Wild weather week ends; Mississippi River rises out of danger zone

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:44 PM GMT on February 01, 2013

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One of the most unusual weeks of January weather in U.S. history has drawn to a close, and residents of the Southeast are cleaning up after a ferocious 2-day outbreak of severe weather. NWS damage surveys have found that at least 42 tornadoes touched down on January 29 - 30, making it the 3rd largest January tornado outbreak since records began in 1950. Here are the largest January tornado outbreaks since 1950:

129 1/21 - 1/22 1999
50 1/7 - 1/8 2008
42 1/29 - 1/30 2013
40 1/9 1/10 1975

As wunderground's Angela Fritz wrote in her blog today, the powerful tornado that ripped through Adairsville, Georgia, northwest of Atlanta, at 11:19 am EST Thursday morning, killing one person, has been rated a high-end EF-3 with 160 mph winds. At least seven other tornadoes in the outbreak were EF-2s. Damaging winds reports for the 2-day period numbered 597, the highest 2-day January total since NOAA's Storm Prediction Center (SPC) began tabulating these in 2000. The severe weather outbreak was fueled an air mass that set many all-time January records for warmth and moisture, as detailed by our weather historian, Christopher C. Burt, in his latest post, A Wild Ride Weather-wise for the Eastern Half of the U.S. the past Four Days.


Figure 1. Damage to the Daiki Corporation factory in Adairsville, GA, after the January 30, 2013 EF-3 tornado. Image credit: Dr. Greg Forbes, TWC.


Figure 2. Severe weather reports for the month of January; 597 reports of damaging winds were recorded January 29 - 30. Image credit: NOAA/SPC.

Mississippi River rising
This week's storm brought widespread rains of 1 - 2" to Missouri and Illinois, along the drainage basin of the stretch of the Mississippi River that was so low as to threaten to stop barge traffic. Happily, the rains have caused the river to rise by more than seven feet over the past week, along the stretch from St. Louis to Thebes, Illinois. Thanks to this much-needed bump in river levels, plus the future run-off that will occur from the snows that have accumulated in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Iowa, I expect no potential low water closures of the Mississippi until June at the earliest. According to today's newly-released Drought Monitor, though, the area of the contiguous U.S. in moderate or greater drought remained unchanged at 58% this week. It will be dry across the core of the drought region for at least the next week; the GFS model is predicting that the next chance of significant precipitation for the drought region will be Saturday, February 9. Don't bet on this happening, though, since the model has been inconsistent with its handling of the storm. The drought has killed hundreds of thousands of trees across the Midwest, and many more will succumb during the next few years. According to Brian Fuchs, a climatologist with the National Drought Mitigation Center, drought was present in at least isolated spots in all 50 states of the U.S. for the first time in history during 2012.


Figure 3. The water level in the Mississippi River at St. Louis was at -4' early this week, just above the all-time record low of -6.2' set in 1940. However, rains from this week's storm have raised water levels by seven feet. Image credit: NOAA/HPC.


Figure 4. The liquid equivalent of melting all the snow on the ground present on February 1, 2013. Widespread amounts of water equivalent to 0.39" - 2" of rain are present over Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Iowa, which is near average for this time of year. When this snow melts, it will raise the level of the Mississippi River and aid barge navigation. Image credit: NOAA/National Operational Hydrologic Remote Sensing Center.

Links
Adairsville Tornado Recap, Photos, and Video from Angela Fritz

A Wild Ride Weather-wise for the Eastern Half of the U.S. the past Four Days by wunderground's weather historian, Christopher C. Burt.

Tornado Expert Sees "Staggering" Damage in Georgia



Have a great Groundhog's Day and Super Sunday, everyone!

Jeff Masters

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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
Remember to always take shelter in a car during a tornado. They're the safest place you could possibly be.



I have never heard that from anyone... if I ever did... I forgot


That is not safe either TA...!!
Member Since: April 23, 2011 Posts: 104 Comments: 14873
Remember to always take shelter in a car during a tornado. They're the safest place you could possibly be.

Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32249
I also think an ice age is coming.

Climate progress:
Manmade Carbon Pollution Has Already Put Us On Track For 69 Feet Of Sea Level Rise
By Joe Romm on Feb 1, 2013 at 12:27 pm

The bad news is that we’re all but certain to end up with a coastline at least this flooded (20 meters or 69 feet):



The “good” news is that this might take 1000 to 2000 years (or longer), and the choices we make now can affect the rate of rise and whether we blow past 69 feet to beyond 200 feet.

