Tornadoes, Floods, and Severe Thunderstorms Continue in the Midwest

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:46 PM GMT on May 31, 2013

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It was yet another active day for tornadoes, flooding, and severe thunderstorms in the Midwest on Thursday, with NOAA's Storm Prediction Center (SPC) logging 16 preliminary tornado reports. Twisters touched down in Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Illinois. The tornadoes missed heavily populated areas for the most part, but seven people were injured in Arkansas in two separate tornadoes, and two other people were hurt by lightning. The severe weather forced organizers of the outdoor Wakarusa Music Festival north of Ozark, Arkansas to delay the start of the festival. The band "Widespread Panic" was one of the groups scheduled to perform, leading to an Associated Press headline from yesterday titled, "Nine hurt in Arkansas storm; Widespread Panic delayed." Heavy rains from this week's thunderstorms have pushed the Mississippi River to major flood stage at most places from Burlington Iowa to Quincy Illinois, and the river is expected to crest near major flood stage at St. Louis early next week. In Iowa, the Cedar River at Cedar Falls, the Iowa River at Marengo, and the Skunk River near Sigourney and at Augusta are also in major flood. The latest forecast from NOAA's Storm Prediction Center calls for a "Moderate Risk" of severe weather today (Friday) over much of Oklahoma and Southwest Missouri, including Oklahoma City and Tulsa in Oklahoma, and Joplin, Missouri, with the potential for several strong EF-2 and EF-3 tornadoes.


Figure 1. Lightning strike from a severe thunderstorm near Guthrie, Oklahoma on May 30, 2013, as photographed by KFOR-TV. (AP Photo/KFOR-TV)


Figure 2. Severe weather outlook for Thursday, May 30, calls for a "Moderate Risk" of severe weather over much of Oklahoma and Southwest Missouri, including Oklahoma City and Tulsa in Oklahoma, and Joplin, Missouri. You can follow today's severe weather outbreak from our Severe Weather page.

A mostly quiet year for violent tornadoes
After a very quiet March, April, and first half of May, the U.S. tornado season has become very active during the last half of May, and is beginning to catch up to normal. TWC's tornado expert Dr. Greg Forbes has a preliminary count of 181 tornadoes for the month of May, through May 29, which is 35% below the 10-year average of 279 through May 29th. May 2012 had only 121 tornadoes. The 2013 tornado tally has risen significantly in the last half of May, due to 7 of the last 15 days having above-average numbers of tornadoes. Fortunately, we are well below-average for strong and violent EF-3, EF-4, and EF-5 tornadoes so far in 2013. According to NOAA, the U.S. has averaged 43 EF-3 or stronger tornadoes per year during the period 1954 - 2012. With tornado season nearly half over, only twelve EF-3 and EF-4 tornadoes have been recorded so far in 2013. An average year should have had at least twenty of these tornadoes by this point in the year. Here are the twelve EF-3 and stronger tornadoes so far in 2013, as detailed in Wikipedia's excellent Tornadoes of 2013 page:

EF-5, May 20, Moore, Oklahoma. 24 deaths, 377 injuries, $2 billion in damage.
EF-4, May 28, Ottawa County, Kansas. Intensity based on mobile Doppler radar data. See the Capital Weather Gang's description of this tornado.
EF-4, May 19, Shawnee, Oklahoma. 2 deaths, 6 injuries.
EF-4, May 15, Granbury, TX. 6 deaths, 24+ injuries.
EF-4, May 18, Rozel, Kansas.
EF-4, February 10, Hattiesburg, MS. 0 deaths, 82 injuries.
EF-3, Corning, KS, May 28.
EF-3, May 27, Lebanon - Esbon, KS. 1 injured. Wind gust of 175 mph measured by TIV2 intercept vehicle.
EF-3, May 15, Cleburne, TX. No deaths or injuries.
EF-3, January 30, Adairsville, GA. 1 death, 17 injuries, 363 buildings damaged or destroyed.
EF-3, April 11, Kemper County, AL. 1 death, 9 injuries.
EF-3, May 19, Luther - Carney, Oklahoma.


Figure 3. The annual number of EF-3 and stronger tornadoes, 1954 - 2012. The greatest number of these dangerous tornadoes was 131 in 1974, the year of the notorious "Super Outbreak." The minimum was just 15, set in 1987. The average is 43 per year. Image credit: NOAA.


