A Night of Tornado Chaos in Oklahoma City: 9 Killed, 71 Injured

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 7:21 PM GMT on June 01, 2013

Share this Blog
57
+

It was a terrifying evening of tornado chaos and extreme atmospheric violence in the Oklahoma City area on Friday. Three tornadoes touched down near the city, killing nine, injuring at least 71, and causing widespread destruction. Huge hail up to baseball-sized battered portions the the metro area, accompanied by torrential flooding rains, widespread damaging straight-line winds, and lightning that flashed nearly continuously. The strongest tornado, which touched down west of Oklahoma City in El Reno, has been preliminarily rated an EF-3 with 136 - 165 mph winds. The tornado warning for the storm was issued 19 minutes before it touched down. Two other EF-3 tornadoes touched down near St. Louis, Missouri, and NOAA's Storm Prediction Center (SPC) logged 20 preliminary tornado reports on Friday. Tinker Air Force Base on the east side of Oklahoma City reported sustained winds of 68 mph, gusting to 88 mph, at 8:09 pm CDT. The Oklahoma City airport had sustained winds of 53 mph, gusting to 71 mph at 7:26 pm. These winds were generated by the massive and powerful downdrafts from the supercell thunderstorm that spawned the El Reno tornado. Thankfully, Friday was likely the peak day for this week's severe weather outbreak, as SPC is calling for only a "Slight Risk" of severe weather Saturday and Sunday.


Figure 1. TWC's Mike ‪Bettes‬ crew caught this image of the El Reno, Oklahoma tornado of May 31, 2013 before the tornado caught them and rolled their vehicle.



Figure 2 and 3. Radar reflectivity (top) and Doppler velocity (bottom) images of the May 31, 2013 El Reno, Oklahoma tornado.


Figure 4. Preliminary tracks of the three tornadoes that touched done near Oklahoma City on May 31, 2013. Image credit: NWS Norman, OK.

Tornadoes and cars: a dangerous mix
A vehicle is about the worst place you can be in a tornado, as the tornado's winds can easily roll a car. (The only place less safe is probably a mobile home, as a tornado's winds can roll mobile homes almost as readily, and mobile homes don't come with seat belts and air bags.) At least five of the deaths in Friday's El Reno tornado occurred in vehicles attempting to flee. There was one local TV station that urged residents without underground shelters to get in their cars and "get south" in advance of the tornado that was approaching Oklahoma City, since chasers were reporting that the El Reno tornado may have been so strong that only an underground shelter would have provided adequate protection. This terrible piece of advice likely contributed to the incredible traffic jams that we saw on I-35, I-40, I-44, and other local roads Friday night. Thousands of cars were bumper-to-bumper on the roads as a dangerous tornado approached them. Had the El Reno tornado plowed directly down one of these car-choked interstates, the death toll could have easily exceeded 500. If you are located in a metro area and don't have an underground shelter, the best thing to do it to take shelter in an interior windowless room or hallway, with protective furniture over your body. Getting in a car and attempting to flee the tornado is the worst thing you can do in an urban area. You may not be able to see the tornado if it is dark or the tornado is wrapped in rain. You are likely to encounter hazardous winds, rain, and hail, run into unexpected traffic, or flooded or debris-blocked roads that will put you directly in the path of the tornado. Even without an underground shelter, most people will be able to survive a dangerous EF-4 tornado. Case in point: during the Mannford, Oklahoma EF-4 tornado of 1984, a packed church received a direct hit, and everyone in the church survived. The only fatality was a man who drove to the church to get his wife. (Thanks to wunderground member AGWcreationists for this link.) It's better to abandon your vehicle and take shelter in a ditch, if you are caught in a car during a tornado.


Video 1. The Weather Channel storm chasers weren't the only ones who got themselves in an extremely dangerous situation on May 31. StormChasingVideo.com storm chaser Brandon Sullivan and his chase partner Brett Wright got caught in the tornado northwest of Union City, OK and slammed with debris as the tornado hit a barn that exploded in front of them.


