A Night of Tornado Chaos in Oklahoma City: 9 Killed, 71 Injured

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 7:21 PM GMT on June 01, 2013

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It was a terrifying evening of tornado chaos and extreme atmospheric violence in the Oklahoma City area on Friday. Three tornadoes touched down near the city, killing nine, injuring at least 71, and causing widespread destruction. Huge hail up to baseball-sized battered portions the the metro area, accompanied by torrential flooding rains, widespread damaging straight-line winds, and lightning that flashed nearly continuously. The strongest tornado, which touched down west of Oklahoma City in El Reno, has been preliminarily rated an EF-3 with 136 - 165 mph winds. The tornado warning for the storm was issued 19 minutes before it touched down. Two other EF-3 tornadoes touched down near St. Louis, Missouri, and NOAA's Storm Prediction Center (SPC) logged 20 preliminary tornado reports on Friday. Tinker Air Force Base on the east side of Oklahoma City reported sustained winds of 68 mph, gusting to 88 mph, at 8:09 pm CDT. The Oklahoma City airport had sustained winds of 53 mph, gusting to 71 mph at 7:26 pm. These winds were generated by the massive and powerful downdrafts from the supercell thunderstorm that spawned the El Reno tornado. Thankfully, Friday was likely the peak day for this week's severe weather outbreak, as SPC is calling for only a "Slight Risk" of severe weather Saturday and Sunday.


Figure 1. TWC's Mike ‪Bettes‬ crew caught this image of the El Reno, Oklahoma tornado of May 31, 2013 before the tornado caught them and rolled their vehicle.



Figure 2 and 3. Radar reflectivity (top) and Doppler velocity (bottom) images of the May 31, 2013 El Reno, Oklahoma tornado.


Figure 4. Preliminary tracks of the three tornadoes that touched done near Oklahoma City on May 31, 2013. Image credit: NWS Norman, OK.

Tornadoes and cars: a dangerous mix
A vehicle is about the worst place you can be in a tornado, as the tornado's winds can easily roll a car. (The only place less safe is probably a mobile home, as a tornado's winds can roll mobile homes almost as readily, and mobile homes don't come with seat belts and air bags.) At least five of the deaths in Friday's El Reno tornado occurred in vehicles attempting to flee. There was one local TV station that urged residents without underground shelters to get in their cars and "get south" in advance of the tornado that was approaching Oklahoma City, since chasers were reporting that the El Reno tornado may have been so strong that only an underground shelter would have provided adequate protection. This terrible piece of advice likely contributed to the incredible traffic jams that we saw on I-35, I-40, I-44, and other local roads Friday night. Thousands of cars were bumper-to-bumper on the roads as a dangerous tornado approached them. Had the El Reno tornado plowed directly down one of these car-choked interstates, the death toll could have easily exceeded 500. If you are located in a metro area and don't have an underground shelter, the best thing to do it to take shelter in an interior windowless room or hallway, with protective furniture over your body. Getting in a car and attempting to flee the tornado is the worst thing you can do in an urban area. You may not be able to see the tornado if it is dark or the tornado is wrapped in rain. You are likely to encounter hazardous winds, rain, and hail, run into unexpected traffic, or flooded or debris-blocked roads that will put you directly in the path of the tornado. Even without an underground shelter, most people will be able to survive a dangerous EF-4 tornado. Case in point: during the Mannford, Oklahoma EF-4 tornado of 1984, a packed church received a direct hit, and everyone in the church survived. The only fatality was a man who drove to the church to get his wife. (Thanks to wunderground member AGWcreationists for this link.) It's better to abandon your vehicle and take shelter in a ditch, if you are caught in a car during a tornado.


Video 1. The Weather Channel storm chasers weren't the only ones who got themselves in an extremely dangerous situation on May 31. StormChasingVideo.com storm chaser Brandon Sullivan and his chase partner Brett Wright got caught in the tornado northwest of Union City, OK and slammed with debris as the tornado hit a barn that exploded in front of them.


