Mighty North Atlantic low bombs to 930 mb

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 6:04 PM GMT on January 26, 2013

Share this Blog
35
+

In the Northern Atlantic south of Iceland, an extratropical storm that brought up to 6" of snow to Maryland on Thursday has put on a remarkable burst of rapid intensification over the past 24 hours, with the center pressure dropping 58 mb in 24 hours. The Free University of Berlin, which names all major high and low pressure systems that affect Europe, has named the storm "Jolle." This meteorological "bomb" was analyzed with a central pressure of 988 mb at 12Z (7 am EST) Friday morning by NOAA's Ocean Prediction Center, and hit 930 mb by 7 am EST Saturday morning. The storm may deepen a few more millibars today, but it is close to maximum intensity. A 930 mb central pressure is what one commonly sees in Category 4 hurricanes, and is one of the lowest pressures attained by an Atlantic extratropical storm in recent decades. Since extratropical storms do not form eyewalls, the winds of the massive Atlantic low are predicted to peak at 90 mph (Category 1 hurricane strength), with significant wave heights reaching 52 feet (16 meters.) The powerful storm brought sustained winds of 52 mph, gusting to 72 mph, to Vestmannaeyjar, Iceland at 6 pm local time Saturday. Fortunately, the storm is expected to weaken dramatically before Jolle's core hurricane-force winds affect any land areas.


Figure 1. Winter Storm Jolle, as seen at 10 am EST January 26, 2013. Three hours prior to this image, Jolle was analyzed with a central pressure of 930 mb--one of the lowest pressures in recent decades for an Atlantic extratropical storm. Image credit: Navy Research Lab, Monterey.

According to wunderground's weather historian Christopher C. Burt's post on
Super Extratropical Storms, the all-time record lowest pressure for a North Atlantic extratropical storm is 913 mb, set on January 11, 1993, near Scotland's Shetland Islands. The mighty 1993 storm broke apart the super oil tanker Braer on a rocky shoal in the Shetland Islands, causing a massive oil spill.

Other notable Atlantic extratropical storms, as catalogued by British weather historian, Stephen Burt:

920.2 mb (27.17”) measured by the ship Uyir while she sailed southeast of Greenland on December 15, 1986. The British Met. Office calculated that the central pressure of the storm, which was centered some distance southeast of the ship, was 916 mb (27.05”).

921.1 mb (27.20”) on Feb. 5, 1870 measured by the ship Neier at 49°N 26°W (another ship in the area measured 925.5 mb)

924 mb (27.28”) on Feb. 4, 1824 at Reykjavik, Iceland (the lowest on land measured pressure in the North Atlantic)

925.5 mb (27.33”) on Dec. 4, 1929 by the SS Westpool somewhere in the Atlantic (exact location unknown)

925.6 mb (27.33”) on Jan. 26, 1884 at Ochtertyre, Perthshire, U.K. (the lowest pressure recorded on land in the U.K.)

For comparison’s sake, the lowest pressure measured on land during an extra-tropical storm in the United States (aside from Alaska) was 952 mb 28.10” at Bridgehampton, New York (Long Island) on March 1 during, the Great Billy Sunday Snowstorm.


Figure 2. Infrared satellite image of the North Atlantic Storm of January 11, 1993 at 0600Z when it deepened into the strongest extra-tropical cyclone ever observed on earth, with a central pressure of 913 mb (26.96”). Satellite image from EUMETSAT Meteosat-4.

Links
You can see a nice AVHRR image of the east side of the storm at the University of Bern. The raw MODIS pass is here.

The Meteorological Institute of Norway has a nice satellite animation of Jolle.

Wunderground's weather historian Christopher C. Burt's posts on Super Extratropical Storms and World and U.S. Lowest Barometric Pressure Records

Claudio Cassardo's January 23, 2013 post,
Very low minima of extratropical cyclones in North Atlantic

Read my story of what it was like to fly though a 936 mb Atlantic low pressure system on January 4, 1989.