Video 1. Impressive 2-minute timelapse of the Bennington, Kansas wedge tornado of May 28, 2013, as filmed by the Aussie Storm Chasers. As discussed in an excellent blog post by Jason Samenow of the Capital Weather Gang, the violent EF-4 tornado stood still for nearly an hour, and had wind gusts as high as 264 mph at an altitude of 300 feet measured by Doppler on Wheels.

Remains of Hurricane Barbara bringing heavy rains to Mexico
Hurricane Barbara died on Thursday as it attempted to cross Mexico's Isthmus of Tehuantepec into the southernmost Gulf of Mexico. While there is no low level circulation apparent on satellite loops this Friday morning, there is a bit of spin at middle levels of the atmosphere, and the remains of Barbara are kicking up some heavy thunderstorm activity over the southernmost Gulf of Mexico and adjacent land areas of Mexico. Wind shear is a high 20 knots in the region, and the area of disturbed weather is quite small, so I don't expect any development to occur over the next few days. Wind shear is predicted to remain high over the Gulf of Mexico for the next six days, and none of the reliable computers models is calling for tropical cyclone development in the Atlantic during that period. Late next week, wind shear is predicted to drop, and there is a better chance for tropical cyclone development in the Gulf of Mexico or Western Caribbean. Both the GFS and ECMWF models suggest that a strong tropical disturbance with heavy rains may affect Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, Western Cuba, and the Southwest Florida by Friday next week.


Figure 4. Remains of Hurricane Barbara in the southernmost Gulf of Mexico as seen by MODIS at 12:05 pm EDT Thursday, May 30, 2013. Barbara had just been declared dead one hour prior to this photo. Image credit: NASA.

Saturday, June 1, is the first day of hurricane season, and I'll post a quick look at what we might expect to see in June.

Jeff Masters

More Wild Weather 4 (Nikongranny)
More Wild Weather 4
Bennington, Ks Tornado (weatherfanatic2010)
This was one of the easiest chase days ever. Left Salina, Ks and thought about going after the storms to the NW but turned back after about 15 miles when the storm that spawned this tornado went up. Me and my group setup just west of Bennington about 20 minutes before this tornado touched down, catching a brief rope tornado about 10 minutes before this tornado touched down. It sat almost stationary for about 45 and we watched it's entire life cycle without having to move.
Bennington, Ks Tornado
LP Supercell (adkinsadam1)
LP Supercell
Lightning (tjlpowell)
Lightning

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Terrible model consistency coming from the models, the only model showing any real consistent develop is the typically over-zealous CMC. I hate these kinds of situations, either drop it entirely or develop it instead of flipping each run and making 90L into a disorganized trough with several lows. It looks like the GFS is suffering from Debby-syndrome and having convective feedback problems. I suspect the models will get a better grip on this situation as we move closer to the predicted time of genesis.

EDIT -- and right as I posted that, post 1908 appears. The GFS does appear to be having convective feedback problems and should be discounted until it either drops any sort of development outside a trough or shows an actual tropical cyclone, not this 4-5 low nonsense.
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Nws Ruskin reinforced their forecast for a hefty sea breeze collision over west central Florida today in their morning update. The winds along the coast are taking their sweet time coming around to the west, though. We are REALLY behind in rainfall, so I'm hoping for at least an inch today. Who knows
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Quoting HurricaneDean07:
GFS in lala land again. It split Andrea up into 3 different lows...
Short excerpt from the Miami NWS:

ATTENTION THEN TURNS TO THE GULF OF MEXICO AS A MONSOON TROUGH/LOW
PUSHES NORTHEASTWARD OUT OF THE BAY OF CAMPECHE AND ACROSS THE
YUCATAN PENINSULA. THE GFS DEVELOPS THE LOW AND MOVES IT ACROSS
SOUTH/CENTRAL FLORIDA ON WEDNESDAY. THE MODEL IS SUFFERING FROM
CONVECTIVE FEEDBACK TIED TO MID LEVEL VORT ENERGY AND STRENGTHENS
THE LOW AND THEN THE SURROUNDING FLOW TOO MUCH AND TOO FAST. SO IT
HAS BEEN DISCARDED.
Member Since: August 31, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 5628
Quoting Chicklit:


Infrastructure are things that make the country stronger, not weaker . . . . .
Become the vocal majority.
Demand your government work for the health and safety of the people of this country.