Video 2. When the hunters became the hunted: Weather Channel storm chasers ‪Mike Bettes and two photographers were in their Tornado Hunt vehicle when they were hit by a tornado in El Reno, Oklahoma on May 31,‬ ‪2013. ‬The tornado picked their car up off the ground and rolled it 6 - 8 times before depositing it in a field 200 yards away. All the occupants were wearing seat belts and the air bags deployed, likely saving their lives. Bettes sustained minor injuries, including stitches in his hand. It was the first injury sustained by a Weather Channel personality covering violent weather, according to company spokesperson Shirley Powell.

A storm chasers' nightmare
Cars and tornadoes can prove a dangerous mix even for the world's most experienced storm chasers. Driving at high speeds though heavy rain, large hail, and high winds is hazardous. If one is lucky enough to chase down a tornado, even the most experienced chasers can find themselves in a serious life-threatening situation when unpredictable events occur. Tornadoes by their nature are unpredictable, and can change course unexpectedly, or pop up suddenly. It's particularly dangerous when a tornado is wrapped in rain, making it hard to see, or if a chaser is operating in a heavily populated area, where roads may suddenly become congested. All four of these conditions occurred Friday during the El Reno tornado, and it is very fortunate that multiple chasers were not killed. The El Reno tornado was wrapped in rain and difficult to see as it headed west towards Oklahoma City. The twister suddenly made a jog to the southeast as a Weather Channel team led by Mike Bettes was attempting to get in front of the storm, and the tornado lifted their vehicle off the ground, rolled it multiple times, and hurled it 200 yards into a nearby field. StormChasingVideo.com storm chaser Brandon Sullivan and his chase partner Brett Wright got caught in the tornado northwest of Union City, OK and slammed with debris as the tornado hit a barn that exploded in front of them. Meteorologist Emily Sutton and storm chaser Kevin Josefy of local Oklahoma City TV station KFOR also had a very close call with the El Reno tornado Friday afternoon. They got too close to the tornado, and were forced to floor the car in reverse to escape flying debris. With branches of trees crashing around them, Sutton began feeling debris hitting her back, and realized that the rear windshield of the car must have gotten destroyed. Both were uninjured. Reed Timmer's armor-plated "Dominator" chase vehicle had its hood torn off by the tornado. Wunderground member Levi32 was out storm chasing during the El Reno Tornado, and got stuck in traffic on Highway 4 and couldn't move. "We looked up above the car and saw the wall cloud over top of us, with very quick rotation and rising scud indicating the updraft. We were definitely too close. We made it home safely last night, but not until after an insanely wild day. One hour of chasing turned into six more of being chased by at least 2 tornadoes and a 3rd wall cloud, one of which was the one that went right through downtown Oklahoma City. At one point we were stuck in traffic underneath the El Rino wall cloud watching rotating, rising scud directly above the car. I am hoping and praying that the daylight does not reveal more fatalities.

Would I go again? Yes, but not today, or tomorrow, and I would take even greater care. We had no clue we would get caught the way we did. I thought we had done everything right. We were kind of freaking out for a while. That velocity signature you guys saw with radar folding and multiple vortices - we were under the southern edge of it. We never got a clear view of the tornado, but we could tell just how close it was to our north. It was unreal. The inflow got pretty strong.

We were almost ready to jump out and take cover right before we found a route south, which ended up being slow. It became a six-lane highway south as everyone panicked and drove on the wrong side of the road. Even we did so. We thought we were clear until we saw the training of tornadic supercells on radar, all connected somehow. I've never seen anything like that. My best pictures of the day were of the wall cloud that followed behind the El Reno storm. We didn't see a funnel from that one either, but it chased us south for a long time, and we heard from radio that it spawned a confirmed tornado in Tuttle, when we realized that we were in Tuttle.

A third mesocyclone showed up behind that one as we continued slowly south, eventually reaching Blanchard. It looked weaker than the others but we weren't going to escape it, so we took shelter in a storm room in the local grocery store for about an hour. It then took a long time to find a way around the huge hail cores to get back home. Lightning flashes were occurring 10 times per second as we drove home in the dark. It was almost calming to watch as we got over the semi-shock that we were all in. None of us in the car had seen a tornado before. We didn't see one yesterday, but we were chased by two."



Video 3. Birth of the El Reno wedge tornado. As the tornado touched down, it produced a rare display of suction vortices.

