Tornado Scientist Tim Samaras and Team Killed in Friday's El Reno, OK Tornado

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 5:43 PM GMT on June 02, 2013

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Veteran tornado scientist Tim Samaras, his son, environmental photographer Paul Samaras, 24, and meteorologist Carl Young, 45, died while chasing Friday's EF-3 tornado in El Reno, Oklahoma. The tornado killed at least nine people, in total. "Thank you to everyone for the condolences. It truly is sad that we lost my great brother Tim and his great son, Paul," said the brother of Tim Samaras, Jim Samaras, on Tim's Facebook page. "They all unfortunately passed away but doing what they LOVED." Tim, his son Paul, and Carl Young were all featured chasers on the Discovery Channel’s series, Storm Chasers, and Tim was known throughout the chase community as a conscientious and safety-minded chaser. Carl Young, who holds a Masters degree in meteorology from the University of Nevada, joined Samaras in the field in 2003. According to his Discovery Channel biography, Young and Samaras chased over 125 tornadoes together: "Carl's finest moment came on June 11, 2004 near Storm Lake, Iowa. Working with Tim, they defied the odds and deployed their probes right in the path of a tornado. The six-camera video probe captured amazing footage from multiple angles while the sensor probe recorded data that revealed just how fast wind speeds are close to the ground."


Figure 1. TWC's Mike ‪Bettes‬ crew caught this image of the El Reno, Oklahoma tornado of May 31, 2013 before the tornado caught them and rolled their vehicle. The tornado killed tornado scientists/storm chasers Tim Samaras, Paul Samaras, and Carl Young.


Figure 2. Storm chasers in North Dakota aligned themselves to spell out "T S" in honor of Tim Samaras today. Image credit: spotternetwork.org.

Tornado science loses a pioneer
Tim Samaras had been a tornado scientist for over 25 years. He was the founder of TWISTEX, the Tactical Weather Instrumented Sampling in Tornadoes Experiment, a 2011 field experiment designed to help learn more about tornadoes and increase lead time for warnings, which resulted in many peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. One of Tim Samaras' most widely recognized contributions to tornado science is his placement of an aerodynamically-designed probe in the path of an EF-4 tornado near Manchester, South Dakota on June 24, 2003. The probe measured a world-record pressure fall of 100 mb over a 40 second period.

One of the publications from the TWISTEX program, "Near-Ground Pressure and Wind Measurements in Tornadoes" recounts this close call Tim had in a tornado in 2011: "As the storm approached, the crew noted that the supercell was moving more sharply to the right of its former course, placing them near the projected path of the low-level mesocyclone. The crew drove south on Highway 259, attempting to position south of the low-level mesocyclone before it crossed the highway. With considerable tree cover in this region hampering the visual observation of the storm's features, TWISTEX crews could not position south of the mesocyclone on Highway 259 before the mesocyclone reached this road. Thus, the two mobile mesonet stations, M2 and M3, had an unplanned tornado encounter with a developing tornadic circulation while the mesonet was traveling south on Highway 259."


Figure 3. One of Tim Samaras' most widely recognized contributions to tornado science is his placement of an aerodynamically-designed probe in the path of an EF-4 tornado near Manchester, South Dakota on June 24, 2003. The probe measured a world-record pressure fall of 100 mb over a 40 second period. See the NWS article and conference paper on the event. Thanks to wunderground member Scott Lincoln for this link.

