Typhoon Bopha hits the Philippines at Cat 5 strength; at least 40 killed

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 5:00 PM GMT on December 04, 2012

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Typhoon Bopha slammed ashore on the Philippine island of Mindanao at 4:45 am local time on Tuesday morning as a Category 5 storm with 160 mph winds. Bopha is the third Category 5 typhoon to affect the Western Pacific this year, and the strongest typhoon ever recorded to hit Mindanao, which rarely sees strong typhoons due to its position close to the Equator. The death toll from the powerful storm already stands at 40, and is expected to rise. While passage over land has weakened Bopha to a Category 2 storm, the tropical cyclone is spreading torrential rains over a large portion of the southern Philippine Islands, and this will cause serious flooding problems today. The island of Mindanao is highly vulnerable to flood disasters from tropical cyclones; last year's Tropical Storm Washi, which hit Mindanao on December 16, 2011 with 60 mph winds and torrential rains, killed over 1500 people. Before hitting the Philippines, Typhoon Bopha brought a storm surge estimated at ten feet to the island nation of Palau, where near-total destruction is being reported in some coastal areas.


Figure 1. Super Typhoon Bopha as seen from the International Space Station on December 2, 2012. At the time, Bopha had top sustained winds of 150 - 155 mph. Image credit: NASA.

Bopha: the 2nd most southerly Category 5 typhoon on record
Bopha, a Cambodian word for flower or a girl, became a tropical depression unusually close to the Equator, at 3.6°N latitude. Tropical cyclones rarely form so close to the Equator, because they cannot leverage the Earth's rotation to get themselves spinning. Bopha became the second most southerly Category 5 typhoon on Monday at 7.4°N latitude. The record is held by Typhoon Louise of 1964, which was a Category 5 storm at 7.3°N.


Video 1. Scenes of wind damage and flooding from Typhoon Bopha's landfall in the Philippines yesterday.

Jeff Masters

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251. trHUrrIXC5MMX
10:55 PM GMT on December 04, 2012
Quoting AussieStorm:

Isn't June 1st the meteorological start of Summer there, hence that Hurricane season starts June 1st?


Im not sure
Member Since: April 23, 2011 Posts: 104 Comments: 14873

Quoting AussieStorm:


Link
Thanks... comments were what I was thinking here!
Member Since: November 13, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 488
Is that Levi?????

Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15977
Quoting trHUrrIXC5MMX:


I should

Isn't June 1st the meteorological start of Summer there, hence that Hurricane season starts June 1st?
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15977
Quoting AussieStorm:
More Typhoon Pablo Photo's....



























great pics indeed aussie
Member Since: April 23, 2011 Posts: 104 Comments: 14873
‘So, that’s what a typhoon is like’

DAVAO CITY—For the first time, people in the coastal towns of Davao Oriental saw for themselves what a typhoon was like.
“Even from the sound alone, it seemed like the wind wanted to eat us alive,” said Juvy Tanio, assistant of Mayor Michelle Rabat of Mati City in Davao Oriental.
Except for the Surigao provinces that face the Pacific Ocean, the rest of Mindanao is not often visited by storms, with only six typhoons making landfall in the area in the past 15 years, according to data from the US Joint Typhoon Warning Center compiled by The Manila Observatory.
Tanio said he was surprised to find the roofs of houses in the neighborhood were gone and trees knocked down.
“So, that’s what a typhoon is like,” said Tanio, who said it was his first time to experience being in the midst of a typhoon.
Between 1945 and 2010, only 35 typhoons made landfall in Mindanao, or about one every two years. An average of 20 storms or typhoons hit the country each year.
In September 1984, Supertyphoon “Nitang” (international name: “Ike”) battered Mindanao, with wind speeds of up to 220 kilometers per hour, the worst typhoon to hit the island in recent memory. Nitang killed more than 1,300 people.
Mindanao’s location near the equator makes it less likely to be hit by typhoons, according to experts. That was when global warming had not ushered in stronger typhoons in the country over the past few years and somehow pushed down the paths of certain storms down to the Visayas and Mindanao.
In December last year, Tropical Storm “Sendong” killed at least 1,268 people in Northern Mindanao and the Visayas, mostly in Cagayan de Oro and Iligan City. Most of the fatalities, who lived along waterways, drowned.
Never-heard sound
Tanio said people were still grumbling on Monday afternoon because it was “too hot.” It never felt like there was an approaching typhoon. Rain fell during the night. The nightmare started before dawn Tuesday.
“When the wind started to howl at 3 a.m., nobody dared to speak,” Tanio said. “Everyone was so quiet, we never heard that sound before.”
Davao Oriental’s Tarragona town, which faces the Pacific Ocean, was among those badly battered when the typhoon made landfall Tuesday morning, forcing the evacuation of close to 300 families.
“I live near the shore, so I’m used to big waves and strong winds,” said Vivencio Anislag, a resident of Tarragona. “But this one is something different, a storm is a different thing.”
At least one electric post and 14 trees were felled in Davao City.
Investment come-on gone
The city’s investment come-on as a typhoon-free area is no longer true.
“Scary,” said Patrick Ronolo, a student at Davao Oriental State College of Science and Technology.
“The wind was really strong,” he said.
“This is the first time we experienced anything like this,” said Flordeliz Bantolinao, a teacher at Baculin National High School in Baganga, Davao Oriental, where Typhoon “Pablo” made its landfall.
She said until Tuesday, she had never seen coconut trees falling down because of strong winds.



