Moore Tornado an EF-5; $2 Billion Damage Estimate: 3rd Costliest Tornado in History

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:22 PM GMT on May 22, 2013

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The Moore, Oklahoma tornado of May 20, 2013 is now ranked an EF-5, making it one of only 59 U.S. tornadoes to achieve that distinction since record keeping began in 1950. The National Weather Service in Norman, Oklahoma announced Tuesday that their damage survey teams found an area of EF-5 damage near Briarwood Elementary School, with winds of 200 - 210 mph indicated. There were no EF-5 tornadoes observed in 2012, and the last time the U.S. had an EF-5 was on May 24, 2011, when the Oklahoma towns of Calumet, El Reno, Piedmont, and Guthrie were hit by an EF-5 with 210+ mph winds that killed nine people. The maximum width of the 2013 Moore tornado's damage swath was a huge 1.3 miles. Detailed damage survey information in Google Earth Format provided by the Norman, OK NWS office shows that the typical width of the EF-0 and greater damage swath was about 0.6 miles, and the EF-4 damage area was about 0.1 miles across at its widest. EF-4 damage occurred along approximately 4 miles of the tornado's 17-mile long path. The damage swath from the May 20, 2013 tornado as it cut through the most densely built up portions of Moore was roughly 1.5 times as wide as the one from the May 3, 1999 EF-5 tornado. That tornado was the 4th costliest in history ($1.4 billion 2011 dollars), so it is a good bet that the 2013 Moore tornado will end up being even more expensive. This morning, the Oklahoma Insurance Department said the preliminary tornado damage estimate could top $2 billion. This would make the 2013 Moore tornado the 2nd most expensive tornado in history (as ranked by NOAA/SPC) or 3rd most expensive (as ranked by insurance broker Aon Benfield.) The nine billion-dollar tornadoes (2013 dollars) are:

1) Joplin, Missouri, May 22, 2011, $2.9 billion
2) Tuscaloosa, Alabama, April 27, 2011, $2.3 billion (not in SPC's list)
3) Moore, Oklahoma, May 20, 2013, $2 billion
4) Topeka, Kansas, June 8, 1966, $1.8 billion
5) Lubbock, Texas, May 11, 1970, $1.5 billion
6) Bridge Creek-Moore, Oklahoma, May 3, 1999, $1.4 billion
7) Hackleburg, Alabama, April 27, 2011, $1.3 billion (not in SPC's list)
8) Xenia, Ohio, April 3, 1974, $1.1 billion
9) Omaha, Nebraska, May 6, 1975, $1 billion


Figure 1. The Moore, Oklahoma tornado of May 20, 2013 (AP Photo/Alonzo Adams)


Figure 2. The damage swath of the Moore, Oklahoma tornado of May 20, 2013. EF-4 damage (red colors) occurred along roughly 4 miles of the 17-mile path, and the EF-4 damage swath was up to 0.1 miles wide. The tornado's maximum width of 1.3 miles (EF-0 and greater damage) occurred over a relatively small portion of the path, before the storm reached Moore. Image credit: NWS Norman.


Figure 3. On May 20, 2013, a supercell thunderstorm in central Oklahoma spawned a destructive tornado that passed just south of Oklahoma City. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite acquired this natural-color image of the storm system at 2:40 p.m. Central Daylight Time (19:40 Universal Time), just minutes before the devastating twister began. The red line on the image depicts the tornado’s track. Image credit: NASA Earth Observatory.

There have been bigger tornadoes
The 1.3 mile maximum width of the 2013 Moore tornado's damage swath was not a record. Wikipedia documents that the EF-3 Edmonson, Texas tornado of May 31, 1968 had a damage path width between 2 and 3 miles (3.2 and 4.8 km) wide. The EF-4 Wilber - Hallam, Nebraska tornado on May 22, 2004 was of similar size, with a damage path up to 2.5 miles wide. Doppler radar measurements indicate that the May 4, 1999 Mulhall, Oklahoma EF-4 tornado--which thankfully passed mostly over farmland--would have caused damage over a path 4 miles wide at its peak size, had it encountered a built-up area. The EF-5 tornado that devastated Greensburg, Kansas on May 4, 2007 was 1.7 miles wide.


Figure 4. Damage swath of the Wilber - Hallam, Nebraska EF-4 tornado of May 22, 2004 was up to 2.5 miles wide, making it one of the largest tornadoes on record.