Video 4. Storm chasers Jeff Piotrowski and Kathryn Piotrowski captured impressive footage of a double vortex tornado near El Reno, Oklahoma on May 31, 2013.

Severe storms causing major flooding
The 5.64" of rain that fell at the Oklahoma City Will Rogers Airport on Friday was their 6th wettest day in city history, and brought the total rainfall for the month of May to 14.52", the wettest May in Oklahoma City's history (Thanks to BaltimoreBrian for this link.) The North Canadian River in Oklahoma City rose sixteen feet in twelve hours, cresting at its 2nd highest flood on record this Saturday morning. The heavy rains have spread eastwards on Saturday, causing more flooding problems. Paducah, KY had its wettest June day and 3rd wettest day on record on June 1, with 5.73" of rain (all-time record: 7.49" on 9/5/1985.) Major flooding is occurring along a substantial stretch of the Mississippi River in Iowa, Illinois, and Missouri.


Figure 5. The North Canadian River in Oklahoma City rose sixteen feet in twelve hours, reaching its 2nd highest flood on record this Saturday morning.


Figure 6. Radar-estimated rainfall in the Oklahoma City area reached 8+" over some areas from Friday's storm.

Remains of Hurricane Barbara may bring heavy rains to Mexico, Florida, and Cuba
Today, June 1, is the official first day of the Atlantic Hurricane season, and we already have our first Atlantic tropical disturbance to talk about. Hurricane Barbara, which died on Thursday as it attempted to cross Mexico's Isthmus of Tehuantepec into the southernmost Gulf of Mexico, has left behind an area of disturbed weather over the southernmost Gulf of Mexico. There is very little heavy thunderstorm activity associated with Barbara's remnants apparent on satellite loops this Saturday afternoon. Wind shear is a high 20 knots in the region, and the area of disturbed weather is quite small, so I don't expect any development to occur over the next few days. NHC is giving the disturbance a 10% chance of developing into a tropical cyclone by Monday. Moisture from the remnants of Barbara may combine with moisture from an area of heavy thunderstorms expected to build over the Western Caribbean this weekend, and begin bringing heavy rains to Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula and Western Cuba on Sunday and Monday. These heavy rains may spread to Southwest Florida as early as Monday night. The computer models predict that this disturbance should be large and poorly organized, making development into a Gulf of Mexico tropical cyclone unlikely.

My next post will be Monday at the latest.

Jeff Masters

LotsOfWater... (CalicoBass)
from the heavy rains overnight, flowing over this low water bridge. We were waiting to see if something about our size drove over it okay (we were in a Toyota Pickup), this is a bit bigger than us, lol.
LotsOfWater...
Sunset Strike (mrwing13)
NE Oklahoma is under the gun, again today. Severe weather, threatens to produce more damaging storms.
Sunset Strike
tornado (modernsourdough)
near bennington, ks
tornado

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 268 - 218

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15Blog Index

Quoting Doppler22:

You know thats not such a bad idea. Although I would pair Oklahoma City with another tornado city such as Dallas/St. Louis/ Joplin... and New Orleans with cities such as Miami/Mobile/Houston

Mm-hmm. Houston, whose mayor told everyone in the city to evacuate for Hurricane Rita and caused a traffic jam that set a great precedent for OKCity's tornado "evacuation" yesterday.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Evacuteer.org is an integral part of the City of New Orleans hurricane evacuation strategy.-Mayor Mitch Landrieu



Evacuteer.org to make first professional hire: Operations Manager position open for applicants until January 25th at 5 PM.

Evacuteer.org is an integral part of the City of New Orleans hurricane evacuation strategy.-Mayor Mitch Landrieu

Evacuteer.org is a New Orleans-based 501c3 non-profit organization that assists the City of New Orleans prepare for and respond to tropical weather events. The organization recruits, trains and manages citizen volunteers (Evacuteers) who perform important functions during emergency activations. A key component of our mission is assisting the City of New Orleans maintain and execute the public evacuation option called City Assisted Evacuation (CAE). CAE is designed to evacuate and return 25,000-30,000 New Orleanians who lack access to reliable personal transportation in the event of a major hurricane.