FAITH OUT OF THE MUD A girl retrieves a statue of the Sto. Niño and cleans it of mud and grime after landslides hit her home due to nonstop rains brought by Typhoon “Pablo” in Compostela town, Compostela Valley province, in Mindanao on Tuesday. AFP
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15977
Quoting AussieStorm:

Ask NOAA/NHC that.


I should
Member Since: April 23, 2011 Posts: 104 Comments: 14873
Quoting trHUrrIXC5MMX:


why do we have june 1st then?

Ask NOAA/NHC that.
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15977
Quoting JustPlantIt:
A. Yes. Might just make a difference to the climate change and warming. Storms seem to be happening sooner and data should be kept earlier.


I agree
Member Since: April 23, 2011 Posts: 104 Comments: 14873
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15977
Quoting AussieStorm:
Mother Nature doesn't know the calender, She starts when she wants to start, like some women. lol


why do we have june 1st then?
Member Since: April 23, 2011 Posts: 104 Comments: 14873
Quoting JustPlantIt:

Holy s*****t. Now this is close to home and no news on major media, where did you get this? This is way over the top! Please send a link. Thanks.


Link
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15977
Quoting VAbeachhurricanes:


There would be, but since water weighs more and is denser the pumps that are able to pump the oil may not be able to pump the water. Plus you have to factor in the viscosity of the liquids.

The water might be classified as hazardous waste after going through an oil pipeline.
Member Since: May 18, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 6157
Typhoon ‘Pablo’ pounds Mindanao



