Moore Tornado an EF-5; $2 Billion Damage Estimate: 3rd Costliest Tornado in History

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:22 PM GMT on May 22, 2013

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The Moore, Oklahoma tornado of May 20, 2013 is now ranked an EF-5, making it one of only 59 U.S. tornadoes to achieve that distinction since record keeping began in 1950. The National Weather Service in Norman, Oklahoma announced Tuesday that their damage survey teams found an area of EF-5 damage near Briarwood Elementary School, with winds of 200 - 210 mph indicated. There were no EF-5 tornadoes observed in 2012, and the last time the U.S. had an EF-5 was on May 24, 2011, when the Oklahoma towns of Calumet, El Reno, Piedmont, and Guthrie were hit by an EF-5 with 210+ mph winds that killed nine people. The maximum width of the 2013 Moore tornado's damage swath was a huge 1.3 miles. Detailed damage survey information in Google Earth Format provided by the Norman, OK NWS office shows that the typical width of the EF-0 and greater damage swath was about 0.6 miles, and the EF-4 damage area was about 0.1 miles across at its widest. EF-4 damage occurred along approximately 4 miles of the tornado's 17-mile long path. The damage swath from the May 20, 2013 tornado as it cut through the most densely built up portions of Moore was roughly 1.5 times as wide as the one from the May 3, 1999 EF-5 tornado. That tornado was the 4th costliest in history ($1.4 billion 2011 dollars), so it is a good bet that the 2013 Moore tornado will end up being even more expensive. This morning, the Oklahoma Insurance Department said the preliminary tornado damage estimate could top $2 billion. This would make the 2013 Moore tornado the 2nd most expensive tornado in history (as ranked by NOAA/SPC) or 3rd most expensive (as ranked by insurance broker Aon Benfield.) The nine billion-dollar tornadoes (2013 dollars) are:

1) Joplin, Missouri, May 22, 2011, $2.9 billion
2) Tuscaloosa, Alabama, April 27, 2011, $2.3 billion (not in SPC's list)
3) Moore, Oklahoma, May 20, 2013, $2 billion
4) Topeka, Kansas, June 8, 1966, $1.8 billion
5) Lubbock, Texas, May 11, 1970, $1.5 billion
6) Bridge Creek-Moore, Oklahoma, May 3, 1999, $1.4 billion
7) Hackleburg, Alabama, April 27, 2011, $1.3 billion (not in SPC's list)
8) Xenia, Ohio, April 3, 1974, $1.1 billion
9) Omaha, Nebraska, May 6, 1975, $1 billion


Figure 1. The Moore, Oklahoma tornado of May 20, 2013 (AP Photo/Alonzo Adams)


Figure 2. The damage swath of the Moore, Oklahoma tornado of May 20, 2013. EF-4 damage (red colors) occurred along roughly 4 miles of the 17-mile path, and the EF-4 damage swath was up to 0.1 miles wide. The tornado's maximum width of 1.3 miles (EF-0 and greater damage) occurred over a relatively small portion of the path, before the storm reached Moore. Image credit: NWS Norman.


Figure 3. On May 20, 2013, a supercell thunderstorm in central Oklahoma spawned a destructive tornado that passed just south of Oklahoma City. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite acquired this natural-color image of the storm system at 2:40 p.m. Central Daylight Time (19:40 Universal Time), just minutes before the devastating twister began. The red line on the image depicts the tornado’s track. Image credit: NASA Earth Observatory.

There have been bigger tornadoes
The 1.3 mile maximum width of the 2013 Moore tornado's damage swath was not a record. Wikipedia documents that the EF-3 Edmonson, Texas tornado of May 31, 1968 had a damage path width between 2 and 3 miles (3.2 and 4.8 km) wide. The EF-4 Wilber - Hallam, Nebraska tornado on May 22, 2004 was of similar size, with a damage path up to 2.5 miles wide. Doppler radar measurements indicate that the May 4, 1999 Mulhall, Oklahoma EF-4 tornado--which thankfully passed mostly over farmland--would have caused damage over a path 4 miles wide at its peak size, had it encountered a built-up area. The EF-5 tornado that devastated Greensburg, Kansas on May 4, 2007 was 1.7 miles wide.