“The natural state of the Earth with present carbon dioxide levels is one with sea levels about 70 feet higher than now.”


Read more here.
Member Since: October 17, 2006 Posts: 60 Comments: 1298
Cleaned everyone off mine end of last year. Well except....
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Quoting Wyote:
A pleasure adding yoboi to the ignore list. poof!


I can't even remember how long he's been in mine.
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356. Wyote
A pleasure adding yoboi to the ignore list. poof!
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Today had fun in my little brother party. The best of all he have a lot of fun with his friends. :)
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353. Skyepony (Mod)
91P was a short lived invest today. NAVY has taken it down already.
Member Since: August 10, 2005 Posts: 172 Comments: 38111
I was looking for a big sat pic of Hurricane Sandy...this is what I saw as i was scrolling down

Member Since: April 23, 2011 Posts: 104 Comments: 14873
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Definitely.


TA... you know what my answer to that is!!!
Member Since: April 23, 2011 Posts: 104 Comments: 14873
Quoting trHUrrIXC5MMX:


I just noticed you put this up..

I need some big weather here... tired of this crappy stuff. Im a bit nuts you might think

Definitely.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32249
Quoting SFLWeatherman:
312hr


I just noticed you put this up..

I need some big weather here... tired of this crappy stuff. Im a bit nuts you might think
Member Since: April 23, 2011 Posts: 104 Comments: 14873
Quoting Doppler22:
Its been snowing for 5 hours now... have around an inch and its expected to continue till tomorrow,But I think PENNDOT is sleeping because the roads are horrible

I got between 2.5-3" of snow today from one clipper system. More snow is expected tomorrow, Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday. So far, the main roads are doing pretty good in my area. Of course, the side streets are snow covered.
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Its been snowing for 5 hours now... have around an inch and its expected to continue till tomorrow,But I think PENNDOT is sleeping because the roads are horrible
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Quoting Neapolitan:
But the thing is, he's wrong. There is no imminent cooling; there is no ice age coming. Those 3.4 million tonnes of CO2 we humans pump into the atmosphere every hour of every day are vastly overwhelming any potentially offsetting natural or manmade cooling factors. At this point, it would take something catastrophic to keep us from the intolerably warm place we seem to be headed--say, a massive asteroid strike, a large and long-lasting supervolcano eruption, or an all-out global thermonuclear war. And those are, of course, GW "cures" that would be far worse than the disease itself.

No, rather than hang our hopes on some fantasy cooldown ala Dr. Marsh, we'd be much wiser to figure out a way to kick our addiction to fossil fuels.


And fast, sil vous plait. We need an intervention. :-)
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344. VR46L
Quoting nymore:
Why don't you all take this nonsense over to Ricky's Blog where it belongs. TIA


Guess there is noone there to beat up today ...LOL
Member Since: March 1, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 6927
Why don't you all take this nonsense over to Ricky's Blog where it belongs. TIA
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Quoting LargoFl:
for NEO and those who think no ice age is coming...
Here's one for you:

SIV

...and another:

SIV
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Quoting CaicosRetiredSailor:


I want to know what weather tools Phil uses to predict weather... He nails it 80% of the time or 4 out of 5 times
Member Since: April 23, 2011 Posts: 104 Comments: 14873
BLADENBORO, NC

train derails
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339. Skyepony (Mod)
Quoting LargoFl:
for NEO and those who think no ice age is coming......


2008 & 2013 both show remarkable refreeze because we had remarkable melts the summer before. The year the Arctic completely melts you will see that chart get even higher. The more ice that melts in summer leads to a greater area refreezing from mid Sept to end of Jan due to the effects of winter. That graph in no way shows an impending ice age.

For all the extra gain this winter it is still below average. Arctic sea ice death spiral still on..
Member Since: August 10, 2005 Posts: 172 Comments: 38111
Quoting LargoFl:
for NEO and those who think no ice age is coming......

Oh give me a break. All you've shown is that ice has been refreezing over a larger area the last several years... of course it does when you start with a substantially larger area of open ocean.

