Moore Tornado an EF-5; $2 Billion Damage Estimate: 3rd Costliest Tornado in History

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:22 PM GMT on May 22, 2013

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The Moore, Oklahoma tornado of May 20, 2013 is now ranked an EF-5, making it one of only 59 U.S. tornadoes to achieve that distinction since record keeping began in 1950. The National Weather Service in Norman, Oklahoma announced Tuesday that their damage survey teams found an area of EF-5 damage near Briarwood Elementary School, with winds of 200 - 210 mph indicated. There were no EF-5 tornadoes observed in 2012, and the last time the U.S. had an EF-5 was on May 24, 2011, when the Oklahoma towns of Calumet, El Reno, Piedmont, and Guthrie were hit by an EF-5 with 210+ mph winds that killed nine people. The maximum width of the 2013 Moore tornado's damage swath was a huge 1.3 miles. Detailed damage survey information in Google Earth Format provided by the Norman, OK NWS office shows that the typical width of the EF-0 and greater damage swath was about 0.6 miles, and the EF-4 damage area was about 0.1 miles across at its widest. EF-4 damage occurred along approximately 4 miles of the tornado's 17-mile long path. The damage swath from the May 20, 2013 tornado as it cut through the most densely built up portions of Moore was roughly 1.5 times as wide as the one from the May 3, 1999 EF-5 tornado. That tornado was the 4th costliest in history ($1.4 billion 2011 dollars), so it is a good bet that the 2013 Moore tornado will end up being even more expensive. This morning, the Oklahoma Insurance Department said the preliminary tornado damage estimate could top $2 billion. This would make the 2013 Moore tornado the 2nd most expensive tornado in history (as ranked by NOAA/SPC) or 3rd most expensive (as ranked by insurance broker Aon Benfield.) The nine billion-dollar tornadoes (2013 dollars) are:

1) Joplin, Missouri, May 22, 2011, $2.9 billion
2) Tuscaloosa, Alabama, April 27, 2011, $2.3 billion (not in SPC's list)
3) Moore, Oklahoma, May 20, 2013, $2 billion
4) Topeka, Kansas, June 8, 1966, $1.8 billion
5) Lubbock, Texas, May 11, 1970, $1.5 billion
6) Bridge Creek-Moore, Oklahoma, May 3, 1999, $1.4 billion
7) Hackleburg, Alabama, April 27, 2011, $1.3 billion (not in SPC's list)
8) Xenia, Ohio, April 3, 1974, $1.1 billion
9) Omaha, Nebraska, May 6, 1975, $1 billion


Figure 1. The Moore, Oklahoma tornado of May 20, 2013 (AP Photo/Alonzo Adams)


Figure 2. The damage swath of the Moore, Oklahoma tornado of May 20, 2013. EF-4 damage (red colors) occurred along roughly 4 miles of the 17-mile path, and the EF-4 damage swath was up to 0.1 miles wide. The tornado's maximum width of 1.3 miles (EF-0 and greater damage) occurred over a relatively small portion of the path, before the storm reached Moore. Image credit: NWS Norman.


Figure 3. On May 20, 2013, a supercell thunderstorm in central Oklahoma spawned a destructive tornado that passed just south of Oklahoma City. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite acquired this natural-color image of the storm system at 2:40 p.m. Central Daylight Time (19:40 Universal Time), just minutes before the devastating twister began. The red line on the image depicts the tornado’s track. Image credit: NASA Earth Observatory.

There have been bigger tornadoes
The 1.3 mile maximum width of the 2013 Moore tornado's damage swath was not a record. Wikipedia documents that the EF-3 Edmonson, Texas tornado of May 31, 1968 had a damage path width between 2 and 3 miles (3.2 and 4.8 km) wide. The EF-4 Wilber - Hallam, Nebraska tornado on May 22, 2004 was of similar size, with a damage path up to 2.5 miles wide. Doppler radar measurements indicate that the May 4, 1999 Mulhall, Oklahoma EF-4 tornado--which thankfully passed mostly over farmland--would have caused damage over a path 4 miles wide at its peak size, had it encountered a built-up area. The EF-5 tornado that devastated Greensburg, Kansas on May 4, 2007 was 1.7 miles wide.


