The bizarrely active hurricane season of 2012 draws to a close

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 4:50 PM GMT on November 30, 2012

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The long and highly destructive hurricane season of 2012 has finally drawn to a close. The hurricane season of 2012 will long be remembered for spawning Hurricane Sandy--a freakish storm that was the largest, most powerful, and second most destructive Atlantic hurricane on record. But this year's hurricane season had a number of unique attributes, making it one of the most bizarre seasons I've witnessed. Despite featuring a remarkable nineteen named storms--tied for the third highest total since record keeping began in 1851--this year's hurricane season had just one major hurricane. That storm was Hurricane Michael, which stayed at Category 3 strength for a scant six hours. This is the least number of major hurricanes in a season since the El Niño year of 1997, which had only Category 3 Hurricane Erika. There were no Category 4 or 5 hurricanes in 2012, for just the 3rd time since the active hurricane period we are in began in 1995. The only two other years since 1995 without a Category 4 or stronger hurricane were the El Niño years of 2006 and 1997. Both of those seasons had around half the number of named storms of 2012--nine in 2006, and eight in 1997. The relative lack of strong storms in 2012 helped keep the Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) down to 128, about 30% above average.


Figure 1. Hurricane Sandy at 10:10 am EDT October 28, 2012. Image credit: NASA/GSFC.

A near-average year for number of tropical cyclones hitting the U.S.
Since the active hurricane period we've been in began in 1995, the U.S. has averaged getting hit by 4 named storms per year, with an average of 1.7 of these being hurricanes, and 0.6 being major Category 3 and stronger hurricanes. This year, we were hit by 3 named storms (Beryl, Debby, and Isaac). One of these was a hurricane (Isaac). Sandy didn't count as a hurricane strike on the U.S., since it transitioned to an extratropical cyclone a few hours before landfall. No major hurricanes hit the U.S., making 2012 the 7th consecutive year without a major hurricane strike. The only other time we've had a streak that long occurred between 1861 - 1868, during the decade of the Civil War.


Figure 2. Vertical instability over the tropical Atlantic in 2004 - 2012 (blue line) compared to average (black line.) The instability is plotted in °C, as a difference in temperature from near the surface to the upper atmosphere (note that the same scale is not used in all the plots, making the black climatological line appear different, when it is really the same for each plot.) Thunderstorms grow much more readily when vertical instability is high. Instability was near average during the August - October peak of hurricane season in 2004 - 2009, but was much lower than average during the hurricane seasons of 2010 - 2012. There was an unusual amount of dry, sinking air in the tropical Atlantic during 2010 - 2012, and the resulting low atmospheric instability reduced the proportion of tropical storms that have intensified into hurricanes. Vertical instability from 2004 - 2011 is taken from NOAA/RAMMB and for 2012 from NOAA/SSD.

Unusually stable air over the Tropical Atlantic in 2012
For the third consecutive hurricane season, 2012 featured an unusual amount of dry, sinking air over the tropical Atlantic and Caribbean Sea. Due to warmer-than-average sea surface temperatures and an active African Monsoon that generated plenty of African waves, a remarkably high number of tropical storms managed to form, but the unusually stable air in the hurricane genesis regions made it difficult for the storms to become strong. When we did see storms undergo significant intensification, it tended to occur outside of the tropics, north of 25°N, where there was not as much dry, sinking air (Sandy's intensification as it approached landfall in Cuba was an exception to this rule.) If we look at the last nine hurricane seasons (Figure 2), we can see that the hurricane seasons of 2010, 2011, and 2012 all featured similar levels of highly stable air over the tropical Atlantic. This is in marked contrast to what occurred the previous six years. The past three seasons all featured a near-record number of named storms (nineteen each year), but an unusually low ratio of strong hurricanes. Steering patterns the past three years also acted to keep most of the storms out to sea. Is this strange pattern something we'll see more of, due to climate change? Or is it mostly due to natural cycles in hurricane activity? I don't have any answers at this point, but the past three hurricane seasons have definitely been highly unusual in a historical context. I expect the steering currents to shift and bring more landfalling hurricanes to the U.S. at some point this decade, though.