The article about ice ages you posted earlier is particularly weak on the scientific substance, maybe a bit heavy on hyperbole. About the only thing scientific they mention is that eventually, in the future sometime, GHG levels will drop and will no longer be able to stop the typical ice age/interglacial cycle. That isn't an unreasonable statement, but we are taking thousands of years. Yes, thousands of years before 1) humans run out of fossil fuels or stop using fossil fuels and 2) the natural carbon cycle pulls CO2 out of the atmosphere and back into rock & oceans. Then the inertia of the oceans will be hundreds of years behind that. By the time all is said and done, we are talking slow, geologic time scales far into the future and almost imperceptible by man.

Meanwhile, the elephant in the room is a climate change - occurring right now - an order of magnitude faster....
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Quoting Neapolitan:
But the thing is, he's wrong. There is no imminent cooling; there is no ice age coming. Those 3.4 million tonnes of CO2 we humans pump into the atmosphere every hour of every day are vastly overwhelming any potentially offsetting natural or manmade cooling factors. At this point, it would take something catastrophic to keep us from the intolerably warm place we seem to be headed--say, a massive asteroid strike, a large and long-lasting supervolcano eruption, or an all-out global thermonuclear war. And those are, of course, GW "cures" that would be far worse than the disease itself.

No, rather than hang our hopes on some fantasy cooldown ala Dr. Marsh, we'd be much wiser to figure out a way to kick our addiction to fossil fuels.


start with your computer and turn it off..:)
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History & Almanac
Max Temperature: Min Temperature:
Normal 66 F 44 F
Record 87 F (1995) 27 F (1946)


Today's State Extremes
State Highs:
Riverside 89F
Santee 80F
Camp Pendleton 80F
Thermal 79F
Fullerton 79F

State Lows:
Truckee-Tahoe 17F
South Lake Tahoe 21F
Alturas 21F
Montague 21F
Big Bear City 26F

I will be laughing tomorrow when this is declared a record temperature on the TV news. I am 2 miles from this station (KRAL) and I got 73.8 as a max.
It was even worse yesterday as they said it was 96 and it was flagged as a record. Yesterdays high here was 75.8 Who verifies these temps. This is the official NWS station for the city Scary isn't it.
Member Since: February 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 5893
Extract from:-
327. Neapolitan
Hoping its copyright free?

"No, rather than hang our hopes on some fantasy cooldown ala Dr. Marsh, we'd be much wiser to figure out a way to kick our addiction to fossil fuels"

Nea, Its too late! We might as well all stop telling everybody what probably going to happen and just wait out the intermission until the sequel to the human race comes along.
OK, they blew that one now whats going to evolve next?
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Quoting LargoFl:
for NEO and those who think no ice age is coming......

LOL! That's the best you've got, some re-freezing of the ice cap...after a new record low area, extent, and volume? LOL!

Congratulations, Largo, on your independent discovery of what we call "Winter".

Wait'll you see what happens in a few months!

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ah yes, im going to stop now, i see some still think..the Earth is Flat too
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 39044
for NEO and those who think no ice age is coming......
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 39044
Quoting LargoFl:
NEO I am going to defer to those smarter than myself..read this..from MIT..............golbal warming vs the next ice age....interesting reading.....Link

You'd be better served to defer to the science rather than op-eds.
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in case that link doesnt work..here is his article from MIT..........Will the greenhouse effect prevent the return of glaciers?

By Franklin Hadley Cocks ’63, SM ’64, ScD ’65 on December 21, 2009

Also featured in:
MIT News Magazine
January/February 2010
More in this issue »


COLD, HARD FACTS Franklin Hadley Cocks ’63 visits the grave of Louis Agassiz, the great proponent of the ice age concept.

Global warming is an inescapable issue for our age. But 180 years ago, most scientists believed that Earth had been steadily cooling since it was formed. When Louis Agassiz presented the concept of a Great Ice Age to the Swiss Society of Natural Sciences in 1837, his suggestion that the planet had turned colder and then warmed up again was met with skepticism and even hostility, triggering years of fierce scientific debate before the idea was accepted.

Exactly why our planet occasionally cools down has taken more than a century to work out. Now we know that cyclic gravitational tugs from Jupiter and Saturn periodically elongate Earth’s orbit, and this effect combines from time to time with slow changes in the direction and degree of Earth’s tilt that are caused by the gravity of our large moon. Consequently, summer sunlight around the poles is reduced, and high-­latitude regions such as Alaska, northern Canada, and Siberia turn cold enough to preserve snow year-round. This constant snow cover reflects a great deal of sunlight, cooling things down even more, and a new ice age begins. Naturally, this process does not occur with anything like the speed portrayed in the movie The Day After Tomorrow, but geological and other evidence shows that it’s happened at least four times.