Chicklit - cannot agree with you more.
Member Since: June 25, 2011 Posts: 2 Comments: 3732
1906. Levi32
And here was one of the velocity shots from my friend's phone with our GPS location. There's one not posted yet where we were under the edge of the cyan colors. At this point we had just managed to turn south and were at a standstill in traffic and couldn't move, and the second tornado to the west was headed in our direction, evident by its warning polygon. The El Reno storm is the one we are closest to, and it was passing east of us at this point, but just 10 minutes before we were a little scared. We looked up above the car and saw the wall cloud over top of us, with very quick rotation and rising scud indicating the updraft. We were definitely too close. I still can't believe this happened to us yesterday.

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GFS in lala land again. It split Andrea up into 3 different lows...
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1904. Levi32
I didn't get the best pictures. My friends got much better ones. I'm not a good photographer, my camera is bad, and I didn't have it in hand at some of the most intense moments, but here are a couple I managed to grab.

El Reno wall cloud from afar, turning in our direction at the time while we were watching. We were sure at one point we could see the wedge in there amongst the rain curtains, or at least the left half of it, but we never got a clear shot. We took off pretty quickly after seeing it turn our way on radar anyway, so we didn't have much time to watch.



Beautiful mammatus from the El Reno storm, the first I've ever seen.



Much later in the day now after the semi-panic under the El Reno wall cloud, the second storm's wall cloud showed up behind us.




...and it got closer.



Beautiful cyan tint in the sky indicating hail.



Highway 4 at a near standstill as far as the eye can see, both northbound and southbound, but all heading south. Even we drove on the wrong side of the highway for quite some time.

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Quoting SLU:
"Andrea" in the Gulf and some additional Cape Verde "development" at 90hrs.



1005mb wouldn't be Andrea, it's not even a TD.
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1901. sar2401
Quoting Bluestorm5:


Even though they takes videos, Reed and Sean Casey got instruments on their cars so scientists can look over the datas.

That's nice. All those cool instruments won't be providing much data from the "Tornado Hunt 2013" TWC chase vehicle, judging from the mangled state it appeared to be in. I would seriously like to know exactly how much data is ever provided to scientists by these commercial chasers.
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GFS splits the gulf system into two.

Link
Member Since: August 31, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 5628
1899. pottery
Quoting SLU:
"Andrea" in the Gulf and some additional Cape Verde "development" at 90hrs.


Loving this breezy weather, SLU.
But looking East at the Tropical Atlantic, and seeing some heavy rains coming.....
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1898. SLU
"Andrea" in the Gulf and some additional Cape Verde "development" at 90hrs.

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Interesting... About 5 Days out
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Quoting sar2401:


Average number of persons killed in US annually by tornadoes = ~175

Average number of people killed by heat waves in the US = ~2,100

It would make more sense from a public health point of view to mandate air conditioning, assuming the government should be passing yet more laws that they have no money to pay for.


Let's not focus on deaths, we have tendency to underestimate the impact of injuries.

And public shelters - constructed for tornadoes - could actually serve a dual purpose . . .
Member Since: June 25, 2011 Posts: 2 Comments: 3732
Quoting AussieStorm:


Do apartments and university accommodation not have internal stairs-wells people can go to, to ride out a storm/tornado?


NO!

Most of these are located by external walls with windows, which if they failed or the roof were lost, would result in people being seriously hurt.

Stairwells would be the worst place for people to take shelter above ground.
Member Since: June 25, 2011 Posts: 2 Comments: 3732
1894. sar2401
Quoting RTSplayer:


New building code for plains states:

All houses should be constructed entirely under ground, with at least 2 feet of earth above all living spaces.

It may be much more expensive initially, but think of all the insurance savings, and all the savings from reductions of death and injuries! Preventing the cost of several days in ICU from being impaled would easily pay for the expenses.


Average number of persons killed in US annually by tornadoes = ~175

Average number of people killed by heat waves in the US = ~2,100

It would make more sense from a public health point of view to mandate air conditioning, assuming the government should be passing yet more laws that they have no money to pay for.
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Quoting RTSplayer:


New building code for plains states:

All houses should be constructed entirely under ground, with at least 2 feet of earth above all living spaces.