Figure 4. Damage swath of the Wilber - Hallam, Nebraska EF-4 tornado of May 22, 2004 was up to 2.5 miles wide, making it one of the largest tornadoes on record.


Figure 5. Severe weather outlook for Wednesday, May 22, calls for a "Slight Risk" of severe weather over portions of the Ohio Valley and Northeast U.S. You can follow today's severe weather from our Severe Weather page.

No tornadoes reported on Tuesday; "Slight Risk" of severe weather on Wednesday
The severe weather outbreak of May 18 - 22 peaked on Sunday and Monday. We did not record any tornadoes on Tuesday, though there were many reports of large hail and damaging winds, including three thunderstorms with wind gusts over 74 mph. Tuesday was the first day since May 14 that no tornadoes were recorded in the U.S. And after issuing four consecutive "Moderate Risk" outlooks for severe weather, NOAA's Storm Prediction Center (SPC) is going with only a "Slight Risk" for severe weather on Wednesday in the U.S., with the main severe weather action expected to affect portions of the Ohio Valley and Northeast U.S. The primary threat will be straight-line wind damage and large hail, though we can't rule out a few tornadoes. During the three-day period May 18 - May 20, 70 tornadoes (preliminary) were recorded by SPC.


Video 1. Charles Cook caught the birth of the May 20, 2013 tornado at Newcastle, OK. It moved from there to Moore where it caused catastrophic devastation.


Video 2. NOAA's GOES-East satellite collected this view of the storm system that spawned a deadly tornado over Moore, Oklahoma on May 20, 2013. The animation runs from 10:45 a.m. through 6:45 p.m., Central Daylight Time. Images courtesy NASA GOES Project Science: ‪http://goes.gsfc.nasa.gov/‬

The Norman, OK NWS office has an excellent page with detailed info on the Moore tornado.

I did a 10-minute Skype interview with democracynow.org on Tuesday morning, discussing the Moore tornado.

I greatly appreciate all the valuable links members of the WU community have posted here, and I have used many of them in my posts over the past day. Keep up the great work!

How to help
Portlight Strategies, an organization that supports disaster victims with disabilities, will be working with shelter operators and disability stakeholder organizations in Oklahoma to serve the needs of people with disabilities. Further information and how to offer additional support can be found on their website.

Donations can be made to American Red Cross disaster relief at redcross.org/weather or by texting WEATHER to 90999 to donate $10.

Donations can be made on The Salvation Army's website or by texting STORM to 80888 to donate $10. You can also call to make donations of other monetary amounts at (800) 725-2769.

Jeff Masters

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Quoting washingtonian115:
D.C has a tornado shield around us.So while other counties are getting rocked we are protected.lol.


You can thank all the hot air from our B.S. politicians for that shield.
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 17 Comments: 10284
Quoting Bluestorm5:
Just looked up DC on Tornado History Project... only two tornadoes? That's very impressive.



Does it count this?

Smithsonian Magazine says there have been 8 tornadoes in Washington DC.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
The Killer Tornado of 1928.

This inspired the Nebraska state legislature to require that all schools have an underground shelter with capacity to hold all the students and personnel.

A decision Oklahoma would be wise to emulate.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
GOES-13 outage
May 22nd, 2013


GOES-13 suffered an anomaly overnight: the satellite is no longer pointed towards the Earth for as yet unknown reasons. The anomaly started at 03:40 UTC on 22 May, and at 04:29 UTC, GOES-West (GOES-15) began a 30-minute full disk scan schedule.