Figure 3. Sea water floods the Ground Zero construction site at the World Trade Center, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York City. Image credit: AP.

Most notable events of the Hurricane Season of 2012
Hurricane Sandy was truly astounding in its size and power. At its peak size, twenty hours before landfall, Sandy had tropical storm-force winds that covered an area nearly one-fifth the area of the contiguous United States. Since detailed records of hurricane size began in 1988, only one tropical storm (Olga of 2001) has had a larger area of tropical storm-force winds, and no hurricanes has. Sandy's area of ocean with twelve-foot seas peaked at 1.4 million square miles--nearly one-half the area of the contiguous United States, or 1% of Earth's total ocean area. Most incredibly, ten hours before landfall (9:30 am EDT October 30), the total energy of Sandy's winds of tropical storm-force and higher peaked at 329 terajoules--the highest value for any Atlantic hurricane since at least 1969. This is 2.7 times higher than Katrina's peak energy, and is equivalent to five Hiroshima-sized atomic bombs. At landfall, Sandy's tropical storm-force winds spanned 943 miles of the the U.S. coast. No hurricane on record has been wider; the previous record holder was Hurricane Igor of 2010, which was 863 miles in diameter. Sandy's huge size prompted high wind warnings to be posted from Chicago to Eastern Maine, and from Michigan's Upper Peninsula to Florida's Lake Okeechobee--an area home to 120 million people. Sandy's winds simultaneously caused damage to buildings on the shores of Lake Michigan at Indiana Dunes National Lake Shore, and toppled power lines in Nova Scotia, Canada--locations 1200 miles apart!


Figure 4. Hurricane Isaac lit up by moonlight as it spins towards the city of New Orleans, LA, on August 26, 2012. The Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite captured these images with its Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS). The "day-night band" of VIIRS detects light in a range of wavelengths from green to near-infrared and uses light intensification to enable the detection of dim signals. Image Credit: NASA/NOAA, Earth Observatory.

Hurricane Isaac hit Louisiana as a Category 1 hurricane with 80 mph winds on August 28, but the storm's massive wind field brought a storm surge characteristic of a Category 2 hurricane to the coast. A storm surge of 11.1 feet was measured at Shell Beach, LA and higher surges were reported in portions of Louisiana. Fortunately, the new $14.5 billion upgrade to the New Orleans levee system kept the city dry. Isaac killed 9 people in the U.S., and 29 in the Caribbean.

Hurricane Ernesto hit Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula as a Category 1 hurricane with 85 mph winds on August 7. The storm killed 12 and did at least $250 million in damage.

Tropical Storm Debby formed on June 23, the earliest formation date on record for the season's 4th storm. The previous record was Dennis, on July 5, 2005. Debby killed seven and did over $300 million in damage, but helped relieve drought conditions over Northern Florida and Southern Georgia.

Tropical Storm Beryl, which made landfall on May 28 near Jacksonville Beach, FL with 70 mph winds, was the strongest tropical storm to make landfall in the U.S. prior to June 1. Beryl killed two but did minimal damage.

Nadine lasted for 21.75 days as a named storm, the 5th longest-lasting tropical storm in the Atlantic basin.

It was the 3rd year in a row with 19 named storms.

No named storms existed during the month of July and November, but we still managed big numbers.

Only 7 seasons have had more hurricanes than 2012.

The season had two named storm before the official June 1 start of hurricane season, only the 3rd time that has occurred.

Eight named storms formed in August, which tied 2004 for the most to form in that month.

Typhoon Bopha a threat to the Philippines
In the Western Pacific, where typhoon season commonly brings several storms in December, we have impressive Typhoon Bopha. Bopha is expected to head west-northwest and intensify over the weekend, potentially arriving in the Philippines on Tuesday as a powerful Category 3 typhoon. Bopha formed at an unusually low latitude for a tropical cyclone--near 4°N. Storms forming that close to the Equator don't get much help from the Earth's spin to get spinning, and it is rare to see a tropical cyclone forming southwards of 5°N.

