Moore Tornado an EF-5; $2 Billion Damage Estimate: 3rd Costliest Tornado in History

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:22 PM GMT on May 22, 2013

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The Moore, Oklahoma tornado of May 20, 2013 is now ranked an EF-5, making it one of only 59 U.S. tornadoes to achieve that distinction since record keeping began in 1950. The National Weather Service in Norman, Oklahoma announced Tuesday that their damage survey teams found an area of EF-5 damage near Briarwood Elementary School, with winds of 200 - 210 mph indicated. There were no EF-5 tornadoes observed in 2012, and the last time the U.S. had an EF-5 was on May 24, 2011, when the Oklahoma towns of Calumet, El Reno, Piedmont, and Guthrie were hit by an EF-5 with 210+ mph winds that killed nine people. The maximum width of the 2013 Moore tornado's damage swath was a huge 1.3 miles. Detailed damage survey information in Google Earth Format provided by the Norman, OK NWS office shows that the typical width of the EF-0 and greater damage swath was about 0.6 miles, and the EF-4 damage area was about 0.1 miles across at its widest. EF-4 damage occurred along approximately 4 miles of the tornado's 17-mile long path. The damage swath from the May 20, 2013 tornado as it cut through the most densely built up portions of Moore was roughly 1.5 times as wide as the one from the May 3, 1999 EF-5 tornado. That tornado was the 4th costliest in history ($1.4 billion 2011 dollars), so it is a good bet that the 2013 Moore tornado will end up being even more expensive. This morning, the Oklahoma Insurance Department said the preliminary tornado damage estimate could top $2 billion. This would make the 2013 Moore tornado the 2nd most expensive tornado in history (as ranked by NOAA/SPC) or 3rd most expensive (as ranked by insurance broker Aon Benfield.) The nine billion-dollar tornadoes (2013 dollars) are:

1) Joplin, Missouri, May 22, 2011, $2.9 billion
2) Tuscaloosa, Alabama, April 27, 2011, $2.3 billion (not in SPC's list)
3) Moore, Oklahoma, May 20, 2013, $2 billion
4) Topeka, Kansas, June 8, 1966, $1.8 billion
5) Lubbock, Texas, May 11, 1970, $1.5 billion
6) Bridge Creek-Moore, Oklahoma, May 3, 1999, $1.4 billion
7) Hackleburg, Alabama, April 27, 2011, $1.3 billion (not in SPC's list)
8) Xenia, Ohio, April 3, 1974, $1.1 billion
9) Omaha, Nebraska, May 6, 1975, $1 billion


Figure 1. The Moore, Oklahoma tornado of May 20, 2013 (AP Photo/Alonzo Adams)


Figure 2. The damage swath of the Moore, Oklahoma tornado of May 20, 2013. EF-4 damage (red colors) occurred along roughly 4 miles of the 17-mile path, and the EF-4 damage swath was up to 0.1 miles wide. The tornado's maximum width of 1.3 miles (EF-0 and greater damage) occurred over a relatively small portion of the path, before the storm reached Moore. Image credit: NWS Norman.


Figure 3. On May 20, 2013, a supercell thunderstorm in central Oklahoma spawned a destructive tornado that passed just south of Oklahoma City. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite acquired this natural-color image of the storm system at 2:40 p.m. Central Daylight Time (19:40 Universal Time), just minutes before the devastating twister began. The red line on the image depicts the tornado’s track. Image credit: NASA Earth Observatory.

There have been bigger tornadoes
The 1.3 mile maximum width of the 2013 Moore tornado's damage swath was not a record. Wikipedia documents that the EF-3 Edmonson, Texas tornado of May 31, 1968 had a damage path width between 2 and 3 miles (3.2 and 4.8 km) wide. The EF-4 Wilber - Hallam, Nebraska tornado on May 22, 2004 was of similar size, with a damage path up to 2.5 miles wide. Doppler radar measurements indicate that the May 4, 1999 Mulhall, Oklahoma EF-4 tornado--which thankfully passed mostly over farmland--would have caused damage over a path 4 miles wide at its peak size, had it encountered a built-up area. The EF-5 tornado that devastated Greensburg, Kansas on May 4, 2007 was 1.7 miles wide.