Intense winter storms are expected to increase in number due to climate change
In my 2010 blog post, The future of intense winter storms, I discuss how evidence for an observed increase in intense wintertime cyclones in the North Atlantic is uncertain. In particular, intense Nor'easters affecting the Northeast U.S. showed no increase in number over the latter part of the 20th century. This analysis is supported by the fact that wintertime wave heights recorded since the mid-1970s by the three buoys along the central U.S. Atlantic coast have shown little change (Komar and Allan, 2007a,b, 2008). However, even though Nor'easters have not been getting stronger, they have been dropping more precipitation, in the form of both rain and snow. Several studies (Geng and Sugi, 2001, and Paciorek et al., 2002) found an increase in intense winter storms over both the North Atlantic, but Benestad and Chen (2006) found no trend in the western parts of the North Atlantic, and Gulev et al. (2001) found a small small decrease of intense winter storms in the Atlantic.

The U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), a scientific advisory board created by the President and Congress, concluded this in their 2009 U.S. Climate Impacts Report: "Cold-season storm tracks are shifting northward and the strongest storms are likely to become stronger and more frequent". The USGRP concluded that an increase of between four and twelve intense wintertime extratropical storms per year could be expected over the Northern Hemisphere by 2100, depending upon the amount of greenhouse gases put into the air (Figure 3). If we assume that the current climate is producing the same number of intense winter storms as it did over the period 1961-2000--about 53--this represents an increase of between 8% and 23% in intense wintertime extratropical storms. Two studies--Pinto et al. (2007) and Bengtsson et al. 2006--suggest that the more intense winter cyclones will affect only certain preferred regions, namely northwestern Europe and Alaska's Aleutian Islands. At least three other studies also find that northwestern Europe--including the British Isles, the Netherlands, northern France, northern Germany, Denmark and Norway--can expect a significant increase in intense wintertime cyclones in a future warmer world (Lionello et al., 2008; Leckebusch and Ulbrich 2004; and Leckebusch et al., 2006). None of these studies showed a significant increase in the number of intense Nor'easters affecting the Northeast U.S.


Figure 3. The projected change in intense wintertime extratropical storms with central pressures < 970 mb for the Northern Hemisphere under various emission scenarios. Storms counted occur poleward of 30°N during the 120-day season beginning November 15. A future with relatively low emissions of greenhouse gases (B1 scenario, blue line) is expected to result in an additional four intense extratropical storms per year, while up to twelve additional intense storms per year can be expected in a future with high emissions (red and black lines). Humanity is currently on a high emissions track. Figure was adapted from Lambert and Fyfe (2006), and was taken from Weather and Climate Extremes in a Changing Climate, a 2009 report from the the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). The USGRP began as a presidential initiative in 1989 and was mandated by Congress in the Global Change Research Act of 1990, which called for "a comprehensive and integrated United States research program which will assist the Nation and the world to understand, assess, predict, and respond to human-induced and natural processes of global change".

Jeff Masters

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 122 - 72

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10Blog Index

122. etxwx
Quoting Some1Has2BtheRookie:


We have all 4 of the deadly snakes in Texas and I have seen them all. Face to face. The Copperhead is the hardest to spot. It blends in perfectly with its background.


Oh, I forgot about the coral snake . I dang near stepped on the coral snake lookalike milk snake (Scarlet king snake) one night this fall. I had to stop and quickly think of the rhyme:
Red and yellow kill a fellow,
Red and black, venom lack.





Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting etxwx:
Here's a pic from this spring of one of our local snakes, commonly called a black or rat snake. (non-poisonous) This one was about a 6 footer and had thoroughly woven himself into the bird netting over my blueberry bush. It took me about 15 minutes to un-weave him and then I let him go out near the woods. The next day he was back and had woven himself into the net again! I disentangled him one more time and gave him a severe talking to before I let him go. He stayed away. We also have rattlers, copperheads, and cottonmouths here, but I'm not near so understanding with them.