The Colorado State University hurricane forecast team, led by Phil Klotzbach and Bill Gray, has a more in-depth summary of the 2012 hurricane season.

Jeff Masters

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Quoting bappit:

Source?
The source is Oceania TV, at least that is where I seen it

BTW what a good game between Bama and the Dawgs
Member Since: July 6, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2259
Three Crow Recipes

From Debbie, courtesy of her Mom's WW II cookbook
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Quoting AGWcreationists:
"Some locals have explained that “it always turns north” representing a general distrust in the meterological predictions for Typhoon Bopha."

Sounds like the attitude in NOLA pre-Katrina. An attitude that gets a lot of people killed.

Source?
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Quoting LurkyMcLurkerson:
And also, chickens, they are stupid.



Why yes, yes they are. If you have ever raised turkeys, you will know that if you leave them out in the rain, they will stare straight up and literally drown where they stand. But you have to put pretty, shiny marbles into their water so they can peck at the baubles and find a drink :) Ironic.
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516. wxmod
Quoting CaicosRetiredSailor:
HELSINKI—In a report released Thursday at the United Nations pop culture summit in Finland, a consortium of leading entertainment scientists confirmed that the year 2012 has witnessed the hottest celebrities in recorded history.

Citing evidence such as dangerously hot celebrity beach bodies, steadily rising chemistry between sizzling-hot megastars, and a myriad of extreme, record-breaking blockbuster movie events, the U.N. group claimed the overall hotness of celebrities worldwide is increasing at a staggering rate, with many specific celebrities reported to be “so on fire right now it’s scary.”


www.theonion.com


I know I am. Thank you.
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515. wxmod
Quoting LurkyMcLurkerson:
Man, I just got _soaked_. We had some downpour, thought there was a calm moment, and I felt bad for my chickens, who were hiding out underneath their henhouse like morons and getting soaked. So I ran out to stuff them _in_ their house, where it's, you know, dry. By the time I had grabbed one chicken, the gods turned on the faucet.

I'm sure that would have been a pretty funny video, me running around in a downpour trying to catch freaked out chickens (though not as funny as the time a squirrel ran up my leg -- I'm still sad that nobody was around to see my awesome squirrel-up-my-leg dance).

Anyway, so CA, yes, it is wet.


THE CHICKENS MUST BE PROTECTED, AT ALL COST!
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Quoting CaicosRetiredSailor:
HELSINKI—In a report released Thursday at the United Nations pop culture summit in Finland, a consortium of leading entertainment scientists confirmed that the year 2012 has witnessed the hottest celebrities in recorded history.

Citing evidence such as dangerously hot celebrity beach bodies, steadily rising chemistry between sizzling-hot megastars, and a myriad of extreme, record-breaking blockbuster movie events, the U.N. group claimed the overall hotness of celebrities worldwide is increasing at a staggering rate, with many specific celebrities reported to be “so on fire right now it’s scary.”


www.theonion.com


trust The Onion! (No, no, what am I saying? Don't trust the Onion.) LOL
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She's just a blog, and she's on fire
Hotter than a fantasy, longer like a highway
She's living in a world, and it's on fire
Feeling the catastrophe, but she knows she can fly away
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HELSINKI—In a report released Thursday at the United Nations pop culture summit in Finland, a consortium of leading entertainment scientists confirmed that the year 2012 has witnessed the hottest celebrities in recorded history.