A storm chasers' nightmare
Cars and tornadoes can prove a dangerous mix even for the world's most experienced storm chasers. Driving at high speeds though heavy rain, large hail, and high winds is hazardous. If one is lucky enough to chase down a tornado, even the most experienced chasers can find themselves in a serious life-threatening situation when unexpected events occur. The exact circumstances of the deaths of Tim Samaras and his team are not clear, but the El Reno tornado was an extremely dangerous one to chase. Tornadoes by their nature are unpredictable, and can change course unexpectedly, or pop up suddenly. It's particularly dangerous when a tornado is wrapped in rain, making it hard to see, or if a chaser is operating in a heavily populated area, where roads may suddenly become congested. All four of these conditions occurred Friday during the El Reno tornado. The El Reno tornado was wrapped in rain and difficult to see as it headed west towards Oklahoma City, and suddenly made a jog to the southeast as a Weather Channel team led by Mike Bettes was attempting to get in front of the storm, and the tornado lifted their vehicle off the ground, rolled it multiple times, and hurled it 200 yards into a nearby field. Austin Anderson was driving the Tornado Hunt vehicle, and suffered several broken bones and was hospitalized. Although Austin will have to undergo surgery in the next few days, doctors say he is expected to make a full recovery. StormChasingVideo.com storm chaser Brandon Sullivan and his chase partner Brett Wright got caught in the tornado northwest of Union City, OK and slammed with debris as the tornado hit a barn that exploded in front of them. Meteorologist Emily Sutton and storm chaser Kevin Josefy of local Oklahoma City TV station KFOR also had a very close call with the El Reno tornado Friday afternoon. They got too close to the tornado, and were forced to floor the car in reverse to escape flying debris. With branches of trees crashing around them, Sutton began feeling debris hitting her back, and realized that the rear windshield of the car must have gotten destroyed. Both were uninjured. Reed Timmer's armor-plated "Dominator" chase vehicle had its hood torn off by the tornado. Wunderground member Levi32 was out storm chasing during the El Reno Tornado, and got stuck in traffic on Highway 4 and couldn't move. "We looked up above the car and saw the wall cloud over top of us, with very quick rotation and rising scud indicating the updraft. We were definitely too close."


Video 1. Severe storm researcher and engineer Tim Samaras talks about his view on tornadoes and what remains to be understood in this interview posted on May 21, 2013.


Video 2. A tornado passes over one of Tim Samaras' specially designed six-camera video probes on June 11, 2004 near Storm Lake, Iowa.

Tornadoes and cars: a dangerous mix
A vehicle is about the worst place you can be in a tornado, as the tornado's winds can easily roll a car. (The only place less safe is probably a mobile home, as a tornado's winds can roll mobile homes almost as readily, and mobile homes don't come with seat belts and air bags.) At least five of the deaths in Friday's El Reno tornado occurred in vehicles. There was one local TV station that urged residents without underground shelters to get in their cars and "get south" in advance of the tornado that was approaching Oklahoma City, since chasers were reporting that the El Reno tornado may have been so strong that only an underground shelter would have provided adequate protection. This terrible piece of advice likely contributed to the incredible traffic jams that we saw on I-35, I-40, I-44, and other local roads Friday night. Thousands of cars were bumper-to-bumper on the roads as a dangerous tornado approached them. Had the El Reno tornado plowed directly down one of these car-choked interstates, the death toll could have easily exceeded 500. If you are located in a metro area and don't have an underground shelter, the best thing to do it to take shelter in an interior windowless room or hallway, with protective furniture over your body. Getting in a car and attempting to flee the tornado is the worst thing you can do in an urban area. You may not be able to see the tornado if it is dark or the tornado is wrapped in rain. You are likely to encounter hazardous winds, rain, and hail, run into unexpected traffic, or flooded or debris-blocked roads that will put you directly in the path of the tornado. Even without an underground shelter, most people will be able to survive a dangerous EF-4 tornado. Case in point: during the Mannsford, Oklahoma EF- 4 tornado of 1984, a packed church received a direct hit, and everyone in the church survived. The only fatality was a man who drove to the church to get his wife. It is often better to abandon your vehicle and take shelter in a ditch, if you are caught in a car during a tornado. However, if there is already flying debris in the air, leaving your car and exposing yourself to the debris in order to get to a ditch may be more hazardous than staying in your car. Furthermore, ditches are prone to flash floods. Four deaths during the El Reno tornado were from a family of seven that sheltered in a drainage ditch, and were washed into the Deep Fork River by a flash flood. Searchers are still looking for the other three bodies. A 2002 research paper, "UNSAFE AT ANY (WIND) SPEED? Testing the Stability of Motor Vehicles in Severe Winds" found that: "The stability and superior safety of being in a vehicle in severe winds, relative to occupying a mobile home or being outdoors, should be considered." Also, TWC's severe weather expert, Dr. Greg Forbes, commented on the pros and cons of abandoning one's vehicle for a ditch in a 2009 blog post, "Tornado Safety - Cars Versus Ditches: A Controversy." His personal take on what he would do if his car was being overtaken by a tornado, and no sturdy buildings were nearby to take shelter in: "I can't see myself getting out of the vehicle. I'd try first to drive away from the tornado. Both the NWS and the American Red Cross actually also advocate this. If you can determine which way the tornado is moving toward, face your body toward that direction and then go to the right, as shown in the diagram below. That is usually toward the south or southeast. The reason that it's best to head this way is that if you went to the left you would normally get into the region where largest hail and blinding rain occur in the kind of supercell, rotating thunderstorms that often spawn tornadoes. If I had no such driving option and I did feel the urge to get out of my car, I'd try to get into a building, and into a ditch well away from the car as the last resort."

