A Night of Tornado Chaos in Oklahoma City: 9 Killed, 71 Injured

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 7:21 PM GMT on June 01, 2013

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It was a terrifying evening of tornado chaos and extreme atmospheric violence in the Oklahoma City area on Friday. Three tornadoes touched down near the city, killing nine, injuring at least 71, and causing widespread destruction. Huge hail up to baseball-sized battered portions the the metro area, accompanied by torrential flooding rains, widespread damaging straight-line winds, and lightning that flashed nearly continuously. The strongest tornado, which touched down west of Oklahoma City in El Reno, has been preliminarily rated an EF-3 with 136 - 165 mph winds. The tornado warning for the storm was issued 19 minutes before it touched down. Two other EF-3 tornadoes touched down near St. Louis, Missouri, and NOAA's Storm Prediction Center (SPC) logged 20 preliminary tornado reports on Friday. Tinker Air Force Base on the east side of Oklahoma City reported sustained winds of 68 mph, gusting to 88 mph, at 8:09 pm CDT. The Oklahoma City airport had sustained winds of 53 mph, gusting to 71 mph at 7:26 pm. These winds were generated by the massive and powerful downdrafts from the supercell thunderstorm that spawned the El Reno tornado. Thankfully, Friday was likely the peak day for this week's severe weather outbreak, as SPC is calling for only a "Slight Risk" of severe weather Saturday and Sunday.


Figure 1. TWC's Mike ‪Bettes‬ crew caught this image of the El Reno, Oklahoma tornado of May 31, 2013 before the tornado caught them and rolled their vehicle.



Figure 2 and 3. Radar reflectivity (top) and Doppler velocity (bottom) images of the May 31, 2013 El Reno, Oklahoma tornado.


Figure 4. Preliminary tracks of the three tornadoes that touched done near Oklahoma City on May 31, 2013. Image credit: NWS Norman, OK.

Tornadoes and cars: a dangerous mix
A vehicle is about the worst place you can be in a tornado, as the tornado's winds can easily roll a car. (The only place less safe is probably a mobile home, as a tornado's winds can roll mobile homes almost as readily, and mobile homes don't come with seat belts and air bags.) At least five of the deaths in Friday's El Reno tornado occurred in vehicles attempting to flee. There was one local TV station that urged residents without underground shelters to get in their cars and "get south" in advance of the tornado that was approaching Oklahoma City, since chasers were reporting that the El Reno tornado may have been so strong that only an underground shelter would have provided adequate protection. This terrible piece of advice likely contributed to the incredible traffic jams that we saw on I-35, I-40, I-44, and other local roads Friday night. Thousands of cars were bumper-to-bumper on the roads as a dangerous tornado approached them. Had the El Reno tornado plowed directly down one of these car-choked interstates, the death toll could have easily exceeded 500. If you are located in a metro area and don't have an underground shelter, the best thing to do it to take shelter in an interior windowless room or hallway, with protective furniture over your body. Getting in a car and attempting to flee the tornado is the worst thing you can do in an urban area. You may not be able to see the tornado if it is dark or the tornado is wrapped in rain. You are likely to encounter hazardous winds, rain, and hail, run into unexpected traffic, or flooded or debris-blocked roads that will put you directly in the path of the tornado. Even without an underground shelter, most people will be able to survive a dangerous EF-4 tornado. Case in point: during the Mannford, Oklahoma EF-4 tornado of 1984, a packed church received a direct hit, and everyone in the church survived. The only fatality was a man who drove to the church to get his wife. (Thanks to wunderground member AGWcreationists for this link.) It's better to abandon your vehicle and take shelter in a ditch, if you are caught in a car during a tornado.


Video 1. The Weather Channel storm chasers weren't the only ones who got themselves in an extremely dangerous situation on May 31. StormChasingVideo.com storm chaser Brandon Sullivan and his chase partner Brett Wright got caught in the tornado northwest of Union City, OK and slammed with debris as the tornado hit a barn that exploded in front of them.