Blown in the wind. Deaths in flash floods.
That’s what happened in areas in Mindanao raked by powerful Typhoon “Pablo” before dawn Tuesday.
Pablo moved swiftly on its predicted path, sending roofs flying off houses, hectares of coconut trees tumbling, rivers bursting their banks, canceling flights and ferry services, church bells ringing and sirens wailing in a large part of Mindanao where the Category 5 storm passed.
Inquirer bureaus in Mindanao and Cebu, in reports attributed to local officials, and civil defense authorities put the initial death toll—mainly in flash floods—at 42 and another 24 unaccounted for. Most of the deaths were in New Bataan in Compostela Valley.
In Manila, the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) said two Army platoons with possibly 66 soldiers were unaccounted for.
Benito Ramos, NDRRMC executive director, said each platoon had 33 soldiers. He said the command post of Charlie Company of the 66th Infantry Battalion at Barangay (village) Andap in New Bataan was reportedly washed away in a flash flood.
Contact with the platoons had not been established as of 4 p.m.
But Gen. Ariel Bernardo, commander of the 10th Infantry Division, told the Inquirer by phone that reports reaching him indicated only six soldiers were missing from the two platoons.
‘Totally unexpected’
Gov. Arturo Uy of Compostela Valley confirmed in a GMA News TV interview that 33 people drowned in New Bataan town. Uy said the bodies were retrieved at 5:30 p.m.
“It was totally unexpected,” Uy said. Flooding reached the barangay hall and the health center that were supposed to be on high ground.
“We never expected the waters to be that strong, the rescue team was only able to enter the area at 4:30 p.m.,” he said.
In the neighboring Compostela town, Provincial Board Member Neri Barte reported a woman and her two children were killed in a landslide.
Davao Oriental Gov. Corazon Malanyaon said four people were confirmed dead while 24 others were feared to have also been killed when Pablo hit the province at dawn on Tuesday.
“Of the 29, four have been confirmed. The rest, we still have to verify with reports coming from the ground,” Malanyaon told the Inquirer by phone.
The reports, the governor said, came from social welfare offices and police officers in Boston, Manay, Baganga, Caraga and Cateel towns.
“This is very depressing,” Malanyaon said.
She added that it was impossible for them to check on the reports yesterday because the roads were impassable due to landslides and fallen trees along the road leading to the towns.
1 soldier killed
The NDRRMC report of fatalities included Erlinda Balante of Manay town, Davao Oriental, Jigger Gomonit, 30, of Panao, Misamis Oriental, Elberto Daniel, 23, of Lazi, Siquijor, and 1st Sergeant Olivarez of the 10th Infantry Division.
Ramos said Olivarez was washed away along with his company commander, identified as Lieutenant Deazeta, after a flash flood hit their temporary command post at Barangay Andap at around 3 p.m. Deazeta was rescued but remains unconscious, Ramos said.
The soldiers’ first names were not immediately available.
The military command also reported power outages and communication interruptions because of fallen electrical outposts and power lines.
Packing peak slightly weakened center winds of 160 kilometers per hour, gusting up to 195 kph, the typhoon that was internationally called “Bopha” struck before dawn Tuesday at Baganga town in Davao Oriental, according to the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (Pagasa).
With a diameter of 500 km, the typhoon swept across the midsection of Mindanao, slightly below the path Tropical Storm “Sendong” took a year ago, before veering west northwest toward the southern Visayas region. Sendong killed over 1,500 people.
As of 4 p.m., the eye of the typhoon was located 60 km southeast of Dumaguete City, Pagasa said. It was forecast to continue moving west northwest at 24 kph, maintaining its peak strength.
Port authorities in Dumaguete said a ferry with six crewmen was missing.
The Philippine National Red Cross (PNRC) said initial reports showed that 8,400 families were evacuated to safer ground in Davao Oriental, Iligan, Cagayan de Oro, Surigao del Norte, Surigao del Sur and Leyte.
More than 3,430 passengers of 93 interisland vessels were stranded in 16 major sea ports, including those in Manila and parts of the Visayas and Mindanao, the Philippine Coast Guard said.
In Davao Oriental, where Pablo made landfall, residents said the wind was so strong it sent coconut trees falling like logs cut by chainsaws.
Flordeliz Bantolinao, a teacher in Baganga, Davao Oriental, said a neighbor died in a house crushed by a coconut tree. Bantolinao said, by her estimate, 90 percent of houses in her village, Baculin, had either been destroyed or damaged.
Coconut trees felled
Bantolinao said in a phone interview that in a 10-hectare plantation in her village, all the coconut trees were felled.
She said other villages in Baganga, especially in the town center, could have suffered the same fate, if not worse, but she had no way of knowing for sure because the roads leading to the villages and the center of town had been blocked by fallen trees.
“Everything is gone—houses, crops,” Bantolinao said. She said the typhoon victims urgently needed food.
Baganga, which faces the Pacific Ocean, is some 100 kilometers from the capital city of Mati.
Emmalyn Oliveros of the Davao Oriental civil defense office, said the extent of damage in the province could not be known immediately because of downed communications.
Oliveros confirmed the death of a 5-year-old child, Errol Lintuan, of Barangay Tubaon in Tarragona town. Lintuan was killed when a tree fell on his family’s house around 5 a.m. Tuesday.
In Cebu City, civil defense authorities said a 23-year-old man died after a coconut tree struck him as he was driving his motorcycle in Lazi town, Siquijor.
By 2 p.m. Tuesday, officials in Davao Oriental had moved 856 families to evacuation centers.
In Tarragona, roofs were torn off houses, according to Vivencio Anislag of the municipal office.
25,000 flee in CDO
In Cagayan de Oro, the shrill sound of sirens warned residents of impending danger when the Cagayan River started to overflow its banks past 2 p.m. The sound of sirens combined with the pealing of church bells when water in the river rose 10 feet beyond its normal level.
While most residents had moved to evacuation centers by the time Pablo struck, many lingered by the riverbanks to watch the river’s water rise, prompting officials to send in policemen to forcibly move the kibitzers out of harm’s way.
The city information office said at least 25,000 people had been moved to 51 evacuation centers.
Willing to evacuate
Unlike when Sendong struck, residents of some places in the path of Pablo knew of the dangers that faced them, and were more willing to submit to preemptive evacuation, officials said.
In Agusan del Sur, two persons were injured when a tree fell on their house in Bayugan City.
Thousands of residents in Tacloban City, Leyte and St. Bernard, Southern Leyte, were evacuated as a preemptive measure. In Bacolod City, residents in coastal areas have packed their belongings.
Tacloban City Mayor Alfred Romualdez said that 247 families, or about 1,214 persons from seven barangays had been evacuated since Monday night to the Tacloban City Convention Center.
The Coast Guard in Legazpi City said a 6-meter storm surge hit the shorelines of Catanduanes, preventing vessels from docking at Virac port.
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15977
Quoting AussieStorm:
Sandy Victims Being Hit With Downed Tree Violations, LIPA Fees

While the neighborhoods shattered by Hurricane Sandy are far from being back to normal, the faceless bureaucratic mechanisms of the City and the Long Island Power Authority seem to be kicking back in. Homeowners are being ticketed by the DOB for fallen trees on their properties, and LIPA is charging customers a "delivery fee" for returning their power, even though it was out for weeks%u2014mainly because of the utility's incompetence.
As the New York Times put it, "the storm struck the city%u2019s trees like a chain saw on methamphetamines," knocking down more than 8,000 in the street and many more in parks. In Queens, homeowners with downed trees say that the DOB is handing out violations that warn that they could face legal action if the trees aren't removed.
%u201CPeople are stressed out, they are in a situation that is really horrible and then they got these violations,%u201D the president of the Queens Civic Congress, Richard Hellenbrect, tells the Daily News. State Senator Tony Avella added, "This is one more example of the insensitivity sometimes of the city. They really need to retract these violations." Though the citations do not carry a monetary penalty, they stay on the books indefinitely and give the city legal recourse to act.
WNYC reports that LIPA is tacking on a delivery fee of more than $10%u2014something ConEd and other utilities in the region have refused to do. "I'm flabbergasted," a LIPA customer in Northport says. "I just don't understand why they think it's necessary." More than half of the 86% of LIPA customers who lost power were without it for more than a week. LIPA will be refunding customers who were billed for "estimated" usage, but is sticking by the fee, calling it "the very minimum it costs LIPA to provide a 24/7 connection to the electric system." A spokesperson tells WNYC that the charge will be discussed at a meeting on Thursday.


