Arctic sea ice volume now one-fifth its 1979 level

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:52 AM GMT on February 19, 2013

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The stunning loss of Arctic sea ice extent in recent years is undeniable--satellite measurements have conclusively shown that half of the Arctic sea ice went missing in September 2012, compared to the average September during 1979 - 2000. But the extent of ice cover is not the best measure of how the fire raging in Earth's attic is affecting sea ice--the total volume of the ice is more important. But up until 2010, we didn't have the measurements needed to say how the total volume of ice in the Arctic might be changing. Scientists relied on the University of Washington PIOMAS model, which suggested that the loss of Arctic sea ice volume during September might be approaching 75% - 80%. The model results were widely criticized by climate change skeptics as being unrealistic. However, in April 2010, a new satellite called Cryostat-2 was launched, which can measure ice volume by beaming pulses of microwave energy off of the ice. With two years of data to Cryosat-2 data to analyze, the results of the PIOMAS model have now been confirmed by a study published on-line in February 2013 in Geophysical Research Letters. In a University of Washington news release, co-author Axel Schweiger said, "people had argued that 75 to 80 percent ice volume loss was too aggressive. What this new paper shows is that our ice loss estimates may have been too conservative, and that the recent decline is possibly more rapid." The U.K.'s Natural Environmental Research Council reported that the team of scientists found that from 2003 to 2012, the volume of Arctic sea ice declined 36% in the autumn and 9% in the winter. The measure of sea ice volume is a good indicator of how the Arctic's most stable, "multi-year" ice is fairing. As the multi-year ice declines, sea ice extent, the total area covered by sea ice, in an "Arctic death spiral". The new study shows that thick, multi-year ice has disappeared in areas north of Greenland, around the Canadian Archipelago, and to the northeast of Svalbard, Norway.


Figure 1. Arctic sea ice volume in thousands of cubic kilometers during the September minimum in 1979 compared to 2012, as estimated by the University of Washington PIOMAS model. Arctic seas ice volume has declined by more than a factor of five. Image credit; Andy Lee Robinson.


Figure 2. The Polar-5 aircraft, carrying the EM instrument that was used to validate Cryosat-2 sea ice thickness measurements, flying over the validation site. Image credit: R. Willatt.

Why care about Arctic sea ice loss?
If you remove an area of sea ice 43% the size of the contiguous U.S. from the ocean, like occurred in September 2012, it is guaranteed to have a significant impact on weather and climate. The extra heat and moisture added to the atmosphere as a result of all that open water over the pole may already be altering jet stream patterns in fall and winter, bringing an increase in extreme weather events. The record sea ice loss in 2012 also contributed to an unprecedented melting event in Greenland. Continued sea ice loss will further increase melting from Greenland, contributing to sea level rise and storm surge damages. Sea ice loss will also continue to crank up the thermostat over Arctic permafrost regions. This will potentially release a significant fraction of the vast amounts of carbon currently locked in the permafrost, further accelerating global warming.

Related Posts
Earth's attic is on fire: Arctic sea ice bottoms out at a new record low (September 2012)
Half of the polar ice cap is missing: Arctic sea ice hits a new record low. September 6, 2012 blog post
Wunderground's Sea Ice page
Arctic Death Spiral Bombshell: CryoSat-2 Confirms Sea Ice Volume Has Collapsed by Joe Romm at climateprogress.org.

Jeff Masters and Angela Fritz

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247. ARiot
Quoting bullitt68:
Wait, you mean the climate is changing. We've never had climate change in the past. Yes, that's sarcasm! I remember being scared when I was a kid in the mid 1970's by all the scientists saying we were heading into another ice-age.

Man is a funny species. We give way too much weight to both our intelligence and our stupidity.


If you were scared in the 1970s, it's because the media was irresponsible then, like they are now.

Climate predictions for cooling were in the minority then. Significant minority.