Video 2. When the hunters became the hunted: Weather Channel storm chasers ‪Mike Bettes and two photographers were in their Tornado Hunt vehicle when they were hit by a tornado in El Reno, Oklahoma on May 31,‬ ‪2013. ‬The tornado picked their car up off the ground and rolled it 6 - 8 times before depositing it in a field 200 yards away. All the occupants were wearing seat belts and the air bags deployed, likely saving their lives. Bettes sustained minor injuries, including stitches in his hand. It was the first injury sustained by a Weather Channel personality covering violent weather, according to company spokesperson Shirley Powell.

A storm chasers' nightmare
Cars and tornadoes can prove a dangerous mix even for the world's most experienced storm chasers. Driving at high speeds though heavy rain, large hail, and high winds is hazardous. If one is lucky enough to chase down a tornado, even the most experienced chasers can find themselves in a serious life-threatening situation when unpredictable events occur. Tornadoes by their nature are unpredictable, and can change course unexpectedly, or pop up suddenly. It's particularly dangerous when a tornado is wrapped in rain, making it hard to see, or if a chaser is operating in a heavily populated area, where roads may suddenly become congested. All four of these conditions occurred Friday during the El Reno tornado, and it is very fortunate that multiple chasers were not killed. The El Reno tornado was wrapped in rain and difficult to see as it headed west towards Oklahoma City. The twister suddenly made a jog to the southeast as a Weather Channel team led by Mike Bettes was attempting to get in front of the storm, and the tornado lifted their vehicle off the ground, rolled it multiple times, and hurled it 200 yards into a nearby field. StormChasingVideo.com storm chaser Brandon Sullivan and his chase partner Brett Wright got caught in the tornado northwest of Union City, OK and slammed with debris as the tornado hit a barn that exploded in front of them. Meteorologist Emily Sutton and storm chaser Kevin Josefy of local Oklahoma City TV station KFOR also had a very close call with the El Reno tornado Friday afternoon. They got too close to the tornado, and were forced to floor the car in reverse to escape flying debris. With branches of trees crashing around them, Sutton began feeling debris hitting her back, and realized that the rear windshield of the car must have gotten destroyed. Both were uninjured. Reed Timmer's armor-plated "Dominator" chase vehicle had its hood torn off by the tornado. Wunderground member Levi32 was out storm chasing during the El Reno Tornado, and got stuck in traffic on Highway 4 and couldn't move. "We looked up above the car and saw the wall cloud over top of us, with very quick rotation and rising scud indicating the updraft. We were definitely too close. We made it home safely last night, but not until after an insanely wild day. One hour of chasing turned into six more of being chased by at least 2 tornadoes and a 3rd wall cloud, one of which was the one that went right through downtown Oklahoma City. At one point we were stuck in traffic underneath the El Rino wall cloud watching rotating, rising scud directly above the car. I am hoping and praying that the daylight does not reveal more fatalities.

Would I go again? Yes, but not today, or tomorrow, and I would take even greater care. We had no clue we would get caught the way we did. I thought we had done everything right. We were kind of freaking out for a while. That velocity signature you guys saw with radar folding and multiple vortices - we were under the southern edge of it. We never got a clear view of the tornado, but we could tell just how close it was to our north. It was unreal. The inflow got pretty strong.

We were almost ready to jump out and take cover right before we found a route south, which ended up being slow. It became a six-lane highway south as everyone panicked and drove on the wrong side of the road. Even we did so. We thought we were clear until we saw the training of tornadic supercells on radar, all connected somehow. I've never seen anything like that. My best pictures of the day were of the wall cloud that followed behind the El Reno storm. We didn't see a funnel from that one either, but it chased us south for a long time, and we heard from radio that it spawned a confirmed tornado in Tuttle, when we realized that we were in Tuttle.

A third mesocyclone showed up behind that one as we continued slowly south, eventually reaching Blanchard. It looked weaker than the others but we weren't going to escape it, so we took shelter in a storm room in the local grocery store for about an hour. It then took a long time to find a way around the huge hail cores to get back home. Lightning flashes were occurring 10 times per second as we drove home in the dark. It was almost calming to watch as we got over the semi-shock that we were all in. None of us in the car had seen a tornado before. We didn't see one yesterday, but we were chased by two."