We have all 4 of the deadly snakes in Texas and I have seen them all. Face to face. The Copperhead is the hardest to spot. It blends in perfectly with its background.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Afternoon Aussie, Good Night Everyone Else. Stay Safe - Stay Warm - Sleep Well.
Member Since: February 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 5690
119. etxwx
Here's a pic from this spring of one of our local snakes, commonly called a black or rat snake. (non-poisonous) This one was about a 6 footer and had thoroughly woven himself into the bird netting over my blueberry bush. It took me about 15 minutes to un-weave him and then I let him go out near the woods. The next day he was back and had woven himself into the net again! I disentangled him one more time and gave him a severe talking to before I let him go. He stayed away. We also have rattlers, copperheads, and cottonmouths here, but I'm not near so understanding with them.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting AussieStorm:

His Daughter, Bindi and Son, Jack, Are just like him. Yeah We all miss him too.


I wish Steve would have listened to his own instincts. He said he knew the land creatures and their moves and his reflexes were fast enough to get out of the way when he is land. He said that he did not know the marine creatures as well and knew he would be too slow in the water to avoid their attacks.

I had heard that Bindi and Jack were continuing their dad's work. Good for them! I wish them both the best of luck in their pursuits in life. I hope their dad gave them an important lesson. Do not work outside of your area of comfort and expertise when working with wild animals. How sad that is no longer with us. He was known and loved the world over.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting HadesGodWyvern:
look at those fangs.. :o

As always, the female is worse than the male.
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15932
Blue Ring Octopus



Stone Fish



Tiger Snake



Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15932
115. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
look at those fangs.. :o
Member Since: May 24, 2006 Posts: 50 Comments: 44829
Quoting Some1Has2BtheRookie:


Not just snakes, Aussie.

This little guy has a reputation of its own. The Funnel Web spider



Along with this friendly face. The RedBack spider.



Then there are these little sea creatures. Such as the Box Jellyfish.

Box Jellyfish

Australia is on my bucket list, but I think I will get a native guide. ... I wish Steve Irwin was still with us. I loved his shows and his attitude.

His Daughter, Bindi and Son, Jack, Are just like him. Yeah We all miss him too.
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15932
Quoting AussieStorm:


I think we have 10 of the top 15 most deadly snakes in the world here. So it doesn't really matter, if you're bitten by a snake, you'll probably die from it unless you're given anti-venom.

Also, that snake is probably a King Brown Snake, King Browns are northern Australian, the Brown Snake is a southern Australian.

This is a fully grown King Brown Snake.



This is a fully grown Brown Snake.


Not just snakes, Aussie.

This little guy has a reputation of its own. The Funnel Web spider



Along with this friendly face. The RedBack spider.



Then there are these little sea creatures. Such as the Box Jellyfish.

Box Jellyfish

Australia is on my bucket list, but I think I will get a native guide. ... I wish Steve Irwin was still with us. I loved his shows and his attitude.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
112. etxwx
Tonight's wolf moon just after sunset:
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Floods likely to isolate hundreds in NSW

MORE than 500 people are expected to be isolated by floodwaters in northern NSW as ex-tropical cyclone Oswald brings damaging winds and heavy rain to the state.

A severe weather warning was issued for the Northern Rivers, the mid-north coast, Northern Tablelands and parts of the Hunter and North West Slopes and Plains on Sunday as Oswald slowly moved south from Queensland.

State Emergency Service (SES) spokesman Phil Campbell said two motorists had already been rescued from floodwaters on Sunday, with one person caught in their car near the border at Tenterfield and another trapped further south at Grafton.

Meanwhile at around noon (AEDT) a Fire and Rescue NSW (FRNSW) helicopter was helping the SES move campers who had been surrounded by floodwaters near Grafton.

"The initial concern for us will be the potential for flash flooding and the potential for people to get themselves into trouble," Mr Campbell told AAP.

More than 400 SES volunteers were stationed in the north of the state with warnings that Oswald was likely to bring damaging winds of up to 110km/h.

"That wind velocity can cause damage to property and bring down trees and power lines," Mr Campbell said.

"There is also some potential for local destructive winds in the Northern River region."