Figure 4. Damage swath of the Wilber - Hallam, Nebraska EF-4 tornado of May 22, 2004 was up to 2.5 miles wide, making it one of the largest tornadoes on record.


Figure 5. Severe weather outlook for Wednesday, May 22, calls for a "Slight Risk" of severe weather over portions of the Ohio Valley and Northeast U.S. You can follow today's severe weather from our Severe Weather page.

No tornadoes reported on Tuesday; "Slight Risk" of severe weather on Wednesday
The severe weather outbreak of May 18 - 22 peaked on Sunday and Monday. We did not record any tornadoes on Tuesday, though there were many reports of large hail and damaging winds, including three thunderstorms with wind gusts over 74 mph. Tuesday was the first day since May 14 that no tornadoes were recorded in the U.S. And after issuing four consecutive "Moderate Risk" outlooks for severe weather, NOAA's Storm Prediction Center (SPC) is going with only a "Slight Risk" for severe weather on Wednesday in the U.S., with the main severe weather action expected to affect portions of the Ohio Valley and Northeast U.S. The primary threat will be straight-line wind damage and large hail, though we can't rule out a few tornadoes. During the three-day period May 18 - May 20, 70 tornadoes (preliminary) were recorded by SPC.


Video 1. Charles Cook caught the birth of the May 20, 2013 tornado at Newcastle, OK. It moved from there to Moore where it caused catastrophic devastation.


Video 2. NOAA's GOES-East satellite collected this view of the storm system that spawned a deadly tornado over Moore, Oklahoma on May 20, 2013. The animation runs from 10:45 a.m. through 6:45 p.m., Central Daylight Time. Images courtesy NASA GOES Project Science: ‪http://goes.gsfc.nasa.gov/‬

The Norman, OK NWS office has an excellent page with detailed info on the Moore tornado.

I did a 10-minute Skype interview with democracynow.org on Tuesday morning, discussing the Moore tornado.

I greatly appreciate all the valuable links members of the WU community have posted here, and I have used many of them in my posts over the past day. Keep up the great work!

How to help
Portlight Strategies, an organization that supports disaster victims with disabilities, will be working with shelter operators and disability stakeholder organizations in Oklahoma to serve the needs of people with disabilities. Further information and how to offer additional support can be found on their website.

Donations can be made to American Red Cross disaster relief at redcross.org/weather or by texting WEATHER to 90999 to donate $10.

Donations can be made on The Salvation Army's website or by texting STORM to 80888 to donate $10. You can also call to make donations of other monetary amounts at (800) 725-2769.

Jeff Masters

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Quoting WDEmobmet:
Quoting 522. TropicalAnalystwx13 12:41 AM GMT on May 23, 2013 2
With the addition of the Moore tornado, Oklahoma and Alabama are now tied for the highest number of F/EF5s in a U.S. state, at 7. Just as a random statistic, the collective F/EF5s in Oklahoma have resulted in 96 dead, while the F/EF5s in Alabama have resulted in 231 deaths



I cant help but wonder the reasoning for that...

A) Its due to a more densely populated area
or
B) People in Alabama are less Educated about tornadoes, or experience less of them so therefor are less likely to react
or
C) The Fact that Alabama is not really considered part of the so called "Tornado Alley", which if you ask me needs to be revised


All of the above, but also has to do with the terrain - hilly and heavily wooded. So, people don't necessarily see it coming. Not a factor here in OK - except for the far eastern part of the state.
Member Since: June 25, 2011 Posts: 2 Comments: 3733
Quoting WDEmobmet:
Quoting 522. TropicalAnalystwx13 12:41 AM GMT on May 23, 2013 2
With the addition of the Moore tornado, Oklahoma and Alabama are now tied for the highest number of F/EF5s in a U.S. state, at 7. Just as a random statistic, the collective F/EF5s in Oklahoma have resulted in 96 dead, while the F/EF5s in Alabama have resulted in 231 deaths



I cant help but wonder the reasoning for that...