Video 2. When the hunters became the hunted: Weather Channel storm chasers ‪Mike Bettes and two photographers were in their Tornado Hunt vehicle when they were hit by a tornado in El Reno, Oklahoma on May 31,‬ ‪2013. ‬The tornado picked their car up off the ground and rolled it 6 - 8 times before depositing it in a field 200 yards away. All the occupants were wearing seat belts and the air bags deployed, likely saving their lives. Bettes sustained minor injuries, including stitches in his hand. It was the first injury sustained by a Weather Channel personality covering violent weather, according to company spokesperson Shirley Powell.

A storm chasers' nightmare
Cars and tornadoes can prove a dangerous mix even for the world's most experienced storm chasers. Driving at high speeds though heavy rain, large hail, and high winds is hazardous. If one is lucky enough to chase down a tornado, even the most experienced chasers can find themselves in a serious life-threatening situation when unpredictable events occur. Tornadoes by their nature are unpredictable, and can change course unexpectedly, or pop up suddenly. It's particularly dangerous when a tornado is wrapped in rain, making it hard to see, or if a chaser is operating in a heavily populated area, where roads may suddenly become congested. All four of these conditions occurred Friday during the El Reno tornado, and it is very fortunate that multiple chasers were not killed. The El Reno tornado was wrapped in rain and difficult to see as it headed west towards Oklahoma City. The twister suddenly made a jog to the southeast as a Weather Channel team led by Mike Bettes was attempting to get in front of the storm, and the tornado lifted their vehicle off the ground, rolled it multiple times, and hurled it 200 yards into a nearby field. StormChasingVideo.com storm chaser Brandon Sullivan and his chase partner Brett Wright got caught in the tornado northwest of Union City, OK and slammed with debris as the tornado hit a barn that exploded in front of them. Meteorologist Emily Sutton and storm chaser Kevin Josefy of local Oklahoma City TV station KFOR also had a very close call with the El Reno tornado Friday afternoon. They got too close to the tornado, and were forced to floor the car in reverse to escape flying debris. With branches of trees crashing around them, Sutton began feeling debris hitting her back, and realized that the rear windshield of the car must have gotten destroyed. Both were uninjured. Reed Timmer's armor-plated "Dominator" chase vehicle had its hood torn off by the tornado. Wunderground member Levi32 was out storm chasing during the El Reno Tornado, and got stuck in traffic on Highway 4 and couldn't move. "We looked up above the car and saw the wall cloud over top of us, with very quick rotation and rising scud indicating the updraft. We were definitely too close. We made it home safely last night, but not until after an insanely wild day. One hour of chasing turned into six more of being chased by at least 2 tornadoes and a 3rd wall cloud, one of which was the one that went right through downtown Oklahoma City. At one point we were stuck in traffic underneath the El Rino wall cloud watching rotating, rising scud directly above the car. I am hoping and praying that the daylight does not reveal more fatalities.

Would I go again? Yes, but not today, or tomorrow, and I would take even greater care. We had no clue we would get caught the way we did. I thought we had done everything right. We were kind of freaking out for a while. That velocity signature you guys saw with radar folding and multiple vortices - we were under the southern edge of it. We never got a clear view of the tornado, but we could tell just how close it was to our north. It was unreal. The inflow got pretty strong.

We were almost ready to jump out and take cover right before we found a route south, which ended up being slow. It became a six-lane highway south as everyone panicked and drove on the wrong side of the road. Even we did so. We thought we were clear until we saw the training of tornadic supercells on radar, all connected somehow. I've never seen anything like that. My best pictures of the day were of the wall cloud that followed behind the El Reno storm. We didn't see a funnel from that one either, but it chased us south for a long time, and we heard from radio that it spawned a confirmed tornado in Tuttle, when we realized that we were in Tuttle.