Video 3. Birth of the El Reno wedge tornado. As the tornado touched down, it produced a rare display of suction vortices.

Video 4. Storm chasers Jeff Piotrowski and Kathryn Piotrowski captured impressive footage of a double vortex tornado near El Reno, Oklahoma on May 31, 2013.

Severe storms causing major flooding
The 5.64" of rain that fell at the Oklahoma City Will Rogers Airport on Friday was their 6th wettest day in city history, and brought the total rainfall for the month of May to 14.52", the wettest May in Oklahoma City's history (Thanks to BaltimoreBrian for this link.) The North Canadian River in Oklahoma City rose sixteen feet in twelve hours, cresting at its 2nd highest flood on record this Saturday morning. The heavy rains have spread eastwards on Saturday, causing more flooding problems. Paducah, KY had its wettest June day and 3rd wettest day on record on June 1, with 5.73" of rain (all-time record: 7.49" on 9/5/1985.) Major flooding is occurring along a substantial stretch of the Mississippi River in Iowa, Illinois, and Missouri.


Figure 5. The North Canadian River in Oklahoma City rose sixteen feet in twelve hours, reaching its 2nd highest flood on record this Saturday morning.


Figure 6. Radar-estimated rainfall in the Oklahoma City area reached 8+" over some areas from Friday's storm.

Remains of Hurricane Barbara may bring heavy rains to Mexico, Florida, and Cuba
Today, June 1, is the official first day of the Atlantic Hurricane season, and we already have our first Atlantic tropical disturbance to talk about. Hurricane Barbara, which died on Thursday as it attempted to cross Mexico's Isthmus of Tehuantepec into the southernmost Gulf of Mexico, has left behind an area of disturbed weather over the southernmost Gulf of Mexico. There is very little heavy thunderstorm activity associated with Barbara's remnants apparent on satellite loops this Saturday afternoon. Wind shear is a high 20 knots in the region, and the area of disturbed weather is quite small, so I don't expect any development to occur over the next few days. NHC is giving the disturbance a 10% chance of developing into a tropical cyclone by Monday. Moisture from the remnants of Barbara may combine with moisture from an area of heavy thunderstorms expected to build over the Western Caribbean this weekend, and begin bringing heavy rains to Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula and Western Cuba on Sunday and Monday. These heavy rains may spread to Southwest Florida as early as Monday night. The computer models predict that this disturbance should be large and poorly organized, making development into a Gulf of Mexico tropical cyclone unlikely.

My next post will be Monday at the latest.

Jeff Masters

LotsOfWater... (CalicoBass)
from the heavy rains overnight, flowing over this low water bridge. We were waiting to see if something about our size drove over it okay (we were in a Toyota Pickup), this is a bit bigger than us, lol.
LotsOfWater...
Sunset Strike (mrwing13)
NE Oklahoma is under the gun, again today. Severe weather, threatens to produce more damaging storms.
Sunset Strike
tornado (modernsourdough)
near bennington, ks
tornado

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Quoting ProgressivePulse:
It's going to have a tough life but I think 84.9W 20.0N is our potential seed.



This is going to be one those typical sheared June systems. The real action starts later.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 588 Comments: 20881
317. etxwx
Post #301 ScottLincoln, I agree, that anecdotal stories of survival or tragedy should not be used to make a plan. What I took away from that piece was that it's important know the situation and the risks. The statistics of survival rates for sheltering in place that you cited in an earlier post were revealing and need to be emphasized more - especially when the media concentrates on showing totally flatten houses.

Quoting Chicklit:
...or go to a public evacuation area that was created in order to protect people in the event of a tornado. I heard on the news that thousands of people (?2) went to the underground tornado shelter at the airport. This is what I'm talking about.