Figure 4. Damage swath of the Wilber - Hallam, Nebraska EF-4 tornado of May 22, 2004 was up to 2.5 miles wide, making it one of the largest tornadoes on record.


Figure 5. Severe weather outlook for Wednesday, May 22, calls for a "Slight Risk" of severe weather over portions of the Ohio Valley and Northeast U.S. You can follow today's severe weather from our Severe Weather page.

No tornadoes reported on Tuesday; "Slight Risk" of severe weather on Wednesday
The severe weather outbreak of May 18 - 22 peaked on Sunday and Monday. We did not record any tornadoes on Tuesday, though there were many reports of large hail and damaging winds, including three thunderstorms with wind gusts over 74 mph. Tuesday was the first day since May 14 that no tornadoes were recorded in the U.S. And after issuing four consecutive "Moderate Risk" outlooks for severe weather, NOAA's Storm Prediction Center (SPC) is going with only a "Slight Risk" for severe weather on Wednesday in the U.S., with the main severe weather action expected to affect portions of the Ohio Valley and Northeast U.S. The primary threat will be straight-line wind damage and large hail, though we can't rule out a few tornadoes. During the three-day period May 18 - May 20, 70 tornadoes (preliminary) were recorded by SPC.


Video 1. Charles Cook caught the birth of the May 20, 2013 tornado at Newcastle, OK. It moved from there to Moore where it caused catastrophic devastation.


Video 2. NOAA's GOES-East satellite collected this view of the storm system that spawned a deadly tornado over Moore, Oklahoma on May 20, 2013. The animation runs from 10:45 a.m. through 6:45 p.m., Central Daylight Time. Images courtesy NASA GOES Project Science: ‪http://goes.gsfc.nasa.gov/‬

The Norman, OK NWS office has an excellent page with detailed info on the Moore tornado.

I did a 10-minute Skype interview with democracynow.org on Tuesday morning, discussing the Moore tornado.

I greatly appreciate all the valuable links members of the WU community have posted here, and I have used many of them in my posts over the past day. Keep up the great work!

How to help
Portlight Strategies, an organization that supports disaster victims with disabilities, will be working with shelter operators and disability stakeholder organizations in Oklahoma to serve the needs of people with disabilities. Further information and how to offer additional support can be found on their website.

Donations can be made to American Red Cross disaster relief at redcross.org/weather or by texting WEATHER to 90999 to donate $10.

Donations can be made on The Salvation Army's website or by texting STORM to 80888 to donate $10. You can also call to make donations of other monetary amounts at (800) 725-2769.

Jeff Masters

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667. beell
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:



One of the main theories going around, which I agree with, is that everybody was at school or work (the reason we thought the fatality count was going to be high in the first place).

Come to find out, the tornado tracked across a mainly residential area, where nobody was home because of their jobs.



Where are these theories going around at? Just curious.
And yes, "The fact that we were able to watch its whole evolution on air probably helped as well." Which is SOP on severe weather days in central OK.
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Quoting BahaHurican:
Saw another comment elsewhere about CNN actually getting that # from the ME's spokesperson. Only thing I can think is there was some kind of miscommunication between the reporter and the spokesperson. I do know that when the pple at News 9 heard the 91 figure, they kept insisting that the 51 was the accurate figure, with an additional 40 FEARED dead at the primary school.

Frankly, there are often days when I am as underwhelmed by CNN reporting as I am by Fox. However, Fox has made such a practice of misreporting and misrepresenting facts that nobody thinks they made a mistake anymore. Everybody thinks they did it on purpose. Meanwhile, people are more willing to give CNN the benefit of the doubt because they have more of a reputation for objective and accurate reporting.
Having people like Piers Morgan on the air will not Help.
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Quoting Bluestorm5:
Surprising an EF-4 at 190 mph. There was an disagreement between survey teams over EF-4 or EF-5 damage, though. Some teams found EF-5 damage, but other teams found it as EF-4. Because of no clear agreement, Tuscaloosa stayed at EF-4.