A third mesocyclone showed up behind that one as we continued slowly south, eventually reaching Blanchard. It looked weaker than the others but we weren't going to escape it, so we took shelter in a storm room in the local grocery store for about an hour. It then took a long time to find a way around the huge hail cores to get back home. Lightning flashes were occurring 10 times per second as we drove home in the dark. It was almost calming to watch as we got over the semi-shock that we were all in. None of us in the car had seen a tornado before. We didn't see one yesterday, but we were chased by two."



Video 3. Birth of the El Reno wedge tornado. As the tornado touched down, it produced a rare display of suction vortices.

Video 4. Storm chasers Jeff Piotrowski and Kathryn Piotrowski captured impressive footage of a double vortex tornado near El Reno, Oklahoma on May 31, 2013.

Severe storms causing major flooding
The 5.64" of rain that fell at the Oklahoma City Will Rogers Airport on Friday was their 6th wettest day in city history, and brought the total rainfall for the month of May to 14.52", the wettest May in Oklahoma City's history (Thanks to BaltimoreBrian for this link.) The North Canadian River in Oklahoma City rose sixteen feet in twelve hours, cresting at its 2nd highest flood on record this Saturday morning. The heavy rains have spread eastwards on Saturday, causing more flooding problems. Paducah, KY had its wettest June day and 3rd wettest day on record on June 1, with 5.73" of rain (all-time record: 7.49" on 9/5/1985.) Major flooding is occurring along a substantial stretch of the Mississippi River in Iowa, Illinois, and Missouri.


Figure 5. The North Canadian River in Oklahoma City rose sixteen feet in twelve hours, reaching its 2nd highest flood on record this Saturday morning.


Figure 6. Radar-estimated rainfall in the Oklahoma City area reached 8+" over some areas from Friday's storm.

Remains of Hurricane Barbara may bring heavy rains to Mexico, Florida, and Cuba
Today, June 1, is the official first day of the Atlantic Hurricane season, and we already have our first Atlantic tropical disturbance to talk about. Hurricane Barbara, which died on Thursday as it attempted to cross Mexico's Isthmus of Tehuantepec into the southernmost Gulf of Mexico, has left behind an area of disturbed weather over the southernmost Gulf of Mexico. There is very little heavy thunderstorm activity associated with Barbara's remnants apparent on satellite loops this Saturday afternoon. Wind shear is a high 20 knots in the region, and the area of disturbed weather is quite small, so I don't expect any development to occur over the next few days. NHC is giving the disturbance a 10% chance of developing into a tropical cyclone by Monday. Moisture from the remnants of Barbara may combine with moisture from an area of heavy thunderstorms expected to build over the Western Caribbean this weekend, and begin bringing heavy rains to Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula and Western Cuba on Sunday and Monday. These heavy rains may spread to Southwest Florida as early as Monday night. The computer models predict that this disturbance should be large and poorly organized, making development into a Gulf of Mexico tropical cyclone unlikely.

My next post will be Monday at the latest.

Jeff Masters

LotsOfWater... (CalicoBass)
from the heavy rains overnight, flowing over this low water bridge. We were waiting to see if something about our size drove over it okay (we were in a Toyota Pickup), this is a bit bigger than us, lol.
LotsOfWater...
Sunset Strike (mrwing13)
NE Oklahoma is under the gun, again today. Severe weather, threatens to produce more damaging storms.
Sunset Strike
tornado (modernsourdough)
near bennington, ks
tornado

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Quoting 7544:
91L today peeps ?

How much do you wanna bet? :-)
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 13138
I'm out for now... want to make a couple runs while the rain is holding up.
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Oh before I go. Only 150 days till the end of the 2013 Atlantic Hurricane season.