Yup. To me, the most important line in that NPR piece was the last sentence: "Without a storm shelter, Oklahoma can be a dangerous place." As someone who remembers the "fallout shelter" signs on public buildings, it seems like communities could evaluate sturdy buildings and mark them as emergency storm shelters, so people know where they can go.
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SYNOPSIS FOR THE GULF OF MEXICO
1004 PM EDT SAT JUN 1 2013

.SYNOPSIS...ATLC HIGH PRES RIDGE EXTEND W ACROSS NORTHERN GULF
THROUGH MON THEN SHIFT E THROUGH WED. TROUGH WITH EMBEDDED LOW
PRES CENTER 1006 MB IN S BAY OF CAMPECHE DRIFT IN N-NE SUN AND
MON. WEAK COLD FRONT EXPECTED TO MOVE INTO FAR NW GULF SUN AND
REACH FROM BIG BEND FLORIDA TO 28N94W THEN DRIFT N BACK INLAND
TUE AND WED.


Broad low indeed. Typical early July sheared mess..



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The day that should change tornado actions and storm chasing forever
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15940
Quoting ProgressivePulse:


Help "must" come from outside. I think coastal cane areas should form a unified coalition in efforts to reduce costs and increase response time.


You would think that would be FEMA but, lol at that.
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so there is a low pressure center in the BOC?

SYNOPSIS FOR THE GULF OF MEXICO
1004 PM EDT SAT JUN 1 2013

.SYNOPSIS...ATLC HIGH PRES RIDGE EXTEND W ACROSS NORTHERN GULF
THROUGH MON THEN SHIFT E THROUGH WED. TROUGH WITH EMBEDDED LOW
PRES CENTER 1006 MB IN S BAY OF CAMPECHE DRIFT IN N-NE SUN AND
MON. WEAK COLD FRONT EXPECTED TO MOVE INTO FAR NW GULF SUN AND
REACH FROM BIG BEND FLORIDA TO 28N94W THEN DRIFT N BACK INLAND
TUE AND WED.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
AREA FORECAST DISCUSSION
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MIAMI FL
1030 PM EDT SAT JUN 1 2013

.UPDATE...IT WAS A VERY ACTIVE WEATHER DAY ACROSS SOUTH FLORIDA
WITH AREAS OF HEAVY RAINFALL, RESULTING IN LOCALIZED FLOODING.
HARDEST HIT WAS WEST BOCA AND THEN HEAVY RAINS SOAKED THE PEMBROKE
PINES-SOUTHWEST RANCHES AND SURROUNDING AREAS WITH FLOODING
REPORTED THERE. THE RAIN HAS COME TO AN END. HAVE PLACED JUST
SLIGHT CHANCE POPS AREA WIDE OVERNIGHT.

ACTIVE WEATHER WILL OCCUR OVER THE NEXT SEVERAL DAYS AS DEEP
MOISTURE REMAINS IN PLACE, ONLY TO INCREASE BY THE MIDDLE PART OF
NEXT WEEK OVER SOUTH FLORIDA AS IT LOOKS AS THOUGH WE WILL BE ON
THE TROPICALLY MOIST SIDE OF A TROUGH OR LOW WITH PWATS SURGING UP
TO NEAR 2.5 INCHES. THIS COULD SPELL VERY HEAVY RAINFALL AND
FLOODING CONCERNS NEXT WEEK. RAINFALL SOMEWHERE COULD BECOME
EXCESSIVE, BUT WHERE THAT SETS UP REMAINS UNCERTAIN. SOME MODEL
RUNS SHOW THE EXCESSIVE RAINS OVER THE GULF OF MEXICO, WHILE OTHER
RUNS PLACE IT OVER SOUTH FL. HARD TO SAY AT THIS POINT. RIGHT NOW
TUE-THU LOOKS WETTEST. THERE ARE ALSO INDICATIONS OF WIND FIELDS
BECOMING POTENTIALLY FAVORABLE FOR MINI-SUPERCELL TORNADO
POTENTIAL BY LATE TUE AS HELICITY INCREASES IN A VERY TROPICALLY,
MOIST ENVIRONMENT. SO A LOT TO KEEP AN EYE ON HERE IN THE COMING
DAYS. /GREGORIA
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Quoting sar2401:
Pat, in reference to evacuteer.org, this is an idea that sounds good but will not work. There's a reason why FEMA USAR teams are always bought in from outside a disaster area. Local resources are either overwhelmed or they are busy taking care of their own families. It's hard enough to keep paid personnel on the job in the face of a mass evacuation, as was shown in New Orleans during Katrina. It will literally be impossible to keep hundreds of volunteers in New Orleans, helping to evacuate others, when they and their own families are at risk. All the drills will go fine but, when the real thing happens, this will all fall apart. It would make more sense to rain volunteers from outside the city and transort them in before a hurricane, but that's expensive and the outside volunteers will lack local knowledge. Having been involved in these kinds of efforts in real life, this is a plan which has almost no chance of success but will be a money pit with very little return.