Figure 5. Severe weather outlook for Wednesday, May 22, calls for a "Slight Risk" of severe weather over portions of the Ohio Valley and Northeast U.S. You can follow today's severe weather from our Severe Weather page.

No tornadoes reported on Tuesday; "Slight Risk" of severe weather on Wednesday
The severe weather outbreak of May 18 - 22 peaked on Sunday and Monday. We did not record any tornadoes on Tuesday, though there were many reports of large hail and damaging winds, including three thunderstorms with wind gusts over 74 mph. Tuesday was the first day since May 14 that no tornadoes were recorded in the U.S. And after issuing four consecutive "Moderate Risk" outlooks for severe weather, NOAA's Storm Prediction Center (SPC) is going with only a "Slight Risk" for severe weather on Wednesday in the U.S., with the main severe weather action expected to affect portions of the Ohio Valley and Northeast U.S. The primary threat will be straight-line wind damage and large hail, though we can't rule out a few tornadoes. During the three-day period May 18 - May 20, 70 tornadoes (preliminary) were recorded by SPC.


Video 1. Charles Cook caught the birth of the May 20, 2013 tornado at Newcastle, OK. It moved from there to Moore where it caused catastrophic devastation.


Video 2. NOAA's GOES-East satellite collected this view of the storm system that spawned a deadly tornado over Moore, Oklahoma on May 20, 2013. The animation runs from 10:45 a.m. through 6:45 p.m., Central Daylight Time. Images courtesy NASA GOES Project Science: ‪http://goes.gsfc.nasa.gov/‬

The Norman, OK NWS office has an excellent page with detailed info on the Moore tornado.

I did a 10-minute Skype interview with democracynow.org on Tuesday morning, discussing the Moore tornado.

I greatly appreciate all the valuable links members of the WU community have posted here, and I have used many of them in my posts over the past day. Keep up the great work!

How to help
Portlight Strategies, an organization that supports disaster victims with disabilities, will be working with shelter operators and disability stakeholder organizations in Oklahoma to serve the needs of people with disabilities. Further information and how to offer additional support can be found on their website.

Donations can be made to American Red Cross disaster relief at redcross.org/weather or by texting WEATHER to 90999 to donate $10.

Donations can be made on The Salvation Army's website or by texting STORM to 80888 to donate $10. You can also call to make donations of other monetary amounts at (800) 725-2769.

Jeff Masters

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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
I remain right now very, very surprised the death toll is only at two dozen. After we all watched this nearly mile and a half tornado touch down and move towards Moore and then saw the subsequent helicopter video of catastrophic damage, I thought to myself -- and even added it here ("the fatality count is going to be enormous") -- that the number of deaths would be in the dozens, if not well over 100. I mean, not only was this a Monday afternoon, meaning everybody was at work or school (and on the roads), but this tornado...which we knew while it was in progress was a significant EF3-EF5...was tracking across a city with a population of 55,081 (2010 Census). The helicopter showed entire buildings and neighborhoods leveled, and some houses didn't even exist. Just clean foundation. And you wonder how anybody survived that.

One of the main theories going around, which I agree with, is that everybody was at school or work (the reason we thought the fatality count was going to be high in the first place). The tornado did hit two schools at near maximum intensity, but it was a well-built structure where you had an above-average chance of survival when compared to surrounding homes. Come to find out, the tornado tracked across a mainly residential area, where nobody was home because of their jobs.

Had this tornado occurred an hour or two later, or if its track would have been just a few miles more north, this horrible disaster probably would've been much, much worse.

But then again, it also has to do with the fact that this tornado struck a region very aware of tornadoes. Having been through the 1999 Moore tornado, people in the area probably knew what, and what not, to do. The fact that we were able to watch its whole evolution on air probably helped as well. In a study following the Joplin and Tuscaloosa tornadoes, it was found out that most people didn't take shelter because they didn't have any PROOF that the tornado was on the ground, headed towards them, and doing damage. And that's usually how it is. This tornado was the exception, not the rule. I'm just glad it was.


Yeah; I thought for sure the death toll would be much higher. This is one situation where I'm actually glad to be wrong.
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Quoting BahaHurican:
Hey. Was wondering how much you got. I saw pictures of the water still standing in the road near the Super Value in Winton Meadows... looked like 6 - 8 inches of water.