(Bureaucracy gone made)
Holy s*****t. Now this is close to home and no news on major media, where did you get this? This is way over the top! Please send a link. Thanks. NY Times... still not on a major network.
Member Since: November 13, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 488
Sandy Victims Being Hit With Downed Tree Violations, LIPA Fees

While the neighborhoods shattered by Hurricane Sandy are far from being back to normal, the faceless bureaucratic mechanisms of the City and the Long Island Power Authority seem to be kicking back in. Homeowners are being ticketed by the DOB for fallen trees on their properties, and LIPA is charging customers a "delivery fee" for returning their power, even though it was out for weeks—mainly because of the utility's incompetence.
As the New York Times put it, "the storm struck the city’s trees like a chain saw on methamphetamines," knocking down more than 8,000 in the street and many more in parks. In Queens, homeowners with downed trees say that the DOB is handing out violations that warn that they could face legal action if the trees aren't removed.
“People are stressed out, they are in a situation that is really horrible and then they got these violations,” the president of the Queens Civic Congress, Richard Hellenbrect, tells the Daily News. State Senator Tony Avella added, "This is one more example of the insensitivity sometimes of the city. They really need to retract these violations." Though the citations do not carry a monetary penalty, they stay on the books indefinitely and give the city legal recourse to act.
WNYC reports that LIPA is tacking on a delivery fee of more than $10—something ConEd and other utilities in the region have refused to do. "I'm flabbergasted," a LIPA customer in Northport says. "I just don't understand why they think it's necessary." More than half of the 86% of LIPA customers who lost power were without it for more than a week. LIPA will be refunding customers who were billed for "estimated" usage, but is sticking by the fee, calling it "the very minimum it costs LIPA to provide a 24/7 connection to the electric system." A spokesperson tells WNYC that the charge will be discussed at a meeting on Thursday.


(Bureaucracy gone made)
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15977

Quoting MrMixon:




There's an old saying in Colorado: You can steal my wife, but not my water.

I've also heard: whiskey is for drinking, water is for fighting.

But yes, many people do set up rain barrels to catch water, despite the laws. But the fact remains - in Colorado and many western states all land is considered to have a "split estate". Meaning that you might own the land, but you do not own the water and/or mineral rights unless you explicitly buy them - and most land owners do not... mostly because those rights rarely come up for sale. It's all a matter of scale - you can collect a little bit of rain water for your garden. But if you steal too much water, you WILL get in trouble...

Case in point:

"FORT MORGAN, Colo. (AP) -- A Fort Morgan farmer believed to be the first sent to jail by a Colorado water court on allegations of stealing water is now free but owes penalties to the state."

LINK TO FULL STORY
This is crazy!!! Water will be like gold.
Member Since: November 13, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 488
Amount of farmland in the USA is 922 million acres (source USDA), now to cover that area with 1 foot of water. It would take approx. 1750 times the entire amount of the water flowing in the Mississippi river annually. Mississippi flow rate Approx. 525,000 acre feet per year (USGS)

The plan just is not feasible.

BTW I rounded numbers and figured someplaces would need more some less so averaged a foot.
Member Since: July 6, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2260
So far, for West Palm Beach, no big changes through Dec. 14...

Member Since: September 10, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 11540
#TORNADO WARNING for Aransas, Calhoun, Refugio Counties until 5:15 PM CDT. Developing tornado west of Austwell.

BULLETIN - EAS ACTIVATION REQUESTED
TORNADO WARNING
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE CORPUS CHRISTI TX
423 PM CST TUE DEC 4 2012

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN CORPUS CHRISTI HAS ISSUED A

* TORNADO WARNING FOR...
NORTHEASTERN ARANSAS COUNTY IN SOUTH TEXAS...
SOUTHWESTERN CALHOUN COUNTY IN SOUTH TEXAS...
EXTREME EASTERN REFUGIO COUNTY IN SOUTH TEXAS...

* UNTIL 515 PM CST

* AT 417 PM CST...NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DOPPLER RADAR INDICATED
A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM CAPABLE OF PRODUCING A TORNADO 7 MILES
NORTHWEST OF ARANSAS NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE...OR 12 MILES WEST
OF SEADRIFT...MOVING SOUTHEAST AT 10 MPH.

* LOCATIONS IMPACTED INCLUDE...
ARANSAS NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE...

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

WHEN A TORNADO WARNING IS ISSUED BASED ON DOPPLER RADAR...IT MEANS
THAT STRONG ROTATION HAS BEEN DETECTED IN THE STORM. A TORNADO MAY
ALREADY BE ON THE GROUND...OR IS EXPECTED TO DEVELOP SHORTLY. IF YOU
ARE IN THE PATH OF THIS DANGEROUS STORM...MOVE INDOORS AND TO THE
LOWEST LEVEL OF THE BUILDING. STAY AWAY FROM WINDOWS. IF DRIVING...DO
NOT SEEK SHELTER UNDER A HIGHWAY OVERPASS.