Help "must" come from outside. I think coastal cane areas should form a unified coalition in efforts to reduce costs and increase response time.
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Pat, in reference to evacuteer.org, this is an idea that sounds good but will not work. There's a reason why FEMA USAR teams are always bought in from outside a disaster area. Local resources are either overwhelmed or they are busy taking care of their own families. It's hard enough to keep paid personnel on the job in the face of a mass evacuation, as was shown in New Orleans during Katrina. It will literally be impossible to keep hundreds of volunteers in New Orleans, helping to evacuate others, when they and their own families are at risk. All the drills will go fine but, when the real thing happens, this will all fall apart. It would make more sense to rain volunteers from outside the city and transort them in before a hurricane, but that's expensive and the outside volunteers will lack local knowledge. Having been involved in these kinds of efforts in real life, this is a plan which has almost no chance of success but will be a money pit with very little return.
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Quoting Ricki13th:


Interesting it looks like something is trying to consolidate over the Yucatan Channel. It seem to be trying to absorb ex90L's vorticity. However, we will see if the convection and persist tonight.


..ex?

per NRL Navy:

(greenball) 90L.INVEST
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It's going to have a tough life but I think 84.9W 20.0N is our potential seed.

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Quoting Tazmanian:



oh boy i be rich if i win
Quoting Tazmanian:




ya right he's not going too pay out 100,000 i don't even think he has 100,000 too give so why did you say some in like that

i would remove that comment you made

Make up your mind Taz....
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15940
Quoting stormchaser19:
Wind shear tendency is decreasing,right in front of Cancun Mexico, this is where i think something is trying to develop, we'll see!!!


Interesting it looks like something is trying to consolidate over the Yucatan Channel. It seem to be trying to absorb ex90L's vorticity. However, we will see if the convection and persist tonight.
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...or go to a public evacuation area that was created in order to protect people in the event of a tornado. I heard on the news that thousands of people (?2) went to the underground tornado shelter at the airport. This is what I'm talking about.
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You guys know what???

I might sort of reward the one who nails the numbers for the season. All of those on my chart have a shot...

I'll think about what to do...
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Wind shear tendency is decreasing,right in front of Cancun Mexico, this is where i think something is trying to develop, we'll see!!!
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Quoting etxwx:
This pretty much sums it up as far as tornado evacuation.
From NPR: No 'Universal' Best Practice To Save Yourself From Tornadoes

Excerpt: In Moore, those who hunkered down as best they could died anyway, including a mother and infant who'd taken shelter in a 7-Eleven's metal freezer box.

Friday, Oklahomans got in their cars and trucks to flee, but some of them died at the wheel, including a mother and infant.

Without a storm shelter, Oklahoma can be a dangerous place.


LinkRita

These kinds of articles are actually pretty bad, and misleading. The risk is higher in your vehicle on the road when compared to being in a sturdy structure, especially when compared to being in an interior room in a sturdy structure. Sheltering in your home on the lowest floor in an interior room is the safest course of action in most situations. There is little to no controversy to these risk statistics.