Look at slide 13 of this presentation on discriminating EF4/5 damage:
http://www.norman.noaa.gov/nsww/wp-content/upload s/2012/03/LaDue_NSWW2012.pdf

This presentation might also be helpful:
https://ams.confex.com/ams/26SLS/flvgateway.cgi/i d/22959?recordingid=22959

There is a little elaboration on the different ratings from different teams. Not all tornadoes will get as many independent teams as this, but because they did so for this tornado, they were able to make a "consensus" final answer. Unfortunately, there will always be some subjectivity and some uncertainty.
Member Since: September 28, 2002 Posts: 5 Comments: 3244
Quoting TomTaylor:
Were you implying this had something to do with being tropical or...?


Sore subject, Jordan. Lol.
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 17 Comments: 10284
Quoting gulfbreeze:
If it had been Fox instead of CNN eveyone would be going Nuts. Sounds like the Pres. always some else to Blame!!!!
Saw another comment elsewhere about CNN actually getting that # from the ME's spokesperson. Only thing I can think is there was some kind of miscommunication between the reporter and the spokesperson. I do know that when the pple at News 9 heard the 91 figure, they kept insisting that the 51 was the accurate figure, with an additional 40 FEARED dead at the primary school.

Frankly, there are often days when I am as underwhelmed by CNN reporting as I am by Fox. However, Fox has made such a practice of misreporting and misrepresenting facts that nobody thinks they made a mistake anymore. Everybody thinks they did it on purpose. Meanwhile, people are more willing to give CNN the benefit of the doubt because they have more of a reputation for objective and accurate reporting.
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Quoting gulfbreeze:
If it had been Fox instead of CNN eveyone would be going Nuts. Sounds like the Pres. always some else to Blame!!!!


CNN accurately reported what the medical examiner inaccurately reported. No excuse for NYT.
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Quoting Patrap:
Termites swarming here ...RUNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN '''


Weird. They were just swarming here too.
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 17 Comments: 10284
Quoting BahaHurican:
Agreed. I am not interested in the personalities of current politics, so much as I am in the policies [and mindsets that fuel them] that are counterproductive to the welfare and commonwealth of the nation. Things like not funding wx programmes, upgrades and research that can increase public safety are counterproductive; not using the available information to inform policy and make one's discretionary spending more productive is wasteful. And that is BEFORE considering impacts to individuals' lives, their health and well-being.

I don't think this should be too much to ask of one's elected officials.


We got what we voted for - unfortunately, "compromise for the good of the nation" is equivalent to betrayal (on both sides of the spectrum).
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Quoting SLU:
Just got in after a busy day. Is my PC malfunctioning or has the GEOS satellite imagery been down since last night?

It's been down.
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Quoting SLU:
Just got in after a busy day. Is my PC malfunctioning or has the GEOS satellite imagery been down since last night?


Nope, It has a problem.
as easy as that Taz.
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Quoting NasBahMan:


Last night Camperdown Drive just off of Culbert's Hill had 4 1/2' of water, down to about 2' now. I didn't have time to get everywhere, understand couple of places in San Souci between hills had 10' of water.
YIKES!!! If it's the valley I'm thinking about just behind the big hill, that must have been a sight to see.

Sure hope the rest of the rainy season is not this... torrential...
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Quoting drs2008:
dig a trench.put in old school bus. Shelter!!


But then how would they get the kids to school? ;)
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Quoting daddyjames:


Unfair shot at the current Prez, we could open a discussion of the month long "summer" vacations Bush took while two wars were waging . . . but let's call it even and stop it here.
Agreed. I am not interested in the personalities of current politics, so much as I am in the policies [and mindsets that fuel them] that are counterproductive to the welfare and commonwealth of the nation. Things like not funding wx programmes, upgrades and research that can increase public safety are counterproductive; not using the available information to inform policy and make one's discretionary spending more productive is wasteful. And that is BEFORE considering impacts to individuals' lives, their health and well-being.

