Tornado Scientist Tim Samaras and Team Killed in Friday's El Reno, OK Tornado

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 5:43 PM GMT on June 02, 2013

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Veteran tornado scientist Tim Samaras, his son, environmental photographer Paul Samaras, 24, and meteorologist Carl Young, 45, died while chasing Friday's EF-3 tornado in El Reno, Oklahoma. The tornado killed at least nine people, in total. "Thank you to everyone for the condolences. It truly is sad that we lost my great brother Tim and his great son, Paul," said the brother of Tim Samaras, Jim Samaras, on Tim's Facebook page. "They all unfortunately passed away but doing what they LOVED." Tim, his son Paul, and Carl Young were all featured chasers on the Discovery Channel’s series, Storm Chasers, and Tim was known throughout the chase community as a conscientious and safety-minded chaser. Carl Young, who holds a Masters degree in meteorology from the University of Nevada, joined Samaras in the field in 2003. According to his Discovery Channel biography, Young and Samaras chased over 125 tornadoes together: "Carl's finest moment came on June 11, 2004 near Storm Lake, Iowa. Working with Tim, they defied the odds and deployed their probes right in the path of a tornado. The six-camera video probe captured amazing footage from multiple angles while the sensor probe recorded data that revealed just how fast wind speeds are close to the ground."


Figure 1. TWC's Mike ‪Bettes‬ crew caught this image of the El Reno, Oklahoma tornado of May 31, 2013 before the tornado caught them and rolled their vehicle. The tornado killed tornado scientists/storm chasers Tim Samaras, Paul Samaras, and Carl Young.


Figure 2. Storm chasers in North Dakota aligned themselves to spell out "T S" in honor of Tim Samaras today. Image credit: spotternetwork.org.

Tornado science loses a pioneer
Tim Samaras had been a tornado scientist for over 25 years. He was the founder of TWISTEX, the Tactical Weather Instrumented Sampling in Tornadoes Experiment, a 2011 field experiment designed to help learn more about tornadoes and increase lead time for warnings, which resulted in many peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. One of Tim Samaras' most widely recognized contributions to tornado science is his placement of an aerodynamically-designed probe in the path of an EF-4 tornado near Manchester, South Dakota on June 24, 2003. The probe measured a world-record pressure fall of 100 mb over a 40 second period.

One of the publications from the TWISTEX program, "Near-Ground Pressure and Wind Measurements in Tornadoes" recounts this close call Tim had in a tornado in 2011: "As the storm approached, the crew noted that the supercell was moving more sharply to the right of its former course, placing them near the projected path of the low-level mesocyclone. The crew drove south on Highway 259, attempting to position south of the low-level mesocyclone before it crossed the highway. With considerable tree cover in this region hampering the visual observation of the storm's features, TWISTEX crews could not position south of the mesocyclone on Highway 259 before the mesocyclone reached this road. Thus, the two mobile mesonet stations, M2 and M3, had an unplanned tornado encounter with a developing tornadic circulation while the mesonet was traveling south on Highway 259."


Figure 3. One of Tim Samaras' most widely recognized contributions to tornado science is his placement of an aerodynamically-designed probe in the path of an EF-4 tornado near Manchester, South Dakota on June 24, 2003. The probe measured a world-record pressure fall of 100 mb over a 40 second period. See the NWS article and conference paper on the event. Thanks to wunderground member Scott Lincoln for this link.

