Superstorm Sandy and the importance of polar orbiting satellites in forecasting

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 8:19 PM GMT on January 03, 2013

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On the 23rd of October, the 18th named storm of the 2012 Atlantic hurricane season, Tropical Storm Sandy, was born in the Central Caribbean. As is common for late-season storms in the Caribbean, Sandy moved northwards across Cuba. The official forecasts from the National Hurricane Center issued on October 23 called for Sandy to turn to the northeast after crossing Cuba, and head into the Central Atlantic. This forecast was based on the output from five of our top six computer models, which all predicted that an upper-level low pressure system in the Central Atlantic would be strong enough to pull Sandy northeastwards. However, the global weather forecast model run by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) showed a disturbing possibility: the upper-level low pressure system in the Central Atlantic would not be strong enough to turn Sandy to the northeast. The hurricane would instead get caught up in the flow associated with a trough of low pressure approaching the U.S. East Coast, and Sandy would get slung into New York or New Jersey on October 29. While the ECMWF model was the best performing model for tracking Atlantic hurricanes in both 2010 and 2011, and had done very well again so far in 2012, the American GFS model had outperformed the ECMWF model several times during the 2012 season. NHC elected to discount the ECMWF forecast for Sandy as an outlier, and went with the forecast from the GFS and other models. By October 25, it was clear that the ECMWF model had the right idea all along. More models were now showing the turn towards New York, and the official NHC forecast now called for Sandy to make landfall in New York or New Jersey on October 29. The ECMWF model's early forecast of a track for Sandy into the Northeast was critical for allowing additional time for residents to prepare for arrival of the devastating storm. So what enabled the ECMWF model to make such an excellent forecast for Sandy, six days in advance?


Figure 1. This image uses the model output from the ECMWF experiment, showing where Sandy was predicted to be located five-days out with the normal satellite data inputs into the model (left) and without any polar-orbiting satellite data (right). Both position and intensity forecasts were affected--Sandy stays out to sea without the polar-orbiting satellite data, and the closer isobar lines encircling the storm also imply a more organized and stronger system. Image credit: NOAA.

Polar satellite data: a key to ECMWF model success
The ECWMF has a very sophisticated technique called "4-D Var" for gathering all the current weather data over the Earth and putting the data on a 3-dimensional grid that is then used as the initial "reality" of the current weather for the model to use for its forecast. The old expression, "garbage in, garbage out" is a truism for weather forecast models. If you don't properly characterize the initial state of the atmosphere, the errors you start off with will grow and give a lower-quality forecast. Data from geostationary satellites, which sit continuously at one spot above the globe, are easy to assimilate, and all the models use this data. However, the ECMWF model's superior technique used to assimilate the initial data allows inclusion of data from a large number of polar-orbiting satellites, which the other models cannot do as well. Polar-orbiting satellites orbit Earth at an altitude of 540 miles twice per day, circling from pole to pole. Their data is difficult to use, since the it is only available twice per day at each spot on the Earth, and the time of availability is different for each location. According to an email I received from Jean-Noël Thépaut, the chief of the Data Division of the Research Department at the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, the ECMWF model uses data from at least fourteen polar orbiting satellites: N-15, N-19, N-19, N-17 (ozone SBUV instrument only), Metop-A, AQUA, NPP (ATMS instrument only), AURA (ozone OMI data only), F-17, TRMM (TMI data), COSMIC, GRACE-A, TERRASAR, and the GPSRO data on top of METOP-GRAS. The data of most importance is the data collected in the infrared and microwave wavelengths, as well as atmospheric density data obtained via GPS radio occultation (as a polar orbiting satellite goes over the horizon, the GPS signals from the satellite get bent by Earth's atmosphere, with the amount of bending proportional to the density of the atmosphere. This GPS Radio Occultation data is gathered from eight polar orbiting satellites, and fed into both the ECMWF and GFS models.) You can find a nice summary of the impacts of polar orbiting satellite data on weather prediction models at this link.)


Figure 2. Forecast track error for four of our top models used to predict Hurricane Sandy, for their runs that began at 00Z October 25, 2012. By this time, the GFDL model had joined the ECMWF in predicting that Sandy would make landfall in Southern New Jersey in five days. The GFS and HWRF models made good 1 - 3 day forecasts, but failed to anticipate Sandy's north-northwestward turn towards the U.S. coast. Image credit: Morris Bender, NOAA/GFDL.