Or perhaps you base your fear on two issues of two news magazines.

http://ams.confex.com/ams/pdfpapers/131047.pdf

"A survey of peer reviewed scientific papers from 1965 to 1979 show that few papers predicted global cooling (7 in total). Significantly more papers (42 in total) predicted global warming (Peterson 2008, link above). The large majority of climate research in the 1970s predicted the Earth would warm as a consequence of CO2."
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Quoting StormHype:
Everytime I look up at the moon and see how it's pocked with 1000s of meteor craters, I'm reminded that man's emissions of CO2 should not be the #1 concern regarding a potential source of serious climate change.
Those craters on the moon--which, by the way, has no atmosphere to slow down impacting objects--were created over billions of years, and the rate of creation has dropped precipitously over those years. Which is to say, most lunar craters are hundreds of millions, if not billions, of years old.

Last week's Russian bolide was a once-in-a-century event, and extinction-level impacts happen once every 25 to 100 million years or so. Bottom line, then: the chances that civilization will be greatly disrupted by a cosmic impact in an average lifetime is about 1-in-1.5 million. But the odds that civilization will be greatly disrupted by climate change in that same average lifetime are roughly 1-in-1.
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245. ARiot
Quoting yonzabam:



There are two main consequences of Arctic Ocean ice melt.

Firstly, there is a positive feedback effect due to reduced albedo. This will increase the rate of global warming.

Secondly, it will alter climate in the northern hemisphere, mainly due to changes in jet stream activity. This is already happening, and reduced snow cover on land also contributes to this.

A warmer Arctic means the temperature contrast between Arctic and temperate latitude air is diminished. The jet stream weakens, as a result. When the jet stream weakens, its meandering loops travel further south, creating all sorts of mayhem.

An unusually southerly jet stream caused both the record Russan heatwave and Pakistani floods in 2010. It's currently causing the US drought and record rainfall here in the UK.

The jet stream causes atmospheric instability, so it might also be contributing to recent increased tornado activity in the US.


I don't know with what certianty science can predict future weather patterns based on periods of ice-free artic. The reply above is a good summary of what observations have indicated recently though.

The instability associated with perhaps months of ice-free arctic conditions has the potential to "load the weather dice" just like AGW loads the climate dice.

If the "five hundred year" type storms become "once a decade storms", for example, it will be a significant economic and humanitarian burden.
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National Snow and Ice Data Center - Frequently Asked Questions on Arctic sea ice

Has the Arctic Ocean always had ice in summer?

We know for sure that at least in the distant past, the Arctic was ice-free. Fossils from the age of the dinosaurs, 65 million years ago, indicate a temperate climate with ferns and other lush vegetation.

Based on the paleoclimate record from ice and ocean cores, the last warm period in the Arctic peaked about 8,000 years ago, during the so-called
Holocene Thermal Maximum. Some studies suggest that as recent as 5,500 years ago, the Arctic had less summertime sea ice than today. However, it is not clear that the Arctic was completely free of summertime sea ice during this time.

The next earliest era when the Arctic was quite possibly free of summertime ice was 125,000 years ago, during the height of the last major interglacial period, known as the Eemian. Temperatures in the Arctic were higher than now and sea level was also 4 to 6 meters (13 to 20 feet) higher than it is today because the Greenland and Antarctic ice
sheets had partly melted. Because of the burning of fossil fuels, global averaged temperatures today are getting close to the maximum warmth seen during the Eemian. Carbon dioxide levels now are far above the highest levels during the Eemian, indicating there is still warming to come.

--------------------------------

So we have past incidents where the Arctic was either ice free or nearly ice free. Both events are a blink of an eye in the past geologically.

Yet somehow a reduction in Arctic Ocean ice coverage now is proof of AGW, even though past events have happened without human influences.
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Everytime I look up at the moon and see how it's pocked with 1000s of meteor craters, I'm reminded that man's emissions of CO2 should not be the #1 concern regarding a potential source of serious climate change.
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Too funny, I was just commenting on how slow the rain was in getting here and I just heard sprinkles and went out and it is raining lightly. I opened the radar to see if there was any image and there is only one spot on the whole display and it is over me.

Member Since: February 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 4929
good effort but the ground hog has been wrong. winter has not let go of her gnarley teeth
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The record sea ice loss in 2012 also contributed to an unprecedented melting event in Greenland.
From your own hotlink to your own previous blog post:

Interestingly, ice core records show that in 1889, a similar pronounced melt event occurred at the top of the Greenland Ice Sheet, and such events occur naturally about every 150 years.