A storm chasers' nightmare
Cars and tornadoes can prove a dangerous mix even for the world's most experienced storm chasers. Driving at high speeds though heavy rain, large hail, and high winds is hazardous. If one is lucky enough to chase down a tornado, even the most experienced chasers can find themselves in a serious life-threatening situation when unexpected events occur. The exact circumstances of the deaths of Tim Samaras and his team are not clear, but the El Reno tornado was an extremely dangerous one to chase. Tornadoes by their nature are unpredictable, and can change course unexpectedly, or pop up suddenly. It's particularly dangerous when a tornado is wrapped in rain, making it hard to see, or if a chaser is operating in a heavily populated area, where roads may suddenly become congested. All four of these conditions occurred Friday during the El Reno tornado. The El Reno tornado was wrapped in rain and difficult to see as it headed west towards Oklahoma City, and suddenly made a jog to the southeast as a Weather Channel team led by Mike Bettes was attempting to get in front of the storm, and the tornado lifted their vehicle off the ground, rolled it multiple times, and hurled it 200 yards into a nearby field. Austin Anderson was driving the Tornado Hunt vehicle, and suffered several broken bones and was hospitalized. Although Austin will have to undergo surgery in the next few days, doctors say he is expected to make a full recovery. StormChasingVideo.com storm chaser Brandon Sullivan and his chase partner Brett Wright got caught in the tornado northwest of Union City, OK and slammed with debris as the tornado hit a barn that exploded in front of them. Meteorologist Emily Sutton and storm chaser Kevin Josefy of local Oklahoma City TV station KFOR also had a very close call with the El Reno tornado Friday afternoon. They got too close to the tornado, and were forced to floor the car in reverse to escape flying debris. With branches of trees crashing around them, Sutton began feeling debris hitting her back, and realized that the rear windshield of the car must have gotten destroyed. Both were uninjured. Reed Timmer's armor-plated "Dominator" chase vehicle had its hood torn off by the tornado. Wunderground member Levi32 was out storm chasing during the El Reno Tornado, and got stuck in traffic on Highway 4 and couldn't move. "We looked up above the car and saw the wall cloud over top of us, with very quick rotation and rising scud indicating the updraft. We were definitely too close."


Video 1. Severe storm researcher and engineer Tim Samaras talks about his view on tornadoes and what remains to be understood in this interview posted on May 21, 2013.


Video 2. A tornado passes over one of Tim Samaras' specially designed six-camera video probes on June 11, 2004 near Storm Lake, Iowa.

Tornadoes and cars: a dangerous mix
A vehicle is about the worst place you can be in a tornado, as the tornado's winds can easily roll a car. (The only place less safe is probably a mobile home, as a tornado's winds can roll mobile homes almost as readily, and mobile homes don't come with seat belts and air bags.) At least five of the deaths in Friday's El Reno tornado occurred in vehicles. There was one local TV station that urged residents without underground shelters to get in their cars and "get south" in advance of the tornado that was approaching Oklahoma City, since chasers were reporting that the El Reno tornado may have been so strong that only an underground shelter would have provided adequate protection. This terrible piece of advice likely contributed to the incredible traffic jams that we saw on I-35, I-40, I-44, and other local roads Friday night. Thousands of cars were bumper-to-bumper on the roads as a dangerous tornado approached them. Had the El Reno tornado plowed directly down one of these car-choked interstates, the death toll could have easily exceeded 500. If you are located in a metro area and don't have an underground shelter, the best thing to do it to take shelter in an interior windowless room or hallway, with protective furniture over your body. Getting in a car and attempting to flee the tornado is the worst thing you can do in an urban area. You may not be able to see the tornado if it is dark or the tornado is wrapped in rain. You are likely to encounter hazardous winds, rain, and hail, run into unexpected traffic, or flooded or debris-blocked roads that will put you directly in the path of the tornado. Even without an underground shelter, most people will be able to survive a dangerous EF-4 tornado. Case in point: during the Mannsford, Oklahoma EF- 4 tornado of 1984, a packed church received a direct hit, and everyone in the church survived. The only fatality was a man who drove to the church to get his wife. It is often better to abandon your vehicle and take shelter in a ditch, if you are caught in a car during a tornado. However, if there is already flying debris in the air, leaving your car and exposing yourself to the debris in order to get to a ditch may be more hazardous than staying in your car. Furthermore, ditches are prone to flash floods. Four deaths during the El Reno tornado were from a family of seven that sheltered in a drainage ditch, and were washed into the Deep Fork River by a flash flood. Searchers are still looking for the other three bodies. A 2002 research paper, "UNSAFE AT ANY (WIND) SPEED? Testing the Stability of Motor Vehicles in Severe Winds" found that: "The stability and superior safety of being in a vehicle in severe winds, relative to occupying a mobile home or being outdoors, should be considered." Also, TWC's severe weather expert, Dr. Greg Forbes, commented on the pros and cons of abandoning one's vehicle for a ditch in a 2009 blog post, "Tornado Safety - Cars Versus Ditches: A Controversy." His personal take on what he would do if his car was being overtaken by a tornado, and no sturdy buildings were nearby to take shelter in: "I can't see myself getting out of the vehicle. I'd try first to drive away from the tornado. Both the NWS and the American Red Cross actually also advocate this. If you can determine which way the tornado is moving toward, face your body toward that direction and then go to the right, as shown in the diagram below. That is usually toward the south or southeast. The reason that it's best to head this way is that if you went to the left you would normally get into the region where largest hail and blinding rain occur in the kind of supercell, rotating thunderstorms that often spawn tornadoes. If I had no such driving option and I did feel the urge to get out of my car, I'd try to get into a building, and into a ditch well away from the car as the last resort."