What happens after most major tornado events is that people begin to look at the situation with hindsight in mind. You'll get comments like "see these people were in their basement and they died in the EF5, I guess no where is safe" or "well I grabbed my kid from the school and drove 70mph south to ____ City and we lived, that's what saved me." In those exact situations, all the little unpredictable things came together such that the conclusion worked out that way; someone following the best practice died, and someone doing a not-so-best practice survived. But they are anecdotes, and when not combined with the wider body of evidence they really mean very little. If everyone followed this anecdote as if it were good advice, I can virtually guarantee you that tornado fatalities and injuries would increase. It is almost a mathematically certainty based upon the calculated risks.

There are numerous situations where major tornadoes have crossed busy highways. In those cases, there have almost always been numerous fatalities and serious injuries. In some tornadoes, the majority of the casualties have been in vehicles. Look at Wichita Falls, Plainfield, and the recent OKC metro tornadoes as examples.

The chance of your house being struck by a tornado is very very low. The chance of your house being struck by a tornado even within a tornado warning box is low. The chance of your house, if struck by a tornado, being significantly damaged is also low. Even if all of these things come to fruition and your house is significantly damaged by a violent tornado (EF4-5), current available evidence suggests that the majority of persons will survive if they are in an interior room, on the lowest floor. This statistic includes tornadoes that have moved through areas where basements are rare.

Although NPR typically does better with science reporting than other media, this article is misleading. There is a universal best practice to minimize your risk of death or serious injury in a tornado: get to an interior room on the lowest floor of a sturdy structure.
Member Since: September 28, 2002 Posts: 5 Comments: 3216
Quoting hurricanes2018:
more severe weather for the northeast!!

Its about time I get something :p
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Quoting wunderkidcayman:

hmm I don't think that 10% will come right away



umm no that would be E and not close enough plus it kinda weakening


We all see the big mass to the right WKC. It's the little one's on the left that catch my attention.
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Quoting BaltimoreBrian:
It would be best to post your season total guess on trHUrrIXC5MMX's blog directly since he is administering the contest. Don't forget the $100,000 grand prize that he has generously agreed to pay out of his own pocket to the winner!


Say what???...
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more severe weather for the northeast!!
Member Since: March 12, 2013 Posts: 30 Comments: 59502
Quoting washingtonian115:
Now that's what I like to I call having all the windows down and the roof off (booooo) I know I suck.
Actually, that was pretty funny :)
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If you feel like reading, I have a new blog about PA Hurricane Prepardness

Link

http://www.wunderground.com/blog/Doppler22/show.h tml
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Quoting Bluestorm5:
There's something going on in NW Caribbeans right now. It's looking better and I think NHC will increase the chance to 10% in next TWO.

hmm I don't think that 10% will come right away

Quoting ProgressivePulse:
Deep convection popping on the W side of 0% 90L



umm no that would be E and not close enough plus it kinda weakening
Member Since: June 13, 2009 Posts: 2 Comments: 12180
293. Skyepony (Mod)
Looks like AF308 went out yesterday a chucked a few dropsondes at the GOM.

12ZCMC is pretty doom for Tampa thru Jacksonville. GFS picking up on something much weaker & more diffuse. Closed low but the vorticity looks like a mess.

I want to lean more to the GEOS-5, that blob over the yukatan is the only thing that gives me pause.. When the front from those tornadoes interacts with it 90L pulses up & down very reminiscent of the weird tornadoes in that storm. It never gets a closed low but makes for a heck of a blob watch. Eventually moves over Central & NEFL.
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Future Gulf Low Evolution

Link
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291. etxwx
This pretty much sums it up as far as tornado evacuation.
From NPR: No 'Universal' Best Practice To Save Yourself From Tornadoes

Excerpt: In Moore, those who hunkered down as best they could died anyway, including a mother and infant who'd taken shelter in a 7-Eleven's metal freezer box.

Friday, Oklahomans got in their cars and trucks to flee, but some of them died at the wheel, including a mother and infant.

Without a storm shelter, Oklahoma can be a dangerous place.


Link

Quoting lhwhelk:

Mm-hmm. Houston, whose mayor told everyone in the city to evacuate for Hurricane Rita and caused a traffic jam that set a great precedent for OKCity's tornado "evacuation" yesterday.