Citing evidence such as dangerously hot celebrity beach bodies, steadily rising chemistry between sizzling-hot megastars, and a myriad of extreme, record-breaking blockbuster movie events, the U.N. group claimed the overall hotness of celebrities worldwide is increasing at a staggering rate, with many specific celebrities reported to be “so on fire right now it’s scary.”


www.theonion.com
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A loop of Bopha or when it enters the Philippines Pablo



Here is the forecast track from the JTWC with Lat and Lon

img src="BOPHA storm path from jtwc Time Speed Location December 1, 2012 12:00pm 125 knots 5.8, 138.8 December 2, 2012 12:00am 130 knots 6.5, 136.4 December 2, 2012 12:00pm 130 knots 7.2, 133.8 December 3, 2012 12:00am 125 knots 7.9, 131.2 December 3, 2012 12:00pm 120 knots 8.7, 128.6 December 4, 2012 12:00pm 95 knots 10.6, 123.7 December 5, 2012 12:00pm 75 knots 12.1, 121.0 December 6, 2012 12:00pm 70 knots 13.8, 118.1">

It is a small storm, hurricane wind only extend out 35 NM or so
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I feel so bad for Palau.

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And also, chickens, they are stupid.
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Man, I just got _soaked_. We had some downpour, thought there was a calm moment, and I felt bad for my chickens, who were hiding out underneath their henhouse like morons and getting soaked. So I ran out to stuff them _in_ their house, where it's, you know, dry. By the time I had grabbed one chicken, the gods turned on the faucet.

I'm sure that would have been a pretty funny video, me running around in a downpour trying to catch freaked out chickens (though not as funny as the time a squirrel ran up my leg -- I'm still sad that nobody was around to see my awesome squirrel-up-my-leg dance).

Anyway, so CA, yes, it is wet.
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Quoting RTSplayer:


I wonder what 175mph sustained on the open ocean looks like?

T 7.5 = 178mph...


Be hard to see it. There would be so much water in the air column next to the surface, it would just be white. During Wilma, there were times my dock, which was just above the wave tops, would disappear. I could see the top of the taller pilings but the dock "deck" whited out. This began happening at about 100 MPH -+ I remember wondering how marine mammals and sea turtles could breath.

I talked to a 1928 survivor and listened to him sharing his story with Eliot Kleinberg some years back. Eliot wrote Black Cloud The deadly hurricane of 1928. He said they could hardly breath after they were forced to chop their way out of the attic and onto the roof, then in the water and pond apple treetops.

175 MPH would be insane, the wind would be trying to rip the tops off the seas while building them up.
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The Song Remains The Same
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Quoting DocNDswamp:
re: #430

Howdy Barefoot,
Just lurking thru at the moment... Actually what they're addressing is sea level rise attributed to warm ocean thermal expansion, several references from Google search - "sea level rise from thermal expansion"...
Thank you, DocNDswamp.

To everyone reading along,
A little different Google search, the one I used, what is tyhermal expansion?, (lol) typo and all, yielded a result at a site called the engineering toolbox that speaks to calculating thermal expansion. Here they're talking about metals but that transfers in my brain to what ScottLincoln wrote at #409: "Thus far, thermal expansion has been responsible for the largest portion of sea level rise (directly tied to ocean temperature)..."

What I have so far gathered is this:
1) Engineers have interesting tools.

2) Related to sea level rise, the scientists among us are looking at

~Simple changes in the chemical state of water molecules, especially global ice. I take it
Antarctic ice does not enter this part of the equation because it is land-based or... ?because its melt does not do much to change sea temperature. That part is kinda hazy.

~The excitation of water molecules already in the seas and those that might join them from ice melt, or rivers run, or rainfall, snowfall or other manifestations of something whose technical name I do not know but would call "the atmospheric cycle of water." At sea, maybe bunches of these molecules are not excited enough to rise into the air as gaseous particles. They stay liquid and are only warm and excited enough to enlarge somewhat. As such, instead of rising they just take up a little more space.

What's most interesting to me is "global warming" can boil down to a discussion about the molecular state of water. Which leads me to some previous discussions of observed weather. For example, the Mississippi floods and the droughts in 2011. Remember how incongruous and ironic it all seemed? Some say all this extreme weather is evidence global warming is out of control. Whose control, Man's or Nature's, is debatable. I have hope any extreme weather will help bring the climate back into a balance more suitable for mankind. All we have to do is what(ever) it takes to live through it.