I don't think this should be too much to ask of one's elected officials.
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Quoting SLU:
Just got in after a busy day. Is my PC malfunctioning or has the GEOS satellite imagery been down since last night?





read back a few page and you have all the info you need
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Quoting flsky:
Anyone know of a good astrological site? I'm curious about what I'm seeing around the moon in Central Florida. TIA


I have a program called Stellarium downloaded on my computer, shows the night sky with labels and the compass directions.

Astronomy is cool
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Quoting daddyjames:


It was a combination of both. The medical examiner's office did release an inaccurate count, 51 dead with 40 more anticipated - immediately reported by CNN.

The New york Times (man, their reporting has really gotten shoddy) then picked up the story, and added the two numbers together - making it 91. Here, the local media quoted those figures once, but immediately began calling them into question.
If it had been Fox instead of CNN eveyone would be going Nuts. Sounds like the Pres. always some else to Blame!!!!
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I'm going to bed. I'll have a post on here tomorrow or Friday (and a possible blog) about storm chasers from my future college (UNC Asheville) being in area at time of Texas tornadoes last week and Oklahoma tornadoes this week, including May 19th and 20th. I'm thinking of doing the same thing few years from now while at UNCA.
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650. SLU
Just got in after a busy day. Is my PC malfunctioning or has the GEOS satellite imagery been down since last night?

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More Loss of Life from weather.

1 Dead, 2 Injured, 1 Missing After Field Trip At Lilydale Park


MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — One child is dead, two others are injured and another is missing after a hillside gave way Wednesday during a fourth grade field trip at a St. Paul park, according to Fire Marshal Steve Zaccard.

Police said the two injured children were taken to Regions Hospital. Their conditions are unknown at this time.

Zaccard said multiple crews are searching for the missing child. The effort, however, is now considered a recovery effort, not a rescue mission. The search is taking place in an area that’s 50 feet by 50 feet — roughly the size of a house. The search will go until nightfall, and it will continue Thursday morning.

Crews responded to the scene at Lilydale Regional Park around 1 p.m., where two fourth grade classes from Peter Hobart Elementary were on a field trip, Zaccard said.

The kids were exploring a hillside in the park when the ground gave way. The slide created a sinkhole, which quickly filled with water. Crews initially used their hands in an effort to dig the children out.

Zaccard said the ground is soft from several days of rain, which made rescue efforts difficult. He said water poured into the hole where the unstable soil gave way, making it very dangerous for rescuers on scene. Crews began pumping water out of the hole, and they were forced to suspend efforts for about an hour due to rain. Once the rain stopped, the pumping resumed.

“We’re working with our partners in parks and public works to make the scene safe to continue what’s now become a recovery effort for what might be another victim,” Zaccard said.
The first child was rescued right away. It took crews an hour to get to the second child, who was submerged in water, and 90 minutes to reach the third.

A firefighter was also injured after a rock fell on his head during the search, according to police. He’s expected to be OK.

St. Paul Mayor Chris Coleman described the efforts of the first responders as “unbelievably heroic.”

Multiple agencies are on the scene, including crews with shovels and a truck with plywood to help control the slippery situation.

Parents at Peter Hobart Elementary said they were sick and heartbroken when they heard the news. More on that story here.

Lilydale Regional Park is a popular place to search for fossils. Local resident Adam Farrell said people often find shells and leaf imprints on the rocks.

“It’s actually pretty fascinating, especially when you are a little kid, to find yourself a fossil,” Farrell said.

Another school, authorities said, was at the park earlier Wednesday morning.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 129093
Quoting flsky:
Anyone know of a good astrological site? I'm curious about what I'm seeing around the moon in Central Florida. TIA


astrological or astronomical? Could it be a Leo?
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

The Moore tornado is #59 on the list. Not sure why there's only six in that image. The National Weather Service Southern Region lists 7 F/EF5s in Oklahoma (since 1950 - I should add that's the time period).