With so much attention focused on global warming, this chilly prospect has been all but forgotten. Given how catastrophic another ice age could be, one might be tempted to ask whether a human-caused increase in atmospheric and ocean temperatures will actually be a boon.

There’s little question that global warming is happening. Climate data show that Earth’s average temperature has risen at least 0.7  oC (1.3 oF) over the 20th century. Temperature increases over the 21st century will probably be two and a half to five times as large,because greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide allow sunlight to penetrate the atmosphere but make it harder for outgoing infrared radiation to escape. What’s more, just as carbonated soda fizzes when it warms up, warmer temperatures cause the ocean to release carbon dioxide taken up during colder periods. Analyses of air trapped in glacial ice over the last 800,000 years show that atmospheric carbon dioxide generally ranged between 200 and 300 parts per million by volume (ppmv); increases in these levels were slightly preceded by increases in temperature caused by natural orbital shifts. During this period, global temperature varied by about 12 oC. Now, carbon levels are approaching 400 ppmv as the burning of fossil fuels pumps more and more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Even if the rate of growth could be moderated enough to stabilize levels at about 550 ppmv, average temperatures might well rise by about 5 oC–with devastating effects for us earthlings, such as rising sea levels and dramatic changes in weather patterns.

But even that warming will not stave off the eventual return of huge glaciers, because ice ages last for millennia and fossil fuels will not.In about 300 years, all available fossil fuels may well have been consumed.Over the following centuries, excess carbon dioxide will naturally dissolve into the oceans or get trapped by the formation of carbonate minerals. Such processes won’t be offset by the industrial emissions we see today, and atmospheric carbon dioxide will slowly decline toward preindustrial levels. In about 2,000 years, when the types of planetary motions that can induce polar cooling start to coincide again, the current warming trend will be a distant memory.

This means that humanity will be hit by a one-two punch the likes of which we have never seen. Nature is as unforgiving to men as it was to dinosaurs; advanced civilization will not survive unless we develop energy sources that curb the carbon emissions heating the planet today and help us fend off the cold when the ice age comes. Solar, nuclear, and other non-fossil-­fuel energy sources need to be developed now, before carbon emissions get out of hand. MIT alumni could play a prominent part in discovering the technology needed to keep us all going. And there are fortunes to be made from the effort. It’s worth thinking about.

Professor Franklin Hadley Cocks ‘63, SM ‘64, ScD ‘65, teaches energy technology and climate-related courses at Duke University and is the author of Energy Demand and Climate Change (Wiley-VCH), which summarizes energy and climate issues of the past, present, and future.
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73.8 here.
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NEO I am going to defer to those smarter than myself..read this..from MIT..............golbal warming vs the next ice age....interesting reading.....Link
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 39044
Quoting LargoFl:
yes in part your right, i dont care for the man myself or his leanings BUT..overall what he is saying is, IF an ice age comes..life as we know it today will cease..the wars, the fighting over food supplies, the fight just for a warm piece of land to live on..will be too much for most of the todays world population...an ice age would be disasterous..plain and simple..Im glad im nearing my end term and wont have to live thru one..and i fear for my great grand children and their children..the world we see here around us today, may not be here when they are growing up..but then all of us here today..probably wont be around to see it.
But the thing is, he's wrong. There is no imminent cooling; there is no ice age coming. Those 3.4 million tonnes of CO2 we humans pump into the atmosphere every hour of every day are vastly overwhelming any potentially offsetting natural or manmade cooling factors. At this point, it would take something catastrophic to keep us from the intolerably warm place we seem to be headed--say, a massive asteroid strike, a large and long-lasting supervolcano eruption, or an all-out global thermonuclear war. And those are, of course, GW "cures" that would be far worse than the disease itself.

No, rather than hang our hopes on some fantasy cooldown ala Dr. Marsh, we'd be much wiser to figure out a way to kick our addiction to fossil fuels.
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so ALL human history, all we read about in the history books..all happened in this time period IN between ice ages..the last one and the one coming...everything we know, everything we invented etc...and when the next big one comes?..perhaps we..are gone too
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FLORIDA'S FIRST PEOPLES, 12,000 BC - 1500 AD



12,000 B.C.