In the next three years, evacuteer.org expects to continue growing as a source of expertise in the subject area of leveraging volunteer citizen participation in disaster/emergency preparedness, mitigation and response.

In order to achieve this goal, evacuteer.org seeks its first full-time professional staff. Public safety and operational expertise in the city of New Orleans is the organization's top priority. Our first full-time hire will be an Operations Manager.

The Operations Manager will be responsible for the following:

1. Serving as chief point of contact with partners within New Orleans Office of Homeland Security & Emergency Preparedness and the New Orleans Fire Department
2. Developing relationships with potential partner organizations within the greater New Orleans community
3. Developing and maintaining relationships with stakeholders within the greater New Orleans community
4. Working with the evacuteer.org Communications Committee to develop and execute a recruitment strategy to attract independent Evacuteers
5. Maintaining the evacuteer.org Operations Plan
6. Maintaining and executing evacuteer.org Incident/Activation Plan
7. Maintaining evacuteer.org training protocol
8. Developing and executing annual volunteer training schedule
9. Developing an annual budget for the Operations department
10. Working with the evacuteer.org Communications Committee to effectively promote operational efforts and successes
11. Completing certification in National Incident Management Systems (NIMS)/Incident Command Systems (ICS)
Desired Personal Characteristics:

High energy level

Superior analytical skills

Participatory management style

Ability to think strategically

Action orientated

Mission driven and self directed

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
FWIW, here are Mike's exact words to his viewers:

"If you can’t, I would recommend going southbound. You need to part the water with this. You need to part the water and get out of its way. Bethany, Warr Acres, all the way down to the airport – I’d go southbound. Do it now. And if you wait much longer, this is softball size hail. All this purple is softballs. So you’re going to be in softball size hail trying to do that. Don’t wait. If you can’t get below ground… Yes, it is still on the ground on the south side of I-40 right now. Go south. Get on down here, you know, toward west Moore, somewhere down here. This is safe down here. Get way down here. Down by Newcastle. Just take I-44, go down to Newcastle. Just get out of the way of it. If you can get down here, you’re going to be safe."
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting ProgressivePulse:
I mean seriously. How can you tell someone there is a tornado, 19 minutes away, get in your car and drive south, lol. There are millions of people on the road at once, you go nowhere. What an idiot. Basically what the people heard is that if you can't get underground or drive south, your dead.

When I heard that, and with the chopper out there observing the scene why didn't the news director or the pilot say to Mike driving is not a good idea right now. Worse off he was saying go South to central Moore where another storm had a potential to hit later that night.
Did Mike later on even make an attempt to explain his reasoning at that time?

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting trHUrrIXC5MMX:


Thanks. .. you are the 114th


Hey Max,
I will take 15-6-2
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Chicklit:
How about if Oklahoma City joins New Orleans in a City of Service initiative to assure preparedness and safety for its citizens in case of a tornado, or cluster of them as we saw last night?


I hadn't heard of citiesofservice. Looking it over.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Chicklit:
How about if Oklahoma City joins New Orleans in a City of Service initiative to assure preparedness and safety for its citizens in case of a tornado?

You know thats not such a bad idea. Although I would pair Oklahoma City with another tornado city such as Dallas/St. Louis/ Joplin... and New Orleans with cities such as Miami/Mobile/Houston
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
@trHUrrIXC5MMX:

Put me down for a 18-6-4 season.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:


AND YEAH, THE WIND SHEAR IS DROPPING!!!!

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
How about if Oklahoma City joins New Orleans in a City of Service initiative to assure preparedness and safety for its citizens in case of a tornado, or cluster of them as we saw last night?
You never know where things will go if there is enough public support for better safety measures.

NOW, THEREFORE, we resolve to develop a coalition of mayors from cities large and small to work together to harness and focus the energies of our citizens. Cities of Service coalition members will support efforts to increase service opportunities in our cities by:
Developing a comprehensive service plan and a coordinated strategy focused on matching volunteers and established community partners to the areas of greatest local need;
Working with other mayors and elected officials to advance strategies and best practices that accelerate the service movement and produce measurable results;
Encouraging other mayors to join this national effort to engage our citizens; and
Ensuring that the voice of cities is heard in federal legislative, policy, and program discussions related to service, which will help the country achieve the ambitious goals of the Serve America Act
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I mean seriously. How can you tell someone there is a tornado, 19 minutes away, get in your car and drive south, lol. There are millions of people on the road at once, you go nowhere. What an idiot. Basically what the people heard is that if you can't get underground or drive south, your dead.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I saw a dust devil today :p don't usually see them here in PA but it was cool
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting ProgressivePulse:
Round and Round she goes..