Once the rain sets in, Mr Campbell said the SES will be monitoring the state's main rivers with moderate to major flooding expected.

On the Bellinger River at Thora in the state's north, a minor flood warning is in place and the Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) is warning that a further 150mm of rain could fall over the next day or two.

Mr Campbell said this was expected to cut off more than 500 people in rural properties slightly upstream at Darkwood.

"They will be isolated for a couple of days so we have asked them to stock up," he said.

The wild weather is expected to move further south on Monday, with strong winds and downpours forecast for Sydney, the SES said.

Motorists travelling on the state's mid north or far north coast are being urged to take extreme care, with reports of heavy rainfall, debris and reduced visibility at some local roads, the NSW Transport Management Centre said.

"Additionally, heavy holiday traffic is also being experienced on the Pacific Highway for motorists travelling southbound approaching the Hexham Bridge, in Newcastle," it said in a statement.
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15932
Quoting Bluestorm5:
Ugh, nothing scares me more than snakes...

opps, I hope I didn't scare you.
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15932
Army choppers called in as Qld floods

THE Queensland government has asked for army helicopters to be sent in, with the state in the grip of an unfolding flood crisis.

Cities and towns along the central Queensland coast are flooding as the low pressure system that was cyclone Oswald batters the south east corner of the state with cyclonic winds and torrential rain.

Releases from dams that protect the cities of Brisbane and Ipswich are continuing, with falls of up to 300mm expected over the next 24 hours.

Destructive winds gusting to 60 knots are also expected.

Forecasters are expecting conditions "comparable to a high category one cyclone" with wind gusts of 60 knots, or 125kph, in the southeast corner over the next day.

The low pressure system is expected to be over the Sunshine Coast on Sunday afternoon, Brisbane by this evening, and the Gold Coast by late on Sunday night or early on Monday.

It will then move across the border into northern NSW.

The bureau's Queensland weather services manager Richard Wardle says there's a strong chance of more tornadoes like the six that caused severe damage in the Bundaberg region on Saturday and Sunday.

In the state's southeast corner, falls of between 200 and 300mm are expected but that could reach 400mm in some locations, Dr Wardle said.

The central Queensland cities of Gladstone, Bundaberg and Gympie are all experiencing widespread flooding.

There have been dramatic rescues across the region, including in Gympie where the mayor says people had been rescued from rooftops.

There are grave fears for at least one man who remains missing after trying to cross a flooded creek near Gympie on Sunday morning.

Residents of north Bundaberg are being ordered to leave their homes immediately, the ABC reported at midday (AEST), with fears 300 homes will flood and those that don't to be left isolated.

Some residents in south and east Bundaberg also being told to leave, the ABC said.

The Queensland government has asked for army helicopters to be sent in to help, the ABC reported.

And Premier Campbell Newman has called on Prime Minister Julia Gillard to say the state will need help to deal with a crisis spanning many communities simultaneously.

Mr Newman said it was highly likely the army would be called on for more support, particularly in the clean-up phase.

"I know she and her government will provide the support we need," Mr Newman told reporters in the tornado hit community of Bargara near Bundaberg.

"The challenge now is that we've got multiple events going on."

In the central Queensland city of Bundaberg, residents are braced for the Burnett River to peak at levels higher than in 2010/11, when floods caused significant damage to the city.

Up to 200 homes and 100 businesses are expected to flood, and evacuations are being ordered in north Bundaberg, with some residents in the south and east also being told to head to evacuation centres.

At Gympie, south of Bundaberg, residents have been rescued from rooftops, Mayor Ron Dyne told AAP.

And the search is continuing for a 27-year-old man who was swept away while trying to cross the Widgee Creek near Gympie. His two companions were rescued.

The Mary River is expected to peak at 17 metres - just shy of levels reached during floods that devastated the region in 2011.

The river is so swollen that it looks more than a kilometre wide, Gympie local Suzanne Chapman told AAP.

"We're not far off from starting to evacuate," said Ms Chapman, who works at the Royal Hotel in Gympie.