The first people move into Florida. Referred to today as PaleoIndians, they moved into the peninsula in search of new food sources. These sources included mastodons, giant armadillos, horses, and saber-toothed tigers. At that time, the end of the last ice Age, Florida was twice the size it is today.

Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 39044
imagine..ice a mile thick..the last ice age........
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 39044
wow florida was twice its size in the last ice age.....
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found in a dig around vero beach Florida..ice age art in the america's?..yes.....
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Quoting Neapolitan:
Thanks for posting that, Largo. It's so refreshing to read the anti-scientific mutterings of yet another superannuated, evolution-denying, fossil-fuel-loving, warmongering, profit-uber-alles ExxonMobil lackey who hasn't published in even his own field in several decades, and has no climate science bona fides, but is nevertheless absolutely certain that all those thousands of people educated and experienced in that field are wrong, that all those mountains of evidence they've gathered have either been falsified or willfully misinterpreted, and that, the voluminous evidence to the contrary, an ice age is upon us. No, we can never hear enough from people like Marsh. :\
yes in part your right, i dont care for the man myself or his leanings BUT..overall what he is saying is, IF an ice age comes..life as we know it today will cease..the wars, the fighting over food supplies, the fight just for a warm piece of land to live on..will be too much for most of the todays world population...an ice age would be disasterous..plain and simple..Im glad im nearing my end term and wont have to live thru one..and i fear for my great grand children and their children..the world we see here around us today, may not be here when they are growing up..but then all of us here today..probably wont be around to see it.
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Quoting LargoFl (#317):
BY GERALD E. MARSH


CHICAGO %u2014 Contrary to the conventional wisdom of the day, the real danger facing humanity is not global warming, but more likely the coming of a new Ice Age.

What we live in now is known as an interglacial, a relatively brief period between long ice ages...

[snip]
Thanks for posting that, Largo. It's so refreshing to read the anti-scientific mutterings of yet another superannuated, evolution-denying, fossil-fuel-loving, warmongering, profit-uber-alles ExxonMobil lackey who hasn't published in even his own field in several decades, and has no climate science bona fides, but is nevertheless absolutely certain that all those thousands of people educated and experienced in that field are wrong, that all those mountains of evidence they've gathered have either been falsified or willfully misinterpreted, and that, the voluminous evidence to the contrary, an ice age is upon us. No, we can never hear enough from people like Marsh. :\
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Inventor of Etch A Sketch dies in France at 86

Etch A Sketch
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BY GERALD E. MARSH


CHICAGO — Contrary to the conventional wisdom of the day, the real danger facing humanity is not global warming, but more likely the coming of a new Ice Age.

What we live in now is known as an interglacial, a relatively brief period between long ice ages. Unfortunately for us, most interglacial periods last only about ten thousand years, and that is how long it has been since the last Ice Age ended.

How much longer do we have before the ice begins to spread across the Earth’s surface? Less than a hundred years or several hundred? We simply don’t know.

Even if all the temperature increase over the last century is attributable to human activities, the rise has been relatively modest one of a little over one degree Fahrenheit — an increase well within natural variations over the last few thousand years.

While an enduring temperature rise of the same size over the next century would cause humanity to make some changes, it would undoubtedly be within our ability to adapt.

Entering a new ice age, however, would be catastrophic for the continuation of modern civilization.

One has only to look at maps showing the extent of the great ice sheets during the last Ice Age to understand what a return to ice age conditions would mean. Much of Europe and North-America were covered by thick ice, thousands of feet thick in many areas and the world as a whole was much colder.

The last “little” Ice Age started as early as the 14th century when the Baltic Sea froze over followed by unseasonable cold, storms, and a rise in the level of the Caspian Sea. That was followed by the extinction of the Norse settlements in Greenland and the loss of grain cultivation in Iceland. Harvests were even severely reduced in Scandinavia And this was a mere foreshadowing of the miseries to come.

By the mid-17th century, glaciers in the Swiss Alps advanced, wiping out farms and entire villages. In England, the River Thames froze during the winter, and in 1780, New York Harbor froze. Had this continued, history would have been very different. Luckily, the decrease in solar activity that caused the Little Ice Age ended and the result was the continued flowering of modern civilization.