How is the melting event unprecedented when, from your own hotlink, a similar event happened in 1889 and such events occur naturally about every 150 years?

This is the problem I have with a lot of climate alarmism - there are natural, clearly not human-caused analogous events for many of the cited events and trends within recorded human history, let alone geological history.
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I don't deny global warming. I also haven't seen enough politically unbiased evidence that it's *primarily* caused by man, and not some natural long-term cycle.

Even so, Obama's cap-and-trade plans can't do anything significant to affect it in proportion to how much misery it will bring to the people of the US. $10 gas and $2K annual increase in family electricity costs are his own accepted numbers for the impacts of it. You won't be able to blame a Bush for this one either.
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Quoting LargoFl:
ok so What happens IF..all the artic Ice melts??...............It looks like the Arctic ice will melt sooner than computer models had predicted. At the current rate of melting the arctic ice will melt by 2030 at the latest. How will this affect our lives?

The answer is that it might not have a devastating impact.


Sea level rise is not the only devastating impact climate change will have.

Temeprature differences between airmasses drive weather. When you make an alteration to the climate that affects those temperature differences, you will alter the weather patterns. This can result in droughts, floods, and more extreme weather events. If these occur in critical areas (such as the US Midwest) you can be sure the effects will be quite devastating.

Also, the gulf stream shutting down isn't going to happen from and ice free arctic, nor will shutting it down bring on an ice age. It would have a regional impact (northern Europe), but even then it would only really affect the winters (making them colder and drier).
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Quoting yonzabam:



There are two main consequences of Arctic Ocean ice melt.

Firstly, there is a positive feedback effect due to reduced albedo. This will increase the rate of global warming.

Secondly, it will alter climate in the northern hemisphere, mainly due to changes in jet stream activity. This is already happening, and reduced snow cover on land also contributes to this.

A warmer Arctic means the temperature contrast between Arctic and temperate latitude air is diminished. The jet stream weakens, as a result. When the jet stream weakens, its meandering loops travel further south, creating all sorts of mayhem.

An unusually southerly jet stream caused both the record Russan heatwave and Pakistani floods in 2010. It's currently causing the US drought and record rainfall here in the UK.

The jet stream causes atmospheric instability, so it might also be contributing to recent increased tornado activity in the US.


Very clear explanation, Yonzabam, thank you.

BTW, google has a really beautiful animation on it's entry site today (if you forget that it means the whole planetary system would circle around google, lol).
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..WIKI..The Pingualuit Crater formerly called Chubb Crater and later New Quebec Crater, is a young impact crater, by geological standards, located in the Ungava Peninsula of Quebec, Canada. It is 3.44 km (2.14 mi) in diameter, and is estimated to be 1.4 ± 0.1 million years old (Pleistocene).

The crater is exposed to the surface, rising 160 m (520 ft) above the surrounding tundra and is 400 m (1,300 ft) deep. A 267 m (876 ft) deep Pingualuk Lake fills the depression, and is one of the deepest lakes in North America. The lake also holds some of the purest fresh water in the world, with a salinity level of less than 3 ppm (the salinity level of the Great Lakes is 500 ppm). The lake has no inlets or apparent outlets, so the water accumulates solely from rain and snow and is only lost through evaporation. In terms of transparency, it is one of most transparent lakes in the world, with Secchi disk visible more than 35 m deep.
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EXTENDED FORECAST DISCUSSION
NWS HYDROMETEOROLOGICAL PREDICTION CENTER COLLEGE PARK MD
1049 AM EST TUE FEB 19 2013

VALID 12Z FRI FEB 22 2013 - 12Z TUE FEB 26 2013

...WET AND ACTIVE WEATHER PATTERN TO CONTINUE ACROSS THE US...