My condolences and prayers go to all of the family and friends of Tim Samaras, Paul Samaras, and Carl Young. Their deaths are a terrible shock to the meteorological community, and a great loss for tornado science. I hope that their deaths will lead towards safer tornado chasing, and help spur efforts to use emerging drone technology to take measurements in dangerous storms such as tornadoes and hurricanes.

Jeff Masters

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1. WIDESPREAD CLOUDINESS AND SHOWERS...ASSOCIATED WITH A TROUGH OF LOW
PRESSURE EXTENDING FROM THE YUCATAN PENINSULA TO THE STRAITS OF
FLORIDA...HAVE CHANGED LITTLE IN ORGANIZATION DURING THE PAST
SEVERAL HOURS. ANY DEVELOPMENT OF THIS SYSTEM IS LIKELY TO BE SLOW
TO OCCUR DUE TO MARGINALLY FAVORABLE ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS.
THIS SYSTEM HAS A LOW CHANCE...20 PERCENT...OF BECOMING A TROPICAL
CYCLONE DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS AS IT DRIFTS GENERALLY NORTHWARD.

ELSEWHERE...TROPICAL CYCLONE FORMATION IS NOT EXPECTED DURING THE
NEXT 48 HOURS.

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Quoting Chicklit:
Good morning from Florida everybody,
here come the blobs


Wheres the blobologist (Grothar)? i havent seen him in a while...
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JeffMasters, thank you for appearing on TWC to explain what he did, as well as posting this about it too.
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Good morning from Florida everybody,
here come the blobs
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06z GFS










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00z Euro






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Member Since: September 10, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 11157
12z CMC




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Good morning all. I'm hoping we don't get too much more rain from this soaker... but expecting at least some today. Ya'll stay safe out there... I gotta run.
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22136
Quoting hurricanehunter27:
Ugh. So disappointing. Did not really capture it.

Great and its sideways.
not bad, connsidering it's from a cell phone.
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22136
lack of sea grass up here in the mosquito lagoon manatees are suspects too
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invest 91L will be only a rain storm .
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Nice interview with mike Bettes this morning on TWC. Great tribute to the chasers that lost their lives. MIke Bettes seems very humble right now.
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Quoting islander101010:
seems as if the rains from 91 have started. up here in e cen fl a half inch so far alot more in the interiors. heard sw coast by ft myers got a wet start with 91 too


I'm hating this.. we currently have discharges from Okeechobee Lake coming into our St. Lucie estuary.. and this new rain will add to that... we still haven't recovered from Isaac.. 55 square miles of dead seagrasses in the northern lagoon, and now discharges wrecking the ecosystems in the southern end...
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Good morning to all,evening Aussie.

Here is this mornings discussion of 91L by Crown Weather.

Crown Weather analysis
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seems as if the rains from 91 have started. up here in e cen fl a half inch so far alot more in the interiors. heard sw coast by ft myers got a wet start with 91 too
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Quoting AussieStorm:
I'm just sitting waiting for someone to join me.....


chewin' on me grits


grits is good.. mmm mmm :)

Evening Mr. Aussie!
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Cape Town Storm -June 2 2013 Hail Snow Link
Member Since: October 27, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 2026
An exceptionally cold weather in the South African capital of Cape Town, which is actually located in a subtropical zone. The city is covered for the first time in many years with snow.


Link
Member Since: October 27, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 2026
Russian Market‏@russian_market22 min
All-time high flooding in Germany.
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Back in a few hours.
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I'm just sitting waiting for someone to join me.....


chewin' on me grits
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DAY 1 CONVECTIVE OUTLOOK
NWS STORM PREDICTION CENTER NORMAN OK
1231 AM CDT MON JUN 03 2013

VALID 031200Z - 041200Z

...THERE IS A SLGT RISK OF SVR TSTMS FROM THE SRN THROUGH THE CNTRL
HIGH PLAINS...