GOES-14, in standby mode at 105.5 W longitude, has been activated; the first images from GOES-14 will be available at 05:00 UTC 23 May. There are no plans now to move GOES-14 from its current position. In the meantime, GOES engineers are working on a solution to GOES-13′s problems. An update from the Environmental Satellite Processing Center (ESPC) is scheduled for around Noon eastern time (see NOAA NESDIS GOES Special Bulletins). Note that GOES-14 data will *not* be relayed via GOES-13 — so ground station users will need to reposition their antennas to receive GOES-14 direct readout data.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 428 Comments: 129908
Quoting HurricaneDean07:

The US invested in a invisible atmospheric wall that caps off strong storms from forming. ;)

They put one in Detroit too, it has worked numerous times... ;) :(
One example is today, the "storms" where nothing more than a light to moderate shower and some minor wind gusts.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting CaicosRetiredSailor:


IR
CRS, have you guys gotten any rain the last 2 days?
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22736
Quoting washingtonian115:
D.C has a tornado shield around us.So while other counties are getting rocked we are protected.lol.
Just looked up DC on Tornado History Project... only two tornadoes? That's very impressive.
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 28 Comments: 8075
Quoting HurricaneDean07:


You say that about Louisiana, but then how come Central and Southeast Texas get them? ;)
Maybe because Texas is closer to the Rockies ;)
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 28 Comments: 8075
Quoting Chucktown:
Well, this is certainly good news about the NWS furloughs in response to the tornadoes over the last few days.

Link
Would be much better if they would just cut the stupidness with the sequester and get a real working budget, imo.
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22736
Quoting Bluestorm5:
To be honest, it really surprised me Louisiana doesn't get stronger tornadoes... but maybe because it's so far south from cold air.


That and we typically only get bitten by the "tail end" of frontal troughs, where the shear is not really maximized, and where instability seems to be farther north.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 602 Comments: 21333
NOVA on PBS is airing an old (from 2004)episode tonight "Hunt for the Supertwister" which has a lot about the 1999 Moore tornado in it. Science will be slightly out of date.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting washingtonian115:
D.C has a tornado shield around us.So while other counties are getting rocked we are protected.lol.

The US invested in a invisible atmospheric wall that caps off strong storms from forming. ;)
Member Since: October 3, 2010 Posts: 40 Comments: 4129
Quoting Bluestorm5:
To be honest, it really surprised me Louisiana doesn't get stronger tornadoes... but maybe because it's so far south from cold air.


You say that about Louisiana, but then how come Central and Southeast Texas get them? ;)
Member Since: October 3, 2010 Posts: 40 Comments: 4129


General Satellite Messages

*Update#9: *GOES-13 has been placed into storage mode while the anomaly
is investigated. There is no new information or estimated return to
service at this time. *
*GOES-14 imaging should be available starting at approximately 0600 UTC
on May 23, 2013.*
*GOES-15 (West) remains in full disk mode and will continue in that
schedule until further notice.*
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
501. washingtonian115
12:25 AM GMT on May 23, 2013
D.C has a tornado shield around us.So while other counties are getting rocked we are protected.lol.
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 17859
500. BahaHurican
12:25 AM GMT on May 23, 2013
Quoting CaicosRetiredSailor:
TESLA REPAYS DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LOAN NINE YEARS EARLY
ONLY AMERICAN CAR COMPANY TO HAVE PAID BACK GOVERNMENT


WEDNESDAY, MAY 22, 2013

PALO ALTO, Calif.-- Tesla Motors announced that it has paid off the entire loan awarded to the company by the Department of Energy in 2010. In addition to payments made in 2012 and Q1 2013, today's wire of almost half a billion dollars ($451.8M) repays the full loan facility with interest. Following this payment, Tesla will be the only American car company to have fully repaid the government.

For the first seven years since its founding in 2003, Tesla was funded entirely with private funds, led by Elon Musk. Tesla brought its Roadster sports car to market with a 30% gross margin, designed electric powertrains for Daimler (Mercedes) and had done preliminary design of the Model S all before receiving a government loan.