THE SAFEST PLACE TO BE DURING A TORNADO IS IN A BASEMENT. GET UNDER A
WORKBENCH OR OTHER PIECE OF STURDY FURNITURE. IF NO BASEMENT IS
AVAILABLE...SEEK SHELTER ON THE LOWEST FLOOR OF THE BUILDING IN AN
INTERIOR HALLWAY OR ROOM SUCH AS A CLOSET. USE BLANKETS OR PILLOWS TO
COVER YOUR BODY AND ALWAYS STAY AWAY FROM WINDOWS.
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15977
More Typhoon Pablo Photo's....

























Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15977
230. Skyepony (Mod)
Quoting VaStormGuy:
So what facts can people here tell me about fracking, I have a school project on it due tomorrow and I've barely started. Sources too please, if you can. The area I'm focusing on is potential air pollution and impacts on possible climate change.


I quick searched this for fracking. Scroll down for several articles.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting RitaEvac:


It maybe the ultimate plan long term, once we wing off oil and its use is nowhere at the levels needed, we can start converting those pipelines into water lines to water the country. That's the route I would go.

Well at least we are getting a bit more positive about all this.
Water is much thinner than oil and a bit heaver. The pumps would need altering or upgrading to deal with water which is a lot more difficult in some ways to pump. On the plus side its not hazardous to the environment and wont burn.
I read somewhere that oil is pumped at higher than the ambient background temp, hence the reason why the pipelines in permafrost areas are elevated above the ground to stop thawing.
Of course its unlikely that water will necessarily be available at the terminals of the oil pipelines, so add on bits of pipes will be needed to connect to any available water but if water is available on route so to say, then water could be pumped in both directions from the source.
I am sure that a lot of pipelines are at least now semi redundant and as a lot of them according to the map seem to be in the drought stricken areas, maybe its the germ of an idea to use them. After all, its probably somebody's funeral not to?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Quoting AussieStorm:
Mother Nature doesn't know the calender, She starts when she wants to start, like some women. lol
Mother Nature or a manmade midlife crisis.... HA
Member Since: November 13, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 488
Quoting VAbeachhurricanes:


That seems ludicrous to me... there is a law against collecting your own rain water? That is like the most water consevationy thing a person can do.


Quoting RitaEvac:


But it's legal to smoke weed there now huh? hell with the law, take all the water you want off your property


There's an old saying in Colorado: You can steal my wife, but not my water.

I've also heard: whiskey is for drinking, water is for fighting.

Yes, many people do set up rain barrels to catch water, despite the laws. But the fact is that in Colorado and many western states all land is considered to have a "split estate". This means you might own the land, but you do not own the water and/or mineral rights unless you explicitly buy them - and most land owners do not... mostly because those rights rarely come up for sale. It's all a matter of scale - you can collect a little bit of rain water for your garden. But if you steal too much water, you WILL get in trouble...

Case in point:

"FORT MORGAN, Colo. (AP) -- A Fort Morgan farmer believed to be the first sent to jail by a Colorado water court on allegations of stealing water is now free but owes penalties to the state."

LINK TO FULL STORY
Member Since: March 26, 2006 Posts: 44 Comments: 1520
So what facts can people here tell me about fracking, I have a school project on it due tomorrow and I've barely started. Sources too please, if you can. The area I'm focusing on is potential air pollution and impacts on possible climate change.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
BULLETIN - EAS ACTIVATION REQUESTED
TORNADO WARNING
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE CORPUS CHRISTI TX
423 PM CST TUE DEC 4 2012

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN CORPUS CHRISTI HAS ISSUED A

* TORNADO WARNING FOR...
NORTHEASTERN ARANSAS COUNTY IN SOUTH TEXAS...
SOUTHWESTERN CALHOUN COUNTY IN SOUTH TEXAS...
EXTREME EASTERN REFUGIO COUNTY IN SOUTH TEXAS...

* UNTIL 515 PM CST

* AT 417 PM CST...NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DOPPLER RADAR INDICATED
A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM CAPABLE OF PRODUCING A TORNADO 7 MILES
NORTHWEST OF ARANSAS NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE...OR 12 MILES WEST
OF SEADRIFT...MOVING SOUTHEAST AT 10 MPH.

* LOCATIONS IMPACTED INCLUDE...
ARANSAS NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE...

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

WHEN A TORNADO WARNING IS ISSUED BASED ON DOPPLER RADAR...IT MEANS
THAT STRONG ROTATION HAS BEEN DETECTED IN THE STORM. A TORNADO MAY
ALREADY BE ON THE GROUND...OR IS EXPECTED TO DEVELOP SHORTLY. IF YOU
ARE IN THE PATH OF THIS DANGEROUS STORM...MOVE INDOORS AND TO THE
LOWEST LEVEL OF THE BUILDING. STAY AWAY FROM WINDOWS. IF DRIVING...DO
NOT SEEK SHELTER UNDER A HIGHWAY OVERPASS.