Yea i took it down, because they must have just updated it, went back and counted at NWS and their it was 7. You were right TA
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Quoting ncstorm:


I was actually watching CNN when Piers Morgan was interviewing the Medical Examiner or someone from that office and they actually broke the news of 91 dead..He asked her at least 3 times about the total of 91 fatalities and she confirmed it each and every time..


I am not sure, but the medical examiner's office in Oklahoma city was plagued with so much problems that essentially it took about a year before they found someone willing to take the position (after the previous one was dismissed).

Guess it is still having "issues".

Edit Would to found
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Quoting daddyjames:


Yes, posted that yesterday during the discussion ( well the one from WU; in fact, much of that article is "borrowed" from the one posted at WU).

But this does not excuse not building above ground shelters, which they have been incorporating into new school construction.
dig a trench.put in old school bus. Shelter!!
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644. flsky
Anyone know of a good astrological site? I'm curious about what I'm seeing around the moon in Central Florida. TIA
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Quoting BahaHurican:
I heard it was very bad near Cuthberts [Culbert's? I always call it wrong] Hill area.

Glad I live SW. We had more flooding than usual, but it ran off fairly quickly. Our roads were mostly clear out here by school time, or shortly thereafter.


Last night Camperdown Drive just off of Culbert's Hill had 4 1/2' of water, down to about 2' now. I didn't have time to get everywhere, understand couple of places in San Souci between hills had 10' of water.
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Tornado birth: Mom endures labor as twister destroys hospital

The Human spirit is a Marvel,esp a Mother's in Labor.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 129093
Quoting Astrometeor:


I believe the site has yet to update, same for the Tornado History place, they have yet to add the most recent Moore tornado in there.

The Moore tornado is #59 on the list. Not sure why there's only six in that image. The National Weather Service Southern Region lists 7 F/EF5s in Oklahoma (since 1950 - I should add that's the time period).
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Or we will run the Bush Helo Exit scene from Obama's first Inauguration.


; )
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 129093
Quoting Patrap:
This Guy gets Dangerously Close to Moore Tornado Until It Tears Into His House




I think this Story Takes the Cake:

Tornado birth: Mom endures labor as twister destroys hospital

When a devastating tornado touched down in Moore, Okla., on Monday afternoon, Shayla Taylor was on the upper floor of the local hospital, in active labor with her second child.
As the floor shook “like an earthquake” beneath her and ceiling tiles and insulation fell overhead, the 25-year-old huddled with four nurses, braving both the peak contractions of childbirth and the wrath of the worst twister the veteran Oklahoman had ever endured.
“We were all just sitting there holding each other’s hands and praying,” Taylor told NBC News.
Moore Medical Center, a 46-bed acute care hospital at 700 S. Telephone Road, took a direct hit from the F-5 tornado, with wind speeds that topped 200 miles per hour.
The blow devastated the hospital, as news photos plainly show, ripping away the roof and walls.
After the chaos, Taylor said she heard not the freight train sound described by so many witnesses, but the absolute silence of the storm’s center. Then she opened her eyes.
All of a sudden I could see daylight and the wall was gone,” she said. “I look out and I see I-35 and part of the Warren theater,” which later became the triage center for victims of the tornado that killed 24 and injured more than 230 people.
She had been dilated to 9 centimeters, nearly ready to deliver the baby, when nurses gave her a quick shot to slow labor during the height of the storm.
Taylor was quickly reunited with her husband, Jerome Taylor, 29, who had taken their 4-year-old son, Shaiden, to wait out the tornado with others in the hospital cafeteria. With the help of hospital workers, she was carefully carried through the destroyed building and out to a waiting ambulance, which whisked her 5 miles to another hospital in the Norman Regional Health System.
Three hours later, after doctors determined that the petite Taylor would need a cesarean section due to the baby's size, she delivered Braeden Immanuel, a healthy 8-pound, 3-ounce boy.
“His middle name means ‘God is with us,’” said Taylor. “The name had been picked out for months. Now I know why.”
Taylor is among 30 patients and staffers at Moore Medical Center who survived the tornado, which destroyed the hospital, said Kelly Wells, a health system spokeswoman. No decision has been made yet about whether to rebuild or simply raze the site.
Two days after the storm, Taylor and her family are recovering from the trauma of the chaotic birth. The family can’t locate their car, a Toyota Camry, which had been parked in the hospital lot and is now nowhere to be found.
“I don’t know if it ended up inside the hospital or down the street,” she said.
Their home is safe, however, and Jerome Taylor, who works for The Hartford insurance company, has been overwhelmed trying to help his neighbors cope.
Oklahomans are used to tornado warnings and Taylor said she wasn’t particularly alarmed before Monday’s storm.
“I’m used to sirens,” she said. “If you panicked, you’d be in a constant panic.”
Now, however, she’s thinking twice about living in Tornado Alley.
“The tornadoes always track through here,” she said. “It’s not to say everybody’s going to pack and leave tomorrow, but they start to reconsider things.”