Now if I could just figure how the molecular state of water relates to CO2. Or maybe CO2 is a whole 'nother part of the recipe that draws the balance in a different direction. I don't know, but it could be.

Some of you might think I'm being silly or facetious here today. By and large, I am not. This is how my mind works.

... Watching GeorgiaStormz' team play for the SEC championship. Great game!
:)
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503. Skyepony (Mod)
BOPHA
CI 7.1
899.7mb
mean cloud -79.09
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Quoting Matthias1967:
Typhoon Bopha is getting bad for Palau, and they just don't realize it:


Palau is dead still right now, with almost an eerie calmness. It belies the impending typhoon disaster that seems to be tracking its way directly for Palau. Any tropical cyclone approaching within 180 miles of Koror is considered a threat to Palau. The latest information has Typhoon Bopha approaching within 15 miles of Koror. In its steady approach, Typhoon Bopha is gaining strength and is expected to reach Palau late Sunday evening with sustained winds of 125 miles per hour and gusts up to 155 miles per hour. This will be the most powerful storm Palau has experienced since before 1941.

Typhoon Bopha is projected to land in mid-Babeldoab with major impact to Palau’s city center Koror. Some businesses and households are beginning to prepare; however, there seems to be a general sense of disbelief that the storm is coming and how powerful it will be when it arrives. Driving through the downtown city center only three or four businesses have boarded up their windows. Some locals have explained that “it always turns north” representing a general distrust in the meterological predictions for Typhoon Bopha.

Palau is an island nation with no building codes. A large majority of homes are built with wood frames and tin roofs. The potential for wide spread destruction is unfathomable. Residents of Palau’s northern state of Kayangel, a low lying atoll, have refused to evacuate and the government is not imposing a mandatory evacuation. The last large storm to hit Palau was Typhoon Marie in 1976 with peak gusts of of 86 mph. However, no severe storm has has ever been recorded as effecting Palau. Typhoon Sally had recorded winds of only 89 miles in 1967. Typhoon Sally in 1967 caused wide spread destruction.


Source

That is going to be bad!
"Some locals have explained that “it always turns north” representing a general distrust in the meterological predictions for Typhoon Bopha."

Sounds like the attitude in NOLA pre-Katrina. An attitude that gets a lot of people killed.
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500. Skyepony (Mod)
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Bopha

Rainbow

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There are now 20 days until the 2012 winter solstice.
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Quoting barbamz:


As far as I know: When they can't find out the depth they write: 0,0.
\

why do you talk about so high numbers...O saw that the storm was raised to 145 mph...not even close to the t number 8.0
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All I can say is thank goodness the AR isn't setup over Western Washington... although there is some mention of that happening on Tuesday/Wednesday in the forecast discussion...



STORM SUMMARY NUMBER 09 FOR WESTERN U.S. HEAVY RAIN AND SNOW NWS HYDROMETEOROLOGICAL PREDICTION CENTER COLLEGE PARK MD 100 PM PST SAT DEC 01 2012

...HEAVY RAIN...SNOW...AND WIND CONTINUE TO IMPACT THE WESTERN STATES...

WINTER STORM WATCHES AND WARNINGS AND WINTER WEATHER ADVISORIES ARE IN EFFECT FOR THE HIGHER ELEVATIONS OF
WASHINGTON...OREGON...IDAHO...WESTERN MONTANA...AND WESTERN WYOMING.

HIGH WIND WATCHES...WARNINGS...AND WIND ADVISORIES ARE IN EFFECT FOR PORTIONS OF CENTRAL AND NORTHERN
CALIFORNIA...OREGON...NORTHERN AND CENTRAL NEVADA...SOUTHWESTERN IDAHO...AS WELL AS PORTIONS OF MONTANA AND WYOMING.

FLOOD AND FLASH FLOOD WATCHES AND WARNINGS...ARE IN EFFECT FOR PORTIONS OF NORTHERN AND CENTRAL CALIFORNIA...AS WELL AS PORTIONS OF OREGON AND WASHINGTON.