Goodnight
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latest rainfall totals from the gfs model 12z

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Quoting sar2401:

Indeed. I'm a "trained" advanced storm spotter for the NWS. I was tracking a tornado on the ground when the funnel got rain wrapped and I lost sight of the direction of travel. I was in a way rural area, and the radar also lost the signature. I was parked next to a barn relaying in information about the tornado. All of a sudden, my cell phone, ham radio, and GPS would not work, as in receive or transmit. That was enough for me. I turned around and, with all deliberate speed, drove away on the one route I was reasonably certain the tornado wouldn't take. When I got back in the same area about 30 minutes later, the barn I was parked next to was gone...as in, there was only some concrete foundation left.

I'm now a net controller and "spot" storms on radar and handle the radio traffic from the field. I'm more than happy to leave those kinds of life-altering experiences to people with a much higher risk tolerance than me.
Indeed. That kind of high risk pursuit is not for everyone. We can admire those who are skilled without emulating them.
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FOR THE NORTH ATLANTIC...CARIBBEAN SEA AND THE GULF OF MEXICO...

1. AN AREA OF DISTURBED WEATHER IS LOCATED OVER THE NORTHWESTERN
CARIBBEAN SEA. DEVELOPMENT...IF ANY...OF THIS SYSTEM IS LIKELY TO
BE SLOW TO OCCUR AS IT DRIFTS NORTH-NORTHWESTWARD. THIS SYSTEM HAS
A LOW CHANCE...10 PERCENT...OF BECOMING A TROPICAL CYCLONE DURING
THE NEXT 48 HOURS.

ELSEWHERE...TROPICAL CYCLONE FORMATION IS NOT EXPECTED DURING THE
NEXT 48 HOURS.

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Quoting CybrTeddy:


Poor model consistency. Can't seem to figure out if it wants to develop it or not.


Yeah,...why I been saying for everyone to wait till today and really tonight 0Z run to see if it comes back some. We still have the 12Z Euro coming out in 2hrs or so. But again, it's why I always say... anything over 5 days out, throw out...even really after 3 days but 5 is a decent #
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Quoting AussieStorm:
I shall be going to bed with a very heavy heart, shock and saddened from the news 3 great leaders in the field of Tornado science have been taken from this world.

Goodnight all. Stay well, Stay safe.

Good night, Aussie. A very sad couple of days for many people. Sleep well.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 13138
0.0


... Excessive heat warning remains in effect from 10 am this
morning to 8 PM MST this evening...

An excessive heat warning remains in effect from 10 am this
morning to 8 PM MST this evening.

* Affected area... south-central Arizona... including the Phoenix
area.

* Temperature... highs around 108 to 110 degrees.

* Impacts... this is the first prolonged period of hot temperatures
this year. Take the necessary precautions to protect yourself from
the heat.

Precautionary/preparedness actions...

Take extra precautions if you work or spend time outside. When
possible... reschedule strenuous activities to early morning or
evening. Know the signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion and heat
stroke. Wear light weight and loose fitting clothing when
possible and drink plenty of water. If you wear a wide-brimmed
hat... your head and body will be much cooler.

To reduce risk during outdoor work... the occupational safety and
health administration recommends scheduling frequent rest breaks
in shaded or air conditioned environments. Anyone overcome by
heat should be moved to a cool and shaded location. Heat stroke
is an emergency... call 9 1 1.

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Storm chasers honoring Tim Samaras in North Dakota...

Link
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 28 Comments: 7902
Quoting Neapolitan:
Which tells us that if even over-cautious, well-prepared, highly-experienced professionals can nevertheless find themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time, what chance do thrill-seeking, inexperienced, ill-prepared, and careless amateur chasers have?

(Of course, it also tells us--again--just how stupid is the advice to "get in your car and drive away from it!" But we already know that.)