Hey Baha, seen water as deep as six feet in some places, some roads still have over two feet of water on them tonight.
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Quoting Bluestorm5:
Medical examiner accidently counted the bodies twice in middle of all chaos. They also thought 40 more bodies were on the way (turn out to be false). Media had nothing to do with it.


Ok thanks. I was just wondering. We all know media can hype things.

Btw, Check out this storm shelter in the video.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
I remain right now very, very surprised the death toll is only at two dozen. After we all watched this nearly mile and a half tornado touch down and move towards Moore and then saw the subsequent helicopter video of catastrophic damage, I thought to myself -- and even added it here ("the fatality count is going to be enormous") -- that the number of deaths would be in the dozens, if not well over 100. I mean, not only was this a Monday afternoon, meaning everybody was at work or school (and on the roads), but this tornado...which we knew while it was in progress was a significant EF3-EF5...was tracking across a city with a population of 55,081 (2010 Census). The helicopter showed entire buildings and neighborhoods leveled, and some houses didn't even exist. Just clean foundation. And you wonder how anybody survived that.

One of the main theories going around, which I agree with, is that everybody was at school or work (the reason we thought the fatality count was going to be high in the first place). The tornado did hit two schools at near maximum intensity, but it was a well-built structure where you had an above-average chance of survival when compared to surrounding homes. Come to find out, the tornado tracked across a mainly residential area, where nobody was home because of their jobs.

Had this tornado occurred an hour or two later, or if its track would have been just a few miles more north, this horrible disaster probably would've been much, much worse.


In addition, the schools were immediately put on lockdown, and emails/text messages sent to all parents not to come to the schools as they would not release any of the kids to anyone. Probably saved the lives of many of these kids, and their parents - as the schools were already at dismissal.

There was an interview of a woman who tried (at Briarwood I believe)to pick up her kid - only to find the doors all locked and no one answering. She left to go back home to her shelter (just in time). In that regards, as soon as wether conditions get serious, they get serious. Respectable to say the leaset
Member Since: June 25, 2011 Posts: 2 Comments: 3733
Quoting daddyjames:


The Moor school district has been actively trying to get grant monies to provide shelters - as the built the schools.
Cripes, screw the grant money. You have had three EF4 plus tornadoes in just over a decade. Make the case for a millage tax increase to pay for all schools to have an underground shelter. You just can't wait for Uncle Sugar to come through. That is what local governance is supposed to be about. You choose to live in the Tornado Alley bullseye, take the LOCAL steps to protect your schoolkids in school.
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A couple people have already seen it, but for those who haven't, here's my blog on the tropics for the day.
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Wish this was me!

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Quoting NasBahMan:


Would prefer if he would take some of ours, had 15.29"/388mm at my house in Nassau, Bahamas last night.
Hey. Was wondering how much you got. I saw pictures of the water still standing in the road near the Super Value in Winton Meadows... looked like 6 - 8 inches of water.
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Termites swarming here ...RUNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN '''
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 428 Comments: 129917
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

I would hardly call a weak, two-closed-isobar low a tropical system, but okay.
Were you implying this had something to do with being tropical or...?
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Quoting AussieStorm:

Yeah, what happened with that. It was 24 then 51 then possible 91 now dropped back to 24. Media Hype?

I'm glad in a way only 24 people were killed, could of been a lot more.
Medical examiner accidently counted the bodies twice in middle of all chaos. They also thought 40 more bodies were on the way (turn out to be false). Media had nothing to do with it.
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That outflow boundary, and I'm getting some rain tonight!
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Quoting Tazmanian:
this think of this if nado haveing to happen in the mid of the night when evere one was sleeping and they had no warning


There was an Illinois tornado two days ago with no tornado warning per se on it, yet at the edge of a squall.

But for night tornadoes, NWS stays up through the night for those events, the only difference is except for lightning, no one will be able to visually confirm a tornado. That's what cell phone app/TV/NOAA radio is good for + a storm shelter to ride the storm out.
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I remain right now very, very surprised the death toll is only at two dozen. After we all watched this nearly mile and a half tornado touch down and move towards Moore and then saw the subsequent helicopter video of catastrophic damage, I thought to myself -- and even added it here ("the fatality count is going to be enormous") -- that the number of deaths would be in the dozens, if not well over 100. I mean, not only was this a Monday afternoon, meaning everybody was at work or school (and on the roads), but this tornado...which we knew while it was in progress was a significant EF3-EF5...was tracking across a city with a population of 55,081 (2010 Census). The helicopter showed entire buildings and neighborhoods leveled, and some houses didn't even exist. Just clean foundation. And you wonder how anybody survived that.