My condolences and prayers go to all of the family and friends of Tim Samaras, Paul Samaras, and Carl Young. Their deaths are a terrible shock to the meteorological community, and a great loss for tornado science. I hope that their deaths will lead towards safer tornado chasing, and help spur efforts to use emerging drone technology to take measurements in dangerous storms such as tornadoes and hurricanes.

Jeff Masters

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Quoting hurricanehunter27:
Yes but it was really quite spectacular. Trying to find peoples other photos of it.
Here is one:
Quoting hurricanehunter27:
Ugh. So disappointing. Did not really capture it.

Great and its sideways.
At least you try :D and the intention is what matters.
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Quoting hurricanehunter27:
Ugh. So disappointing. Did not really capture it.

Great and its sideways.
did u try to rotate the pic off the phone then save it
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Quoting sar2401:

Except for the crick in my neck, it looks like a pretty good shelf cloud to me. :-)
Yes but it was really quite spectacular. Trying to find peoples other photos of it.
Here is one:
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Quoting hurricanehunter27:
Ugh. So disappointing. Did not really capture it.

Great and its sideways.

Except for the crick in my neck, it looks like a pretty good shelf cloud to me. :-)
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 14593
Quoting sar2401:

I've been saying this for two days. The CMC shows a path over Panama City Beach directly to my house in Eufaula, Al. No matter how big tropical storms get or where they go, we never get any rain Eufaula. We are always on the dry side of any storm. Hence, the CMC is totally wrong and can be completely discounted. In any case, assuming it survives, 91L is never going to be more than a blob in any case.

BTW, we finally did get .08 inches of rain from our toad choker earlier this afternoon. It was enough to make steam rise from the streets, but my lawn still looks dead. :-(

I don't think 91L should have been tagged yet
Member Since: June 13, 2009 Posts: 2 Comments: 11848
Ugh. So disappointing. Did not really capture it.

Great and its sideways.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
as expected no change

000
ABNT20 KNHC 030500
TWOAT

TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOK
NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL
200 AM EDT MON JUN 3 2013

FOR THE NORTH ATLANTIC...CARIBBEAN SEA AND THE GULF OF MEXICO...

WIDESPREAD CLOUDINESS AND SHOWERS...ASSOCIATED WITH A TROUGH OF LOW
PRESSURE EXTENDING FROM THE YUCATAN PENINSULA TO THE STRAITS OF
FLORIDA...HAVE CHANGED LITTLE IN ORGANIZATION DURING THE PAST
SEVERAL HOURS
. ANY DEVELOPMENT OF THIS SYSTEM IS LIKELY TO BE SLOW
TO OCCUR
DUE TO MARGINALLY FAVORABLE ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS.
THIS SYSTEM HAS A LOW CHANCE...20 PERCENT...OF BECOMING A TROPICAL
CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS AS IT DRIFTS GENERALLY NORTHWARD.

ELSEWHERE...TROPICAL CYCLONE FORMATION IS NOT EXPECTED DURING THE
NEXT 48 HOURS.

$$
FORECASTER KIMBERLAIN
Member Since: June 13, 2009 Posts: 2 Comments: 11848
Quoting stormchaser19:
CMC is crazy,the pressure still dropping in land!!!


I've been saying this for two days. The CMC shows a path over Panama City Beach directly to my house in Eufaula, Al. No matter how big tropical storms get or where they go, we never get any rain Eufaula. We are always on the dry side of any storm. Hence, the CMC is totally wrong and can be completely discounted. In any case, assuming it survives, 91L is never going to be more than a blob in any case.

BTW, we finally did get .08 inches of rain from our toad choker earlier this afternoon. It was enough to make steam rise from the streets, but my lawn still looks dead. :-(
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 14593
I made a new blog about praying for the tornado victims.You can go on my blog and pray or just speak to God on what you feel.
Member Since: March 25, 2013 Posts: 29 Comments: 991
Quoting allancalderini:
Fay is that you?
My personal favorite as far as Tropical Storms go. What a wacky storm Fay was.

Also I promised shelf cloud photos I took earlier. Will get them up ASAP.

Looking at them now shows they did not turn out so well. I wish I had a proper camera. Uploading anyway.
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Quoting stormchaser19:
CMC is crazy,the pressure still dropping in land!!!