"The sports bar will get a metre or so of water if the river stops at 17 metres but if it goes higher the restaurant will go under. The power hasn't been cut yet but we've been told it might be soon."

At Gladstone, floodwaters appear to be dropping but 900 homes have been evacuated in low lying areas.

And there are reports of homes flooded to their ceilings at Baffle Creek, between Gladstone and Bundaberg.

The Insurance Council of Australia has declared a Queensland-wide catastrophe.

Severe weather is now affecting the Sunshine Coast, and the Moreton Bay Regional Council areas north of Brisbane, causing severe beach erosion and three to four metre swells.

Brisbane city is also being lashed by cyclonic winds gusting above 120kph, and the city's disaster co-ordination centre has been activated.

There are already reports of localised flooding in Brisbane, including in Bayside suburbs.

***********************************************

Evacuation order for north Bundaberg

NORTH Bundaberg is being evacuated after the Burnett River broke its banks.

A disaster declaration now covers most low-lying suburbs of the central Queensland city, giving authorities the power to enforce mandatory evacuations if people refuse to leave.

North Bundaberg residents have been told they have a very short window to get out, with up to 100 homes and businesses already flooded there, the ABC reports.

Several properties have also been inundated in the city's east - some of them the same ones that were hit during the city's 2010-11 floods.

The Burnett River is now expected to peak at 9 metres - well above the levels recorded during the 2010/11 floods.

Evacuation centres have been set up for those forced to leave their homes.
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15932
Ugh, nothing scares me more than snakes...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Sarasota nearly full moon has huge blue aura round it! Orion, Sirius and other stars are bright here, grazi!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Some1Has2BtheRookie:


Well, the snake is well named, considering its color. Wouldn't it have more aptly been named the Brown Snake of Death? ... Or, Brown is in Town So Don't Stick Around Snake? ... Something a little more descriptive of its capabilities as well as its color, perhaps???? ... I mean, you do get tourist there, right?


I think we have 10 of the top 15 most deadly snakes in the world here. So it doesn't really matter, if you're bitten by a snake, you'll probably die from it unless you're given anti-venom.

Also, that snake is probably a King Brown Snake, King Browns are northern Australian, the Brown Snake is a southern Australian.

This is a fully grown King Brown Snake.



This is a fully grown Brown Snake.
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15932
Quoting PedleyCA:


I thought you lived in Tx, my bad ..... That looks very cold.

East Central Florida Ped...it's gorgeous here.
What a night. Beautiful. According to our nearby weather station, it's 61 F.
Wish my camera could have caught those clouds around the moon better but that's the best we could do.
Anyway, off to try my luck at sleep.
Quite an interesting system in the Atlantic.
Glad no one's getting torn up by it so far.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Chicklit:


I thought you lived in Tx, my bad ..... That looks very cold.
Member Since: February 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 5690
Quoting AussieStorm:


Um........ That is not a stick, that is a very deadly Brown Snake seeking refuge on the window of a flooded car. A bite from that snake, you'll be dead within an hour.

Photo courtesy of State Emergency Service Queensland


Well, the snake is well named, considering its color. Wouldn't it have more aptly been named the Brown Snake of Death? ... Or, Brown is in Town So Don't Stick Around Snake? ... Something a little more descriptive of its capabilities as well as its color, perhaps???? ... I mean, you do get tourist there, right?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Long Time no see. How are you. getting any rain?
Member Since: February 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 5690
Never enter floodwater (even if the pub is flooded).

Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15932
Thannks, Dr. Masters. Yet another great blog!
Enjoying the moon tonight.
Now if I can just get to sleep...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:


Um........ That is not a stick, that is a very deadly Brown Snake seeking refuge on the window of a flooded car. A bite from that snake, you'll be dead within an hour.