It may be much more expensive initially, but think of all the insurance savings, and all the savings from reductions of death and injuries! Preventing the cost of several days in ICU from being impaled would easily pay for the expenses.


What about when the underground houses collapse or flood? 5+ inches of rain also fell in OKC yesterday with the tornadoes, they showed plenty of flash flooding. The chance of a tornado hitting your particular house is low even though the chance of a tornado hitting the area is high.
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1892. SLU
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Quoting TreasureCoastFl:
From local mets "If this system develops and moves toward the west coast of Florida, we could have a very rainy and windy middle and end of next week.
If the system develops and moves toward Louisiana, we may see very little or no impact from it at all. "


We might be looking at another Debby set-up.
Member Since: August 31, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 5628
Quoting VR46L:
3 Day Nam Loop Some rain for Florida But does not appear to be the levels of the CMC

that's because it keeps the low in the gulf a little longer before bringing it into the west coast of fl.
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Here's a link to a constructed on site masonry shelter. Your local mason may be able to help you out and save you some money.

Link
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93 hours out on 12z GFS. 1004 mb low in the middle of the gulf sitting stationary. Link
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Quoting JNTenne:

Ok seriously.. there are no guarantees in life right? If we demand that the gov't protect us from all possible threats . . .


The government is what we want it to be . . . and if "we" decide that "we" want protection from a reasonable threat, like protecting people's lives when a tornado passes through a heavily populated area - in a region where this has consistently happened, that certainly is not a violation of our "liberty".

because "we" would determine that "we" would pay for it. More reasonable, smaller towns in OK, have made this decision for themselves . . . and with the help of grants and bond issues, provide public shelters.

Why this "cannot be done" in larger populated areas is irresponsible, irrational, and, in a large part, a factor of greed.
Member Since: June 25, 2011 Posts: 2 Comments: 3732
From local mets "If this system develops and moves toward the west coast of Florida, we could have a very rainy and windy middle and end of next week.
If the system develops and moves toward Louisiana, we may see very little or no impact from it at all. "


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Quoting JNTenne:

My hope is that the Chinese will seek to protect their consumer base and offer to construct the necessary shelters -at least in the vicinity of major shopping malls and banks..
Ok seriously.. there are no guarantees in life right? If we demand that the gov't protect us from all possible threats they will turn on SKYNET and the machines will kill us to protect us from ourselves ...oh carp.. was really trying to stay serious :(%uFFFD
anyway... stay positive and make a difference in someone's life today


Infrastructure are things that make the country stronger, not weaker. People getting in harms way because there is nowhere to go is poor planning.
Have really had enough of the rhetoric over not supporting government services to make our communities and people stronger.
For example, am sick of seeing malls go up as others go vacant. Retrofit some of those for actual public uses and things may begin to make sense again.
We've had enough of the paranoid arguments that have been running policy in this great country for far too long. It's time to put common sense back into public policy.
Protect the people.
Preserve life.
Invest in America, not some pie in the sky idea that is thrown out like so much rhetoric, fear mongering, and paranoic delusion.
Really have had enough.
People swarming on highways trying to escape tornados in tornado alley is plain irresponsible public policy. People who don't want to spend money on America and instead want it to go overseas and into the hands of the slim minority need to get out of the way.
Nothing can stop the majority of people when they decide they want something done.
Say you've had enough and things will change.
Become the vocal majority.
Demand your government work for the health and safety of the people of this country.
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Interesting thing to note the 12z GFS has a 1006 mb low in the gulf heading for Florida 3 days from now. Timing has been inconsistent but it has still been showing a system.
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Quoting RTSplayer:


New building code for plains states:

All houses should be constructed entirely under ground, with at least 2 feet of earth above all living spaces.

It may be much more expensive initially, but think of all the insurance savings, and all the savings from reductions of death and injuries! Preventing the cost of several days in ICU from being impaled would easily pay for the expenses.


The soil type in OK, and the high water table - almost makes this impractical.

