting islander101010:
donna gave central florida a wacking similiar i believe to charlie


Ironic that you compared the two storms, when I just read this:

"Nobel Prize-winner John Steinbeck wrote about Hurricane Donna in his 1962 non-fiction memoir Travels with Charley: In Search of America. Steinbeck had had a truck fitted with a custom camper-shell for a journey he intended to take across the United States, accompanied by his poodle Charlie. He planned on leaving after Labor Day from his home in Sag Harbor, Long Island, New York. Steinbeck delayed his trip slightly due to Donna, which made a direct hit on Long Island. Steinbeck wrote of saving his boat during the middle of the hurricane, during which he jumped into the water and was blown to shore clinging to a fallen branch driven by the high winds. It was an exploit which foreshadowed his fearless, or even reckless, state of mind to dive into the unknown.
The winds of Donna can be seen in the feature film Blast of Silence (1961); a fist fight scene on Long Island had been previously scheduled, and the filmmakers decided to go ahead and shoot the exterior scene despite the hurricane.
"
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Well, I thought it would've been 45mph based off of the past vortex messages, but it stays at 40mph.

...RECONNAISSANCE PLANE FINDS THE SECOND TROPICAL STORM OF THE 2013 HURRICANE SEASON...
4:00 PM CDT Wed Jun 19
Location: 19.6°N 95.2°W
Moving: W at 6 mph
Min pressure: 1005 mb
Max sustained: 40 mph
Member Since: March 16, 2012 Posts: 127 Comments: 7972
.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
The last three center passes...with an hour between each pass...have been within 5 miles of each other. Barry has hit the brakes...and hard.


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TROPICAL STORM BARRY DISCUSSION NUMBER 10
NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL AL022013
400 PM CDT WED JUN 19 2013

SATELLITE IMAGERY AND DATA FROM AN AIR FORCE RECONNAISSANCE PLANE
INDICATE THAT THE TROPICAL DEPRESSION IN THE SOUTHERN BAY OF
CAMPECHE STRENGTHENED AND IS NOW TROPICAL STORM BARRY...THE SECOND
NAMED CYCLONE OF THE 2013 SEASON. SFMR AND FLIGHT-LEVEL WINDS FROM
THE AIRCRAFT YIELD AN INITIAL INTENSITY OF 35 KNOTS. SOME SFMR
VALUES WERE A LITTLE HIGHER...BUT THESE WINDS WERE RAIN
CONTAMINATED AND WERE DISCARDED. THERE IS A CHANCE FOR BARRY TO
STRENGTHEN SLIGHTLY JUST BEFORE LANDFALL DURING THE NEXT 12 TO 18
HOURS. RAPID WEAKENING IS ANTICIPATED AFTER THE CENTER MOVES
INLAND...BUT RAINS WILL CONTINUE.

BARRY HAS BEEN MOVING WESTWARD ABOUT 5 TO 10 KNOTS DURING THE DAY...
AND THIS GENERAL MOTION WITH A DECREASE IN FORWARS SPEED IS
FORECAST TO CONTINUE UNTIL LANDFALL. ONCE INLAND...AND THE CENTER
BECOMES DISRUPTED BY THE HIGH TERRAIN...THE REMNANT CIRCULATION
WILL LIKELY CONTINUE WESTWARD OVER THE STATE OF VERACRUZ UNTIL
DISSIPATION. GLOBAL MODELS HAVE A NARROW RIDGE OF HIGH PRESSURE
OVER THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO...AND THIS FLOW PATTERN IS
CONSISTENT WITH THE FORECAST WESTWARD MOTION OF THE TROPICAL STORM.

IT IS IMPORTANT TO EMPHASIZE THAT REGARDLESS OF THE EXACT TRACK AND
WHETHER THE CYCLONE STRENGTHENS...THE MAIN THREAT WILL BE HEAVY
RAINFALL...WHICH COULD CAUSE SIGNIFICANT FLOODING OVER A LARGE
PORTION OF SOUTHERN MEXICO PRIMARILY IN THE STATE OF VERACRUZ DURING
THE NEXT COUPLE OF DAYS. SO PLEASE DO NOT FOCUS ON THE EXACT CENTER
LOCATION OF THE CYCLONE.