THE DAY 4-5 SYSTEM INTENSIFYING OUT WEST IN THE GREAT
BASIN...APPEARS TO EJECT SEVERAL SHORTWAVES NORTHEASTWARD INTO THE
CENTRAL PLAINS...AND THE DETERMINISTIC THICKNESS/TEMPERATURE
FIELDS DO NOT SUPPORT A 'LONE' OR SINGLE (VERTICALLY-STACKED)
CYCLONE. RATHER A COMPLEX 'TROWAL'...AND TRIPLE POINT LOW
STRUCTURE. ONE THAT EJECTS AND INTENSIFIES AN ADDITIONAL SHORTWAVE
AND SURFACE WAVE ACROSS THE SOUTHEAST AND INTO THE CAROLINAS
BETWEEN DAYS 6-7. THE 'TROWAL' STRUCTURE IS DEPICTED ON THE
SURFACE GRAPHICS AS A COMPLEX OCCLUSION...WITH THE PRIMARY WAVE
EMERGING ACROSS THE PIEDMONT REPRESENTING SOMETHING THAT PATTERNS
ITSELF MORE LIKE A NEGATIVELY-TILTED TROUGH.


VOJTESAK
Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 13460
Stacking up, Yesterday. Reno, NV:

Uploaded by: catilac:

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Sunset splits the Sidney Lanier Bridge in Brunswick, Ga.

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12Z GFS..till 120 hours-precip map

Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 13460
Quoting RitaEvac:
Nice day at the Kemah Boardwalk along Galveston Bay. How bout some Bubba Gump?



Galveston Island Pleasure Pier in distance




I had to Google WTH Budda Gump was. Never heard of that. Heard of Andy Gump and was sure they weren't related. There are a few out here
according to Google. May have to try this place.

Storm is not here yet. Taking its sweet time. Now they say this afternoon into evening. Currently 53.3 here. PWS up the hill is 50°, Airport is 51°.
Member Since: February 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 4929
12z CMC precip map-WOW!







Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 13460
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Quoting LargoFl:
ok so What happens IF..all the artic Ice melts??...............It looks like the Arctic ice will melt sooner than computer models had predicted. At the current rate of melting the arctic ice will melt by 2030 at the latest. How will this affect our lives?

The answer is that it might not have a devastating impact. This is because arctic ice is floating. This means that the volume of water will not change considerably. There won’t be big increases in sea levels due to the ice in the arctic turning into water. However, the release of massive fresh amounts of water into the northern ocean will dilute the salinity of the water. The movie, The Day Before Yesterday predicts that this loss of salinity will cause the warming gulf stream to stop and many parts of Northern Europe and Northern America will quickly become ice – perma ice. Scientists are not unanimous in their adherence to this hypothesis.

The bigger problem will be when and if the glaciers melt in Greenland and on Antarctica in the South. This is ice on land and if it melts will greatly raise water levels. If all the ice melted the sea levels around the world would rise between 175 and 225 feet. About a third of the world’s land mass would disappear. The Maldives would disappear, New York would disappear, no more beach parties in Thailand, no more Fiji, the Netherlands would go, much of England would vanish. 60% of the world’s population live on the coast so it is easy to see the extent of the tragedy that would unfold. It would be like a Biblical flood.

For the places which survive the weather would become much warmer; many species would die out and ecosystems would go out of balance. Those that survive will not have a life style like we enjoy today.



There are two main consequences of Arctic Ocean ice melt.

Firstly, there is a positive feedback effect due to reduced albedo. This will increase the rate of global warming.

Secondly, it will alter climate in the northern hemisphere, mainly due to changes in jet stream activity. This is already happening, and reduced snow cover on land also contributes to this.

A warmer Arctic means the temperature contrast between Arctic and temperate latitude air is diminished. The jet stream weakens, as a result. When the jet stream weakens, its meandering loops travel further south, creating all sorts of mayhem.

An unusually southerly jet stream caused both the record Russan heatwave and Pakistani floods in 2010. It's currently causing the US drought and record rainfall here in the UK.

The jet stream causes atmospheric instability, so it might also be contributing to recent increased tornado activity in the US.
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PR Actual conditions... Beautiful ongoing N/NW surfing / high swell conditions...





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Wait, you mean the climate is changing. We've never had climate change in the past. Yes, that's sarcasm! I remember being scared when I was a kid in the mid 1970's by all the scientists saying we were heading into another ice-age.

Man is a funny species. We give way too much weight to both our intelligence and our stupidity.
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Quoting spbloom:

That's great news. I had really cut down on my visits here because of the troll problem.

...............