However JNTenn is right, and scientific studies are backing it up, reposting a link I posted before:

Oklahoma tornadoes: Aboveground shelters stood up in face of EF5 Moore tornado

Researchers who toured Moore after the May 20 tornado said aboveground storm shelters held up well in the storm and can be a better choice than underground storm cellars.
Member Since: June 25, 2011 Posts: 2 Comments: 3732
Quoting sar2401:

Wait. There are two types of "chasers". One group consists of volunteers that are NWS trained Skywarn spotters. Their mission is to provide ground truth to local NWS offices either by phone or amateur radio. These people are all volunteers who really do this as a public service. The second group are really "chasers", people like Mr. Bettes and Mr. Sullivan, who are out chasing to provide revenue to the media, either directly or by selling thier videos to the media. They will take many more risks to get a good video because that's what sells. Any service to the public is secondary to their main mission of generating revenue.

It was quite striking yesterday to see the number highly decorated "chase" vehicles tying up traffic while their videographers were running into the road trying to get the best shot. Sometimes there were four or five of these commercial vehicles in the same place, often with no regard for traffic or safety. I imagine this must be turning into an issue for public safety agencies in places like OKC. The two incidents I'm aware of that caused damage and/or injuries involved commercial chasers. I have yet to hear of any Skywarn volunteer in the same situation.


Even though they takes videos, Reed and Sean Casey got instruments on their cars so scientists can look over the datas.
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 28 Comments: 8009
1881. JNTenne

Quoting Chicklit:


The U.S. public needs to demand infrastructure improvements, including public storm shelters. With unemployment a huge problem and interest rates at record lows, this makes good sense right now.
My hope is that the Chinese will seek to protect their consumer base and offer to construct the necessary shelters -at least in the vicinity of major shopping malls and banks..
Ok seriously.. there are no guarantees in life right? If we demand that the gov't protect us from all possible threats they will turn on SKYNET and the machines will kill us to protect us from ourselves ...oh carp.. was really trying to stay serious :( 
anyway... stay positive and make a difference in someone's life today
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Quoting Chicklit:
Glad Levi made it back okay. I think storm chasing is something one should do in front of a computer.

Agreed, much safer. even I can do it from 10,000km away
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Quoting dkb:

Yes because the local news station (KFOR) was telling everyone to get in their cars and drive south if you did not have underground shelter (which most people there don't).


I live in a foam paneled house with brick, and I would not stay in this house if I thought an EF4 was going to hit it. You couldn't pay me enough to make me stay here.
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Tornado that went through St. Charles and St. Louis County is reported by NWS St. Louis to be EF3.
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 28 Comments: 8009
Quoting daddyjames:


The issue is not necessarily with private residences . . . it is more on where do:
(1) apartment dwellers
(2) people at work
(3) people travelling on the highways - just passing through
(4) students at Universities, "college towns" like Norman and Stillwater.

Go?

There is nowhere for them to go.

Here in Stillwater, the University provides public shelters - that are hold overs from the '50's bomb shelters, still have the signs and everything.

However, the student population is current 40,000 people - which just about doubles the population of the city. The public shelters cannot hold even a reasonable fraction of the student population.


Do apartments and university accommodation not have internal stairs-wells people can go to, to ride out a storm/tornado?
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1876. sar2401
Quoting Astrometeor:


I'm not aggravated, although I know what you mean, especially on the late night blog.

Those tornadoes last night repeatedly changed direction, first from going east to southeast to northeast, back to southeast, and finally east when going through OKC. Scary stuff for chasers.

And I am glad that there were those out there yesterday willing to risk their lives to locate a storm and report the exact location, strength, and speed back to the NWS to make a more detailed warning to those living in the way. The chasers should be welcomed and thanked for their service not shamed upon.

Wait. There are two types of "chasers". One group consists of volunteers that are NWS trained Skywarn spotters. Their mission is to provide ground truth to local NWS offices either by phone or amateur radio. These people are all volunteers who really do this as a public service. The second group are really "chasers", people like Mr. Bettes and Mr. Sullivan, who are out chasing to provide revenue to the media, either directly or by selling thier videos to the media. They will take many more risks to get a good video because that's what sells. Any service to the public is secondary to their main mission of generating revenue.