...SYNOPSIS...

PROGRESSIVE SYNOPTIC PATTERN WILL PREVAIL MONDAY WITH BELT OF FASTER
WLYS CONFINED TO NRN TIER STATES. UPPER TROUGH CENTERED OVER ONTARIO
WILL ADVANCE INTO QUEBEC...WHILE SHORTWAVE TROUGH OVER THE NRN
ROCKIES MOVES INTO THE NRN PLAINS MONDAY AFTERNOON. THIS TROUGH WILL
BE ACCOMPANIED BY A FRONT THAT WILL OCCLUDE OVER THE NRN PLAINS WITH
TRAILING COLD FRONT EXTENDING SWWD THROUGH THE CNTRL ROCKIES. LEE
TROUGH/DRYLINE WILL EXTEND FROM THE SRN THROUGH THE CNTRL HIGH
PLAINS DURING THE DAY.

...CNTRL THROUGH SRN HIGH PLAINS AREAS...

LOW-MID 50S DEWPOINTS WILL ADVECT THROUGH THE SRN AND CNTRL HIGH
PLAINS BENEATH STEEP MID-LEVEL LAPSE RATES ALONG SLY LLJ EAST OF LEE
TROUGH. THIS PROCESS IN CONJUNCTION WITH DIABATIC WARMING WILL
RESULT IN AN AXIS OF 1500-2000 J/KG MLCAPE FROM WRN TX NWD THROUGH
CNTRL NEB...WITH THE GREATER INSTABILITY LIKELY OVER WRN TX. STRONG
DIABATIC WARMING WILL CONTRIBUTE TO DEEPLY MIXED BOUNDARY LAYERS
ALONG AND WEST OF THE TROUGH AXIS. STORMS WILL LIKELY DEVELOP BY
LATE AFTERNOON WITHIN ZONE OF CONVERGENCE AND WEAKENING CONVECTIVE
INHIBITION ALONG THIS BOUNDARY. BELT OF STRONGER WLYS WILL RESIDE
NORTH OF THE WARM SECTOR. HOWEVER...SELY WINDS VEERING TO WLY 30-35
KT AT 500 MB WILL RESULT IN 40+ KT EFFECTIVE SHEAR FROM NRN PART OF
WRN TX NWD THROUGH THE CNTRL PLAINS. HIGHER BASED SUPERCELLS WILL BE
THE INITIAL STORM MODE...BUT SOME OF THE ACTIVITY MAY EVENTUALLY
CONGEAL INTO LINE SEGMENTS AND CLUSTERS AND PERSIST INTO THE PLAINS
DURING THE EVENING SUPPORTED BY A STRENGTHENING LLJ. LARGE HAIL AND
DAMAGING WIND WILL BE THE MAIN THREATS THROUGH MID EVENING.

...SWRN TX...

OTHER STORMS WILL LIKELY DEVELOP FARTHER SOUTH OVER THE HIGHER
TERRAIN OF SWRN TX WITHIN AN ENVIRONMENT OF WEAK SHEAR...BUT STEEP
LAPSE RATES AND MODERATE INSTABILITY WILL SUPPORT A THREAT FOR
ISOLATED DOWNBURSTS AND LARGE HAIL. DUE TO WEAK FLOW ALOFT...THIS
ACTIVITY WILL PROBABLY SLOW TO MOVE OFF THE HIGHER TERRAIN.

THERE IS A SLGT RISK OF SVR TSTMS TO THE RIGHT OF A LINE FROM 35 E
LAA ITR 45 ENE AKO 35 NE SNY 35 ENE AIA 60 ENE CDR 30 SSE PHP 20 SSW
PIR 30 NW 9V9 15 E 9V9 30 NNE ONL 35 N GRI 40 WNW CNK 40 W HUT 45
SSW AVK 20 SW LTS 60 NW ABI 25 NE BGS 25 NNE MAF 25 E HOB 50 N HOB
20 ENE CVS 25 SSW DHT 20 WSW EHA 35 E LAA.