As originally reported by the Washington Post's Capital Weather Gang, then confirmed in a NOAA press release, a study done by ECMWF research scientist Tony McNally found that if the ECMWF model did not have all of the data from the fourteen polar orbiting satellites, the five-day forecast of the model for Hurricane Sandy would have shown Sandy missing the Northeast U.S. This brings up a concern, since the U.S. polar orbiting satellite program is behind schedule. As explained by Andrew Freedman of Climate Central, the program is plagued by mismanagement, billions in cost overruns, and technical development challenges. The next polar orbiting satellite is not scheduled to be launched until 2017, and one or more of the existing polar orbiting satellites are expected to fail before then. This will result in a degradation of our ability to observe and predict the weather, and may result in poorer forecasts for storms like Hurricane Sandy. Given that the ECMWF model used data from fourteen polar orbiting satellites, the failure of just one satellite may not have made a significant difference in its forecast for Sandy. But if we lose several of these key satellites by 2017, our hurricane forecasts in 2017 may be worse than they were in 2012. To figure out how to cope with the loss of satellite-derived data, NOAA is conducting a Gap Risk Study that seeks ideas from researchers and the public on how NOAA can preserve the quality of its weather model forecasts in the event of the failure of one or more polar orbiting satellites in the coming years.


Figure 3. A tanker rests on the southern shore after being swept onto land by a storm surge due to Superstorm Sandy, Friday, Nov. 2, 2012, in the Staten Island borough of New York. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)

Links
Eric Berger of the Houston Chronicle has an interview with Jean-Noël Thépaut, chief of the Data Division of the Research Department at the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, on why the European model did so well with Hurricane Sandy.

Jeff Masters

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Quoting bappit:

I think you raise a valid question. I know that FEMA buys out properties that flood repeatedly. Does anyone know the details?

I would also point out that the money from the New Jersey economy does not all stay in New Jersey. The benefits of building on the shore are felt elsewhere, too.

Also there is the follow up question: what should we do when a disaster comes to your neck of the woods?
FEMA delivers a blow at Shore

BRIGANTINE, N.J. - Bill Haeser and Bob Huff were neighbors before Sandy, but the storm has chased Haeser and his wife, Laurel, off their block, at least for now.

Still, their dark-humored buddy routine has held, even as the short-term rebuilding on Cummings Place has stalled, and the long-term future of people like them along the Jersey Shore gets murkier.

Both big guys in their own way, they were happy to see each other again last week in the back of the Brigantine North Elementary School auditorium, where at a FEMA town-hall meeting, their mayor had speculated that requirements from proposed flood-map elevations would "decimate" the island.

- snip

Settled is the last thing they are now, eight weeks after Hurricane Sandy. Hardly anyone's rebuilding, because insurance payments have not been issued. And there are new wrinkles.

FEMA and town representatives acknowledged last week that the Federal Emergency Management Agency's proposed flood and velocity zones mean steep insurance hikes and the costly if not impossible task of lifting thousands of old homes on pilings.

- more at link, click headline
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Quoting GeorgiaStormz:


Yep itll change, but im certain some type of warm sector area will exist over the eastern US with the consistency of a very large low in the central to north US.
At least the warm temps part should materialize somewhere.
I'll agree with that. Another unusual winter season so far for the deep south and southeast.
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Quoting RTSplayer:


Wow.

They made nukes decades ago, but they only just figured out how to collect basic data on the environment.


Ever looked at their coastline.. up close? They don't care much about environment. If you don't care, no reason to study..
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Quoting Chapelhill:
That would be something if it's right, but we are talking about long term GFS. ;)


Yep itll change, but im certain some type of warm sector area will exist over the eastern US with the consistency of a very large low in the central to north US.
At least the warm temps part should materialize somewhere.
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Quoting indianrivguy:


ANNND, there is football in the afternoon!

Aussie, the weather here could hardly be better. The front stalled to the north (on top of Mr. Largo :( )so we are still in paradise!


Yep, Go Vikings.

And I can't wait for this boring GA weather to end.
It's been Hi-50 Lo-30 for a week now.
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Quoting AussieStorm:

Thanks for letting us know. Do you have anymore information or graphs you could post?