Fay is that you?
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I used to print out basin charts on 8.5x11" printer paper and tape them together, took a couple hours to do and most of the weight was tape instead of paper.



Happily, having access to a plotter permits one to produce larger charts much faster, too.

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Quoting wunderkidcayman:

kick CMC out the door

Nahh the CMC is showing the worst case scenario i guess!!!
Member Since: June 20, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 2159
Quoting stormchaser19:
CMC 72 HAHAHA

Quoting stormchaser19:
CMC is crazy,the pressure still dropping in land!!!


kick CMC out the door
Member Since: June 13, 2009 Posts: 2 Comments: 11848
Quoting ScottLincoln:
if there is as much data as rumors suggest, there will be so much expert attention paid to this case, it will trump anything I have to say.
Yeah, it'll be very interesting to see what the final conclusion on 2013 El Reno/Union City tornado will be. NWS Norman still got TBD all over the tornado.
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 28 Comments: 8007
I think the CMC is just saying the pressure was dropping right till landfall and it takes a couple hours for it to turn around. So it probably leveled off around 102hrs.

Still I think it's overdone, but again, time will tell. Need the 0z Euro
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Quoting ScottLincoln:
why use the shear as a proxy? To calculate the shear, you needed two opposing velocities, so just use the velocities you started with the get shear. In this case, we had 190kts and 100kts. But remember, that is an estimate, and the radar couldn't actually sample above that VCPs Nyquist velocity, so it was a dealias algorithm that reconstructed that number. And even if correct (it may be) it was not ground velocity.
So you're saying in an idealized environment we'd just use one velocity then?
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Quoting Bluestorm5:
Gotcha. We'll see. NWS mets are pro for a reason and not us on WU (except for you, of course).
if there is as much data as rumors suggest, there will be so much expert attention paid to this case, it will trump anything I have to say.
Member Since: September 28, 2002 Posts: 5 Comments: 3192
The "Old" El Reno Tornado

Besides the Bridge Creek event, only one other E/F5 tornado has been analyzed by mobile doppler radar. The El Reno, Oklahoma, EF5 tornado formed on May 24th, 2011, during a large scale outbreak that also produced the deadly Joplin tornado two days earlier. The tornado killed nine people and left a streak of scoured earth as it thundered through rural areas west and north of Oklahoma City. Though still not officially made public, a rapid scanning mobile radar recorded a radial velocity of 280 mph (125 m/s) about 220 ft above ground level early in the tornado’s life. The tornado was given an EF5 rating based on the doppler measurement, and its intensity is currently quoted in NWS literature as having been “greater than 210mph” at ground level. The mobile radar team was only able to follow the tornado for part of its 65-mile long path, so it is very possible the tornado had higher winds in later stages of its life.

http://extremeplanet.me/2012/07/03/highest-winds- measured-in-several-different-tornadoes/
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Quoting TomTaylor:
In an idealized environment (perfect beam propagation, perfectly symmetrical tornado, no debris, blah blah blah), couldn't we add use shear to determine velocity?
why use the shear as a proxy? To calculate the shear, you needed two opposing velocities, so just use the velocities you started with the get shear. In this case, we had 190kts and 100kts. But remember, that is an estimate, and the radar couldn't actually sample above that VCPs Nyquist velocity, so it was a dealias algorithm that reconstructed that number. And even if correct (it may be) it was not ground velocity.
Member Since: September 28, 2002 Posts: 5 Comments: 3192
CMC is crazy,the pressure still dropping in land!!!

Member Since: June 20, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 2159
Quoting ScottLincoln:
I would have to see the data or an analysis of the data. It wouldnt be prudent to make conclusions off hearsay. My gut feeling was that EF3 might be too low, but most times we are bound by the available damage indicators.
Gotcha. We'll see. NWS mets are pro for a reason and not us on WU (except for you, of course).
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 28 Comments: 8007
Quoting Bluestorm5:
A meteorologist on AmericanWX forum "heard" that the data from two DOWs all showed above 100 m/s winds. He also heard that there were many teams from different places measuring the tornado as well.
I would have to see the data or an analysis of the data. It wouldnt be prudent to make conclusions off hearsay. My gut feeling was that EF3 might be too low, but most times we are bound by the available damage indicators.
Member Since: September 28, 2002 Posts: 5 Comments: 3192
Quoting ScottLincoln:

Shear is the speed difference divided by the distance. They do not need to be next to one another. The roughly 275mph of shear off of the NEXRAD during the event is NOT velocity. And it wasn't at the surface, either.