AT 100 PM PST...AN EXPANSIVE AREA OF LOW PRESSURE WITH A CENTRAL PRESSURE OF 978 MB...28.88 INCHES...CENTERED OVER THE NORTHEAST PACIFIC CONTINUES TO FEED MOISTURE INTO THE WESTERN U.S. A FRONTAL SYSTEM EXTENDING TO THE SOUTHEAST OF THE LOW HAS PUSHED ONSHORE IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST. NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DOPPLER RADARS AND SURFACE OBSERVATIONS INDICATED SCATTERED TO WIDESPREAD PRECIPITATION ACROSS CENTRAL AND NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ...WESTERN WASHINGTON...AS WELL AS OVER PORTIONS OF THE INTER-MOUNTAIN WEST. THE MAJORITY OF THE PRECIPITATION ACROSS THE REGION IS FALLING AS LIGHT TO MODERATE RAIN. HOWEVER...SNOW WAS OCCURRING IN THE HIGHER ELEVATIONS OF THE NORTHWEST AND INTER-MOUNTAIN WEST.

PACIFIC MOISTURE WILL CONTINUE TO IMPACT THE NORTHWESTERN STATES THROUGH THE NEXT FEW DAYS. THROUGH TUESDAY AFTERNOON...AN ADDITIONAL 3 TO 6 INCHES OF RAIN...WITH LOCALLY HIGHER AMOUNTS...WILL BE POSSIBLE ACROSS COASTAL AREAS OF CENTRAL AND NORTHERN CALIFORNIA AS WELL AS OREGON AND WASHINGTON. FLOODING AND FLASH FLOODING WILL BE POSSIBLE IN THESE AREAS. AT HIGHER ELEVATIONS...WHERE SNOW IS FALLING...AN ADDITIONAL 1 TO 3 FEET OF SNOW WILL BE POSSIBLE THROUGH TUESDAY.
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91L:

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Quoting yqt1001:
Well, 3rd category 5 storm of the year (all WPAC). 3 more than last year.



No doubt the strongest storm this close to the equator though.







Unbelievable the amounts of super Typhoon (10) in west pacific in contrast with the atlantic with (1) majors hurricane........ Will be interesting to see if exist any correlation in that.....
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Quoting Orcasystems:
BTW...

How do you have a earthquake with a depth of 0 Km?

01-DEC-2012 16:58:49 56.06 -156.94 4.4 0.0 ALASKA PENINSULA


As far as I know: When they can't find out the depth they write: 0,0.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
01/2030 UTC 5.9N 138.2E T7.5/7.5 BOPHA -- West Pacific


Incredible, if this keeps up it could go as high as 8.0.
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I made a blog update on 91L and Bopha. I usually do not post blog entires on the western Pacific.

91L could develop over the central Atlantic; Bopha in the Western Pacific
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Quoting bappit:

Some becomes ground water.
Which generally finds its way back to the surface. Or maybe you can provide evidence of aquifers that are actually expanding?

Quoting bappit:

Some of what goes in the air comes back as ice.
But, of course, the initial premise here was that glaciers are contracting. Certainly some of the water that ends up in the atmosphere will return to the glaciers but there's still a net loss of mass. The question at hand is where does that lost water end up.

Quoting bappit:

Some slim amount perhaps could stay in the air.
I don't quite get this one. Are you suggesting that water vapor that comes from glaciers somehow behaves differently than water vapor from other sources?

Quoting bappit:

Some goes into lakes.

And lakes generally drain into rivers which drain into the ocean.


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Quoting MAweatherboy1:
The Sun has risen out there... that island could not possibly be in a worse spot right now:



I wonder what 175mph sustained on the open ocean looks like?