One of the main theories going around, which I agree with, is that everybody was at school or work (the reason we thought the fatality count was going to be high in the first place). The tornado did hit two schools at near maximum intensity, but it was a well-built structure where you had an above-average chance of survival when compared to surrounding homes. Come to find out, the tornado tracked across a mainly residential area, where nobody was home because of their jobs.

Had this tornado occurred an hour or two later, or if its track would have been just a few miles more north, this horrible disaster probably would've been much, much worse.

But then again, it also has to do with the fact that this tornado struck a region very aware of tornadoes. Having been through the 1999 Moore tornado, people in the area probably knew what, and what not, to do. The fact that we were able to watch its whole evolution on air probably helped as well. In a study following the Joplin and Tuscaloosa tornadoes, it was found out that most people didn't take shelter because they didn't have any PROOF that the tornado was on the ground, headed towards them, and doing damage. And that's usually how it is. This tornado was the exception, not the rule. I'm just glad it was.
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Quoting AGWcreationists:
Quite honestly, as a limited government conservative, I believe government should stick to what matters. Moore had 3 major tornadoes since 1999. This was the fourth. This matters. Where the heck was the initiative to get secure shelters for all schools? It would be even worse than Syracuse refusing to buy enough snowplows, or NOLA not preparing for flooding rains.


All of the schools built/rebuilt after the 1999 tornado do have above ground shelters. Even in the smaller communities that were impacted by that tornado. These schools did not have one, as they did not have to be rebuilt. The Moor school district has been actively trying to get grant monies to provide shelters - as the built the schools.
Member Since: June 25, 2011 Posts: 2 Comments: 3733
Quoting MississippiWx:


D) Not as many people have storm shelters in Alabama


F) Geography & Humanoid Reactions

Many people down here in Tennessee and Alabama understand the warnings but want to see the tornado with their own eyes before they take action. With a lot of tornadoes either at night or rain-wrapped, that can be a problem.

Combine that way of thinking with the fact that tornadoes are hard to see past trees and hills (storm chasers don't chase often here), and a potentially dangerous situation becomes even more volatile.
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Quoting AussieStorm:

You can have some of what we are getting right now.
Current Radar


24 Hour rain totals


Would prefer if he would take some of ours, had 15.29"/388mm at my house in Nassau, Bahamas last night.
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this think of this if nado haveing to happen in the mid of the night when evere one was sleeping and they had no warning
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Quoting AussieStorm:

Yeah, what happened with that. It was 24 then 51 then possible 91 now dropped back to 24. Media Hype?

I'm glad in a way only 24 people were killed, could of been a lot more.

The number of bodies was accidentally double counted.
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NWSBinghamton
Hen egg size hail near Taberg, NY just before 8 PM tonight courtesy of Kaylie Wylubski.




That's some weird looking hail.
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Quoting MississippiWx:


When every piece of every house is laying on the ground somewhere, I guess rating doesn't really matter. Just glad the death toll was way wrong.

Yeah, what happened with that. It was 24 then 51 then possible 91 now dropped back to 24. Media Hype?

I'm glad in a way only 24 people were killed, could of been a lot more.
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Quoting MississippiWx:


When every piece of every house is laying on the ground somewhere, I guess rating doesn't really matter. Just glad the death toll was way wrong.
I just can't imagine what wide-area of EF-5 damage look like. Rating doesn't matter, though. More people died in EF-4 Tuscaloosa than this tornado. And I'm with you on that, Miss. Glad they screwed up doing the death toll.
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The Quarterly Hail - National Weather Service - Hastings, Nebraska. (pdf)

Some interesting articles including,
Learn about Landspouts
Impact Based Warnings
What a difference a year can make!
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Quoting BaltimoreBrian:
The Killer Tornado of 1928.

This inspired the Nebraska state legislature to require that all schools have an underground shelter with capacity to hold all the students and personnel.