Indeed. I'm a "trained" advanced storm spotter for the NWS. I was tracking a tornado on the ground when the funnel got rain wrapped and I lost sight of the direction of travel. I was in a way rural area, and the radar also lost the signature. I was parked next to a barn relaying in information about the tornado. All of a sudden, my cell phone, ham radio, and GPS would not work, as in receive or transmit. That was enough for me. I turned around and, with all deliberate speed, drove away on the one route I was reasonably certain the tornado wouldn't take. When I got back in the same area about 30 minutes later, the barn I was parked next to was gone...as in, there was only some concrete foundation left.

I'm now a net controller and "spot" storms on radar and handle the radio traffic from the field. I'm more than happy to leave those kinds of life-altering experiences to people with a much higher risk tolerance than me.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 13138
I shall be going to bed with a very heavy heart, shock and saddened from the news 3 great leaders in the field of Tornado science have been taken from this world.

Goodnight all. Stay well, Stay safe.
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Death toll from Friday's tornadoes in Oklahoma increases to 10
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UPDATES:

12:31 p.m. EDT Sunday: Strong thunderstorms developing near the far eastern Pennsylvania/New York border and heading toward the communities of Saugerties and Kingston, N.Y.

12:14 p.m. EDT Sunday: Strong thunderstorm winds down trees and wires in West Winfield, N.Y. One tree fell onto a home.

11:57 a.m. EDT Sunday: A thunderstorm with a history of producing damaging winds is headed toward Cooperstown, N.Y.

11:35 a.m. EDT Sunday: A Severe Thunderstorm Watch box has been issued from upstate New York to northern Maine. The box is in effect through 8 p.m. EDT.
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Woo finally rain! light rain right now, and it looks like it is supposed to get worse, according to other states.




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652. 7544
91L today peeps ?
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Quoting sar2401:

There is some logic to this. Community shelters in rural areas, especially areas with a high proportion of mobile homes, makes sense. Shelters in suburban or urban areas only encourage people to leave homes that will generally protect them and drive to a shelter. This leaves them at risk of being caught on the road by a tornado, which is much more likely to kill you than sheltering in the best place you can find in even a marginally well built single story structure. There's also the issue of lead time. Although several of the Oklahoma tornadoes had extraordinary lead times, most tornadoes have a five minute or less lead time when the path is reasonably certain. I wouldn't want to see several thousand, or even several hundred people, leaving their homes and attempting to get to a public shelter with a five minute lead time.


Yeah, but much has been made about "increased security" for schools - in case of a deranged person with a gun. But the reality is, at least in certain areas of OK, your more likely to be killed by a tornado at the school.

And there is a divide between folks that live in "cities" vs. those that live in the surrounding county. Remember, most counties here have only a single "city" that provides the vast majority of the educational facilities for the county:

School security or tornado shelters? Commissioner sees a city/county divide (poll)
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Quoting Hurricane1956:
Good afternoon!!!,just checking all the latest Models runs it seems to me that South Florida must be out of the woods?,all the forecasted rain amounts 20"+ for our area here in Miami maybe will not materialize?,it seems like the low pressure is moving more North? (according to the latest CMC & CFS Models),the last report I read yesterday from the NWS said that the low was going to enter around Naples in the West Coast,but this new models runs shows the low entering around the Florida big bend.
We probably need our fellow bloger HYDRUS to post a new future rain amount map for South Florida.
Any comments about my thoughts? I have a very busy week ahead and will like to know if we will get all the previous forecasted rain amounts here in South Florida to plan ahead of time.