Trolls are never useful, but some of the climate change deniers and skeptics on here have served a real purpose: When other people come back with counter-arguments, links to scientific studies, explanations of why the skeptic's statement is wrong, and so on - you provide a lot of information and education to us lurkers and less-knowledgeable people out here. I've learned a lot since I started to read this blog six months ago. Thanks, guys.
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Quoting AlwaysThinkin:


You're welcome. When you consider the people who deal with it on the front end are the people who live next to coal plants and refineries deal with pollution (Ozone) on the front end and the people who deal with the pollution (Greenhouse Gases) on the back end are often times the ones to receive the smallest benefit of their production it makes ya kind of sick.


Please do not forget or leave out the mercury coming out of the coal fired plants also.

I think a lot of progress has been made in the last 10? years to reduce the mercury, but I am not sure how much. A significant amount of the mercury in Devils Lake is attributed to the coal fired power plants up wind from the lake.

The following EPA study states that man versus natural occurring mercury is about 2:1 from a airborne pollution point of view.

http://water.epa.gov/lawsregs/lawsguidance/cwa/tm dl/mercury/upload/2009_01_08_tmdl_mercury_pdf_devi lslakefinalreport.pdf
Link

http://nd.water.usgs.gov/pubs/wri/wri034078/pdf/w ri034078.pdf
Link
Methylmercury, which is produced by methylation of inorganic mercury, is a potent form of organic mercury and is
among the most toxic and widespread contaminants affecting the Nation’s aquatic ecosystems (Brumbaugh and others,
2001). Methylation and bioaccumulation of mercury pose toxicological risks to both fish (Wiener and Spry, 1996) and
humans (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1997). Because of serious concerns about methylmercury toxicity, the
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently reduced the recommended standard for methylmercury in fish tissue from
0.5 milligram per kilogram to 0.3 milligram per kilogram (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, accessed February 8,
2001). Methylmercury contamination also has caused many states, including North Dakota, to issue fish-consumption advisories.
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beautiful day around here today thank goodness
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What's gonna happen?
In our lifetimes, the oceans will likely continue to rise. Although they are getting higher, the rate is relatively slowly. Unless your house is literally on the ocean or you live on an isolated island, the change will be rather insignificant. Computer models estimate that ocean levels will rise about 20 inches between now and 2100. That's a long way away and we have plenty of time to prepare. 20 inches may not be a lot on the big scheme of things, but that would put some metropolitan areas in danger of losing parts of their cities. Places like New York City along lower Manhattan, who are currently on dry land, would be under water by then.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
After disagreeing since the Day 8 Outlook...Kerr and I have come into agreement regarding Thursday. The NAM has trended towards slightly more instability despite a very spatially challenged warm sector. Extremely favorable wind shear and a less stable atmosphere than previously thought, coupled with marginal lapse rates should allow the development of supercells across central Louisiana Thursday afternoon. With low-level shear near 60 knots from the south and mid-level shear near 60-70 knots from the southwest, conditions will be favorable for rotating storms. In addition, with large, looping hodographs and Effective Storm Relative Helicity values (both at 0-1km and 0-3km) over 450 m2/s2, there is a good chance we see a few strong to significant tornadoes. Thermodynamics are not all that indifferent to the system that eventually spawned the EF4 Hattiesburg tornado.



This won't be a massive outbreak geographically, however, the parameters that will be present on Thursday are simply insane. A relatively small area will be in the threat, but the threat in this area is very high - A moderate risk for tornadoes is more or less the likely outcome come tomorrow's 16z outlook from the SPC.

TOR:CON should also be raised IMO for Louisiana and Mississippi. A value of at least 5 should be created.

This could end up being very similar, as you said, to the Hattiesburg setup last week. Hopefully this time no big towns are hit.
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ok so What happens IF..all the artic Ice melts??...............It looks like the Arctic ice will melt sooner than computer models had predicted. At the current rate of melting the arctic ice will melt by 2030 at the latest. How will this affect our lives?

The answer is that it might not have a devastating impact. This is because arctic ice is floating. This means that the volume of water will not change considerably. There won’t be big increases in sea levels due to the ice in the arctic turning into water. However, the release of massive fresh amounts of water into the northern ocean will dilute the salinity of the water. The movie, The Day Before Yesterday predicts that this loss of salinity will cause the warming gulf stream to stop and many parts of Northern Europe and Northern America will quickly become ice – perma ice. Scientists are not unanimous in their adherence to this hypothesis.