In 2010, Tesla was awarded a milestone-based loan, requiring matching private capital obtained via public offering, by the DOE as part of the Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing program. This program was signed into law by President Bush in 2008 and then awarded under the Obama administration in the years that followed.

This program is often confused with the financial bailouts provided to the then bankrupt GM and Chrysler, who were ineligible for the ATVM program, because a requirement of that program was good financial health.
...
http://www.teslamotors.com/about/press/releases/t esla-repays-department-energy-loan-nine-years-earl y
I want one!

Quoting wunderkidcayman:

Look I don't care tell me when a satellite is up over the W hemisphere
I care. I know I can start looking at the NASA site again.

Quoting WDEmobmet:


Your late... thats old news :)
I'm glad he posted... I hadn't seen it before. Thanks, Taz.
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22736
499. Bluestorm5
12:24 AM GMT on May 23, 2013
Quoting KoritheMan:


The strongest I've experienced (actually I was at work, but I would have loved to see it from a distance) is an EF1. Louisiana doesn't really get strong tornadoes, at least right near the Gulf Coast. The strongest I've heard of in the general area was an EF2 in western Louisiana spawned by a weakening Hurricane Gustav in 2008.

As you say, it's hard to fathom something stronger.
To be honest, it really surprised me Louisiana doesn't get stronger tornadoes... but maybe because it's so far south from cold air.
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 28 Comments: 8075
498. daddyjames
12:24 AM GMT on May 23, 2013
Quoting CybrTeddy:


How dare they! I wear them in my rowboat when I go out to recon random blobs for you guys when the NHC "clearly" doesn't recognize the potential for development. :)


Virtual waders are useless real world ;)
Member Since: June 25, 2011 Posts: 2 Comments: 3733
497. Bluestorm5
12:22 AM GMT on May 23, 2013
Quoting trHUrrIXC5MMX:


That's what scares me a bit more living in Atlanta metro... higher chances for seeing those. ..

At least in NYC people would have some protection being between those major buildings, a tornado wont easly make it through if at all.
Don't be afraid. For one person to see a single tornado is very rare unless you chase them. You'll be under tornado warning maybe at least once or twice in life, but you're likely to never see them. I've lived in Tornado Alley and Carolina Alley for 18 years and I've never seen tornado ever. Closest call was 5 miles away on April 16, 2011 when EF3 went through my county. I've seen damage from other EF3 in Sanford and it's pretty sobering. But I promise you that you're very unlikely to get hit by one. You still have to go to shelter if you do get a warning. Atlanta metro area is known for many close calls to downtown (some hit the city).
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 28 Comments: 8075
496. CaicosRetiredSailor
12:18 AM GMT on May 23, 2013


IR
Member Since: July 12, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 6069
495. CybrTeddy
12:17 AM GMT on May 23, 2013
Quoting BaltimoreBrian:


CyberTeddy's been tracking through the blog for 8 years and you ask if he has waders?!


How dare they! I wear them in my rowboat when I go out to recon random blobs for you guys when the NHC "clearly" doesn't recognize the potential for development. :)
Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 24580
494. Doppler22
12:14 AM GMT on May 23, 2013
Quoting KoritheMan:


The strongest I've experienced (actually I was at work, but I would have loved to see it from a distance) is an EF1. Louisiana doesn't really get strong tornadoes, at least right near the Gulf Coast. The strongest I've heard of in the general area was an EF2 in western Louisiana spawned by a weakening Hurricane Gustav in 2008.

As you say, it's hard to fathom something stronger.