Photo courtesy of State Emergency Service Queensland
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15932
24hr rainfall totals to 9am this morning for between Mackay to Bundaberg courtesy of the BOM showing again massive totals toward the south east Thanks to ex Tropical Cyclone Oswald, with

Gladstone (176mms),
Captain Crk (275mms),
Boolaroo tops (467mms),
Brovinia (242mms),
Springfield (314mms),
Miriam Vale (237mms),
Bucca Weir (349mms) &
Bundaberg (252mms)
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15932
96. Skyepony (Mod)
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
If you've not been outside to see the moon yet, and are in a position to actually, physically see it (clear skies), then I suggest going to look at it. Tonight's full moon is what they call a Full Wolf Moon. It's nothing rare, but still interesting to look at.



Also known as Quiet Moon, Snow Moon, Cold Moon, Chaste Moon, Disting Moon & Moon of Little Winter. Beautiful here.


I've got January moon lore in the comments of my blog. Clicking my handle will take anyone there that wants to see it.
Member Since: August 10, 2005 Posts: 161 Comments: 37428
Remnants of Cyclone Oswald are lingering over eastern Australia, bring gusty winds and heavy rain:

Member Since: July 21, 2011 Posts: 83 Comments: 7167
Garry continues to weaken over the South Pacific:

Member Since: July 21, 2011 Posts: 83 Comments: 7167
Had a lot of fun with the family in the circus today. love it! having those memories that are going to stay forever :). right now its a beautiful night with a few raindrops.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Here comes Ex-TC Oswald.....



Severe Weather Warning
for destructive winds, damaging winds, heavy rain and damaging surf
for people in the Metropolitan, Northern Rivers, Mid North Coast, Hunter, Northern Tablelands, Illawarra and Central Tablelands forecast districts
Issued at 12:58 pm EDT on Sunday 27 January 2013.
VERY HEAVY RAIN, DAMAGING WINDS AND SURF OVER NORTHEASTERN NSW DURING THE LONG WEEKEND.

Weather Situation
Ex-Tropical Cyclone Oswald currently over eastern Queensland is moving slowly south-southeast towards NSW.

Very heavy surf which may lead to localised damage and coastal erosion is forecast for the Metropolitan, Northern Rivers, Mid North Coast and Hunter forecast districts and parts of the Illawarra forecast district. Beach conditions in these areas could be dangerous and people should stay well away from the surf and surf exposed areas.

Destructive winds around 80 km/h with peak gusts of 140 km/h are forecast for parts of the Northern Rivers forecast district, mostly near the coast.

Damaging winds around 60 km/h with peak gusts of 100 km/h are forecast for parts of the Metropolitan, Mid North Coast, Hunter and Northern Tablelands forecast districts.

Thunderstorms and heavy rain which may lead to flash flooding are forecast for the Metropolitan, Northern Rivers, Mid North Coast, Hunter, Northern Tablelands and Illawarra forecast districts and parts of the Central Tablelands forecast district.

In last 24h till 9am Sunday 203 mm has been recorded at Upper Rous River (Hopkins Ck), Mullumbimby 136 mm, Lowanna west of Coffs Harbour 164 mm.

The State Emergency Service advises that people should:

Move vehicles under cover or away from trees.
Secure or put away loose items around your house, yard and balcony.
Keep clear of fallen power lines.
Don't drive, ride or walk through flood water.
Keep clear of creeks and storm drains.
If you are trapped by flash flooding, seek refuge in the highest available place and ring 000 if you need rescue.
For emergency help in floods and storms, ring your local SES Unit on 132 500.

The next warning will be issued by 5:00 pm EDT Sunday.
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15932
Ex-tropical cyclone brings rain to NSW

HUNDREDS of emergency services personnel in northern NSW are preparing for destructive winds and flash flooding as ex-cyclone Oswald moves south from Queensland.

A severe weather warning was issued for the Northern Rivers, the mid-north coast, Northern Tablelands and parts of the Hunter and North West Slopes and Plains on Sunday.

The Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) said Oswald was likely to bring damaging winds of up to 110km/h as well as dangerous surf and heavy rain.

The strong gusts were forecast to develop on Sunday afternoon (AEDT) in parts of the Northern Rivers and Northern Tablelands.