Link
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Quoting BahaHurican:
Media was the one promoting the jump to 91, but I do think the ME's office was expecting to see further fatalities from the Plaza Towers school that they never actually saw. It was pretty heartening to have them pulling children out alive there that night after they had recovered the dead bodies. I'm sure the ME's office was VERY glad to have gotten that count too high, instead of too low.


I was actually watching CNN when Piers Morgan was interviewing the Medical Examiner or someone from that office and they actually broke the news of 91 dead..He asked her at least 3 times about the total of 91 fatalities and she confirmed it each and every time..
Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 16078
Quoting help4u:
I say take away the millions of Obama phones given away at election time get a refund and build storm shelters in tornado alley.Or save all the money from green programs that go belly up and spend on the children that live in tornado alley.Maybe Obama could give uo one 5 million dollar vacation to build 4or 5 shelters at schools that don't have storm shelters.


Unfair shot at the current Prez, we could open a discussion of the month long "summer" vacations Bush took while two wars were waging . . . but let's call it even and stop it here.
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Quoting BahaHurican:
Cut the subsidy to Oil Companies and pay for all the shelters in less than a year.


Indeed
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 129093
Quoting JTDailyUpdate:


Just to Put this Argument to Rest; Here You Go:
Why aren't there more storm shelters in Oklahoma?


Yes, posted that yesterday during the discussion ( well the one from WU; in fact, much of that article is "borrowed" from the one posted at WU).

But this does not excuse not building above ground shelters, which they have been incorporating into new school construction.
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Quoting help4u:
I say take away the millions of Obama phones given away at election time get a refund and build storm shelters in tornado alley.Or save all the money from green programs that go belly up and spend on the children that live in tornado alley.Maybe Obama could give uo one 5 million dollar vacation to build 4or 5 shelters at schools that don't have storm shelters.
Cut the subsidy to Oil Companies and pay for all the shelters in less than a year.
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Quoting Patrap:
no BahaHurican
LOL... maybe it's a seasonal thing...
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Quoting AGWcreationists:
Cripes, screw the grant money. You have had three EF4 plus tornadoes in just over a decade. Make the case for a millage tax increase to pay for all schools to have an underground shelter. You just can't wait for Uncle Sugar to come through. That is what local governance is supposed to be about. You choose to live in the Tornado Alley bullseye, take the LOCAL steps to protect your schoolkids in school.


Totally agree that more should have been done, and a few of the smaller communities did that - built above ground shelters that was open to anyone. However, not all. In fact, Midwest City (one of those impacted by the May 3 1999 tornado) did this:


City No Longer Providing Public Storm Shelters

Effective January 1, 2013, the city of Midwest City will no longer make available public storm shelters. City officials are urging residents to plan and prepare now for severe weather that may occur in the future.

Wonder if they're gonna rethink this.
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Quoting WDEmobmet:


Someone posted this map earlier, it shows only 6 total EF5s in OK, but it shows a total of 7 in AL. They are definitely not tied. Alabama holds the record for the most 5's


I believe the site has yet to update, same for the Tornado History place, they have yet to add the most recent Moore tornado in there.
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Quoting daddyjames:


All of the schools built/rebuilt after the 1999 tornado do have above ground shelters. Even in the smaller communities that were impacted by that tornado. These schools did not have one, as they did not have to be rebuilt. The Moor school district has been actively trying to get grant monies to provide shelters - as the built the schools.