Different mayor these days in Houston, and fortunately the State of Texas did some big time reevaluation after Rita and, hopefully, has a better plan now. Evacuation Planning in Texas: Before and After Hurricane Rita
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Quoting Bluestorm5:
Somehow, this car is still working after being tossed by a twister... this was sighted in metro OKC today.



Crazy.
Now that's what I like to I call having all the windows down and the roof off (booooo) I know I suck.
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Quoting hurricanes2018:
look at 30 west!!

That's the feature we were looking at last night, off Africa.
Not looking like much today, but fighting off the SAL and dry air pretty well.
Keeping an eye on that one.
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Quoting OrchidGrower:
Sounds great, Chiklit! Keep us posted, por favor.

It's a matter of a city deciding what its priorities are. In some cities, it's youth crime. Right now in Oklahoma City and environs the big issue appears to be public safety.
Once people agree on an issue then it's a matter of insisting something be done about it.
Not really complicated.
Just takes people deciding to agree on something and then agreeeing it's time to do something about it.
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The Moore tornado was such a tough thing. I cried, looking at all those kids and thinking about my daughter, I cried hard. Instead of chastising this reporter, think of the recent past. "Most" thankfully were ok but let's get this reporter a much needed break as there are more tornado's to come that we don't need people driving in or away from...
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Somehow, this car is still working after being tossed by a twister... this was sighted in metro OKC today.



Crazy.
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look at 30 west!!
Member Since: March 12, 2013 Posts: 30 Comments: 59502
Deep convection popping on the W side of 0% 90L

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Remember what a TWO is, a forecast that goes out to 48 hours (I thought though they were going to extend beyond 48 hours for the TWO -- I'm assuming they mean for the 2014 season though). 90L has no chance of development in 48 hours and I think we all can agree by its current state that it's highly unlikely that it will. The models aren't showing anything developing and we've all seen invests that go down to 0% become even hurricanes.
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Quoting washingtonian115:
Someone wake me up when something real is out in the tropics to track besides just models playing peek-a-boo and hide in go seek and charades along with Simon says..
There's something going on in NW Caribbeans right now. It's looking better and I think NHC will increase the chance to 10% in next TWO.
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Quoting sporteguy03:

When I heard that, and with the chopper out there observing the scene why didn't the news director or the pilot say to Mike driving is not a good idea right now. Worse off he was saying go South to central Moore where another storm had a potential to hit later that night.
Did Mike later on even make an attempt to explain his reasoning at that time?



There's a story on Yahoo News now about how some residents of OKC "opted" to flee their homes in the face of thses incoming tornadoes. Not one mention in the story about Mike Morgan and Channel 4 telling people to leave relative safety and risk it on the highways. Nothing on Channel 4's web site either. There are sure lots of references to it in the comments on the Yahoo news story though.
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Sounds great, Chiklit! Keep us posted, por favor.
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Quoting BaltimoreBrian:


I hadn't heard of citiesofservice. Looking it over.

Taking three grad courses this summer
One is cross-sectoral governance
This particular unit is covering the ways that volunteers can address issues in their community.
And also shape policy to present to legislatures to address needs in their community.
People power can get a lot done, especially when there is a well formulated plan that addresses an apparent need.
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Someone wake me up when something real is out in the tropics to track besides just models playing peek-a-boo and hide in go seek and charades along with Simon says..
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Quoting Tazmanian:




yay right hes not going too pay out 100,000 i dont even think he has 100,000 too give so why did you say some in like that

i would re move that commet you made
He was joking...
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Quoting sporteguy03:

When I heard that, and with the chopper out there observing the scene why didn't the news director or the pilot say to Mike driving is not a good idea right now. Worse off he was saying go South to central Moore where another storm had a potential to hit later that night.
Did Mike later on even make an attempt to explain his reasoning at that time?