A) Its due to a more densely populated area
or
B) People in Alabama are less Educated about tornadoes, or experience less of them so therefor are less likely to react
or
C) The Fact that Alabama is not really considered part of the so called "Tornado Alley", which if you ask me needs to be revised


D) Not as many people have storm shelters in Alabama
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting 522. TropicalAnalystwx13 12:41 AM GMT on May 23, 2013 2
With the addition of the Moore tornado, Oklahoma and Alabama are now tied for the highest number of F/EF5s in a U.S. state, at 7. Just as a random statistic, the collective F/EF5s in Oklahoma have resulted in 96 dead, while the F/EF5s in Alabama have resulted in 231 deaths



I cant help but wonder the reasoning for that...

A) Its due to a more densely populated area
or
B) People in Alabama are less Educated about tornadoes, or experience less of them so therefor are less likely to react
or
C) The Fact that Alabama is not really considered part of the so called "Tornado Alley", which if you ask me needs to be revised, but ultimately casting a false since of hope
Member Since: February 3, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 755
Quoting BahaHurican:
CRS, have you guys gotten any rain the last 2 days?


nope.. or perhaps just a trace.
Member Since: July 12, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 6049
Quoting wxchaser97:

Don't worry, you're special in your own ways ;)

Did you finish the updated TCR list? If so, message me pls.


Nope. Gonna work on that tonight.

EDIT: I have been saving the real-time upper air data from Africa, however.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting MississippiWx:
Since we are now in the 8-10 day frame of where models are hinting at development in the Western Caribbean, I thought it would be a good idea to bring up the GFS predicted 500mb heights and the best analogs to the predicted 500mb heights. Of course, this is highly dependent on the upper pattern the GFS is predicting at this time period and not taking into consideration what the other models see at that time. However, this has been a decent tool to use in the past when determining tracks of tropical cyclones and sometimes development. On the bottom right of the 8 to 10 day 500mb analog composite map from the GFS, it gives the top analogs from years past. Two that stood out to me were the June 12, 2005 and the June 4th, 2005 analog. Around that time period (June 8), Tropical Storm Arlene formed in the Western Caribbean from a large messy area of disturbed weather similar to what we should have at the beginning of June in this area of the world. Here's the 500mb analog composite:



Arlene became a 70mph tropical storm, but she battled shear all the way until landfall as would be expected from a storm moving north in that area of the world this time of the year. This is just a thought that I had and I thought it was interesting since comparing patterns from the past is a good tool for predicting what will happen. This obviously isn't a guarantee and doesn't really increase the odds of anything forming, but it does show that a system has formed in this area of the world in the recent past with a similar 500mb setup.



Based on the pattern, I can think of three decent track analogs for any potential cyclone developing there:

Abby (1968)
Arlene (2005)
Arthur (2008)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting trHUrrIXC5MMX:


Got two from that lovere (whoever that is) on May 20 at about 6:50 a.m.
I'll check his blog thanks.




i got the same e mail the other day i this nowe got a ch too re move it from my email box
Member Since: May 21, 2006 Posts: 5091 Comments: 115239
Quoting mitthbevnuruodo:


But many places have politicians who are anti-government funding. So, they have no backing for gov funds for anything that helps the common folkes. I read some OK politicians vetoed help for Sandy. How can they ask for funding for OK when they didn't want funding for elsewhere hit by natural disaster as well? Irony I suppose for them. But those who oppose government and funding for help...can't go and ask for it when it hits them like only they are worth having it I reckon. there's a reason for government help and taxes, and those who rally against it, need to open their eyes...but sadly only do when it affects them or their city/state.


What is especially hilarious is that this is an administration that has completely turned down everything and anything to do with "ObamaCare", yet most if not all of the above-ground shelters built in schools since the May, 3 1999 Moore tornado have been done with FEMA federal grants.