THE SAFEST PLACE TO BE DURING A TORNADO IS IN A BASEMENT. GET UNDER A
WORKBENCH OR OTHER PIECE OF STURDY FURNITURE. IF NO BASEMENT IS
AVAILABLE...SEEK SHELTER ON THE LOWEST FLOOR OF THE BUILDING IN AN
INTERIOR HALLWAY OR ROOM SUCH AS A CLOSET. USE BLANKETS OR PILLOWS TO
COVER YOUR BODY AND ALWAYS STAY AWAY FROM WINDOWS.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32830
224. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
Philippines Atmospheric Geophysical Astronomical Services and Administration
Tropical Cyclone Bulletin #11
TYPHOON PABLO (BOPHA)
5:00 AM PhST December 5 2012
==============================

Typhoon "PABLO" has further weakened as it continues to move towards northern Palawan

At 4:00 AM PhST, Typhoon Pablo [972 hPa] located at 10.2°N 120.4°E or 180 km east of Puerto Princesa City has 10 minute sustained winds of 70 knots gusting up to 90 knots. The cyclone is reported as moving west northwest at 12 knots.

Signal Warnings
==============

Signal Warning #3
-----------

Luzon Region
-----------
1. Northern Palawan
2. Calamian Grp. of Islands

Signal Warning #2
-----------

Luzon Region
-----------
1. Rest of Palawan

Visayas Region
-------------
1. Antique
2. Iloilo
3. Guimaras
4. Bohol
5. Siquijor
6. Southern Cebu
7. Negros Oriental
8. Negros Occidental

Signal Warning #1
----------

Luzon Region
-------------
1. Occidental Mindoro
2. Lubang Is.
3. Oriental Mindoro
4. Romblon

Visayas Region
=============
1. Aklan
2. Capiz
3. Rest of Cebu

Mindanao Region
================
1. Lanao del Norte
2. Misamis Occidental
3. Zamboanga del Norte
4. Camiguin

Additional Information
========================
Public Storm Warning Signals elsewhere are now lowered.

Estimated rainfall amount is from 10-18 mm per hour (heavy to intense) within the 400 km diameter of the typhoon.

Residents living in low lying and mountainous areas under public storm warning signals are alerted against possible flash floods and landslides. Likewise, those living in coastal areas under public storm warning signal #3 and signal #2 are alerted against big waves or storm surges generated by this typhoon.

Fishing boats and other sea vessels are advised not to venture out into the Seaboards of southern Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao.

The public and the disaster coordinating councils concerned are advised to take appropriate actions and watch for the next bulletin to be issued at 11 am today.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Bielle:


A further question from someone who knows very little science: water and oil don't mix. Is there any way of using the existing oil pipelines (or some of them at some times) to transport water, either concurrently or at alternating times? Presumably it all has to be filtered anyway . . .


I honestly thought about that same thing. From a theoretical standpoint you could use the piping infrastructure to move water instead of oil. You%u2019d of course have to retrofit the pumping stations account for pressure/volume difference etc between oil and water. From a realistic standpoint though this would not be good as the lines would need to be completely shutdown cleaned out of all things petroleum etc and verified that no cross contamination existed. Not to mention I highly doubt that they would trade oil for water but who knows. Desperate situations lead to desperate measures. On a similar note, however, we already have a majority of the water distribution infrastructure in place (the pipes in your city distribution plants, gravity tanks etc.) The issue that we deal with is not so much how the water gets from point A to point B but rather where does the water come from at point A to begin with. If it%u2019s not coming from the sky, aquifers, rivers, or lakes then as I mentioned earlier, desalination might be the way to go. Lots of water in the ocean to tap into. I know in Florida that there are water companies that use desalination and pump it into the main system. It uses reverse osmosis and it isn%u2019t cheap but it%u2019s an option. As our population grows so does the demand so we have to be creative on both where we get our water from and how we use it and conserve it. Thankfully in the truest sense that water is renewable. The same stuff you drink now at one point was probably peed out of a tyrannosaurus rex so it%u2019s available somewhere. In many places thought its just not where you want it to be naturally. Also since the US has three oceans on its borders this makes it that much easier that it%u2019s there. I%u2019d hate to be a country that was landlocked with its border states having water sources and not getting along with you.
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Quoting AussieStorm:
Mother Nature doesn't know the calender, She starts when she wants to start, like some women. lol



And ends when she wants as well.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
It has been a long time since I've made a poll, so here goes one.

Q: Should the Atlantic hurricane season start date be pushed back from June 1 to May 15?

A. Yes
B. No
C. Makes no difference to me
Mother Nature doesn't know the calender, She starts when she wants to start, like some women. lol
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15977
81 dead as Pablo rips through Mindanao

MANILA, Philippines (5th UPDATE) - At least 81 people have died in Mindanao from the Onslaught of Typhoon Pablo (international name Bopha), authorities said Tuesday.

In New Bataan town in Compostela Valley, 43 people died when flash floods swept away an Army patrol base, a landslide hit a community, and trees Fell on people and the height of the typhoon.

"I saw itself, soldiers dead ... 43 here now," ABS-CBN News Southern Mindanao Vina Araneta told ANC reporter by telephone.

On the way to the disaster site, Araneta also met a man who said His 2-year-old child died because I of the typhoon.

"If we include those killed 2-year-old mind 44 were confirmed dead in New servant, Compostela Valley alone," she said. "Definitely so it dies after fall on a palm tree in strong winds. Definitely others drowned because of the height of the flood and mud."

Lt.. Col. Lyndon Paniza, spokesman of the Army's 10th Infantry Division, confirmed the deaths.