Well aware of that.

I believe the sampling was about 2500 feet or so. 300 knots at the surface would be unfathomable

Enough beating the dead horse though...

This was an intense tornado and I'm looking forward to seeing the data from the research groups.
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CMC 72 HAHAHA

Member Since: June 20, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 2159
Quoting ScottLincoln:

Shear is the speed difference divided by the distance. They do not need to be next to one another. The roughly 275mph of shear off of the NEXRAD during the event is NOT velocity. And it wasn't at the surface, either.
In an idealized environment (perfect beam propagation, perfectly symmetrical tornado, no debris, blah blah blah), couldn't we use shear to determine velocity?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting ScottLincoln:
Hard to say without seeing the data.
Just have to make sure we do not confuse shear and velocity once again.
A meteorologist on AmericanWX forum "heard" that the data from two DOWs all showed above 100 m/s winds. He also heard that there were many teams from different places measuring the tornado as well.
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 28 Comments: 8007
I say the speed of something in a given direction, you say the variation in wind velocity occurring along a direction at right angles to the wind's direction and tending to exert a turning force

Link

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Quoting Stormchaser2007:


Ah Mr. Lincoln,

I'm not sure I would call it shear since the velo bins never actually met one another. There was serious range folding and I consider it somewhat suspect.

(And I must say, I am a fan of your work)

Link




Shear is the speed difference divided by the distance. They do not need to be next to one another. The roughly 275mph of shear off of the NEXRAD during the event is NOT velocity. And it wasn't at the surface, either.
Member Since: September 28, 2002 Posts: 5 Comments: 3192
Quoting Bluestorm5:
Your opinion on DOW winds measurement along with 300 knots shear?
Hard to say without seeing the data.
Just have to make sure we do not confuse shear and velocity once again.
Member Since: September 28, 2002 Posts: 5 Comments: 3192
Quoting ScottLincoln:

SHEAR not velocities.


Ah Mr. Lincoln,

I'm not sure I would call it shear since the velo bins never actually met one another. There was serious range folding and I consider it somewhat suspect.

(And I must say, I am a fan of your work)

Link



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Quoting stormchaser19:

Well, you are almost graduate of paint, I'm few grades down of you Lol!!! :D

I could have done better but I was rushing

Quoting stormchaser19:
CMC 5 HOURS hahaha

nah
Member Since: June 13, 2009 Posts: 2 Comments: 11848
CMC 5 HOURS hahaha
Member Since: June 20, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 2159
Quoting ScottLincoln:

SHEAR not velocities.
Your opinion on DOW winds measurement along with 300 knots shear?
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 28 Comments: 8007
668. DDR
2.4 inches and a lot more coming
Barbados radarLink
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Quoting Stormchaser2007:
Now its all up to KOUN to see if they use the data or not.

It took a while for them to reluctantly use the 113 m/s wind in the 2010 El Reno tornado

Personally with the 293+ knot velocities, I think its likely.

SHEAR not velocities.
Member Since: September 28, 2002 Posts: 5 Comments: 3192
Quoting Stormchaser2007:
Now its all up to KOUN to see if they use the data or not.

It took a while for them to reluctantly use the 113 m/s wind in the 2010 El Reno tornado

Personally with the 293 knot velocities, I think its likely.


I believe the peak was 298kts, I didn't think winds that intense could be recorded on this planet.
Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 23936
Quoting wunderkidcayman:
My graphic on W Carib/Yucatan AOI



yellow lines trofs and tropical waves
red Ls lows
blue lines with triangles front
orange lines streamline winds

Well, you are almost graduate of paint, I'm few grades down of you Lol!!! :D
Member Since: June 20, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 2159
Quoting Stormchaser2007:


The preliminary data surely supports it. Norman just has to decided whether or not to use it. Since there are multiple sources, I think it's possible.

Hell, even the Phased Array Radar network measured some insane velocities.

And that forum is americanwx.com
Ok, thank you for responding! Keep us informed!
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 28 Comments: 8007
Quoting Stormchaser2007:


The preliminary data surely supports it. Norman just has to decided whether or not to use it. Since there are multiple sources, I think it's possible.

Hell, even the Phased Array Radar network measured some insane velocities.