I have plenty more done and in progress. Will surely keep you informed when the time comes!
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Quoting GeorgiaStormz:
The GFS so looks like spring:

THE GFS IS ACTUALLY OUTPUTTING PWATS OF
1.8 TO 1.9 INCHES FOR SOUTHERN PORTIONS OF OUR CWA.
TO PUT THAT INTO
PERSPECTIVE...THE HIGHEST PW EVER OBSERVED FOR EARLY JANUARY IS
AROUND 1.75 BASED ON PW CLIMATOLOGY
. IF THOSE RECORD MOISTURE LEVELS
ARE ACTUALLY REALIZED...WE COULD BE LOOKING AT A POSSIBLE FLASH
FLOOD THREAT WITH A SLOW MOVING CONVECTIVE LINE THAT COULD MOVE
THROUGH IN THE LATE WEDNESDAY EVENING THROUGH THURSDAY AFTERNOON
TIME FRAME.

And then 60s in ohio? That's a large winter warm sector.

That would be something if it's right, but we are talking about long term GFS. ;)
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RSOE EDIS
Event Report
Saturday, 5th January 2013 :: 15:17:21 UTC




Summary
Translate


Preliminary Earthquake Report
Notice! This is a computer-generated report - this event has not reviewed by a seismologist!
RSOE EDIS Alert:

Fern Forest, Hawaii,USA

EDIS Number: EQ-20130105-296639-USA Common Alerting Protocol
Magnitude: 4.3
Mercalli scale: 3
Date-Time [UTC]: Saturday, 05th January 2013 at 02:37 PM
Local Date/Time: Sunday, January 06, 2013 at 05:37 at night at epicenter
Coordinate: 19 20.238, 155 3.942
Depth: 9.00 km (5.59 miles)
Hypocentrum: Shallow depth
Class: Light
Region: North America
Country: United States
Location: 16.06 km (9.98 miles) - of Fern Forest, Hawaii, United States
Source: USGS
Generated Tsunami: Not or no data
Damage: Not or no data

Member Since: August 13, 2009 Posts: 13 Comments: 6774
Quoting GeorgiaStormz:
The GFS so looks like spring:

THE GFS IS ACTUALLY OUTPUTTING PWATS OF
1.8 TO 1.9 INCHES FOR SOUTHERN PORTIONS OF OUR CWA.
TO PUT THAT INTO
PERSPECTIVE...THE HIGHEST PW EVER OBSERVED FOR EARLY JANUARY IS
AROUND 1.75 BASED ON PW CLIMATOLOGY
. IF THOSE RECORD MOISTURE LEVELS
ARE ACTUALLY REALIZED...WE COULD BE LOOKING AT A POSSIBLE FLASH
FLOOD THREAT WITH A SLOW MOVING CONVECTIVE LINE THAT COULD MOVE
THROUGH IN THE LATE WEDNESDAY EVENING THROUGH THURSDAY AFTERNOON
TIME FRAME.

And then 60s in ohio? That's a large winter warm sector.

I wouldn't be surprised to see 70's sometime in the next week or two.I've enjoy wearing my heavy coat.Looks like it'll be taken away from me yet again.
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 16437
Quoting AGWcreationists:
Maybe because the fedgov provides flood insurance at rates well below what private insurance would charge - thereby encouraging development in flood-prone areas? Jersey Shore residents are already complaining about the higher rates they will face in the future and that FEMA is requiring them to raise their houses to qualify for flood insurance. I can only imagine that the politicians will get involved and force FEMA to lower the standards.


Should be a build ban, and make a wildlife preserve out of it or something.

Elevating houses a few feet won't save them next time either. The waves will just wash it all away anyway.


As much tax money as NJ has made from the Jersey Shore over the decades, why didn't NJ put a fair percentage aside for the day when something like Sandy happened? Experts have been warning for decades that it was only a matter of time, and there were bad hurricanes in the past as historical precedent. I'm sorry, but the Shore interests want to enjoy the party but have taxpayers around the country pay for the cleanup.


Hey. That's the business model of this entire country. A handful of people profit at everyone else's expense.

You're not actually suggesting that something is fundamentally wrong with our civilization, are yah? hehe.



To me federal funding should be for disaster management and relief, not rebuilding. Let those rebuilding in what is clearly now harm's way assume the cost and the risk. It will lead to a much more sane rebuilding process. Otherwise, we will just be setting up the bowling pins all over again.


Yup. Steeerike. Steerike.

No biggie, when the games over they make a new score card and start over too.

Don't fool yourself into thinking the federal government will do anything about it. The federal government is too divided over everything, and so to get support for any bill, you must add lots of brib-I mean earmarks to any bill, inflating it's cost to at least twice the final value.

At least Texas did build bans and build at your own risk laws in some locations. I don't remember whether they passed or not. FEMA probably still pays anyway if some bozo builds back in there.