FORECAST POSITIONS AND MAX WINDS

INIT 19/2100Z 19.6N 95.2W 35 KT 40 MPH
12H 20/0600Z 19.6N 96.2W 40 KT 45 MPH
24H 20/1800Z 19.6N 97.0W 25 KT 30 MPH...INLAND
36H 21/0600Z 19.5N 98.0W 20 KT 25 MPH...POST-TROP/REMNT LOW
48H 21/1800Z...DISSIPATED

$$
FORECASTER AVILA
Member Since: July 21, 2011 Posts: 83 Comments: 7167
110. yoboi
Quoting JasonWins33:
img src="">
Nfl news video just made!!



I don't understand that video......did you post the wrong thing????
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"Is the North Atlantic hurricane season getting longer?" He concluded that there is a "apparent tendency toward more common early- and late-season storms that correlates with warming Sea Surface Temperature but the uncertainty in these relationships is high."

Might take several more years, or decades, of similar events in the Atlantic Basin before NHC decides to extend the season at either end. If the ITCZ, from where a good portion of these early season lower Caribbean storms form (in competition with the E-Pac season and waves feeding off the same source in relatively close proximity) continues to fire off early May and June Atlantic storms, and if sheer also shows a lowering trend in this same time-frame/proximity, an argument can be made that the Atlantic Season should kick off should coincide with the May 15th date for the E-Pac. The uncertainly is quite high at the moment as stated.

Same issue would apply for the back-end of the season but a much harder nut to crack given cooling sst's and higher sheer starting in October at current trends; Definitely don't see them looking at the back end anytime soon (in my remaining lifetime) unless we see a consistent slew of early December storms.
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Quoting 62901IL:

Does that mean he stopped moving?

He's slowed down considerably.

Quoting Doppler22:

I'm not suggesting it will, just curious... but what percent chance to you give Barry of becoming a category 1 hurricane due to the topography and the fact that he has slowed down?

20%.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32805
BULLETIN
TROPICAL STORM BARRY ADVISORY NUMBER 10
NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL AL022013
400 PM CDT WED JUN 19 2013

...RECONNAISSANCE PLANE FINDS THE SECOND TROPICAL STORM OF THE 2013
HURRICANE SEASON...


SUMMARY OF 400 PM CDT...2100 UTC...INFORMATION
----------------------------------------------
LOCATION...19.6N 95.2W
ABOUT 70 MI...115 KM ENE OF VERACRUZ MEXICO
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...40 MPH...65 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT...W OR 270 DEGREES AT 6 MPH...9 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...1005 MB...29.68 INCHES
Member Since: July 21, 2011 Posts: 83 Comments: 7167
Quoting 62901IL:

Does that mean he stopped moving?



Quoting CybrTeddy:
Latest vortext message suggests Barry is a 45mph tropical storm. Intensification is occurring as the recon is finding a much better organized cyclone on each pass. This is supported by satellite, Barry has shed the "blob" look in favor of developing spiral bands.

My guess is 45mph at 5pm with peak being between 50 and 60.
Member Since: March 16, 2012 Posts: 127 Comments: 7972
TROPICAL STORM CENTER LOCATED NEAR 19.6N 95.2W AT 19/2100Z
POSITION ACCURATE WITHIN 50 NM

PRESENT MOVEMENT TOWARD THE WEST OR 270 DEGREES AT 5 KT

ESTIMATED MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE 1005 MB
MAX SUSTAINED WINDS 35 KT WITH GUSTS TO 45 KT.
34 KT....... 60NE 30SE 30SW 30NW.
12 FT SEAS.. 90NE 0SE 0SW 0NW.
WINDS AND SEAS VARY GREATLY IN EACH QUADRANT. RADII IN NAUTICAL
MILES ARE THE LARGEST RADII EXPECTED ANYWHERE IN THAT QUADRANT.
Member Since: September 23, 2005 Posts: 15 Comments: 11341
this is not going too be a vary good season bret was olny 40mph and made landfall in the same place if BARRY is really has 45mph winds that means it has this sure pass bret in 2005 wish means this year storms are looking stronger then the ones in 2005

Link
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102. VR46L
That Wave in the Caribbean looks sweet

Rammb IR
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
The last three center passes...with an hour between each pass...have been within 5 miles of each other. Barry has hit the brakes...and hard.