Here in PA, the largest i've seen personally was EF1 damage. However, I did see EF3 damage on my local news station years ago when a tornado went about 20 miles North of me causing damage
(It was either an EF 2 or EF 3, I can't 100% remember)
Member Since: February 13, 2012 Posts: 11 Comments: 3885
493. KoritheMan
12:13 AM GMT on May 23, 2013
It should be noted that, at least in my experience as a forecaster over the last five years, the models generally want to latch onto to some kind of low pressure area/cyclogenesis in the western Caribbean this time of year. The climatological northward rise of the monsoon trough excites them and can often lead to overzealous forecasts due to issues with convective feedback; this is especially true beyond one week.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 602 Comments: 21333
492. BahaHurican
12:11 AM GMT on May 23, 2013
Evening everyone. We had some extensive flooding throughout New Providence today, to the point where schools throughout the island were closed. People just couldn't get their children over the flooded roads, and some school campuses were flooded.

I'll go backread a bit, but I have to say I heard comments like "I hope the rainy season is not going to be like this" all day today.
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22736
491. HurricaneDean07
12:10 AM GMT on May 23, 2013
Quoting washingtonian115:
Maybe as we get closer to this supposed time period where the storm is starting to develop I won't be so doubtful about the situation.after the models got Sandy from except for the Euro and got me excited for many snow events that never came to materialize I've became doubtful and skeptical of model runs so far out in advance.March 6 comes to my mind..

The timeframe has moved up slightly. Just have to wait and see what happens over the next week.
Member Since: October 3, 2010 Posts: 40 Comments: 4129
490. washingtonian115
12:07 AM GMT on May 23, 2013
Quoting HurricaneDean07:

I understand your skepticism, but for one. It wasnt the Models pushing back the date. It was the GFS, singular, pushing it back. The GFS has had this idea of development since Early may, because it was taking the MJO pulse into the SW atlantic region way too fast. The GFS has slowly progressed and came into agreement with the other models of the timing of the MJO pulse, which is the reason it has moved back the timing so considerably. The other models have started latching onto the Ideas since the GFS has became more reasonable with the MJO, which leads me to think that we could have some mischief around this time period, whether a storm or disturbance. We'll just have to wait and see. :)
Maybe as we get closer to this supposed time period where the storm is starting to develop I won't be so doubtful about the situation.after the models got Sandy wrong except for the Euro and got me excited for many snow events that never came to materialize I've became doubtful and skeptical of model runs so far out in advance.March 6 comes to my mind..
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 17859
489. HurricaneDean07
12:03 AM GMT on May 23, 2013
Updated last comment. just FYI
Member Since: October 3, 2010 Posts: 40 Comments: 4129
488. HurricaneDean07
12:02 AM GMT on May 23, 2013
Quoting washingtonian115:
I'm skeptical because 1: the models keep pushing back the date.2:sst in the gulf aren't that hot right now to support that kind of intensity the model was showing.3:the models can be wrong about the upper air pattern far out in advance.

I understand your skepticism, but for one. It wasnt the Models pushing back the date. It was the GFS, singular, pushing it back. The GFS has had this idea of development since Early may, because it was taking the MJO pulse into the SW atlantic region way too fast. The GFS has slowly progressed and came into agreement with the other models of the timing of the MJO pulse, which is the reason it has moved back the timing so considerably. The other models have started latching onto the Ideas since the GFS has became more reasonable with the MJO, which leads me to think that we could have some mischief around this time period, whether a storm or disturbance. We'll just have to wait and see. :)
Member Since: October 3, 2010 Posts: 40 Comments: 4129
487. MississippiWx
12:02 AM GMT on May 23, 2013
Quoting SuzK:


Don't let the bullies keep you from anything!! I am grateful for your courteous demeanor!!


Lol.
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 17 Comments: 10284
486. Gearsts
12:02 AM GMT on May 23, 2013
Quoting Tropicsweatherpr:


I think after he returns from Norman Oklahoma he will do it.
He told me this:ECMWF should come out on the 15th. UKMET and NMME should come out a little before that (varies) and the JMA a little after (also varies).
Member Since: August 2, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 2003
485. TropicalAnalystwx13
12:01 AM GMT on May 23, 2013
Quoting KoritheMan:


Right. I forgot about that one. My mother has family down there, and often tells me how worried she was during that tornado. They were like 45 miles apart so it was impossible to get to them. We also didn't have cellphones like we do now, which of course made communication even more difficult.