That looks like more than the usual diurnal heating that occurs in Yucatan.
Member Since: April 29, 2009 Posts: 75 Comments: 14890
NWS Norman is saying surveying yesterday's storms is harder than any other storms this month. El Reno monster still at EF3, but they haven't reached the starting or ending point. They still haven't reach the worst area. It'll be awhile to figures out tornado's real strength.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Sandy was a 85 mph noreaster according to mayor Bloomy I would think we would see more storms at least this weak since we are in a pattern like the 50's.During this time about 7 majors hit east coast.Remember it has been almost 8 years since last major storm hit US,longest period in history.The hype of these storms is unbelieveable when all you have to do is go back and look at history or charts and see there is nothing new under the sun.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
looking at surface obs in the area there seem to be a weak LLC forming around the gulf of honduras also it has been noted that this weak LLC is not closed yet and elongated SW-NE
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Round and Round she goes..

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
My area ended up with some intense sea breeze storms this evening! Over four inches of rain and it's still coming down at a moderate pace.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

I saw on Twitter, so take it for what its worth, that KFOR was planning on being sued by a high profile attorney. Hopefully this is the case.


I don't think that will work without a direct connection to injury or damage.

But going to the FCC and pressuring them to yank their broadcast license if they don't drop him (on the grounds of broadcasts contrary to the public interest) may have more success.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting BaltimoreBrian:


I can't agree with you more TropicalAnalystwx13. When I first heard about Mike Morgan's irresponsible comments I did not really believe it until people posted youtube clips of him saying that over and over. Mike Morgan's statements are one of the most irresponsible things I have observed in my lifetime.

I saw on Twitter, so take it for what its worth, that KFOR was planning on being sued by a high profile attorney. Hopefully this is the case.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting ScottLincoln:
Sorry, please check my correction I noted in the post.

Numerous papers suggest that the vast majority of people following the official tornado advice will survive a direct hit from a tornado. On average, the majority of people directly hit by an EF4-5 tornado will survive inside a small interior room inside of a sturdy structure. I've seen the fatality rate range from 1-10% in various papers... that's a 90% survivability rate... although I'm not sure of the exact break-down between underground and above ground. Let me see if I can find the papers.

Either way... your vehicle has a significantly larger risk than an above ground interior room. This is established fact.


http://cswr.org/publications/BAMS-88-1-31.pdf
Pages 39-40
Assumes fatality rate in EF4-5 damaged area as ~10%.


http://www.flame.org/~cdoswell/publications/Brook s_etal_08.pdf

Is a rebuttal comment in the scientific literature that suggests the 10% fatality rate in EF4-5 damage is too high.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
This video shows well how packed the roads in and around the Oklahoma City area were yesterday evening, a result of rush-hour traffic and Mike's idiotic advice to leave your home to drive south. When I was watching the live stream from News 9 yesterday the helicopter focused in on the roadways...they were all packed. We are very lucky the storm struggled as it entered the Metro area...had it produced another tornado like the one near El Reno and tracked over this populated area as expected, the result would've been catastrophic. I for one feel Mike Morgan should be fired, his advice could've easily costed many lives.



I can't agree with you more TropicalAnalystwx13. When I first heard about Mike Morgan's irresponsible comments I did not really believe it until people posted youtube clips of him saying that over and over. Mike Morgan's statements are one of the most irresponsible things I have observed in my lifetime.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting sar2401:

Plants transpire moisture, which is their equivalent of sweating. The hotter it is, the more moisture they lose, just like us. The real killer for plants is not daytime heat, it's a lack of night time recovery. As long as the overnight low goes below 70, most plants can recover some moisture from the normally humid night air. If the temperature stays above 70 or, even worse, it's windy with low humidity, it's almost impossible to keep up with plant water needs without drip irrigation.