A decision Oklahoma would be wise to emulate.
Quite honestly, as a limited government conservative, I believe government should stick to what matters. Moore had 3 major tornadoes since 1999. This was the fourth. This matters. Where the heck was the initiative to get secure shelters for all schools? It would be even worse than Syracuse refusing to buy enough snowplows, or NOLA not preparing for flooding rains.
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Quoting Bluestorm5:
NWS Norman said on Twitter that they were supposed to release more information about May 19-20 tornadoes tonight, but I still haven't seen it. I'm also wondering if they found more areas of EF-5 damage other than Briarwood Elementary.


When every piece of every house is laying on the ground somewhere, I guess rating doesn't really matter. Just glad the death toll was way wrong.
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 17 Comments: 10284
Tornado touches down in Ontario town
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NWS Norman said on Twitter that they were supposed to release more information about May 19-20 tornadoes tonight, but I still haven't seen it. I'm also wondering if they found more areas of EF-5 damage other than Briarwood Elementary.
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Quoting Bluestorm5:
Surprising an EF-4 at 190 mph. There was an disagreement between survey teams over EF-4 or EF-5 damage, though. Some teams found EF-5 damage, but other teams found it as EF-4. Because of no clear agreement, Tuscaloosa stayed at EF-4.


That doesnt make much sense to me, they could have at least called it an EF4.5
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Quoting MississippiWx:


Yeah, we could probably sit here all night and list reasons for it and a lot of them would be legit.


LOL i would say i would take that action, and test some hypothesis' but then again, yea i know myself better than to follow through with it
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Quoting WDEmobmet:


Also thinking about it... Was the tuscaloosa tornado rated a EF4 or EF5?

Cause if it was an EF5 then i can understand why that number would be inflated due to where the tornado struck... a very populated university town
Surprising an EF-4 at 190 mph. There was an disagreement between survey teams over EF-4 or EF-5 damage, though. Some teams found EF-5 damage, but other teams found it as EF-4. Because of no clear agreement, Tuscaloosa stayed at EF-4.
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Guerra Family Video After Hurricane Katrina





Hurricane Preparation 2013




It's time to dust off that family disaster plan, or in many cases, create one.

Keeping your family safe during a hurricane starts with proper planning. One in six Americans live along the eastern seaboard or the Gulf of Mexico, making hurricane preparation a must for many and their families.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 428 Comments: 129917
Quoting WDEmobmet:


ahh throw that out the window


Yeah, we could probably sit here all night and list reasons for it and a lot of them would be legit.
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 17 Comments: 10284
Not sure if y'all saw this on the news.

Link
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Quoting MississippiWx:
There are so many different factors that you have to consider when talking about why one area had more deaths than another. It's not as simple as listing 1-5 different reasons.


Yea thats true... that stat just struck a thought bubble for me
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Quoting CaicosRetiredSailor:


nope.. or perhaps just a trace.

You can have some of what we are getting right now.
Current Radar


24 Hour rain totals
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Quoting WDEmobmet:


Thats true, its very hard to see distances in parts of Alabama unless you find yourself on a farm or a hill


Even in OK, you hear in the interviews "I saw it coming and I . . .

The last tornado that came through here - so many people were out and about that it was ridiculous. Was actually on the Discovery Channel (?) program - the episodes where they were cursing the amount of traffic on the roads as they were trying to intercept the tornadoes.

Edit to correct spell "hear"
Member Since: June 25, 2011 Posts: 2 Comments: 3733
Quoting mitthbevnuruodo:


But many places have politicians who are anti-government funding. So, they have no backing for gov funds for anything that helps the common folkes. I read some OK politicians vetoed help for Sandy. How can they ask for funding for OK when they didn't want funding for elsewhere hit by natural disaster as well? Irony I suppose for them. But those who oppose government and funding for help...can't go and ask for it when it hits them like only they are worth having it I reckon. there's a reason for government help and taxes, and those who rally against it, need to open their eyes...but sadly only do when it affects them or their city/state.
Less irony, more hypocracy, IMO. They were backtracking and stuttering all over the place yesterday.

I wouldn't feel so bad about the anti-government funding stance if they were consistent about it - i. e. if they didn't feel it was okay to fund private companies and entities with breaks and kickbacks they don't need.
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Quoting MississippiWx:


EF-4.


ahh throw that out the window
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Quoting WDEmobmet:


Also thinking about it... Was the tuscaloosa tornado rated a EF4 or EF5?