By the time these new Jersey Shore homes are paid for, the sea level will be a foot or two higher, and average SST up there will be 1C or 2C higher.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
The GFS so looks like spring:

THE GFS IS ACTUALLY OUTPUTTING PWATS OF
1.8 TO 1.9 INCHES FOR SOUTHERN PORTIONS OF OUR CWA.
TO PUT THAT INTO
PERSPECTIVE...THE HIGHEST PW EVER OBSERVED FOR EARLY JANUARY IS
AROUND 1.75 BASED ON PW CLIMATOLOGY
. IF THOSE RECORD MOISTURE LEVELS
ARE ACTUALLY REALIZED...WE COULD BE LOOKING AT A POSSIBLE FLASH
FLOOD THREAT WITH A SLOW MOVING CONVECTIVE LINE THAT COULD MOVE
THROUGH IN THE LATE WEDNESDAY EVENING THROUGH THURSDAY AFTERNOON
TIME FRAME.

And then 60s in ohio? That's a large winter warm sector.

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Active earthquake day in the pacific so far.Alaska and now Hawaii.
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 16437
My Current WU weather..

A couple of Webcams from my area this am..



Member Since: August 13, 2009 Posts: 13 Comments: 6774
Quoting PensacolaDoug:



That sounds like a good way to spend a sunday.
Enjoy!


ANNND, there is football in the afternoon!

Aussie, the weather here could hardly be better. The front stalled to the north (on top of Mr. Largo :( )so we are still in paradise!
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Quoting SFLWeatherman:
What do all of you say for the 2013 hurricane season is it going to be a big one?? and yes i know it January!


The very early indications are telling of yet another active season.
Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 23620
Brad Panovich9:45 AM - Public
The polar vortex has shifted into Siberia right now. This is a big reason we will be warming on the other side of the globe. Long term guidance shows the vortex shifting back to North America late this month. I'll be watching where this goes over the next few weeks. Those temperatures in Siberia are around -50° to -60° right now


Looks like a heavy rain/strong to severe storm dual threat around Alabama Wednesday night into Thursday. Something to watch in coming days.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:






Member Since: August 13, 2009 Posts: 13 Comments: 6774
Little earthquake on Hawaii:

TSUNAMI SEISMIC INFORMATION STATEMENT NUMBER 1
NWS PACIFIC TSUNAMI WARNING CENTER EWA BEACH HI
440 AM HST SAT JAN 05 2013

TO - CIVIL DEFENSE IN THE STATE OF HAWAII

SUBJECT - LOCAL TSUNAMI INFORMATION STATEMENT

THIS STATEMENT IS FOR INFORMATION ONLY. NO ACTION REQUIRED.

AN EARTHQUAKE HAS OCCURRED WITH THESE PRELIMINARY PARAMETERS

ORIGIN TIME - 0437 AM HST 05 JAN 2013
COORDINATES - 19.3 NORTH 155.1 WEST
LOCATION - ON THE SOUTH FLANK OF KILAUEA VOLCANO
MAGNITUDE - 4.4

EVALUATION

NO TSUNAMI IS EXPECTED. REPEAT. NO TSUNAMI IS EXPECTED.
HOWEVER...SOME AREAS MAY HAVE EXPERIENCED SHAKING.

THIS WILL BE THE ONLY STATEMENT ISSUED FOR THIS EVENT UNLESS
ADDITIONAL DATA ARE RECEIVED.

$$
Member Since: February 11, 2012 Posts: 82 Comments: 7637
Quoting RTSplayer:


One wonders why this needs to be approved as "spending," as opposed to having been funded by investments of the flood insurance premiums in some profitable venture, such as energy.
Maybe because the fedgov provides flood insurance at rates well below what private insurance would charge - thereby encouraging development in flood-prone areas? Jersey Shore residents are already complaining about the higher rates they will face in the future and that FEMA is requiring them to raise their houses to qualify for flood insurance. I can only imagine that the politicians will get involved and force FEMA to lower the standards.

As much tax money as NJ has made from the Jersey Shore over the decades, why didn't NJ put a fair percentage aside for the day when something like Sandy happened? Experts have been warning for decades that it was only a matter of time, and there were bad hurricanes in the past as historical precedent. I'm sorry, but the Shore interests want to enjoy the party but have taxpayers around the country pay for the cleanup.