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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
I can't believe it. Tim, Paul, and Carl? They were always so cautious, so hesitant to get anywhere near a regular tornado, much less a rain-wrapped tornado.
Yeah, Tim and his crew would get in arguments on Storm Chasers about getting closer to tornado or not. Other chasers chasing with him thought Tim was very stubborn about the safety and thought the tornadoes would've got a better chance of running over probes if Tim wasn't so cautious. I was shocked that he and 2 others was killed as he's usually a distance from tornadoes especially the violent ones. Maybe he got caught in traffic jam or tornado changed direction on them or a satellite tornado got them. Again, was trying to say Tim was a very cautious person. May he rest in peace.
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 28 Comments: 7902
Good afternoon!!!,just checking all the latest Models runs it seems to me that South Florida must be out of the woods?,all the forecasted rain amounts 20"+ for our area here in Miami maybe will not materialize?,it seems like the low pressure is moving more North? (according to the latest CMC & CFS Models),the last report I read yesterday from the NWS said that the low was going to enter around Naples in the West Coast,but this new models runs shows the low entering around the Florida big bend.
We probably need our fellow bloger HYDRUS to post a new future rain amount map for South Florida.
Any comments about my thoughts? I have a very busy week ahead and will like to know if we will get all the previous forecasted rain amounts here in South Florida to plan ahead of time.
Member Since: August 28, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 603
Quoting BahaHurican:
When I read about this, I thought of the toreadors... they are very, very skilled, very knowledgeable, very trained, very quick.

But every now and then, the bull wins.

I also remembered the young chaser who was killed in the accident with the drunkard driving the wrong way down the highway last year [forgive me, I don't recall his name]. If you are a tornado chaser and you have to die on the road, I'd bet any one of them would choose to be chasing when it happens....

RIP.


That was Andy Gabrielson that was killed on his way home from chasing.

Discovery Dedicates Tonight's Oklahoma Tornado Documentary to Storm Chasers Killed on Friday
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Quoting sar2401:

There is some logic to this. Community shelters in rural areas, especially areas with a high proportion of mobile homes, makes sense. Shelters in suburban or urban areas only encourage people to leave homes that will generally protect them and drive to a shelter. This leaves them at risk of being caught on the road by a tornado, which is much more likely to kill you than sheltering in the best place you can find in even a marginally well built single story structure. There's also the issue of lead time. Although several of the Oklahoma tornadoes had extraordinary lead times, most tornadoes have a five minute or less lead time when the path is reasonably certain. I wouldn't want to see several thousand, or even several hundred people, leaving their homes and attempting to get to a public shelter with a five minute lead time.
There has to be a middle ground between leaving your house to get to a public shelter and getting off the interstate to get to a public shelter. Sounds like some informational training needs to be done. It seems ridiculous to throw the baby out because you can't figure out how to drain the bathtub. Sometimes I think we are too quick to assume things have to be black or white. There are lovely shades of grey [and brown] out there...
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Quoting ncstorm:
12z GFS
171 hours


Nada..tropical moisture heading for florida which is a good bet.
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They always had such great video.



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Quoting scottsvb:
12Z GFS is Dramatically weaker with scatterd T-Storms over the GOM and no real low pressure system.. Mostly due to shear and dry midlevel air over most of the GOM after Tuesday.


Poor model consistency. Can't seem to figure out if it wants to develop it or not.
Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 23571
I don't understand the purpose of government in the US. It's not to collect revenue for the king. It doesn't seem to be to collect revenue for the welfare of the people. What IS it for?

[constantly amazed at government decisions that put masses of the population at greater risk when lesser risk is not only possible, but feasible...]
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Quoting daddyjames:



Did you read the last sentence? Hey, we warned you - and that is all the responsibility that public officials feel is necessary to the general public.

Their philosophy is: "You are on your own." Really.


Quoting Chicklit:

What about public shelters?
I cannot believe they are being shut down because officials say they give a false sense of security or encourage people to drive to a safe area when they are are better off staying home.
What the heck is going on in Oklahoma?


Oklahoma is - perhaps quietly, the most "conservative" state in the nation. Very much a "limited government" attitude. Not sure if this really a reflection of the general public, because I am sure that the reason the vote to close the public shelters was not effectively communicated to the people in MidWest City in January 2013 was because the general public would have reacted in outrage.
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12Z GFS is Dramatically weaker with scatterd T-Storms over the GOM and no real low pressure system.. Mostly due to shear and dry midlevel air over most of the GOM after Tuesday.
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Quoting Chicklit:

What about public shelters?
I cannot believe they are being shut down because officials say they give a false sense of security or encourage people to drive to a safe area when they are are better off staying home.
What the heck is going on in Oklahoma?