Cause if it was an EF5 then i can understand why that number would be inflated due to where the tornado struck... a very populated university town


EF-4.
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 17 Comments: 10284
Quoting MississippiWx:


There are many variables to that stat, but then you also have to compare it to Alabama's.


Also thinking about it... Was the tuscaloosa tornado rated a EF4 or EF5?

Cause if it was an EF5 then i can understand why that number would be inflated due to where the tornado struck... a very populated university town
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There are so many different factors that you have to consider when talking about why one area had more deaths than another. It's not as simple as listing 1-5 different reasons.
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 17 Comments: 10284
I got to think Moore got lucky it hits at 3 pm and not 6 pm. I'm assuming most people in Moore works in Oklahoma City just like people in my town work in Raleigh/Durham.
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575. skook
Disclaimer, I am not trying to take away at all, what happened in Moore, I just wanted to dig into the cost of these deadly tornadoes a bit more.

I started to look into the top 2 tornadoes, posted in Dr. Masters Link since there is a 50 years difference between the 2, and a similar cost. I looked at things such has overall buildings destroyed, and tried to look at buildings damaged, as well, but couldn't find clear data of damaged buildings, so for the most part, I'm ignored damaged, and only considering destroyed.

When looking at the Topeka Ks, tornado, the overall adjusted cost is 1,735,480,000 adjusted to 2013 numbers. But the few websites, I actually found listed it to be 800 million, but most of these websites(Wikipedia) lacked substantial sources to back the 800 million number up. Buildings destroyed in this storm came out at about 1070. Another thing I looked at is the population of Topeka, which in 1960 was 119,484.

The Joplin tornado ranks first on the 10 costliest list comes in at 2,800,000,000. But when looking at the number of buildings destroyed is about 7000 for just houses alone. The population at the time of the storm was 51,186 estimated.


So whats the point of this post? Really just me rambling. I just picked 2 tornadoes, and wanted to explored the numbers behind the costs, and try to understand it. Comparing the number of buildings destroyed, and than comparing the two sets, did catch my eye, and is a reason, why top 10 lists are great, but there really is a lot more to it, then listing it by the estimated cost.
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Quoting daddyjames:


All of the above, but also has to do with the terrain - hilly and heavily wooded. So, people don't necessarily see it coming. Not a factor here in OK - except for the far eastern part of the state.


Thats true, its very hard to see distances in parts of Alabama unless you find yourself on a farm or a hill
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Quoting Bluestorm5:
Moore didn't have many storm shelters either. Only about 2% had basements and 15% had a cellar of some sort.


There are many variables to that stat, but then you also have to compare it to Alabama's.
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 17 Comments: 10284
Quoting MississippiWx:


D) Not as many people have storm shelters in Alabama


When you move closer to Central and northern counties of Alabama you would be surprised at the amount of storm cellars people have
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Also,..the Moore storm hit at 3pm...during school

While the other after 6pm when most were home.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 428 Comments: 129917
Quoting MississippiWx:


D) Not as many people have storm shelters in Alabama
Moore didn't have many storm shelters either. Only about 2% had basements and 15% had a cellar of some sort.
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Quoting Tazmanian:



i got the same e mail the other day i this nowe got a ch too re move it from my email box


Im doing a deep scan on your response, ??????

Anyway, I understand what you mean.
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Quoting WDEmobmet:
Quoting 522. TropicalAnalystwx13 12:41 AM GMT on May 23, 2013 2
With the addition of the Moore tornado, Oklahoma and Alabama are now tied for the highest number of F/EF5s in a U.S. state, at 7. Just as a random statistic, the collective F/EF5s in Oklahoma have resulted in 96 dead, while the F/EF5s in Alabama have resulted in 231 deaths



I cant help but wonder the reasoning for that...

A) Its due to a more densely populated area
or
B) People in Alabama are less Educated about tornadoes, or experience less of them so therefor are less likely to react
or
C) The Fact that Alabama is not really considered part of the so called "Tornado Alley", which if you ask me needs to be revised


All of the above, but also has to do with the terrain - hilly and heavily wooded. So, people don't necessarily see it coming. Not a factor here in OK - except for the far eastern part of the state.
Member Since: June 25, 2011 Posts: 2 Comments: 3733

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