I'm not suggesting it will, just curious... but what percent chance to you give Barry of becoming a category 1 hurricane due to the topography and the fact that he has slowed down?
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
The last three center passes...with an hour between each pass...have been within 5 miles of each other. Barry has hit the brakes...and hard.

Does that mean he stopped moving?
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It would appear the Alvarado radar is inaccessible

Nearest radar altamira


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The last three center passes...with an hour between each pass...have been within 5 miles of each other. Barry has hit the brakes...and hard.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32805
Latest vortext message suggests Barry is a 45mph tropical storm. Intensification is occurring as the recon is finding a much better organized cyclone on each pass. This is supported by satellite, Barry has shed the "blob" look in favor of developing spiral bands.
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Quoting islander101010:
donna gave central florida a wacking similiar i believe to charlie


Since Charley, I have viewed Hurricane Donna as the other best analog for a major hurricane impact in inland Central Florida. Donna and Charley are likely the only hurricanes in the last century to actually bring sustained hurricane force winds to the Orlando area. Donna went further west than Charley, so the worst of the winds went west of Orlando itself, unlike with Charley.
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95. MTWX
Geez! Every time I check in today we have a new blog!! LOL!

See we have Barry now... Well back to work..
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On the last blog, someone suggested that Andrea was not a warm core system or a Tropical Storm and that the National Hurricane Center was just padding the number, thus i would like to counter that persons argument with a simple landfall loop of Tropical Storm Andrea and a brief discussion: In the loop that precedes this brief paragraph, you can clearly see that on the morning of Thursday the 6th of June, Andrea was developing a curved band eye wall and some kind of eye feature along with numerous bands of convection to the northeast and an eventual wrap around of convection around the center, it is also evident by the recon observations that the system was warm core and the pressure readings clearly indicated it was at least a moderate tropical storm, in fact some people on this blog thought that the storm was a minimal hurricane at one point in time before it weakened quickly on its final approach to the Big Bend region. Now as for the whole the National Hurricane Center pads their number critique, Andrea was well deserving of a name, and 93L (Now Barry) was actually underestimated with a 40% chance of developing just before the National Hurricane Center initiated advisory on TD2 (Barry), and now as evident by surface observations coupled with HH Data as well as ships offshore the Mexican coast that Barry is well deserving of its name. Furthermore, as some have speculated and debated, the National Hurricane Center may have turned a blind eye to invest 92L which was located in the central Atlantic, and had wind sat and estimations by satellites of winds up to 45kts, that could have qualified a TS Designation before it was ripped to shreds by shear, however due to Andrea making landfall at that time, it appears the National Hurricane Center had its hands full on a big fish to fry, even 92L if it had been designated was a legitimate storm. And final in concluding this paragraph, the National Hurricane Center is generally considered conservative on many weather blogs and online forums dedicated to tropical cyclones, they would not waste the time or resources to initiate advisory on illegitimate systems. Up in till recently they were facing big budget cuts and were looking to make their employees conduct work without pay, so it would seem logical to pad any numbers and use more human Resources.

- FIC

Member Since: May 1, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 776
URNT12 KNHC 192029
VORTEX DATA MESSAGE AL022013
A. 19/20:21:40Z
B. 19 deg 37 min N
095 deg 03 min W
C. NA
D. 39 kt
E. 232 deg 36 nm
F. 318 deg 46 kt
G. 232 deg 39 nm
H. EXTRAP 1005 mb
I. 22 C / 393 m
J. 24 C / 396 m
K. 24 C / NA
L. NA
M. NA
N. 1345 / 01
O. 0.02 / 3 nm
P. AF308 0102A CYCLONE OB 12
MAX FL WIND 47 KT 270/42 19:50:00Z
SLP EXTRAP FROM BELOW 1500 FT
Scattered convection on west semicircle and outbound to NE
;
Member Since: April 29, 2009 Posts: 75 Comments: 14887
Well, this doesn't show that the center has reformed north of 20N. It's possible that there is another center forming there currently still or Barry is just not vertically stacked at all.