And that forum is americanwx.com


What's unusual is that none of the damage observed supports anything beyond EF3, this leads me to suspect that the El Reno tornado rapidly intensified right as it swerved unexpectedly, and rapidly weakened.
Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 23936
Going for my first forecast for the 2013 season.
Kinda early as I still want to see better model runs from the GFS and midlevel air patterns over the GOM for weds-thurs but it appears 2 things will happen.

1 Shear
2 Dry air

GFS has been constant also on 2 things

1 Convective feedback errors
2 Inverted trough along 88W

#2 will probably happen... GFS has convection feedback errors and that trys to push a weak low N causing a inverted trough. While a trough is expected to extend north.. I think the GFS is overplaying the Blobing of the T-Storms...probably be more widespread over the easter gulf. A LLC should though form from the inverted trough. Now the shear should pull most of the moisture east accross florida and dry air in the midlevel will enter the LLC. A new low should develop near the convection on Thurs just west of Florida or east of Florida Thur night..the position of the GFS 120hrs out seems reasonable and is in good agreement with the 12Z Euro. Question to many is... will this become a Tropical Storm before Florida? right now, it's too hard to tell cause of the convective feedback problems the GFS is having and not wanting to strengthen this much before the pull across florida. If the system gets organized enough Thurs before crossing the state, then I would say Yes. But it's hard to tell as of this post.I expect a LLC to form Tues night or Weds around 86W and 26N then dry air and shear take over....then a new LLC will develop in the convection as it nears florida and crosses the state. There is a better chance for a tropical storm by Friday just east of Daytona. Will know more in 12-14hrs
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G'night all...
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 21947
Quoting Bluestorm5:
Which forum is that again? So you're suggesting we might get an EF5 ranking for this monster?


The preliminary data surely supports it. Norman just has to decided whether or not to use it. Since there are multiple sources, I think it's possible.

Hell, even the Phased Array Radar network measured some insane winds.

And that forum is americanwx.com
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My graphic on W Carib/Yucatan AOI



yellow lines trofs and tropical waves
red Ls lows
blue lines with triangles front
orange lines streamline winds
Member Since: June 13, 2009 Posts: 2 Comments: 11848
Quoting Skyepony:
Tribute Video To Twistex Team of Tim Samaras, Paul Samaras, and Carl Young.
Nice ...

I thought he put it well, when he said that you know you've made it in life, when you get a pay check for something you love to do.
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Quoting stormchaser19:
99hr




Oh my.Look how many lows are in the graphic. Over 30 lows and only 7 highs.
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Quoting CybrTeddy:


My bad, and thanks!


Just messing with you, and no problem. I'll post more info as it comes my way.
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Quoting Stormchaser2007:


Source please?

And the data isn't for public use.

Only accessible for OUN Met students and researchers

Meteorologists:

"Update: Sounds like there was VORTEX2-type radar coverage on yesterday's supercell. DOWs, 3 OU groups, Tech, NSSL all were on it. Good news."

http://i300.photobucket.com/albums/nn39/Stormchas er20079/American%20Stuff/ScreenHunter_52Jun030001. png




My bad, and thanks!
Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 23936
Quoting Stormchaser2007:


Source please?

And the data isn't for public use.

Only accessible for OUN Met students and researchers

Meteorologists:

"Update: Sounds like there was VORTEX2-type radar coverage on yesterday's supercell. DOWs, 3 OU groups, Tech, NSSL all were on it. Good news."

http://i300.photobucket.com/albums/nn39/Stormchas er20079/American%20Stuff/ScreenHunter_52Jun030001. png


Which forum is that again? So you're suggesting we might get an EF5 ranking for this monster?
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 28 Comments: 8007
Quoting TylerStanfield:

That's the Best case scenario. Worst Case is that the low stays disorganized, sheared and stays an open trough and drenches Florida and the East Coast.

Welcome aboard by the way!

I'd still be concerned about some drenching for western Cuba...south Florida...Florida Keys...and western Bahamas as this thing is going to be stalled in this region between now and 96 hrs...this circulation looks like its getting trapped between the building central US low-level ridge and Atlantic ridge until the next upper trough comes in and erodes the central US ridge...

I think the model representations are too far west with this thing...that upper ridge that is supporting this system in the first place is going to get knocked southeast into the NW Caribbean in the next 24 hours..and so with broad systems like this the center can regenerate basically where the core of the upper ridge ends up. That's why I favor a W Cuba...south Florida...W Bahamas...W Atlantic track.
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99hr


Member Since: June 20, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 2159

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.