Is that really so? Nights here usually very humid whether it is above 70 or not. Most places in the east are usually humid at night, dew at dawn, condensation on the windshield.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
This season is a bust
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting evilpenguinshan:
Hey Max, put me down for 13-7-3 :)
I'm mostly a lurker during tropical season, but it'll give me something to root for I guess




Thanks. .. you are the 114th
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting allancalderini:
I remember I say 3 to 5 majors right? I will go with 5-Thanks for the dedication Max.


Ill check that for you...

---------'-

BAHA... I've been waiting for your numbers fot a while...thanks.
You are the 113th.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Just finished up my blog regarding 2013 hurricane season in whole and possible development in near future.

Bluestorm5's Blog

It's a simple blog for those who want to understand why this season is expected to be slightly active.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
And CMC!


Quoting HurricaneDean07:

Very interesting feature the GFS is now showing. Could be something to monitor after this whole mess in the gulf is said and done.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Dakster:


I have never seen a plant 'sweat'. Although the water in the leaves will evaporate out faster, if that is what you mean. Unless it is a cactus which is a plant designed to not be around water all the time.

If the plants/flowers are not hardy in hot/dry weather you may need to water them a little more than normal. I have some plants that are not as heat tolerant and I have to water them more often than the Florida native plants/flowers.

Plants transpire moisture, which is their equivalent of sweating. The hotter it is, the more moisture they lose, just like us. The real killer for plants is not daytime heat, it's a lack of night time recovery. As long as the overnight low goes below 70, most plants can recover some moisture from the normally humid night air. If the temperature stays above 70 or, even worse, it's windy with low humidity, it's almost impossible to keep up with plant water needs without drip irrigation.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
..is the "mjo" rising ?...

Mr. Mojo Risin', Mr. Mojo Risin'
Mr. Mojo Risin', Mr. Mojo Risin'
Got to keep on risin'
Mr. Mojo Risin', Mr. Mojo Risin'
Mojo Risin', gotta Mojo Risin'
Mr. Mojo Risin', gotta keep on risin'
Risin', risin'
Gone risin', risin'
I'm gone risin', risin'
I gotta risin', risin'
Well, risin', risin'
I gotta, wooo, yeah, risin'
Woah, ohh yeah
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting JRRP:
nice wave in the CATL

Very interesting feature the GFS is now showing. Could be something to monitor after this whole mess in the gulf is said and done.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
236. JRRP
nice wave in the CATL
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
NW Pacific basin has the greatest TCHP anomaly of any basin at the moment. Interestingly, tropical cyclone activity does not reflect this at all. In fact, TC activity in the NW Pacific is at or near record low levels (hard to say because of poor climatology documentation). They haven't had a named storm since February, and ACE for the year is at 2.59 points (normal year to date is 28 points, source). I haven't tried to look at the reasons for this, hopefully some researchers will tackle this one though because this anomaly is quite significant. One thing this does show us more heat in the oceans doesn't necessarily mean more storm activity.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Hey Max, put me down for 13-7-3 :)
I'm mostly a lurker during tropical season, but it'll give me something to root for I guess


Quoting trHUrrIXC5MMX:
Good evening everyone. ..

Just to let you know that my hurricane card now counting 112 bloggers.
Tell me of changes or new entries RSVP...in my blog as there I will catch you not here.

The poll closes on JULY 1ST... you only have ONE MONTH left until I close up for final numbers...

Take care.

Ps. Expect the new hurricane chart on Monday...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting ProgressivePulse:
Barbara wannabe is going to put on a show tonight, IMO.


sent u a pm
Member Since: May 14, 2006 Posts: 8 Comments: 13841
During the May 1 to May 14 period, a total of 12 tornadoes were confirmed across the United States. During the May 15 to today period, a total of 142 tornadoes have been confirmed across the United States. Many surveys from yesterday are still ongoing, and many tornadoes from the previous two outbreaks (May 15-17)(May 18-21) have yet to be confirmed and/or rated as well.