T 7.5 = 178mph...
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This storm is going to kill over 10,000 people if it keeps going the way it is. Bopha is probably a 175 mph Category 5 super typhoon right now and it's heading straight for an island with a complete crap building code and people that are extremely complacent. Afterwards, it's headed straight towards a portion of the Philippines not accustomed to these types of storms. For example, a tropical storm in 1991 took a similar path. It peaked with winds of 50 mph. That's all. But you know what it's death toll was? Between 5,000 and 8,000. The strongest storm in Palau's history (the island) produced wind gusts below 90 mph. Bopha is expected to produce sustained winds of at least 125 mph.

They need a miracle.

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The Sun has risen out there... that island could not possibly be in a worse spot right now:

Member Since: February 11, 2012 Posts: 83 Comments: 7849
This is crazy:

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Very intense convection around the eye.

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Quoting Orcasystems:


Sun? WTH is that?
Its been raining for months now...
I don't want to even look at the totals... its been raining really hard today... backyard looks like a place you would find gators
So THAT's where all FL's rain went to... we've been fortunate in that the post-Sandy rains we've had have mainly worked to revitalized the severely sand,salt and wind burned foliage. The trees are almost back to normal instead of the weirdly wintry brown and grey of the week after that nefarious system went through here.

And fortunately no 'gator lakes in sight....

Hope you guys get a break for Christmas... didn't I hear something about a change in the AO pattern? Might send those whopper systems north or south of u guys for a change.
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BTW...

How do you have a earthquake with a depth of 0 Km?

01-DEC-2012 16:58:49 56.06 -156.94 4.4 0.0 ALASKA PENINSULA
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Quoting BahaHurican:
Boy, u ga live long, as they say out here... my mind just went on you. How's the wx in [ahem] sunny Vancouver Isle???

[snicker]


Sun? WTH is that?
Its been raining for months now...
I don't want to even look at the totals... its been raining really hard today... backyard looks like a place you would find gators
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Quoting Orcasystems:


I sure hope your right... I used your credit cards to buy presents this year :)
Boy, u ga live long, as they say out here... my mind just went on you. How's the wx in [ahem] sunny Vancouver Isle???

[snicker]
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Quoting pottery:
November rainfall at my location is 165mm (6.5") which is about 2/3 of the average.


We went from basically July to the middle of Sept with no rain... and it hasn't stopped since :(
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Quoting pottery:

LOLOL.
You couldn't have got very much, then.
Shoelaces on special ???


What would you know about shoe laces? Those pink slippers didn't have laces...
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475. Skyepony (Mod)
Quoting BahaHurican:
We've been getting at least a trace here almost every day in November.... don't know if that will last far into December though.... I do hope the rain does hold up enough to support the Junkanoo season...


Horribly dry in Melbourne. Saw my first coastal showers lastnight in weeks. Had a few fleeting ones today. Only added up to .01".


Spent the day at the local NWS. Hams are calling from NWS to NWS across the country today, skywarn recognition day. MLB has won it a few times. Most the answers were coming from the mid-west.
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Quoting Orcasystems:


I sure hope your right... I used your credit cards to buy presents this year :)

LOLOL.
You couldn't have got very much, then.
Shoelaces on special ???
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November rainfall at my location is 165mm (6.5") which is about 2/3 of the average.
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Quoting misanthrope:


Streams that don't drain into the sea generally "drain" into the atmosphere (evaporation). That water is going to fall somewhere as precipitation and, sooner or later, is going to make its way to the sea. In this case, the connection to the ocean would be through the atmosphere.

Same goes for sublimation.



Probably for an approximation. Some becomes ground water. Some of what goes in the air comes back as ice. Some slim amount perhaps could stay in the air. (Who's to say?) Some goes into lakes.

I suppose it is fungible to some extent. One could say it leaves the glaciers and goes into the hydrologic cycle.
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Quoting pottery:

2013 ?
There's nothing after Dec. 21st 2012, apparently......


I sure hope your right... I used your credit cards to buy presents this year :)
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Quoting pottery:

Priorities in place, I see.

heheheheh

Hope you have a Good one!
LOL.... as always... would you be hoping for rain in February??? ;o)
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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