The BoM said downpours could lead to flash flooding at the Northern Rivers, the mid-north coast, the Northern Tablelands and parts of the Hunter and North West Slopes and Plains.

In the 48 hours to 10am on Sunday, more than 100mm of rain had fallen around the Bellinger River at Thora, with another 100 to 150mm expected over the next 24 to 48 hours.

Fire and Rescue NSW said a helicopter was working with the State Emergency Service (SES) around 11am to rescue campers stranded by rising waters near Grafton.

Meanwhile Upper Rous River near the Queensland border had more than 200mm of rain while Coffs Harbour had recorded 164mm in the past 24 hours.

Local SES controller Bob White said people were getting ready in Coffs Harbour, with extra swiftwater rescue teams on hand.

"We have had people coming to us already, collecting sandbags," he told the ABC.

"It's great that people are thinking ahead and being a little bit proactive, and not waiting until the last minute."

He said crews were preparing for a repeat of the 2009 floods, when 90 rescues were made.

"Rather than just leave it to a very small number of people who worked very very hard back in 2009, we're bringing extra resources into the area, so that we can be fully prepared and offer protection to the community," he said.

© ABC 2013
**********************************************


Rooftop rescues as Qld floods hit Gympie

RESIDENTS in the Gympie area, north of Brisbane, are being rescued from rooftops while one person remains missing in floodwaters.

The Mary River is expected to peak at 17 metres - just shy of levels reached during floods that devastated the region in 2011.

The centre of Gympie is expected to flood later on Sunday.

Mayor Ron Dyne told AAP western locations including Midgee and Sexton had been the worst hit.

"We have people on rooftops in Widgee and Sexton and we have a swiftwater rescue team currently deployed in Widgee," he said.

Mr Dyne said a man and a woman had already been saved in the rescue effort, but a 27-year-old man was still missing after the trio tried to cross the swollen Widgee Creek near Gympie.

The water rescue crew that went to the group's aid lost their boat and gear at one point during the operation.

Mr Dyne said businesses in the CBD near the Mary River were expecting flooding.

"At this stage, we've got major concerns," he said.

"Everything's occurred rather rapidly given the amount of rain we've had and so forth."

Mr Dyne said roads into Gympie, including south on the Bruce Highway, were cut and the town was experiencing localised flooding in several areas.

The mayor urged residents to keep out of harm's way.

"Get off the roads, stay at home, don't go rubbernecking around to have a look because there are major concerns," he said.

"Powerlines are down, there's trees across roads and the normal inconveniences and we don't need to see swiftwater rescue teams deployed for people who are being foolish trying to cross flooded streams."

Mr Dyne said local disaster management groups would meet later on Sunday.

© ABC 2013
***********************************************

Wild storms hit Canberra

Emergency services in the ACT are responding to hundreds of calls for help after a severe storm swept across the area last night.

The storm dumped up to 65 millimetres of rain in some areas of Canberra with strong winds and rain causing flash flooding and downing power lines.

Some suburbs in the capital's north are still waiting for power to be restored after 20,000 homes lost power.

Emergency services received more than 400 calls for help, mostly for flooding, fallen trees and leaking roofs.

The priority calls were dealt with overnight and crews will get to work on the remainder today.

The Calvary Public Hospital in Canberra also lost power for about 20 minutes when its backup generator failed to kick in.

Calvary Hospital's director of nursing and midwifery, Kerrie Hayes, says the generator failed because the boiler room flooded.

She says there are always procedures in place if the power fails, but a review of what happened is underway.

"On Tuesday morning when everyone is back at work we will have a formal debrief and a formal review," she said.

"We'll be working on actions to make sure that the next time we have this quick inundation and big storm that flooding doesn't occur and that our auxiliary power kicks in as it's supposed to."

No surgery was being performed at the time and no patients were adversely affected.


© ABC 2013
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15932
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
If you've not been outside to see the moon yet, and are in a position to actually, physically see it (clear skies), then I suggest going to look at it. Tonight's full moon is what they call a Full Wolf Moon. It's nothing rare, but still interesting to look at.