It was quite striking yesterday to see the number highly decorated "chase" vehicles tying up traffic while their videographers were running into the road trying to get the best shot. Sometimes there were four or five of these commercial vehicles in the same place, often with no regard for traffic or safety. I imagine this must be turning into an issue for public safety agencies in places like OKC. The two incidents I'm aware of that caused damage and/or injuries involved commercial chasers. I have yet to hear of any Skywarn volunteer in the same situation.
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Glad Levi made it back okay. I think storm chasing is something one should do in front of a computer.
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How do I read this???

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Quoting Tropicsweatherpr:
No plans for now to send recon to check 90L.

WEATHER RECONNAISSANCE FLIGHTS
CARCAH, NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER, MIAMI, FL.
1130 AM EDT SAT 01 JUNE 2013
SUBJECT: TROPICAL CYCLONE PLAN OF THE DAY (TCPOD)
VALID 02/1100Z TO 03/1100Z JUNE 2013
TCPOD NUMBER.....13-001

I. ATLANTIC REQUIREMENTS
1. NEGATIVE RECONNAISSANCE REQUIREMENTS.
2. OUTLOOK FOR SUCCEEDING DAY.....NEGATIVE.

II. PACIFIC REQUIREMENTS
1. NEGATIVE RECONNAISSANCE REQUIREMENTS.
2. OUTLOOK FOR SUCCEEDING DAY.....NEGATIVE.

III. REMARKS: THIS IS THE FIRST TCPOD OF THIS SEASON,
A NEW ONE WILL NOW BE PUBLISHED EACH DAY THROUGH
30 NOVEMBER.
$$
INITIALS WVW

I wouldn't think so considering that it is just a bunch of disorganized showers and thunderstorms. We might get some action later this week though.
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Quoting daddyjames:


Have to disagree with you JNTenn. Our government is supposed to be for the people. And if local and state governments, and the people that are being governed, cannot come to a consensus that shelters should be available to protect the general public - in high population centers - then what good is government?

And if we, as a members of the general population, can't agree that this is worth the cost, well that is placing a value on people's lives . . . which is, one could argue, downright evil.


New building code for plains states:

All houses should be constructed entirely under ground, with at least 2 feet of earth above all living spaces.

It may be much more expensive initially, but think of all the insurance savings, and all the savings from reductions of death and injuries! Preventing the cost of several days in ICU from being impaled would easily pay for the expenses.
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Quoting winter123:
It begins.

Ex-Barbara doesn't look like much now, but anything that sits over the Gulf for days could spell trouble.


More like, THEY begin. So disappointing ex-Barb shows zero interest in TX.
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Quoting Levi32:



Would I go again? Yes, but not today, or tomorrow, and I would take even greater care. We had no clue we would get caught the way we did. I thought we had done everything right. We were kind of freaking out for a while. That velocity signature you guys saw with radar folding and multiple vortices - we were under the southern edge of it. We never got a clear view of the tornado, but we could tell just how close it was to our north. It was unreal. The inflow got pretty strong.

We were almost ready to jump out and take cover right before we found a route south, which ended up being slow. It became a six-lane highway south as everyone panicked and drove on the wrong side of the road. Even we did so. We thought we were clear until we saw the training of tornadic supercells on radar, all connected somehow. I've never seen anything like that. My best pictures of the day were of the wall cloud that followed behind the El Reno storm. We didn't see a funnel from that one either, but it chased us south for a long time, and we heard from radio that it spawned a confirmed tornado in Tuttle, when we realized that we were in Tuttle.

A third mesocyclone showed up behind that one as we continued slowly south, eventually reaching Blanchard. It looked weaker than the others but we weren't going to escape it, so we took shelter in a storm room in the local grocery store for about an hour. It then took a long time to find a way around the huge hail cores to get back home. Lightning flashes were occurring 10 times per second as we drove home in the dark. It was almost calming to watch as we got over the semi-shock that we were all in. None of us in the car had seen a tornado before. We didn't see one yesterday, but we were chased by two.
Wow, you are one of those lucky ones that escaped El Reno storm! Many storm chasers didn't get lucky with that tornado yesterday. That tornado was so violent that Scott Lincoln was really impressed by it.
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 28 Comments: 8009
Quoting daddyjames:


The issue is not necessarily with private residences . . . it is more on where do:
(1) apartment dwellers
(2) people at work
(3) people travelling on the highways - just passing through
(4) students at Universities, "college towns" like Norman and Stillwater.

Go?