The bigger problem will be when and if the glaciers melt in Greenland and on Antarctica in the South. This is ice on land and if it melts will greatly raise water levels. If all the ice melted the sea levels around the world would rise between 175 and 225 feet. About a third of the world’s land mass would disappear. The Maldives would disappear, New York would disappear, no more beach parties in Thailand, no more Fiji, the Netherlands would go, much of England would vanish. 60% of the world’s population live on the coast so it is easy to see the extent of the tragedy that would unfold. It would be like a Biblical flood.

For the places which survive the weather would become much warmer; many species would die out and ecosystems would go out of balance. Those that survive will not have a life style like we enjoy today.
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FLZ041-044-144-192115-
INLAND VOLUSIA-NORTHERN LAKE-SOUTHERN LAKE-
INCLUDING THE CITIES OF...DE LAND...LEESBURG...CLERMONT
1015 AM EST TUE FEB 19 2013

THIS AFTERNOON
PARTLY SUNNY. HIGHS IN THE UPPER 70S. SOUTHWEST
WINDS 10 TO 15 MPH.

TONIGHT
PARTLY CLOUDY WITH A SLIGHT CHANCE OF SHOWERS. LOWS IN
THE LOWER 50S. SOUTHWEST WINDS AROUND 5 MPH BECOMING NORTHWEST
5 TO 10 MPH AFTER MIDNIGHT. CHANCE OF RAIN 20 PERCENT.

WEDNESDAY
PARTLY SUNNY. HIGHS IN THE LOWER 70S. NORTH WINDS
5 TO 10 MPH.

WEDNESDAY NIGHT
PARTLY CLOUDY. LOWS IN THE UPPER 40S.
NORTHEAST WINDS AROUND 5 MPH.

THURSDAY
PARTLY SUNNY. HIGHS IN THE UPPER 70S. NORTHEAST WINDS
5 TO 10 MPH BECOMING EAST IN THE AFTERNOON.

THURSDAY NIGHT
PARTLY CLOUDY. MILDER. LOWS AROUND 60.

FRIDAY
PARTLY CLOUDY. HIGHS IN THE LOWER 80S.

FRIDAY NIGHT
PARTLY CLOUDY. LOWS IN THE MID 60S.

SATURDAY
PARTLY CLOUDY. HIGHS IN THE MID 80S.

SATURDAY NIGHT
PARTLY CLOUDY. LOWS IN THE MID 60S.

SUNDAY
CONSIDERABLE CLOUDINESS WITH A CHANCE OF SHOWERS. HIGHS
IN THE MID 80S. CHANCE OF RAIN 30 PERCENT.

SUNDAY NIGHT
CONSIDERABLE CLOUDINESS WITH A CHANCE OF SHOWERS.
LOWS IN THE LOWER 60S. CHANCE OF RAIN 30 PERCENT.

MONDAY
PARTLY CLOUDY WITH A SLIGHT CHANCE OF SHOWERS. HIGHS IN
THE UPPER 70S. CHANCE OF RAIN 20 PERCENT.
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Quoting AlwaysThinkin:


Ask them about the Climate Justice Initiative.


THANK YOU for providing that..I will surely pass this along for discussion..

I also wonder though why the state chapters dont carry this initiative on their websites...couldnt list them all but since Texas is one of those drought stricken states and NY recently hit by Sandy, I would assume they would be leading the charge but nothing?

Texas

NC

Florida

New Jersey


NY

California



Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 13460
http://www.npr.org/2013/02/19/171832641/forecasting -climate-with-a-chance-of-backlash
Link

The following poll was linked to from the above NPR article. Can any of you weather Geeks expand on how many of the weathercastors in the poll are 4 year (or more) trained Meteorologists?