The Tornado History Project is a nice database for tornadoes within a particular state.

Louisiana has experienced one F5 (2-21-1971) that killed 47 and injured 510. There have been nine F4s that have caused a collective 52 deaths.

And on and on...
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32875
484. drg0dOwnCountry
12:01 AM GMT on May 23, 2013
James B. Elsner, an atmospheric scientist at Florida State University:

%u201CClimate change increases the available energy for tornadoes through a warmer and moister atmosphere. Wind shear decreases in the global mean, but this might be irrelevant locally when the jet stream dives southward like it did last weekend across the Plains.

%u201CI believe there is evidence that the strongest tornadoes are getting stronger. They are certainly getting longer and wider.
%u201D Link
Member Since: September 22, 2005 Posts: 11 Comments: 2032
483. Tropicsweatherpr
11:59 PM GMT on May 22, 2013
Quoting Gearsts:
And the seasonal forecast that Levi mention on his video for this month?


I think after he returns from Norman Oklahoma he will do it.
Member Since: April 29, 2009 Posts: 75 Comments: 14921
482. Patrap
11:58 PM GMT on May 22, 2013
Post-Traumatic Stress from a Storm

In the days and weeks to come, it’s likely that some survivors’ emotions will turn from shock to symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, Thomas said, prompting a wide-range of reactions, including stress, fear and anger.




Commonly, survivors will be unable to stop thinking about the storm and they’ll be in a more excitable state, which causes them to react strongly to sounds and sights around them. Physical reactions, such as a loss of appetite, trouble sleeping and excess smoking or alcohol use are also common, according to the National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

First-responders in particular risk PTSD, especially those who had to pull the bodies of the seven children who reportedly died during the storm out of the rubble, Thomas said. At least 24 total people died as a result of Monday’s tornado, the Oklahoma Medical Examiner's Office and Associated Press reported Tuesday, and another 120 were injured.

In the wake of such tragedy, individuals need to accept support and help in order to heal, according to the National Center for PTSD. Professional support, through individual or group counseling, often helps.

Acts of communal mourning, including memorial services, volunteer opportunities and fundraisers for victims, have been shown to help survivors of similar disasters emotionally recover in the past, according to national data.

The Obama administration, Federal Emergency Management Agency and American Red Cross have so far led national relief efforts.

"Oklahoma needs to get everything it needs, right away," President Obama said in a press conference Tuesday morning. "The people of Moore, Okla. should know that their country will remain on the ground, there for them, beside them as long as it takes."

Although it certainly helps survivors to know that they are not alone, a national outpouring of media attention can also be overwhelming to people experiencing shock or PTSD, Thomas said. “For survivors, connecting to the community in which the disaster occurred is much more meaningful, emotionally, than hearing from the wider community,” Thomas said. “But knowing they are not forgotten will help Oklahoma recover.”





Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 428 Comments: 129908
481. washingtonian115
11:57 PM GMT on May 22, 2013
Quoting HurricaneDean07:

Why so Debby downer about this? You're not the type to completely just put down every single post someone says about the forecast the models are showing.
I'm skeptical because 1: the models keep pushing back the date.2:sst in the gulf aren't that hot right now to support that kind of intensity the model was showing.3:the models can be wrong about the upper air pattern far out in advance.
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 17859
480. KoritheMan
11:56 PM GMT on May 22, 2013
Quoting Patrap:


Before making landfall, Andrew spawned an F3 tornado in Laplace, which killed two people and injuring 32.



Right. I forgot about that one. My mother has family down there, and often tells me how worried she was during that tornado. They were like 45 miles apart so it was impossible to get to them. We also didn't have cellphones like we do now, which of course made communication even more difficult.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 602 Comments: 21333
479. daddyjames
11:56 PM GMT on May 22, 2013
Quoting Chucktown:
Well, this is certainly good news about the NWS furloughs in response to the tornadoes over the last few days.