He said 23 others were injured while six soldiers remain missing.

Paniza said he has no confirmed information yet on the number of missing civilians in the Compostela Valley tragedy.

Compostela Valley Governor Arturo Uy said local officials told him earlier in the day that 34 people were killed in New Bataan.

"It's possible They have found more bodies," Uy told ANC.

"The first news, there is suddenly a huge blast of water from a mountain which they expected," he said.

"Do I please request that the chopper in the Army. Appealed as I provide whatever assistance - rescue equipment," he added.

Benito Ramos, executive director of the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC), told ANC he has no information yet on the Compostela Valley tragedy.

He said They are still verifying the reports.

The typhoon has also killed and least 29 people in Davao Oriental province, police said Tuesday.

Twenty-three people died in Cateel town alone because I of a flash flood caused by a storm surge, provincial police director Supt. Romil Mitra said.

He said 95 others were injured.

Initial reports said an evacuation center in the town collapsed.

Four fishermen were also reported missing, said Freddie Bendulo, planning and development officer of Davao Oriental.

Three were killed in Caraga, and 3 died in BANGANGA, Tarragona, and Manay, according to Mitra.

Deaths in Surigao del Sur, Agusan del Sur

Three people also died in Surigao del Sur, according to police chief Supt. Ranier Pearl.

One of the fatalities, 68-year-old Rosita Amundio, died when a coconut tree Fell on her house.

Two were killed in Lingig, near Surigao del Sur's boundary with Davao Oriental.

Five people also died in Trento town in Agusan del Sur, according to radio dzMM's Noel Alamar.

"I was able to penetrate Bislig City, Surigao Sur in Lingig. Sites of destruction. People need help here," Alamar said on Twitter Tuesday night.

More than 53,000 in emergency shelters

As Night Fell and the typhoon continued its Onslaught in Mindanao, fears rose that the toll could rise sharply as the strongest storm to hit the country this year brought scenes of devastation.

On Tuesday, Typhoon Pablo brought driving rain and packed gusts of up to 210 kilometers an hour, toppling trees and power lines, causing flashfloods and forcing more than 50,000 to seek refuge in emergency shelters.

The cyclone, Which had weakened after making landfall, headed for the Sulu Sea in the late afternoon, changing course westward, state weather bureau PAGASA said.

Winds blew roofs off some buildings and residents of coastal and low-lying communities in Mindanao moved into shelters as floods hit some areas.

Television footage also showed logs being swept down river Mindanao's Sumilao, utility workers and cutting up fallen trees that were blocking highways.

More than 53,000 people had moved into government shelters nearly 1,000 by early Sunday, the NDRRMC said.

Television footage showed large numbers of people lying on mats or cardboard sheets on the concrete floors of gyms.

People living in the path of the storm They did what could to protected Their homes and possessions.

"We have taken our pigs and chickens inside our house because I shed Their Might be destroyed," 46-year-old shopkeeper Marianita Villamor from the southern farming town of San Fermin said.

In Cagayan de Oro city, where giant waves crashed down on the shoreline, Mayor Vicente Emano told ABS-CBN News that police rounded up all residents of low-lying areas and moved them to government shelters.

In Tagum City, hotel waiter Edgie Atilano, 23, said he and His family hunkered down in Their Home as Pablo bore down.

"And 3:00 am, we were woken by strong rain and howling winds. Trees and branches started snapping off near the house," he said. "This is my first time to experience a strong typhoon. It was a bit scary."

Typhoon heads for Palawan

By early evening the weakened typhoon was streaking across the Sulu Sea, having changed course westward in the afternoon after briefly threatening the central tourist islands of Bohol, Cebu and Negros, the state weather service said.

It was heading Toward the north western tip of the island of Palawan and the South China Sea beyond.

A total of 146 flights to and from Mindanao and the central islands had been grounded since Thursday night and more than 3,000 passengers were stranded as ferry vessels were ordered to stay in port, according to a civil defense updates.

Large parts of Mindanao, Which is not normally hit by typhoons, were still without electricity on Tuesday night, it added.

Typhoon Bopha/Pablo comes after tropical storm Sendong (Washi) hit Mindanao in December last year, killing more than 1,200 and leaving hundreds of thousands homeless. - With reports from Vina Araneta and Paul Palacio, ABS-CBN News Southern Mindanao: Jeff Canoy, ABS-CBN News: Noel Alamar, dzMM; ANC: Agence France-Presse
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15977
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
It has been a long time since I've made a poll, so here goes one.

Q: Should the Atlantic hurricane season start date be pushed back from June 1 to May 15?

A. Yes
B. No
C. Makes no difference to me
B
Member Since: October 15, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 4467
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
It has been a long time since I've made a poll, so here goes one.

Q: Should the Atlantic hurricane season start date be pushed back from June 1 to May 15?

A. Yes
B. No
C. Makes no difference to me
A. Yes. Might just make a difference to the climate change and warming. Storms seem to be happening sooner and data should be kept earlier.
Member Since: November 13, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 488
Quoting VAbeachhurricanes:


There would be, but since water weighs more and is denser the pumps that are able to pump the oil may not be able to pump the water. Plus you have to factor in the viscosity of the liquids.