There is some logic to this. Community shelters in rural areas, especially areas with a high proportion of mobile homes, makes sense. Shelters in suburban or urban areas only encourage people to leave homes that will generally protect them and drive to a shelter. This leaves them at risk of being caught on the road by a tornado, which is much more likely to kill you than sheltering in the best place you can find in even a marginally well built single story structure. There's also the issue of lead time. Although several of the Oklahoma tornadoes had extraordinary lead times, most tornadoes have a five minute or less lead time when the path is reasonably certain. I wouldn't want to see several thousand, or even several hundred people, leaving their homes and attempting to get to a public shelter with a five minute lead time.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 13138
638. MPI88
We've got a major flood (> 2002 major flood level) in the Danube River near Passau (Germany). The Rhine river is elevated as well, not as bad though.

Floods are highly uncommon in June, its actually the first major flood in June in ~300 years.
Danube River:




Rhine River:

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Quoting AussieStorm:

I think but not 100% sure it was due to the Tornado suddenly changing direction like what happened to TWC crew.


That must be it, so sad.
Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 23571
Quoting daddyjames:


Did you read the last sentence? Hey, we warned you - and that is all the responsibility that public officials feel is necessary to the general public.

Their philosopy is: "You are on your own." Really.


ridiculous thinking..
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Dr. Masters just gave a audio interview on TWC concerning Tim and Paul Samaras and Carl Young..
He sent out his condolences and talked about storm/tornado chasing and his suprise that more deaths in the storm chasing community haven't occured..
I would guess he will be updating his blog shortly..
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Quoting CybrTeddy:


I wonder what happened, I suspect it was because their route of escape was blocked by traffic from people fleeing.

I think but not 100% sure it was due to the Tornado suddenly changing direction like what happened to TWC crew.
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12z GFS
171 hours
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Quoting ncstorm:


whats the sirens for if the shelters are not in place or accessible??..


Did you read the last sentence? Hey, we warned you - and that is all the responsibility that public officials feel is necessary to the general public in the larger metropolitan areas of OK.

Their philosophy is: "You are on your own." Really.
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I send my condolences to the families of Tim, Paul, and Carl. I learned a lot from their stint on Discovery. I know some people will say negative things about chasing but professional chasers are a huge resource for public safety. This is a loss that will be felt far and wide.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
I can't believe it. Tim, Paul, and Carl? They were always so cautious, so hesitant to get anywhere near a regular tornado, much less a rain-wrapped tornado.
When I read about this, I thought of the toreadors... they are very, very skilled, very knowledgeable, very trained, very quick.

But every now and then, the bull wins.

I also remembered the young chaser who was killed in the accident with the drunkard driving the wrong way down the highway last year [forgive me, I don't recall his name]. If you are a tornado chaser and you have to die on the road, I'd bet any one of them would choose to be chasing when it happens....

RIP.
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?????
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Quoting Chicklit:

What about public shelters?
I cannot believe they are being shut down because officials say they give a false sense of security or encourage people to drive to a safe area when they are are better off staying home.
What the heck is going on in Oklahoma?


Chicktlit see my post #595 or read the article:

Oklahoma tornadoes: Oklahoma City metro-area cities oppose public storm shelters

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the spin on land!! look at the weather map.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
I can't believe it. Tim, Paul, and Carl? They were always so cautious, so hesitant to get anywhere near a regular tornado, much less a rain-wrapped tornado.