Only because it is the town/local school districts smart enough to apply for the monies.
Member Since: June 25, 2011 Posts: 2 Comments: 3733
Since we are now in the 8-10 day frame of where models are hinting at development in the Western Caribbean, I thought it would be a good idea to bring up the GFS predicted 500mb heights and the best analogs to the predicted 500mb heights. Of course, this is highly dependent on the upper pattern the GFS is predicting at this time period and not taking into consideration what the other models see at that time. However, this has been a decent tool to use in the past when determining tracks of tropical cyclones and sometimes development. On the bottom right of the 8 to 10 day 500mb analog composite map from the GFS, it gives the top analogs from years past. Two that stood out to me were the June 12, 2005 and the June 4th, 2005 analog. Around that time period (June 8), Tropical Storm Arlene formed in the Western Caribbean from a large messy area of disturbed weather similar to what we should have at the beginning of June in this area of the world. Here's the 500mb analog composite:



Arlene became a 70mph tropical storm, but she battled shear all the way until landfall as would be expected from a storm moving north in that area of the world this time of the year. This is just a thought that I had and I thought it was interesting since comparing patterns from the past is a good tool for predicting what will happen. This obviously isn't a guarantee and doesn't really increase the odds of anything forming, but it does show that a system has formed in this area of the world in the recent past with a similar 500mb setup.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting KoritheMan:


And here I thought I was special. Guess not. :/

Don't worry, you're special in your own ways ;)

Did you finish the updated TCR list? If so, message me pls.
Member Since: March 16, 2012 Posts: 127 Comments: 7948
Quoting whitewabit:


Did you get those e-mails today .. Auburn has a blog opened about it ..


Got two from that lovere (whoever that is) on May 20 at about 6:50 a.m.
I'll check his blog thanks.

Member Since: April 23, 2011 Posts: 104 Comments: 14873
Quoting KoritheMan:


And here I thought I was special. Guess not. :/


Awww. You're alright, Kori.
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630
Quoting BahaHurican:
There was a fair amount of discussion about this yesterday. I can understand the concerns with the clay soil in central OK. However, I do think some measures should be put in place to reinforce specific areas of all schools so that there is a safe place within speedy reach of the school population. Lead times on tornado formation and track information are getting longer on average, but the improvement in forecasting doesn't benefit the impacted population very much if there isn't an effective shelter available.


But many places have politicians who are anti-government funding. So, they have no backing for gov funds for anything that helps the common folkes. I read some OK politicians vetoed help for Sandy. How can they ask for funding for OK when they didn't want funding for elsewhere hit by natural disaster as well? Irony I suppose for them. But those who oppose government and funding for help...can't go and ask for it when it hits them like only they are worth having it I reckon. there's a reason for government help and taxes, and those who rally against it, need to open their eyes...but sadly only do when it affects them or their city/state.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: July 21, 2011 Posts: 83 Comments: 7167
Quoting HurricaneDean07:

The US invested in a invisible atmospheric wall that caps off strong storms from forming. ;)

Speak of the devil, and he shall appear. Look what just happened. A strong storm was headed right toward me and then it went around me.
Member Since: March 16, 2012 Posts: 127 Comments: 7948
Quoting wxchaser97:

I got the same spam mail.


And here I thought I was special. Guess not. :/
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
F4/EF4 killed 2,300+ people since 1950. F5/EF5 killed 1,300+ people since 1950. So F4/EF4 killed more people because it's more common. However, the average death per tornado for F5/EF5 is a lot higher than average death per tornado for F4/EF4. 540 F4/EF4 vs. 59 F5/EF5.
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 28 Comments: 8030
.
Member Since: July 21, 2011 Posts: 83 Comments: 7167
First Day schedule

AGENDA

Monday, June 3, 2013

4:00pm – 6:30pm – Registration

6:30pm – 6:40pm - Welcome, Overview & Conference Expectations, Paul Timmons, Executive Director, Portlight Strategies, Inc.

6:40pm – 7:40pm- Dinner (Provided)

7:40pm–8:30pm- Dr. Jeff Masters, Chief Meteorologist, Weather Underground

Dr. Masters co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990. He’ll discuss current weather and environmental trends, and why we can expect to see more storms like Sandy



Full AGENDA
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128654
548. whitewabit (Mod)
Quoting trHUrrIXC5MMX:


I got that too


Did you get those e-mails today .. Auburn has a blog opened about it ..
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
91E is back.