I feel for the guy, I really do. My wife, who is a licensed Psychologist, heard the video, knows about Moore. Said he likely had a "PTSD" epsiode from the Moore event. Evident the guy needs a break, for sure.
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Quoting BaltimoreBrian:
It would be best to post your season total guess on trHUrrIXC5MMX's blog directly since he is administering the contest. Don't forget the $100,000 grand prize that he has agreed to pay out of his own pocket to the winner!




yay right hes not going too pay out 100,000 i dont even think he has 100,000 too give so why did you say some in like that

i would re move that commet you made
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Quoting indianrivguy:


Colonel, there was some talk on the weather channel about flight having been an option for those facing the Moore EF-5 with no underground shelter. Some folks questioned why the school wasn't evacuated with 19 minutes from siren to impact, which of course is impossible... and then the question turned to homes and the case for leaving sounded "reasonable" and I bet he saw it. I wondered if this would be the result..

I have never seen anything like what I saw last evening in my life, I was fascinated and terrified all at once. If those folks before that tornado train knew it was coming, and had fresh in their minds the Moore monster, and thought that this was the same thing times two, maybe three, I can understand the flight. If one missed or hit, there were more coming. That tornadic train frightened me clear over here, I was certain that the death toll would be enormous.



At least folks weren't trying to ride it out under an overpass.. it took years of education to stop that. Maybe this fatal lesson, and the obvious luck it wasn't hundreds more will teach others to create a better plan.


My thoughts basically parallel with yours. Whether right or wrong, Moore would have been fresh in their minds.

Amazing videos on the blog. Shows despite all the grandstanding with some weatherchasers, when the going gets tough, the tough panic like everyone else! How glad I am My grandparents moved from OK to Ca...as much as I hated earthquakes, tornado country even worse I reckon.

My laptop was at shop getting fixed last few days, so have been reading blog on my phone...but couldn't remember password, so belatedly wanted to say...couldn't believe how fast Barbara went from TD, to 65mph storm, to hurricane...in May. I didn't think she's make it to hurricane. EPac storm sure...August/Sept likely. But a May storm there, so close to land...erm, no..did not think would get some RI going. Sad she didn't make it to the other basin enough to keep name. I think it's cool when one makes it to the other! And think they should keep their name when they manage it.

Anyway, tornado outbreak amazing and amazingly scary. As the Dr said, if it hit a traffic jam, what a disaster. But so hard with Moore fresh on their minds. Panic leads to doing what you hear on the news for most people without thinking twice or of consequences. I reckon was a sincere effort on broadcasters part...but ill advised. What a mess, but incredible video. Glad not loads killed at the very least, though no consolation to their family :/
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Guys, if you want the numbers in trHUrrIXC5MMX's chart, you got to post onto his blog.

Max's blog
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Quoting BaltimoreBrian:
It would be best to post your season total guess on trHUrrIXC5MMX's blog directly since he is administering the contest. Don't forget the $100,000 grand prize that he has agreed to pay out of his own pocket to the winner!



oh boy i be rich if i win
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It would be best to post your season total guess on trHUrrIXC5MMX's blog directly since he is administering the contest. Don't forget the $100,000 grand prize that he has generously agreed to pay out of his own pocket to the winner!
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Quoting lhwhelk:

Mm-hmm. Houston, whose mayor told everyone in the city to evacuate for Hurricane Rita and caused a traffic jam that set a great precedent for OKCity's tornado "evacuation" yesterday.

I was just listing cities with a large hurricane history
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Quoting sar2401:

Plants transpire moisture, which is their equivalent of sweating. The hotter it is, the more moisture they lose, just like us. The real killer for plants is not daytime heat, it's a lack of night time recovery. As long as the overnight low goes below 70, most plants can recover some moisture from the normally humid night air. If the temperature stays above 70 or, even worse, it's windy with low humidity, it's almost impossible to keep up with plant water needs without drip irrigation.


Depends on the plant -- and I'll give you that losing moisture could in a way be equivalent to human sweating...
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Quoting Doppler22:

You know thats not such a bad idea. Although I would pair Oklahoma City with another tornado city such as Dallas/St. Louis/ Joplin... and New Orleans with cities such as Miami/Mobile/Houston

Mm-hmm. Houston, whose mayor told everyone in the city to evacuate for Hurricane Rita and caused a traffic jam that set a great precedent for OKCity's tornado "evacuation" yesterday.
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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