GEN TSTMS ARE FCST TO THE RIGHT OF A LINE FROM 65 S DMN 30 SW ALM 25
W SRR 15 NE ONM 55 SSW GNT 25 WSW GNT 45 N GNT 45 SW CEZ 25 ESE PGA
55 ESE SGU 20 SE SGU 25 NNE P38 25 WSW TPH 35 N NID 35 WSW NID 40
NNW BFL 10 NNW FAT 45 SSW TVL 50 W RNO 20 WNW RNO 40 S NFL 30 NNE
U31 55 N ELY 55 W U24 10 WSW U24 45 ENE U24 15 NNW VEL 35 SE RWL 15
SE TOR 30 NNE TOR 55 NNE DGW 40 S GCC 45 SSE WRL 25 SW JAC 45 W MQM
45 SSE LWS 55 NNE BLI ...CONT... 80 NNW ISN 40 ENE N60 35 S GFK 30
NNE AXN 50 SSE RST 25 ESE CID 40 ESE IRK 45 NNE JLN 15 ENE ADM 20
WSW MWL 30 NNW JCT 20 SSW DRT ...CONT... 60 S 7R4 25 ENE 7R4 35 E
BTR 25 W PIB 15 SSE MEI 35 E CHA 25 W SHD 25 SSW MSV 30 WNW AUG 35
ENE CAR.
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goodnight to all work in a few. yall be good
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727. TXCWC
Quoting KoritheMan:


You can't find those products just anywhere. I don't consider $99 per year an unfair price considering the quality of his products, anyway.


Don't get me wrong, I understand the business angle and wanting to grow...but after YEARS of free access to go suddenly to a paid access is a bit of a shock...especially when living and barely getting by paycheck to paycheck...will simply be going to Noaa's model pgs and the British Met model page more as well as other sites...now off my vent for the night...carry on :)
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I'm going to bed. Check out my blog created few hours ago if you like:

Bluestorm5's Blog from June 2nd, 2013
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 28 Comments: 8009
Quoting wunderkidcayman:

yeah but remember unlike some of us they don't take storm tacking and trop. meteorology as a profession it rather more of a hobby and some just don't think its worth it


True. I can't imagine writing my forecasts without Allan's page, though.
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anyway I'm out be back in a few hours
Member Since: June 13, 2009 Posts: 2 Comments: 12024
NHC's 24-72 hour forecast map are out and NHC does not develop the low anymore a matter of fact NHC doesn't even have a low anymore
Member Since: June 13, 2009 Posts: 2 Comments: 12024
Quoting KoritheMan:


You can't find those products just anywhere. I don't consider $99 per year an unfair price considering the quality of his products, anyway.

yeah but remember unlike some of us they don't take storm tacking and trop. meteorology as a profession it rather more of a hobby and some just don't think its worth it
Member Since: June 13, 2009 Posts: 2 Comments: 12024
Quoting TXCWC:
Are you kidding me...I am gone a day or two off the net and now find out Allen Huffman's site is now PAID subscription to access GFS and all other models except the rap...no thank you...will look elsewhere for model data :/


You can't find those products just anywhere. I don't consider $99 per year an unfair price considering the quality of his products, anyway.
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720. TXCWC
Are you kidding me...I am gone a day or two off the net and now find out Allen Huffman's site is now PAID subscription to access GFS and all other models except the rap...no thank you...will look elsewhere for model data :/
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As we mourn the loss of brave souls who put instruments into the tornadoes path, and the injured storm chasers at TWC; I found these curious forecast graphics doing some digging around in my non-published files. Apparently I had become almost obsessed with this particular area of interest, culminating in the forecast that I published here on March 27, 2013(Post 978.) I'll typically create several graphics, and then choose the one I like best to convey the forecast I'm trying to depict.





Who could of imagined that in 2013 this trail of tears would lead to a news focus of demolished cars with their "roofs partly caved in" as opposed to homes and businesses, which are typically the focus in the aftermath of a violent tornado.

In my curious nightmare, I only saw the aftermath, not the storm in progress, and my primary focus was on the cars I saw, not homes or businesses. I simply assumed that the cause was giant hail, but in retrospect hail would not likely have caused the type of damage that I saw. What I saw was far too devastating. So why was the primary focus on the cars I saw? I think I have the answer.