There is nowhere for them to go.

Here in Stillwater, the University provides public shelters - that are hold overs from the '50's bomb shelters, still have the signs and everything.

However, the student population is current 40,000 people - which just about doubles the population of the city. The public shelters cannot hold even a reasonable fraction of the student population.


The U.S. public needs to demand infrastructure improvements, including public storm shelters. With unemployment a huge problem and interest rates at record lows, this makes good sense right now.
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1868. 7544
Quoting winter123:
It begins.

Ex-Barbara doesn't look like much now, but anything that sits over the Gulf for days could spell trouble.
bb

is that blob on the tip cuba the one that gets in the gulf and forms alow that that the models are showing it looks pretty good we are talikn in about 3 days tia
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My latest blog that I posted yesterday.
The 2013 Hurricane Season : What to expect Check it out if you're interested. :)
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It begins.

Ex-Barbara doesn't look like much now, but anything that sits over the Gulf for days could spell trouble.
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Quoting sar2401:
One thing that could be done now is require that any house rebuilt or replaced as a result of tornado damage be equipped with a family shelter. That could be done fairly rapidly at a state level, and the cost of shelter during rebuilding would be relatively minimal. A state insurance commission can make this happen in a few weeks if they really want to.


The issue is not necessarily with private residences . . . it is more on where do:
(1) apartment dwellers
(2) people at work
(3) people travelling on the highways - just passing through
(4) students at Universities, "college towns" like Norman and Stillwater.

Go?

There is nowhere for them to go.

Here in Stillwater, the University provides public shelters - that are hold overs from the '50's bomb shelters, still have the signs and everything.

However, the student population is current 40,000 people - which just about doubles the population of the city. The public shelters cannot hold even a reasonable fraction of the student population.
Member Since: June 25, 2011 Posts: 2 Comments: 3732
Quoting Tropicsweatherpr:
No plans for now to send recon to check 90L.

WEATHER RECONNAISSANCE FLIGHTS
CARCAH, NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER, MIAMI, FL.
1130 AM EDT SAT 01 JUNE 2013
SUBJECT: TROPICAL CYCLONE PLAN OF THE DAY (TCPOD)
VALID 02/1100Z TO 03/1100Z JUNE 2013
TCPOD NUMBER.....13-001

I. ATLANTIC REQUIREMENTS
1. NEGATIVE RECONNAISSANCE REQUIREMENTS.
2. OUTLOOK FOR SUCCEEDING DAY.....NEGATIVE.

II. PACIFIC REQUIREMENTS
1. NEGATIVE RECONNAISSANCE REQUIREMENTS.
2. OUTLOOK FOR SUCCEEDING DAY.....NEGATIVE.

III. REMARKS: THIS IS THE FIRST TCPOD OF THIS SEASON,
A NEW ONE WILL NOW BE PUBLISHED EACH DAY THROUGH
30 NOVEMBER.
$$
INITIALS WVW



at lest not right now
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1863. Thrawst
NWS Norman ‏@NWSNorman 33m
Initial estimates indicate our tornado warning was issued 19 minutes before the El Reno tornado developed. #okwx
Member Since: July 18, 2010 Posts: 50 Comments: 1893
1862. dkb

Quoting daddyjames:


Interesting excerpt from that article:

At least five people killed were in vehicles and may have been trying to flee as dark clouds gathered and warning sirens wailed, authorities said.

So, the vast majority were in their cars . . .
Yes because the local news station (KFOR) was telling everyone to get in their cars and drive south if you did not have underground shelter (which most people there don't).
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1861. JNTenne

Quoting sar2401:

I agree, except we are technically broke as a country. I am old enough to remember the huge spate of atomic bomb shelters built by the government in the 1950's, but nuclear war was considered almost a certainty then. The vast majority of places in tornado prone areas have never been hit by a fatal storm. If we had the national will to do so, I'm sure we could scrape up the money to build public shelters but I don't see that happening.

One thing that could be done now is require that any house rebuilt or replaced as a result of tornado damage be equipped with a family shelter. That could be done fairly rapidly at a state level, and the cost of shelter during rebuilding would be relatively minimal. A state insurance commission can make this happen in a few weeks if they really want to.

This is from a local Nashville company and will set you back $5K. It has 12 anchor points and they deliver...

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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