To me federal funding should be for disaster management and relief, not rebuilding. Let those rebuilding in what is clearly now harm's way assume the cost and the risk. It will lead to a much more sane rebuilding process. Otherwise, we will just be setting up the bowling pins all over again.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
We could see some light snow this evening according to capital weather gang.It appears it'll be more likely snow as the temps around here will be in the upper 20's to low 30's.Their is a chance however nothing falls because the system could dry out completely.
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 16437
Quoting txjac:



((pcola)) ...peace and love hug for you!


Thanks txjac..
And one back too you too.. :)

(Man I felt so guilty correcting "someone" last night..
It really got to me..I've edited the post out now..
I have got to keep that under better control.. :)
Member Since: August 13, 2009 Posts: 13 Comments: 6774
Quoting JNCali:
Meanwhile in Eastern China...


The state-run, English-language China Daily reported Friday that about 1,000 ships were stuck in ice in Laizhou Bay in eastern China's Bohai Sea.


The meteorological administration said Saturday that ice had covered 27,000 square meters (10,500 square miles) of the sea surface by Thursday, the most expansive since 2008 when authorities began to collect such data. The administration expects the ice to continue to grow. (AP Article Link)


Wow.

They made nukes decades ago, but they only just figured out how to collect basic data on the environment.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Meanwhile in Eastern China...


The state-run, English-language China Daily reported Friday that about 1,000 ships were stuck in ice in Laizhou Bay in eastern China's Bohai Sea.


The meteorological administration said Saturday that ice had covered 27,000 square meters (10,500 square miles) of the sea surface by Thursday, the most expansive since 2008 when authorities began to collect such data. The administration expects the ice to continue to grow. (AP Article Link)
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Quoting SFLWeatherman:
What do all of you say for the 2013 hurricane season is it going to be a big one?? and yes i know it January!

Storm W's 2013 numbers.

Total Named Storms: 14-15
Total Hurricanes: 7-8
Intense Hurricanes: 3-4

Goodnight all
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Quoting bayoubug:
Sure will let you now, thanx..

In the mean time, you can always check out my Australian Weather Blog.
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What do all of you say for the 2013 hurricane season is it going to be a big one?? and yes i know it January!
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Quoting AussieStorm:

No worries. If you can, find out and I'll give you a link to a local weather page.
Sure will let you now, thanx..
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Quoting bayoubug:
Good morning Aussie..I don't post a lot but i read everyday on here..I have a cousin who lives over there,not sure of the location...Keep the post a coming.

No worries. If you can, find out and I'll give you a link to a local weather page.
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Good morning Aussie..I don't post a lot but i reed everyday on hear..I have a cousin who lives over there,not sure of the location...Keep the post a coming.
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It appears the NAO and especially AO could go way negative in the long range:



Member Since: February 11, 2012 Posts: 82 Comments: 7637
Quoting indianrivguy:
Mornin' Aussie.

Morning Mate!
How's your day looking, up over there?
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Quoting indianrivguy:


65F here, clear skies, light wind. "should've" got my lazy fanny out of the house and went to the beach to throw a spoon for awhile. Tomorrow.. I have an "ocean dune/coastal hammock" walk with some State biologists and will arrive early and fish first!



That sounds like a good way to spend a sunday.
Enjoy!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Light absorption speeding up arctic melting.

Duh moment.

It's okay though. Not all of our descendants will die; only the rich people who don't actually know how to do anything valuable for themselves.
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Mornin' Aussie.
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Quoting PensacolaDoug:



Mornin' back at cha.

44.6F on da bayou.


65F here, clear skies, light wind. "should've" got my lazy fanny out of the house and went to the beach to throw a spoon for awhile. Tomorrow.. I have an "ocean dune/coastal hammock" walk with some State biologists and will arrive early and fish first!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 37046
Quoting indianrivguy:
I agree ^^ mornin' Doug

in about 10mins I will greet you Good Morning. At the moment it's Good Evening. lol
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GFS 48 hours................
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 37046
ST. PETERSBURG --
There's no cold in the forecast for the next two days, but this won't be the nicest weekend of the new year, Bay New 9 meteorologist Josh Linker said.

Today will be mostly cloudy, with temperatures warming to about 72 degrees. Tomorrow could be rainy.
"There's a stationary front to the south of us right now, and because of that, there are extra clouds in place - high-level and some low-level," Linker said. "But I do expect some of the clouds to break up just a bit today, and we'll have some blue in the sky - though not a lot.