20:21:00Z 19.617N 95.083W 966.5 mb
(~ 28.54 inHg) 346 meters
(~ 1,135 feet) 1005.2 mb
(~ 29.68 inHg)
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Tropical Storm Barry's outer rain bands are seen on Long Range radar

Brownsville
NEXRAD Radar

Base Reflectivity 0.50° Elevation
Range 248 NMI


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Quoting nrtiwlnvragn:


Landsea et al would mostly agree with you.



I'll modify my response a bit:

Awesome, this IS exactly what I was looking for.
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wonder what a donna would do to s. florida nowadays marco island naples ext under water?
Member Since: September 11, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 5001
Look'in beautiful Barry.
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Quoting Civicane49:
UW - CIMSS
ADVANCED DVORAK TECHNIQUE
ADT-Version 8.1.4
Tropical Cyclone Intensity Algorithm

----- Current Analysis -----
Date : 19 JUN 2013 Time : 191500 UTC
Lat : 19:37:11 N Lon : 94:53:56 W


CI# /Pressure/ Vmax
2.9 /1001.1mb/ 43.0kt


Final T# Adj T# Raw T#
2.9 3.2 3.5

Center Temp : -57.5C Cloud Region Temp : -57.8C

Scene Type : UNIFORM CDO CLOUD REGION

Positioning Method : FORECAST INTERPOLATION

Ocean Basin : ATLANTIC
Dvorak CI > MSLP Conversion Used : ATLANTIC

Tno/CI Rules : Constraint Limits : 0.5T/hour
Weakening Flag : OFF
Rapid Dissipation Flag : OFF

C/K/Z MSLP Estimate Inputs :
- Average 34 knot radii : 40km
- Environmental MSLP : 1012mb

Satellite Name : GOES13
Satellite Viewing Angle : 32.2 degrees
Maybe a 50 mph storm.
Member Since: June 11, 2013 Posts: 20 Comments: 3383
Quoting Neapolitan:
I believe you'll see that Dr. Masters addressed this very issue in the 2008 blog post he referenced above, Is the Atlantic hurricane season getting longer?.


Thanks for the link, I hadn't seen that before and I did read it, but it's a bit different than what I'm asking. My question is more about just all the additional resources have today versus even 30 years ago. Satellites aren't the only way we determine if something is a named storm or not, with all the additional information we have available today I believe we are able to name storms that would not have been named in say, the early 80s. I'm just curious if that is a valid conclusion or not.
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BTW, you never answered, what do you do for a living?


i am my significant others boy....personal assistant and secretary...manny to the kids.....mannah god to the pets
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UW - CIMSS
ADVANCED DVORAK TECHNIQUE
ADT-Version 8.1.4
Tropical Cyclone Intensity Algorithm

----- Current Analysis -----
Date : 19 JUN 2013 Time : 191500 UTC
Lat : 19:37:11 N Lon : 94:53:56 W


CI# /Pressure/ Vmax
2.9 /1001.1mb/ 43.0kt


Final T# Adj T# Raw T#
2.9 3.2 3.5

Center Temp : -57.5C Cloud Region Temp : -57.8C

Scene Type : UNIFORM CDO CLOUD REGION

Positioning Method : FORECAST INTERPOLATION

Ocean Basin : ATLANTIC
Dvorak CI > MSLP Conversion Used : ATLANTIC

Tno/CI Rules : Constraint Limits : 0.5T/hour
Weakening Flag : OFF
Rapid Dissipation Flag : OFF

C/K/Z MSLP Estimate Inputs :
- Average 34 knot radii : 40km
- Environmental MSLP : 1012mb

Satellite Name : GOES13
Satellite Viewing Angle : 32.2 degrees
Member Since: July 21, 2011 Posts: 83 Comments: 7167
Barry's center has more than likely reformed a degree to the north. It was below 20N at the advisory and now appears to be closer to 20.5N.