I wonder what happened, I suspect it was because their route of escape was blocked by traffic from people fleeing.
Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 23571
Quoting Hurrihistory:
I think it's ironic that several years ago The Weather Channel used to Discourage people from Storm Chasing and now they encourage it by putting some of their own people in harms way and almost getting him killed in the process! What Hypocrites! They even try to hype up the story by saying that Mike Bettes chase vehicle rolled about 200-yards. Seems more like 20-yards to me. If he rolled over a distance of 200-yards he and the rest of his crew would have been killed for sure. 200-yards is the size of two football fields. Come On. With all this The Weather Channel's over-all credibility as a serious source of Weather Information has sunk to a new low. But we all knew this anyway once they put (Mr.Potato Head) Al Roker and his chatter-box side kick Stephanie Abrams on the air a few years ago. " Now remember everyone, just keep sending in your storm video and photo's here to TWC and we might even show it on the air" (And no, we will not pay you for it.)


As with most of the visual media industry, the emphasis has changed from information to entertainment. With the proliferation of bandwidth and smart phones, folks reduce the amount of time spent on the television getting information. All you have to do is see how the TWC programming schedule has changed over the past 5 years or so.

Give the people what they want.
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Quoting HurricaneDean07:
Hey guys. Just a heads up, I've made a decision to leave this account and I made a new account using my actual name. Would rather be known around the blog with my actual identity instead this fake username, had a lot of good time tracking and had some great memories on this account but I think I'd rather move onto something offical to my name. I really want to make this my future. Though I still have things to learn? Ready to make this a full time effort to be on the blog an post.
Hope you guys agree with my choice as well.
We still need to know it is you.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
I can't believe it. Tim, Paul, and Carl? They were always so cautious, so hesitant to get anywhere near a regular tornado, much less a rain-wrapped tornado.
Which tells us that if even over-cautious, well-prepared, highly-experienced professionals can nevertheless find themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time, what chance do thrill-seeking, inexperienced, ill-prepared, and careless amateur chasers have?

(Of course, it also tells us--again--just how stupid is the advice to "get in your car and drive away from it!" But we already know that.)
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maybe two tropical storm to watch down the road.. some kind of storm moving up the east coast or hangout there.
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Quoting CaicosRetiredSailor:
The statistic I take from this unfortunate news is:

25 percent of the fatalities from the tornados in OK

were Storm Chasers...

3/12

What percentage of fatalities were on the road? in vehicles?

This business with people getting in cars to run from storms seems to me like a disaster waiting to happen. [still remembering what happened w/ Rita evac in TX]

I also don't understand refusing motorists on a highway a place inside your business if you have a sturdy building. If your worry is insurance etc [aka money] change your laws to say that if a person seeking shelter in a public place chooses to shelter in that place [rather than being sent there by officials] the owner of the place is not liable for their injuries.

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Quoting FOREX:


Where do you live? I'm in Panama City Beach.

Eufaula AL, just up the road. Current radar is showing a few showers around PCB. As usual, there is nothing up here. My lawn now looks like it has green and brown measles. I mean, for crying out loud, it's 87 with a dewpoint of 72 and all we have is a few scattered clouds. You'd think a Cessna flying by would generate enough instability to at least give me a lousy 2 minute shower. :-)
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 13138
Quoting daddyjames:


It'll take a lot from the "leaders" here in parts of OK.

Oklahoma tornadoes: Oklahoma City metro-area cities oppose public storm shelters


The article ends with Moore Emergency Management Director Gayland Kitch saying:

“Ultimately you are responsible for your own safety,” Kitch said. “We provide people with information. That's what the sirens are about. How they choose to act on it is up to them.”
.

sirens are mainly for people outside. WX radios are for people both inside and outside. but shutting people out is like holding a life ring while standing a few feet away from someone drowning. Totally wrong
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Quoting CaicosRetiredSailor:
The statistic I take from this unfortunate news is:

25 percent of the fatalities from the tornados in OK

were Storm Chasers...

3/12


Those three were all in the same vehicle, though I'm not endorsing tornado chasing.
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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