This active pattern isn't expected to last. It's already on the decline.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting WxLogic:
500MB VORT:


Yeah... this image shows the circulation that's caught my eye... 'twould be quite interesting if it sits there spinning long enough to acquire tropical characteristics... that's more or less where the Gulf Stream starts to cross, yes?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:


This would suggest a weak circulation around 13N/77W
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
500MB VORT:


Member Since: August 14, 2008 Posts: 4 Comments: 5038
Quoting CosmicEvents:
The dead storm raises for the first time some probability of having a zombie storm form. Don't let your guard down. Keep a piece of wood around in case of something more Transylvanian as well which isn't in the model algorithms. Unless Romania is producing a model these days.


LOL!!
Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 16223
Barbara wannabe is going to put on a show tonight, IMO.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I'd put the odds of tropical cyclone development from this feature, overall not in 48 hours, in the neighborhood of 40%.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting indianrivguy:


Colonel, there was some talk on the weather channel about flight having been an option for those facing the Moore EF-5 with no underground shelter. Some folks questioned why the school wasn't evacuated with 19 minutes from siren to impact, which of course is impossible... and then the question turned to homes and the case for leaving sounded "reasonable" and I bet he saw it.


Lately, a number of the media mets here have been saying this, and some government officials have also . . .

I don't think that the one person should be held up to the fire as the poster boy for irresponsible media. A number of people are to blame.

I posted this in the last blog, just before Dr. Masters posted the new one. Its a nice Op-Ed piece on the problems that all media have in creating the problem we saw yesterday.

The day that should change tornado actions and storm chasing forever


Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Our upcoming disturbance is already starting to converge together near cancun...



Look for this area to start the beginning of Tropical Cyclone Mischief for this week. Lower convergence and Upper Divergence have remained high in this area for the past 9-15 Hours and Lower Level voricity has gradually increased... Could get interesting.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting trHUrrIXC5MMX:
Good evening everyone. ..

Just to let you know that my hurricane card now counting 112 bloggers.
Tell me of changes or new entries RSVP...in my blog as there I will catch you not here.

The poll closes on JULY 1ST... you only have ONE MONTH left until I close up for final numbers...

Take care.

Ps. Expect the new hurricane chart on Monday...
MAX!!!!! I forgot to give you my numbers!

I'm thinking 17 8 3. For some reason this seems like a year we will get some activity in July; I know I was thinking about that but now can't remember what was making me think so.

And I will post to your blog...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting anotherwrongyear:
anything they say might head to florida usually dies out or hooks away so im not suprised its dead dead dead


Man, everything IS right on cue on the first day of hurricane season!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
The dead storm raises for the first time some probability of having a zombie storm form. Don't let your guard down. Keep a piece of wood around in case of something more Transylvanian as well which isn't in the model algorithms. Unless Romania is producing a model these days.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Live Blogging from the Getting it Right Conference

We will be live blogging from the conference at Shepherd Center in Atlanta on our Weather Underground blog.





The live blog begins 6pm Monday, 8am to 5pm Tuesday and 8am to 11am on Wednesday. Please check it out!


Monday, June 3, 2013

4:00pm 6:30pm Registration

6:30pm 6:40pm - Welcome, Overview & Conference Expectations, Paul Timmons, Executive Director, Portlight Strategies, Inc.

6:40pm 7:40pm- Dinner (Provided)

7:40pm 8:30pm- Dr. Jeff Masters, Chief Meteorologist, Weather Underground

Dr. Masters co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990. He'll discuss current weather and environmental trends, and why we can expect to see more storms like Sandy
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Animated Gif was an hour old, updated with still image.

Don't quite know when those TWO's are created but, I personally think the AOI will have a short life at 0%.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting ncstorm:
I believe I remember a couple of majors having a 0% outlook..I googled it but nothing came up..anyone remember?


Don't know... but remember, they stated 0% in the NEXT 48 HOURS. Just because it says so doesn't mean that it won't EVER develop. Conditions could always become favorable beyond the 48 hour timeframe. Not saying this is the case with 90L, but just take that into consideration.

Just my 2 cents worth!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Viewing: 268 - 218

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

Local Weather

Overcast
28 °F
Overcast

JeffMasters's Recent Photos

Lake Effort Snow Shower Over Windsor, Ontario
Sunset on Dunham Lake
Pictured Rocks Sunset
Sunset on Lake Huron