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Quoting islander101010:
donna gave central florida a wacking similiar i believe to charlie


Donna was much worse than Charlie in overall impact.
And she does still hold the record:
"Hurricane Donna holds the record for retaining major hurricane status (Category 3 or greater on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale) in the Atlantic Basin for the longest period of time."

"Hurricane Donna was a very destructive hurricane that caused extensive damage from the Lesser Antilles to New England. At least 364 people were killed by the hurricane and over $900 million in damage were done (1960 USD)"
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Quoting FIUStormChaser:


Depending on how long it has over water, i think it has a outside chance of reaching minimal Hurricane Status.


Definitly organizing. I would not be surprised if Barry makes landfall as a strong TS 60kts.
Member Since: April 29, 2009 Posts: 75 Comments: 14887
Saw this pic on Reddit, figured someone would like it.

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Depending on how long it has over water, i think it has a outside chance of reaching minimal Hurricane Status.
Member Since: May 1, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 776
Quoting 62901IL:

How do you make these graphics? can you give me a step-by-step guide?


I can tell you that I make them with Powerpoint. As far as the step-by-step guide, it would take me years to get it together. There's so many gradients and side things to spice the graphic up, that it would take a very long time to tell you how I do it step-by-step. You just have to have a wide imagination. :-)

Barry has been named, I see. :-) Never underestimate the power of the Bay of Campeche. It does wonders to storms, unfortunately sometimes too much (Hurricane Karl 2010)

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donna gave central florida a wacking similiar i believe to charlie
Member Since: September 11, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 5001
Thank You Dr. Will be very interesting to see how strong Barry can get before coming ashore considering that BOC "curvature" topography issue. I believe this same type of issue may have been a factor in the intensification of hurricane Barbara, in the E-Pac, just before landfall a few weeks ago.

Ironically, Barbara intensified and made landfall along the "curved" portion of the Gulf of Tehuantepec which lies just a few hundred miles directly to the South of where Barry is right now in the BOC.

Barry and Barbara are like Romeo and Juliet; related by geographic proximity but from two very basins..........
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Product: Air Force High Density (HDOB) Message (URNT15 KNHC)


edit:

20:14:30Z 19.450N 95.317W 966.0 mb
(~ 28.53 inHg) 359 meters
(~ 1,178 feet) - - From 296 at 36 knots
(From the WNW at ~ 41.4 mph) 21.4%
(~ 70.5) -* 40 knots
(~ 46.0 mph) 38 knots
(~ 43.7 mph) 2 mm/hr
(~ 0.08 in/hr) 34.2 knots (~ 39.3 mph)

Tropical Storm 95.0%

HDOB Observations
Independent Calculations from Tropical Atlantic
Time Coordinates Aircraft
Static Air Pressure Aircraft
Geopotential Height Extrapolated
Surface Pressure D-value Flight Level Wind (30 sec. Avg.) Air Temp.

Time Coordinates Aircraft
Static Air Pressure Aircraft
Geopotential Height Extrapolated
Surface Pressure D-value Flight Level Wind (30 sec. Avg.) Air Temp. Dew Point Peak (10 sec. Avg.)
Flight Level Wind SFMR
Peak (10s Avg.) Sfc. Wind SFMR
Rain Rate Estimated Surface Wind (30 sec. Avg.)
Using Estimated Reduction Factor Peak Wind at Flight Level to
Est. Surface Reduction Factor
HDOB Observations
Independent Calculations from Tropical Atlantic
At 20:05:00Z (first observation), the observation was 196 miles (315 km) to the WNW (294) from Villahermosa, Tabasco, M%uFFFDxico.
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Quoting mitthbevnuruodo:
One of the nicest looking invests and TD's finally gets a name after holding out so long :P Thought was a lovely looking storm before making landfall. Must be named after Barry Gibb...staying alive and all..buhdumdum...I'll get me coat LOL

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One of the nicest looking invests and TD's finally gets a name after holding out so long :P Thought was a lovely looking storm before making landfall. Must be named after Barry Gibb...staying alive and all..buhdumdum...I'll get me coat LOL
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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