It maybe the ultimate plan long term, once we wing off oil and its use is nowhere at the levels needed, we can start converting those pipelines into water lines to water the country. That's the route I would go.



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Quoting VAbeachhurricanes:


There would be, but since water weighs more and is denser the pumps that are able to pump the oil may not be able to pump the water. Plus you have to factor in the viscosity of the liquids.


I wonder how the cost of sorting such problems might compare to the cost of new, liquid-specific piping.
Member Since: September 18, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 616
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
It has been a long time since I've made a poll, so here goes one.

Q: Should the Atlantic hurricane season start date be pushed back from June 1 to May 15?

A. Yes
B. No
C. Makes no difference to me

A!!!! A A A A A.....
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Quoting RitaEvac:




#203
Wow!! what a map Rita..
I had no clue..
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
It has been a long time since I've made a poll, so here goes one.

Q: Should the Atlantic hurricane season start date be pushed back from June 1 to May 15?

A. Yes
B. No
C. Makes no difference to me


C
Member Since: September 18, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 616
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
It has been a long time since I've made a poll, so here goes one.

Q: Should the Atlantic hurricane season start date be pushed back from June 1 to May 15?

A. Yes
B. No
C. Makes no difference to me


C
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Quoting Bielle:


A further question from someone who knows very little science: water and oil don't mix. Is there any way of using the existing oil pipelines (or some of them at some times) to transport water, either concurrently or at alternating times? Presumably it all has to be filtered anyway . . .


There would be, but since water weighs more and is denser the pumps that are able to pump the oil may not be able to pump the water. Plus you have to factor in the viscosity of the liquids.
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Quoting Bielle:


Here, out in the countryside, I am surrounded by working farms, a mix of grain and vegetable crops and dairy farms, with some beef. It is considered unneighbourly to water grass. We are all relying on groundwater and, while we have enough and then some right at the moment, any given year can be a bad one. A beautiful lawn, except after a good rain, is not something in which we take any pride.


Like I said earlier..I had to convince my mom not to water..
It's the old ways that are harder to break..JMO. :)
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Quoting Bielle:


A further question from someone who knows very little science: water and oil don't mix. Is there any way of using the existing oil pipelines (or some of them at some times) to transport water, either concurrently or at alternating times? Presumably it all has to be filtered anyway . . .


I heard they could do it, but have to google it
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
It has been a long time since I've made a poll, so here goes one.

Q: Should the Atlantic hurricane season start date be pushed back from June 1 to May 15?

A. Yes
B. No
C. Makes no difference to me
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32830
Quoting RitaEvac:




A further question from someone who knows very little science: water and oil don't mix. Is there any way of using the existing oil pipelines (or some of them at some times) to transport water, either concurrently or at alternating times? Presumably it all has to be filtered anyway . . .
Member Since: September 18, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 616
Quoting yonzabam:


Of course. We could pay the growing unemployed population to melt the ice with blowtorches. At least they'd be earning their welfare money.

A long road and buckets?
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Quoting Bielle:


Wow! Thank you and calkevin77.


Why it's economically damaging when storms hit LA and TX
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Quoting RitaEvac:




Wow! Thank you and calkevin77.
Member Since: September 18, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 616
Quoting calkevin77:


I believe that there are both pipes that transport crude unrefined oil from a drill area or tanker distribution center to a refinery as well as pipes that transport refined petroleum products from refineries to other centers. Not sure but I know we have hundreds of miles of underground pipes transporting that stuff from the coast to inland here in TX. Then you have the Alaska pipeline for example that transports crude oil over 800 miles in a four foot diameter pipe. I believe there are a bunch of pumps throughout the line that are required move the oil across the state.


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Quoting pcola57:


Thanks for your input Mr. Mixon
Very good thinking in my book..
Each area has a climate of it's own..
Here in Pensacola we have been rated to have the worst water in the US..
I only drink bottled water here and use the municipal water for clothes washing ect..
I finally convinced my mother to quit watering the lawn here...
The lawn was just awful until rains came and wow what a difference..
I agree that as a society we all need to remedy our building codes to allow and encourage better homes with intelligent designs to protect our futures..
Thanks again.. :)


Here, out in the countryside, I am surrounded by working farms, a mix of grain and vegetable crops and dairy farms, with some beef. It is considered unneighbourly to water grass. We are all relying on groundwater and, while we have enough and then some right at the moment, any given year can be a bad one. A beautiful lawn, except after a good rain, is not something in which we take any pride.
Member Since: September 18, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 616
Quoting MrMixon:


If only there were any "extra" water in the Rockies. I don't know the situation for other states, but every drop of water in Colorado is already bought and paid for. Most land owners don't own the water on their land here. We're not even (legally) allowed to catch rain water running off our roofs. There's not a single extra drop of water in our stretch of the Rockies to supply an aqueduct system.

Moreover, there are at any one time numerous ongoing lawsuits regarding claims to Colorado water. It's a messy, complicated system and the only real certainty is that there are no longer any springs or ice fields in Colorado that are unclaimed (many are claimed by more than one party - hence the lawsuits).


That seems ludicrous to me... there is a law against collecting your own rain water? That is like the most water consevationy thing a person can do.
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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