Just to Put this Argument to Rest; Here You Go:
Why aren't there more storm shelters in Oklahoma?
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Quoting help4u:
How does anything get on the news if it is not the media. lol!one and the same.
Media was the one promoting the jump to 91, but I do think the ME's office was expecting to see further fatalities from the Plaza Towers school that they never actually saw. It was pretty heartening to have them pulling children out alive there that night after they had recovered the dead bodies. I'm sure the ME's office was VERY glad to have gotten that count too high, instead of too low.
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This Guy gets Dangerously Close to Moore Tornado Until It Tears Into His House


Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 129093
nm my bad
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Quoting NasBahMan:


Hey Baha, seen water as deep as six feet in some places, some roads still have over two feet of water on them tonight.
I heard it was very bad near Cuthberts [Culbert's? I always call it wrong] Hill area.

Glad I live SW. We had more flooding than usual, but it ran off fairly quickly. Our roads were mostly clear out here by school time, or shortly thereafter.
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@NJSnowFan Chris Beal
Even the lower elev. at Mount Rainier getting snow. Trees have there leaves already.

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Quoting AussieStorm:


Ok thanks. I was just wondering. We all know media can hype things.

Btw, Check out this storm shelter in the video.


It was a combination of both. The medical examiner's office did release an inaccurate count, 51 dead with 40 more anticipated - immediately reported by CNN.

The New york Times (man, their reporting has really gotten shoddy) then picked up the story, and added the two numbers together - making it 91. Here, the local media quoted those figures once, but immediately began calling them into question.
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Quoting Bluestorm5:
Medical examiner accidently counted the bodies twice in middle of all chaos. They also thought 40 more bodies were on the way (turn out to be false). Media had nothing to do with it.


Yea I have heard this rationality/explanation a couple of times now... but, and I am in no way a mathematician, double counting 24 gives you 48 not 51... Something doens't add up here
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no BahaHurican
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 426 Comments: 129093
Quoting Patrap:
Termites swarming here ...RUNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN '''
Is it raining? I saw that last night... had to spray and ever'thing.
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How does anything get on the news if it is not the media. lol!one and the same.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
I remain right now very, very surprised the death toll is only at two dozen. After we all watched this nearly mile and a half tornado touch down and move towards Moore and then saw the subsequent helicopter video of catastrophic damage, I thought to myself -- and even added it here ("the fatality count is going to be enormous") -- that the number of deaths would be in the dozens, if not well over 100. I mean, not only was this a Monday afternoon, meaning everybody was at work or school (and on the roads), but this tornado...which we knew while it was in progress was a significant EF3-EF5...was tracking across a city with a population of 55,081 (2010 Census). The helicopter showed entire buildings and neighborhoods leveled, and some houses didn't even exist. Just clean foundation. And you wonder how anybody survived that.

One of the main theories going around, which I agree with, is that everybody was at school or work (the reason we thought the fatality count was going to be high in the first place). The tornado did hit two schools at near maximum intensity, but it was a well-built structure where you had an above-average chance of survival when compared to surrounding homes. Come to find out, the tornado tracked across a mainly residential area, where nobody was home because of their jobs.

Had this tornado occurred an hour or two later, or if its track would have been just a few miles more north, this horrible disaster probably would've been much, much worse.

But then again, it also has to do with the fact that this tornado struck a region very aware of tornadoes. Having been through the 1999 Moore tornado, people in the area probably knew what, and what not, to do. The fact that we were able to watch its whole evolution on air probably helped as well. In a study following the Joplin and Tuscaloosa tornadoes, it was found out that most people didn't take shelter because they didn't have any PROOF that the tornado was on the ground, headed towards them, and doing damage. And that's usually how it is. This tornado was the exception, not the rule. I'm just glad it was.


Yeah; I thought for sure the death toll would be much higher. This is one situation where I'm actually glad to be wrong.
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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