EP, 91, 2013052300, , BEST, 0, 104N, 1018W, 20, 1009, DB
Member Since: April 29, 2009 Posts: 75 Comments: 14321
One more year!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Good thing I haven't got the mail yet.
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 28 Comments: 8030
Join us in Atlanta

GETTING IT RIGHT: SHELTER & TRANSPORTATION ACCESSIBILITY FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES

Portlight Strategies, Inc. in partnership w/ Brain Dance & Weather Underground is pleased to announce: The Getting It Right Conference: Shelter & Transportation Accessibility for People with Disabilities. We will bring together the disability community with community first responders to dispel false information & facilitate discussion of the real needs of the community with respect to evacuation and sheltering; draw upon the recent, first-hand experience of people with disabilities, & disaster responders, to define the issues we face, & launch a collaborative effort to address them proactively;
focus on simple, easily executable solutions for evacuation transportation & short-term shelter for all people with disabilities, addressing issues of mobility, communication, & cognition; and identify key points to address in planning guidelines & training materials, to be compiled after the conference & incorporated with our TRUE Shelter preparedness program.

[www.portlight.org/conference]
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128654
I like the DC weather gang a lot!
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630
Link History on D.C tornado's capital weather gang...
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 17084
Quoting wxchaser97:

I got the same spam mail.


I got that too
Member Since: April 23, 2011 Posts: 104 Comments: 14873
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

I don't know for sure, but my educated guess would be from F4/EF4 tornadoes. Whether it's an F4 or an F5, it still levels buildings, and there have been many more F4s than F5s.


I think you are right.

It's not possible to perform this sorty of analysis for the data we have but many of the deaths from tornadoes which reached F-5 status at some point occurred when the tornadoes were 'only' F4 strength.
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630
Quoting wxchaser97:

I got the same spam mail.
that individual has been removed from seeing the site and no longer able to send mail
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 174 Comments: 54364
Quoting Bluestorm5:
Don't be afraid. For one person to see a single tornado is very rare unless you chase them. You'll be under tornado warning maybe at least once or twice in life, but you're likely to never see them. I've lived in Tornado Alley and Carolina Alley for 18 years and I've never seen tornado ever. Closest call was 5 miles away on April 16, 2011 when EF3 went through my county. I've seen damage from other EF3 in Sanford and it's pretty sobering. But I promise you that you're very unlikely to get hit by one. You still have to go to shelter if you do get a warning. Atlanta metro area is known for many close calls to downtown (some hit the city).

I have been under 5 waings siince 2009 anr nothing happened. Hope it goes that way on...
But i know the reality
Member Since: April 23, 2011 Posts: 104 Comments: 14873
Quoting BahaHurican:
There was a fair amount of discussion about this yesterday. I can understand the concerns with the clay soil in central OK. However, I do think some measures should be put in place to reinforce specific areas of all schools so that there is a safe place within speedy reach of the school population. Lead times on tornado formation and track information are getting longer on average, but the improvement in forecasting doesn't benefit the impacted population very much if there isn't an effective shelter available.


Baha,

There is. But it is piecemeal, and up to the local school districts. Two elementary schools here (where I live) are being renovated/rebuilt. They are including plans to provide above ground shelters that can withstand all but the most violent tornadoes in both of them..

However, that is only two out of the 10 schools present in the town. The other 8 have nothing.

And there is a recent push that people here "accept personal responsibility". However, this does nothing for those that live in apartment complexes. as was illustrated in this interview:

Moore couple survives in storm ditch: Moore couple left apartment to find shelter and say they were turned away at local bank


Member Since: June 25, 2011 Posts: 2 Comments: 3733
Quoting fo:


Where can I get this imagery (for free)?
not free but you can get a 14 day free trial run

its less than 10 dollars a month to have it I go with monthly plan from mid may till mid nov

Link
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 174 Comments: 54364
Quoting KoritheMan:


I dunno. Here's mine:

I came across your profile in the site, ()i know we don't know each

other befor now,but knowing some one starts a day,my name is pahaly

nechwa,i am a girl and i will like you to contact me with my email(

pahalynechwa@yahoo.com) so that we can know each other and i will tell

you about my self and my picture for better understanding.

pahalynechwa@yahoo.com

pahaly.


I felt so elated.

I got the same spam mail.
Member Since: March 16, 2012 Posts: 127 Comments: 7948
Quoting BaltimoreBrian:


Have more people in the USA died from F-4 or F-5 tornadoes?