I have a friend who is a professor of meteorology at the University of North Dakota. We were discussing climate change about a week back. I told him that Dr. Roy Spencer (on his web site) claimed that there were a lot of meteorologists in the closet; IE "non-believers in climate change". My friend laughed and said "for the 100's that do not believe, there are 1000's that do". I believe my friend is referencing 4 year (or more) trained mets.

http://www.climatechangecommunication.org/images/ files/2011_Mason_AMS_NWA_Weathercaster_Survey_Repo rt_NA_doc_pdf%281%29.pdf
Link

All broadcast TV members of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and the National Weather
Association (NWA) were surveyed using a web-based method and member email lists provided by the
two professional associations.


I know a couple of the Mets' that work for the National Weather Service in Grand Forks (former students of my friend). When I ask them about climate change "things" they tend to "duck the issue". When pressed on why, it comes down to not wanting to put up with the "flack they might get", and also, it is a complex topic, and they quickly lose people who do not have a strong grounding in science and physics.
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Re: #210 -- thanks, Barbamz!!
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Quoting kwgirl:
Thank you for that link. Yes, I imagine that Climate Change will disproportionately affect the poorer citizens of our world, whatever race they may be. When the Keys are underwater, I don't think anyone is going to pay me enough money for my property so I can relocate. I already told my daughter to start looking for higher land for relocation.


You're welcome. When you consider the people who deal with it on the front end are the people who live next to coal plants and refineries deal with pollution (Ozone) on the front end and the people who deal with the pollution (Greenhouse Gases) on the back end are often times the ones to receive the smallest benefit of their production it makes ya kind of sick.
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Quoting GeorgiaStormz:
SOMEBODY BUY ME A BOAT!!!


I'M just jesting, my house isn't even in a flood zone.... Even if it rained 2 feet, I wouldn't be susceptible to a flood....although areas around me might have problems:




HAHAHAHA!!! Stay safe GeorgiaStormz!
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Quoting barbamz:


Great pics, thank you Karen. Actually I'm really a fan of your island and its volcanos (not only since Eyjafallajoekull gave us some calm days near our airport in Frankfurt, lol). Moreover I've read nearly every of the hundreds of thrillers, staging in Iceland, which are very popular in Germany. I sometimes wonder in respect to all those "murders" whether there still is anybody alive in Iceland, lol (you are fortunately). But in reality it's a quite peaceful community in Iceland, as far as I know.

But to stay near topic, here is the weather service of Iceland.


Yeah, vedur.is is great. What other country's weather service's main page also has a recent-earthquake report map, a volcano report page, and a northern lights forecast? ;)

Oh, and here's our actual murder rate - link. ;) Some years there's not even one! We've got one of the lowest in the world, even on a per-capita basis. Now, back in the good 'ol days, that was a different story ;)
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Quoting OrchidGrower:
Re: #205 above, looks like a problem with the link; trying this as plain text:

http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/ animal_forecast/2013/02/ocean_acidification_and_oy sters_shellfish_are_already_suffering_1.html



Try it this way.
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Quoting JTDailyUpdate:
rel="nofollow">Link
Quick Excerpt from the Article:

Bogdan, who will travel to Australia in coming weeks for talks on the F-35 Lightning II, said the aircraft was ironically unable to fly within 40 km (25 miles) of a lightning storm because its fuel tanks could ignite.
"Will this problem occur in the future? No, because we have the known fixes for it and we will fix it," he said.


I read that as 'Bogan, who will travel to Australia' and thought oh that poor man if he only knew why people snickered when he told them his last name was Bogan. Funny thing is too that in White Lightning the Arkansas county they were running moonshine through was called Bogan County.
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Quoting AlwaysThinkin:


Ask them about the Climate Justice Initiative.
Thank you for that link. Yes, I imagine that Climate Change will disproportionately affect the poorer citizens of our world, whatever race they may be. When the Keys are underwater, I don't think anyone is going to pay me enough money for my property so I can relocate. I already told my daughter to start looking for higher land for relocation.
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Re: #205 above, looks like a problem with the link; trying this as plain text:

http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/ animal_forecast/2013/02/ocean_acidification_and_oy sters_shellfish_are_already_suffering_1.html

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Quoting ncstorm:


Just my opinion..I will be sure to ask at the next NAACP chapter meeting that I attend this friday if MLK was alive today would he be serving an agenda of climate change?..I will let you know what they say.