In the future, I'll simply report what I see, not guess as to the cause I suspect, as it would have been a more accurate forecast. The region affected, however, and the curious focus of the vehicle damage that resulted, were correct.
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Quoting sar2401:

Those water temperatures are actually a little on the cool side, or least so I remember from my scuba diving trips in many of those locations.

Heres another look at where the potential 91L maybe headed towards water temps.
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Quoting sar2401:

Those water temperatures are actually a little on the cool side, or least so I remember from my scuba diving trips in many of those locations.
Yeah i see that but surprising me is that near Pensacola its still 78. One would think the 91L thing would not develop with that cool water if it persist.
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Quoting bigwes6844:



Those water temperatures are actually a little on the cool side, or least so I remember from my scuba diving trips in many of those locations.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 15236
Quoting allancalderini:
you live in Georgia I suppose I live in Honduras.

Where in Honduras? I spent a couple of weeks in Catacamas three years ago in July. We had a relatively small tropical storm come ashore and the amount of rainfall was amazing. It was three days before they could clear the roads and we could leave. It's not the kind of place I want to be during hurricane season again.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 15236
Quoting hurricanehunter27:
I had an EF3 this January not to far north of me. They do tend to be weak though and from linear lines.
I had an EF3 shaving part of my town on April 16, 2011 here. I was only few miles from it although I never saw it.
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 28 Comments: 8009
Quoting sar2401:

Really, trying to chase storms in Alabama and Georgia is both unrewarding and dangerous. Except for those rare outbreaks, most of our tornadoes are fairly weak and are short path events. Even the stronger storms tend to be rain wrapped, and a tornado can pop out right on top of you. Our normal summertime visibility is pretty poor, and it's even worse in bad weather. At least on the plains, you have some chance of seeing a tornado on the ground and staying out of the way...although Friday's events tragically showed that isn't always true either.
Honestly, if I do go storm chasing in the future (might only do this once or twice in my lifetime), I'm staying away from the South. Too much trees. Central North Carolina and Central South Carolina are not too bad, but they don't get anything strong.
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 28 Comments: 8009


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Quoting hurricanehunter27:
Yeah. I am just glad I got to see it. I would chase myself but Georgia country is not to friendly to storm chasers.

Really, trying to chase storms in Alabama and Georgia is both unrewarding and dangerous. Except for those rare outbreaks, most of our tornadoes are fairly weak and are short path events. Even the stronger storms tend to be rain wrapped, and a tornado can pop out right on top of you. Our normal summertime visibility is pretty poor, and it's even worse in bad weather. At least on the plains, you have some chance of seeing a tornado on the ground and staying out of the way...although Friday's events tragically showed that isn't always true either.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 15236
June 2

June 8
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Just released my 4th blog update of the 2013 Atlantic season....

I think 91-L will become a tropical cyclone (tropical depression or tropical storm) within the next 5 days...and give details on how I think it will happen. Details in special feature section of that blog post...
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Quoting hurricanehunter27:
I had an EF3 this January not to far north of me. They do tend to be weak though and from linear lines.
Quoting hurricanehunter27:
I had an EF3 this January not to far north of me. They do tend to be weak though and from linear lines.
you live in Georgia I suppose I live in Honduras.
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Quoting allancalderini:
They are really really weird the last one was in 2012 and they are likely EF=0
I had an EF3 this January not to far north of me. They do tend to be weak though and from linear lines.
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I knew that the Friday storms gave many storm chasers close calls (particularly Mike Bettes and his crew), but I didn't know until reading Dr. Master's blog that storm chasers actually died.

I hate people dying, particularly those who are just trying to advance science to save lives. They've brought much praise to their family for putting the lives of others first before themselves (they were raised right). Those were good people who died. I am sorry for your loss.
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Quoting hurricanehunter27:
Yeah. I am just glad I got to see it. I would chase myself but Georgia country is not to friendly to storm chasers.
They are really really weird the last one was in 2012 and they are likely EF=0
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Quoting allancalderini:
At least you try :D and the intention is what matters.
Yeah. I am just glad I got to see it. I would chase myself but Georgia country is not to friendly to storm chasers.
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Quoting hurricanehunter27:
Yes but it was really quite spectacular. Trying to find peoples other photos of it.
Here is one:
Quoting hurricanehunter27:
Ugh. So disappointing. Did not really capture it.

Great and its sideways.
At least you try :D and the intention is what matters.
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.