I don't know for sure, but my educated guess would be from F4/EF4 tornadoes. Whether it's an F4 or an F5, it still levels buildings, and there have been many more F4s than F5s.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32275
Quoting BaltimoreBrian:


Have more people in the USA died from F-4 or F-5 tornadoes?
EF4/EF5 are only 1% of all tornadoes, but 90% deaths of all tornado deaths.
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 28 Comments: 8030
Yes many long term Washingtonians know about the 1814 tornado and if it were to happen today talk about a Hollywood disaster in the making.
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 17084
531. fo
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:


Where can I get this imagery (for free)?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Hurricane Imagery Gallery
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128654
Quoting AussieStorm:
As it's a bit quiet. Was there a reason why some of us got spam emails in our WU-Mail boxes?


I dunno. Here's mine:

I came across your profile in the site, ()i know we don't know each

other befor now,but knowing some one starts a day,my name is pahaly

nechwa,i am a girl and i will like you to contact me with my email(

pahalynechwa@yahoo.com) so that we can know each other and i will tell

you about my self and my picture for better understanding.

pahalynechwa@yahoo.com

pahaly.


I felt so elated.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
With the addition of the Moore tornado, Oklahoma and Alabama are now tied for the highest number of F/EF5s in a U.S. state, at 7. Just as a random statistic, the collective F/EF5s in Oklahoma have resulted in 96 dead, while the F/EF5s in Alabama have resulted in 231 deaths.


Have more people in the USA died from F-4 or F-5 tornadoes?
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630
Quoting AussieStorm:
As it's a bit quiet. Was there a reason why some of us got spam emails in our WU-Mail boxes?


Check out auburn's blog about that. There have been reports of trackers embedded in that spam.
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630


Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 128654
As it's a bit quiet. Was there a reason why some of us got spam emails in our WU-Mail boxes?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I also saw that page Bluestorm. Thanks for posting :)
Member Since: August 9, 2011 Posts: 26 Comments: 8630
Quoting MississippiWx:


You can think all the hot air from our B.S. politicians for that shield.
Lol.I knew they were useful for something.
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 17084
With the addition of the Moore tornado, Oklahoma and Alabama are now tied for the highest number of F/EF5s in a U.S. state, at 7. Just as a random statistic, the collective F/EF5s in Oklahoma have resulted in 96 dead, while the F/EF5s in Alabama have resulted in 231 deaths.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32275
Quoting BaltimoreBrian:



Does it count this?

Smithsonian Magazine says there have been 8 tornadoes in Washington DC.
I think Tornado History Project only go back to 50s, explaining 2 tornadoes.

NWS Sterling got a better list:

http://www.erh.noaa.gov/er/lwx/Historic_Events/DC -tornado-events.htm
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 28 Comments: 8030
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

The Tornado History Project is a nice database for tornadoes within a particular state.

Louisiana has experienced one F5 (2-21-1971) that killed 47 and injured 510. There have been nine F4s that have caused a collective 52 deaths.

And on and on...

By the looks of it, Michigan is way overdue for a violent tornado. It has been 36 years in all of MI (37 in SE MI) since the last F4 tornado, even longer for a F5. The average for SE MI is every 5 or 6 years. The clock is ticking.
Member Since: March 16, 2012 Posts: 127 Comments: 7948
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 174 Comments: 54364
Quoting BaltimoreBrian:
The Killer Tornado of 1928.

This inspired the Nebraska state legislature to require that all schools have an underground shelter with capacity to hold all the students and personnel.

A decision Oklahoma would be wise to emulate.
There was a fair amount of discussion about this yesterday. I can understand the concerns with the clay soil in central OK. However, I do think some measures should be put in place to reinforce specific areas of all schools so that there is a safe place within speedy reach of the school population. Lead times on tornado formation and track information are getting longer on average, but the improvement in forecasting doesn't benefit the impacted population very much if there isn't an effective shelter available.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting washingtonian115:
D.C has a tornado shield around us.So while other counties are getting rocked we are protected.lol.


You can thank all the hot air from our B.S. politicians for that shield.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.