Ask them about the Climate Justice Initiative.
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Great article on Slate today about how increased ocean acidification from increased CO2 is threatening all shellfish, to the point that the clam and oyster industries have had to make some major changes.

http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/ animal_forecast/2013/02/ocean_acidification_and_oy sters_shellfish_are_already_suffering_1.html

(Very new at posting links so hope I did this right!)
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so true.
a tornado will affect a small area, but the drought hurts us all.

Quoting washingtonian115:
If they don't want to get a really terrible drought like Texas did two years ago then they batter take some tornados then.Hey at least it comes with benificial rain..
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Quoting KarenRei:


Haha, everyone always forgets about Iceland, it's okay ;) Cool that you know Iceland, though - if you know the areas, I live in Hafnarfj%uFFFDr%uFFFDur but am looking to buy land to build in Mosfellsdalur

Nothing much to report on the weather here lately - sometimes it's quite crazy, but the forecast is just more "drizzly and unseasonably warm". Thankfully no more storms like the one that ripped a body panel off my car a month ago ;)


Great pics, thank you Karen. Actually I'm really a fan of your island and its volcanos (not only since Eyjafallajoekull gave us some calm days near our airport in Frankfurt, lol). Moreover I've read nearly every of the hundreds of thrillers, staging in Iceland, which are very popular in Germany. I sometimes wonder in respect to all those "murders" whether there still is anybody alive in Iceland, lol (you are fortunately). But in reality it's a quite peaceful community in Iceland, as far as I know.

But to stay near topic, here is the weather service of Iceland.
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SENIOR DUTY METEOROLOGIST NWS ADMINISTRATIVE MESSAGE
NWS NCEP CENTRAL OPERATIONS COLLEGE PARK MD
1328Z TUE FEB 19 2013

12Z NAM RAOB RECAP...

72645/GRB - 10142.
72776/TFX - 10142.
78866/SXM - 10142.
78073/NAS - 10142.
91408/ROR - MISSING PART A.


CRITICAL WEATHER DAY STATUS...

CWD WILL BEGIN TONIGHT AT 20/0000Z AND IS EXPECTED TO
EXPIRE AT 22/1200Z.. A DEVELOPING STRONG WINTER STORM IS EXPECTED
TO IMPACT MUCH OF THE CENTRAL PLAINS AND THIS SYSTEM HAS THE
POTENTIAL ALSO TO BRING HEAVY RAINFALL AND SEVERE WEATHER ACROSS
PORTIONS OF LA/MS. A THREAT OF FREEZING RAIN AND MIXED WINTER
PRECIP WILL ALSO EXIST ACROSS PORTIONS OF MO/AR DURING THE CWD
PERIOD.


NWS CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN REGIONS... NCF..TOC AND NCEP WILL
PARTICIPATE IN THIS CWD TO CONTINUE TO PROVIDE RELIABLE FLOW OF
DATA AND RESOURCES TO NWS OFFICES DURING THIS EVENT.


NEWBY/SDM/NCO/NCEP
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 109 Comments: 30268
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

It'll help in the long range.


Yeah, by the time a spring airmass is permantently forced over the SE by the seasonal changes, it'll help....
That wont be till April...
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Quoting ncstorm:
00z CMC-precip map..Looks like flooding may be the upcoming news story for the next two weeks..back to work!







This IS the CMC we've talking about.
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Quoting pottery:

Thanks.
In June/July, we will be planting out about 100 trees on lands around here. Abandoned sugarcane lands.
We expect about 25% of them to get to the point where they will become real trees in a couple of years. It's an ongoing project, and the problem is grass-fires at this time of year.

Cant stop a fire in 6' grass when the wind is 15-20 mph......


Very interesting, Pottery! Is this tree planting specifically to kill off the fire-hazard grass, or for the usual host of environmental benefits? What kind of trees (or do you know)?

I ask because I'm foresting my lot in largely treeless Cape Coral -- a lot I bought for its size and because it was barren. I have many kinds of trees now, but am always interested in what others are planting.
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Quoting GeorgiaStormz:


And bad for my severe wx.

It'll help in the long range.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 109 Comments: 30268
00z CMC-precip map..Looks like flooding may be the upcoming news story for the next two weeks..back to work!







Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 13460

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About JeffMasters

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.