There were very few Ice Ages until about 2.75 million years ago when Earth’s climate entered an unusual period of instability. Starting about a million years ago cycles of ice ages lasting about 100,000 years, separated by relatively short interglacial perioods, like the one we are now living in became the rule. Before the onset of the Ice Ages, and for most of the Earth’s history, it was far warmer than it is today.

Indeed, the Sun has been getting brighter over the whole history of the Earth and large land plants have flourished. Both of these had the effect of dropping carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere to the lowest level in Earth’s long history.

Five hundred million years ago, carbon dioxide concentrations were over 13 times current levels; and not until about 20 million years ago did carbon dioxide levels drop to a little less than twice what they are today.

It is possible that moderately increased carbon dioxide concentrations could extend the current interglacial period. But we have not reached the level required yet, nor do we know the optimum level to reach.

So, rather than call for arbitrary limits on carbon dioxide emissions, perhaps the best thing the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the climatology community in general could do is spend their efforts on determining the optimal range of carbon dioxide needed to extend the current interglacial period indefinitely.

NASA has predicted that the solar cycle peaking in 2022 could be one of the weakest in centuries and should cause a very significant cooling of Earth’s climate. Will this be the trigger that initiates a new Ice Age?

We ought to carefully consider this possibility before we wipe out our current prosperity by spending trillions of dollars to combat a perceived global warming threat that may well prove to be only a will-o-the-wisp.



Gerald Marsh is a retired physicist from the Argonne National Laboratory and a former consultant to the Department of Defense on strategic nuclear technology and policy in the Reagan, Bush, and Clinton Administration. Readers may e-mail him at gemarsh@uchicago.edu
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Quoting ScottLincoln:

How would something about seasonal abnormalities have anything to do with someone being a denialist or having an agenda?
What was even the relevance of taking something that was just a somewhat odd occurrence and making it into something more?


"taking something that was just a somewhat odd occurrence and making it into something more?"

like Sandy? or I'm sorry, Superstorm Sandy?

I see it everyday on this blog everytime we have a weather event and how it relates to GW/climate change

off topic:


BREAKING NEWS:
Town of Bladenboro being evacuated
Posted: Feb 02, 2013 5:01 PM EST Updated: Feb 02, 2013 5:01 PM EST
By: Sarah Crandall - email

BLADENBORO, NC (WECT) %u2013 The Town of Bladenboro is currently being evacuated following reports of a train derailment, according to dispatch officials.

No other details are known at this time, but WECT has a crew on the way to the scene.

Stick with WECT.com for more on this developing story.

Copyright 2013 WECT. All rights reserved.
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we must remember..we are definitely Inbetween Ice Ages..and if history is correct, we are now overdue for the next one to begin..now IF..man is causing some global warming, we are delaying an ice age, but we must remember ..IF a new ice age comes..imagine the changes, imagine the destruction to all mankind..IN the USA..there just isnt enough ground..to house all of canada AND all the northern USA residents in the south...so those against..global warming...beware of what you wish for...................imagine if you will..just food costs etc..energy costs,housing costs..the whole 9 yards of human existance..all smashed into a 3rd of the earths land masses....remember..BOTH poles..the glaciers come down and up from....for my take..Bring on global warming..i hate freezing weather lol
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CIVIL EMERGENCY MESSAGE
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

RELAYED BY NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BISMARCK ND
354 PM CST SAT FEB 2 2013 /254 PM MST SAT FEB 2 2013/

THE FOLLOWING MESSAGE IS TRANSMITTED AT THE REQUEST OF THE
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT.

THE NORTH DAKOTA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AND THE NORTH DAKOTA
HIGHWAY PATROL HAVE CLOSED I-94 WESTBOUND AND EASTBOUND LANES BETWEEN
DICKINSON AND MANDAN DUE TO BLOWING SNOW AND NEAR ZERO VISIBILITY.

A NO TRAVEL ADVISORY HAS ALSO BEEN EXTENDED TO WESTERN AND CENTRAL
REGIONS NORTH OF I-94 AND THE NORTHWEST REGION OF THE STATE DUE TO
SNOW...BLOWING SNOW...AND REDUCED VISIBILITY CREATING HAZARDOUS
DRIVING CONDITIONS.
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Take a look at this persons blog for the month of January. I found it fascinating. Link
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WINTER WEATHER UPDATE 84
______________________________

Light snow for the NYC area tonight into Sunday...



click pic fro larger size
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NOT AS COLD TONIGHT...................
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About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.