Link


It's no news, unless both parties agree to fix the problem. Just a bunch of political grandstanding.
Member Since: June 25, 2011 Posts: 2 Comments: 3733
478. VR46L
11:55 PM GMT on May 22, 2013
Quoting PedleyCA:
Burning Down One Side


Much preferred the first tune ya posted .. even though it was due to a sad loss
Member Since: March 1, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 6998
477. Gearsts
11:54 PM GMT on May 22, 2013
Quoting Tropicsweatherpr:


Tommorow NOAA will release the North Atlantic and East Pacific outlooks.
And the seasonal forecast that Levi mention on his video for this month?
Member Since: August 2, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 2003
476. SuzK
11:54 PM GMT on May 22, 2013
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
I really don't understand. When I was younger and made posts here with incorrect information or only slightly accurate observations, others helped me by explaining or correcting. I just try to do the same and lately have been being called a genius and know-it-all on me. I just try to help out like I was, but apparently that's not working for y'all, so I'll just stop.

I have stuff to do, I'll be back later.


Don't let the bullies keep you from anything!! I am grateful for your courteous demeanor!!
Member Since: October 8, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 100
475. Civicane49
11:53 PM GMT on May 22, 2013
Member Since: July 21, 2011 Posts: 83 Comments: 7167
474. Patrap
11:53 PM GMT on May 22, 2013
Quoting KoritheMan:


The strongest I've experienced is an EF1. Louisiana doesn't really get strong tornadoes, at least right near the Gulf Coast. The strongest I've heard of in the general area was an EF2 in western Louisiana spawned by a weakening Hurricane Gustav in 2008.

As you say, it's hard to fathom something stronger.


Before making landfall, Andrew spawned an F3 tornado in Laplace, which killed two people and injuring 32.

Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 428 Comments: 129908
473. HurricaneDean07
11:53 PM GMT on May 22, 2013
Quoting washingtonian115:
Laughable..

Why so Debby downer about this? You're not the type to completely just put down every single post someone says about the forecast the models are showing.
Member Since: October 3, 2010 Posts: 40 Comments: 4129
472. trHUrrIXC5MMX
11:52 PM GMT on May 22, 2013
Quoting Bluestorm5:
Seeing the damage from EF3 tornado, I can't imagine EF4/EF5 damage... hope I never have to see that in North Carolina.


That's what scares me a bit more living in Atlanta metro... higher chances for seeing those. ..

At least in NYC people would have some protection being between those major buildings, a tornado wont easly make it through if at all.
Member Since: April 23, 2011 Posts: 104 Comments: 14873
471. VR46L
11:52 PM GMT on May 22, 2013
Quoting Civicane49:


Oops. Thanks.


Your Welcome !!
Member Since: March 1, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 6998
470. Civicane49
11:51 PM GMT on May 22, 2013
Member Since: July 21, 2011 Posts: 83 Comments: 7167
469. Chucktown
11:51 PM GMT on May 22, 2013
Well, this is certainly good news about the NWS furloughs in response to the tornadoes over the last few days.

Link
Member Since: August 27, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 1785
468. KoritheMan
11:50 PM GMT on May 22, 2013
Quoting Bluestorm5:
Seeing the damage from EF3 tornado, I can't imagine EF4/EF5 damage... hope I never have to see that in North Carolina.


The strongest I've experienced (actually I was at work, but I would have loved to see it from a distance) is an EF1. Louisiana doesn't really get strong tornadoes, at least right near the Gulf Coast. The strongest I've heard of in the general area was an EF2 in western Louisiana spawned by a weakening Hurricane Gustav in 2008.

As you say, it's hard to fathom something stronger.
Member Since: March 7, 2007 Posts: 602 Comments: 21333
467. PedleyCA
11:49 PM GMT on May 22, 2013
Burning Down One Side
Member Since: February 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 6258

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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