Here's two photo's I took last night just before the fireworks went off.



Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15932
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
If you've not been outside to see the moon yet, and are in a position to actually, physically see it (clear skies), then I suggest going to look at it. Tonight's full moon is what they call a Full Wolf Moon. It's nothing rare, but still interesting to look at.

I saw it an hour or so ago, it was big and and an orange yellowish color.
Member Since: March 16, 2012 Posts: 127 Comments: 7928
If you've not been outside to see the moon yet, and are in a position to actually, physically see it (clear skies), then I suggest going to look at it. Tonight's full moon is what they call a Full Wolf Moon. It's nothing rare, but still interesting to look at.

Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31531
TC Thirteen:

Member Since: July 21, 2011 Posts: 83 Comments: 7167
Iceland radar:

Member Since: July 21, 2011 Posts: 83 Comments: 7167
Quoting Skyepony:
1900~ The wind map doesn't have the yellows of earlier. We called that one:)

Well, you were the one who called that. I merely agreed with you. :P
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53296
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53296
Member Since: July 21, 2011 Posts: 83 Comments: 7167
Moisture is slowly increasing throughout Hawaii ahead of an approaching cold front:

Member Since: July 21, 2011 Posts: 83 Comments: 7167
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53296
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53296
The cold front is intensifying northwest of Hawaii:

Member Since: July 21, 2011 Posts: 83 Comments: 7167
Quoting PedleyCA:
Life is Good again -The Auto Racing Season started - 24 Hours of Daytona

For everyone else:

There are 126 days until
Saturday, 1 June 2013.

Now we just need NASCAR to start with speed weeks.

Winter weather advisories and freezing rain advisories are in effect for parts of the Mid West and Great Lakes. I will probably be under some advisory tomorrow.
Member Since: March 16, 2012 Posts: 127 Comments: 7928
Quoting Slamguitar:


I hope your old one was completely non-functional, otherwise you should feel very guilty for wastefulness and adding to our climate problem just for a little dopamine boost from shiny new possessions. :D




poof you go too my Ignore list


Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting FLWaterFront:


It may wind up as less impressive than first thought. It is possible.

1. The peak energy with the system may arrive in the Mississippi/Arkansas
area during the middle of the night or the wee hours of Wednesday morning,
and not during the maximum diurnal heating time of the afternoon.

2. By the time the maximum daytime heating could take effect, the energy with the system may be positioned over the bumpy and still-cooled ground of NE Alabama and central and East Tennessee, where the cooler and more stable air pooling over and east of the Appalachians may inhibit maximum severe Wx potential.

3. Further south and where the air will be warmer, dew points will be higher and surface instability will be greater, the upper level wind profile will not be nearly as conducive for the development of super cells and severe Wx in general. It's the infamous, "The main energy with this system passed to our north" scenario.

4. I could be totally, completely and absolutely wrong as wrong could be. We'll see.


We shall see. The models keep wanting to speed up the arrival in central Alabama. Looks like maybe midnight to 0300 Wednesday. As you say, at least it will not arrive during peak heating, which should be near 80 with dewpoints in the high 60's. Not a lot of forcing except for the predicted jet streak that's supposed round the wave of low pressure that will form somewhere west of us. Not a classic severe weather outbreak but, if we get any and it's at night, the effect is worse than the same storms during the day, since we won't see any tornadoes that form. The last front bought nothing, not even any cold air, and we've been warmer than normal already for the last several days. It's been really strange here, with two periods of much above normal temperatures ending with no severe storms. Our luck won't last forever.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
by wed overnight lows will be 30 degrees or more above normal

Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53296
73. Skyepony (Mod)
Fresh ASCAT
Member Since: August 10, 2005 Posts: 161 Comments: 37428
72. Skyepony (Mod)
1900~ The wind map doesn't have the yellows of earlier. We called that one:)
Member Since: August 10, 2005 Posts: 161 Comments: 37428

Viewing: 122 - 72

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

Local Weather

Partly Cloudy
73 °F
Partly Cloudy