"What's going to happen over time is the front is going to lift back to the north as a disturbance develops in the gulf. That will bring in some warmer air for us tomorrow and the chance - a pretty good one - of seeing some rain."

Linker puts the chance of rain at 10 to 20 percent today and 70 percent tomorrow. Tonight's low will be in the upper 50s to low 60s around Tampa Bay and in the upper 40s to low 50s in the north counties.
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 37046
I am not sure if anyone else has posted this so I will.

I received an email from Portlight during the past week. Here is what it said.

Operation Restore, our project to aid people with disabilities who were affected by Superstorm Sandy, has begun in New York and New Jersey. Because the damage wrought is so great, the process of clean-up and remediation has been slow, but needs of the community are coming to light every day. We will be replacing durable medical equipment. We'll also be helping to muck-out basements and crawlspaces, gut flooded homes, and begin the restoration process.

As we reach out to the local disability community, we've encountered families with children with mobility issues, who've lost everything from chairs and scooters, to ramps and lifts. There are elderly couples whose lifelong homes were destroyed; a mother caring for her grown daughter, whose accessible apartment on the ground level of her mother's home was taken out by floodwaters; and so many more.

As is often the case, it has taken some time for the scope of these needs to come into focus, and they are far greater than we'd even imagined. We will continue to address as many of them as we can in the coming weeks, with more volunteers on the ground as needed. We are building a network within the community and coming together to restore and rebuild.

As always, we thank you for your continued support!






I received this email after I donated money to help Portlight with there Hurricane recovery efforts. I hope many of us here also received one.
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Quoting indianrivguy:
I agree ^^ mornin' Doug



Mornin' back at cha.

44.6F on da bayou.
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Quoting PensacolaDoug:
You do a good job here Aussie. Just consider the source when faced with negativity.

Thanks Mate!

I only just recently took Taz off my ignore list thinking I could give him another chance. I'm not going to let one person spoil the enjoyment of sharing information here.

More photo's from the Tasmania bushfire crisis area.













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506. VR46L
Just to say , There is hardly any weather out there right now, found myself getting interested in a cloud west of Mexico ..thats sad.I have blah weather grey dull and drizzly . theres nothing crazy weatherwize in the US just normal winter weather and the Australian weather at the moment is interesting at least ,between the heat wave tornadoes and potential Tropical Cyclones .
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I agree ^^ mornin' Doug
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You do a good job here Aussie. Just consider the source when faced with negativity.
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Quoting Levi32:


Well, here comes another Australian post :P

------------------------------------------------- ----

The GFS sure winds up a near-hurricane in a hurry coming out of the Indonesian islands into northern Australia in about 3 days. This is stronger than its last run.


I have been watching those runs, the CMC also has a cyclone off the NW Western Australian coast. Also develops a low in the coral sea which at the moment looks to stay only a tropical low so that area will need to be watched closely.

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Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 37046
Quoting Tazmanian:



ture


AussieStorm talks nothing about the USA weather 95% of the time he comes herehe talks about his own weather and nevere any thing about the USA weather so talk about off topic

Really Taz, I guess you weren't here during Issac and Sandy. I was posting a lot of information about both of those Hurricanes. What about all the posts I did about Super Typhoon Pablo/Bopha that struck Palau and Southern Philippines and claimed the lives of 1100 people and 800 missing.

Isn't this a weather blog? No where do I see just USA Weather blog. Even Dr Masters did blogs on the typhoons in the NW Pacific. I watch and comment on world wide cyclone activity. I rarely see you posting comments about weather related news other that CONUS weather, I would say you Taz talk 98% of the time on CONUS weather and 2% about non CONUS weather.

Btw, funny how you went back and erased both the off-topic post and you insulting me. Felt guilty or something?? Lucky you did or I was going to copy it and refer your insult toward me onto Admin.

I come on here to share world-wide weather related news, not to be insulted.
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We must keep a close eye on all the plate boundaries surrounding Antarctica, because as she rises, I have reason to believe the others will become more free to move around.

The south southeast quadrant of the Pacific Plate is of particular interest to me. It's the hinge to a door that I call "terror nonfirma."

Lives can be saved if careful attention is paid to this.



Member Since: August 27, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 502
We had our first M class solar flare in quite a while last night, from a new sunspot coming in from the NE limb, no threat of any Earth impacts with this one, but that could change as the region moves towards the center of the Sun.



Link
Member Since: February 11, 2012 Posts: 82 Comments: 7637
Member Since: February 11, 2012 Posts: 82 Comments: 7637

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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