Nineteen Atlantic tropical storms 3 consecutive years: a very rare event

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 4:13 PM GMT on November 28, 2012

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The 2012 Atlantic hurricane season closes this Friday with another top-five tally for named storms--nineteen. This is the third consecutive year with nineteen named storms in the Atlantic, which is a remarkable level of activity for a three-year period. The closest comparable three-year period of activity occurred during 2003 - 2004 - 2005, when each season had fifteen-plus named storms. Since 1851, only two seasons--2005 (28 named storms) and 1933 (20 named storms)--have been busier than 2010, 2011, and 2012.


Figure 1. Preliminary tracks of the nineteen named storms from 2012. Image credit: National Hurricane Center.

How rare are 3 consecutive top-five hurricane seasons for named storms?
It is tremendously rare to get three consecutive top-five years in a database with a 162-year record. This would occur randomly just once every 34,000 years--assuming the database were unbiased, the climate were not changing, and a multi-year climate pattern favorable for active seasons were not present. However the database IS biased, the climate IS changing, and we have been in an active hurricane period that began in 1995. So, which of these factors may be responsible for recording three consecutive years with nineteen named storms? It is well-known that prior to the arrival of geostationary satellites in December 1966 and aircraft hurricane reconnaissance in 1945 that tropical storms in the Atlantic were under-counted. Landsea et al. (2004) theorized that we missed up to six named storms per year between 1851 - 1885, and up to four between 1886 - 1910. Landsea (2007) estimated the under-count to be 3.2 named storms per year between 1900 - 1965, and 1.0 per year between 1966 - 2002. Other studies have argued for lower under-counts. So, if we assume the highest under-counts estimated by Landsea et al. (2004) and Landsea (2007), here would be the top ten busiest Atlantic hurricane seasons since 1851:

2005: 28
1887: 25
1933: 23
1995: 20
2012, 2011, 2010, 1969, 1936: 19

So, 2012, 2011, and 2010 would still rank as top-five busiest seasons since 1851, but the odds of having three consecutive seasons with nineteen named storms would drop from a 1-in-34,000 year event to "only" a 1-in-5800 year event. More recently, Landsea et al. (2010) showed that the increasing trend in North Atlantic tropical storm frequency over the past 140 years was largely due to the increasing trend in short‐lived storms (storms lasting 2 days or less, called “shorties”), after the 1940s (Figure 2, top). They did not detect a significant increasing trend in medium‐ to long‐lived storms lasting more than 2 days. They wrote that “while it is possible that the recorded increase in short‐duration TCs [tropical cyclones] represents a real climate signal, we consider it is more plausible that the increase arises primarily from improvements in the quantity and quality of the observations, along with enhanced interpretation techniques.” Villarini et al. (2011), in a paper titled, "Is the recorded increase in short-duration North Atlantic tropical storms spurious?", agreed. They attempted to correlate increases in tropical Atlantic sea surface temperatures in recent decades to the increase in short-lived Atlantic tropical storms, and were unable to do so. They wrote: using statistical methods combined with the current understanding of the physical processes, we are unable to find support for the hypothesis that the century‐scale record of short‐lived tropical cyclones in the Atlantic contains a detectable real climate signal. Therefore, we interpret the long‐term secular increase in short‐duration North Atlantic tropical storms as likely to be substantially inflated by observing system changes over time. These results strongly suggest that studies examining the frequency of North Atlantic tropical storms over the historical era (between the 19th century and present) should focus on storms of duration greater than about 2 days. So, let's do that. If we look during the past three hurricane seasons at how many "shorties" were observed, we see that a large number that stayed at tropical storm strength for two days or less: six storms in 2010, six in 2011, and seven in 2012. This leaves the hurricane seasons of 2010, 2011, and 2012 with twelve to thirteen tropical storms that lasted more than two days. This doesn't stand out that much when looking at trends since 1878 (Figure 2, bottom); there are now 25 years in the 135-year record with twelve or more long-lived tropical cyclones. However, there are no previous occurrences of three consecutive years with at least twelve long-lived tropical storms, so 2010, 2011, and 2012 still represent an unprecedented level of tropical storm activity in the historical record, and we would expect such an event to occur randomly about once every 157 years. That's a pretty rare event, and it is possible that climate change, combined with the fact we are in an active hurricane period that began in 1995, contributed to this rare event.


Figure 2. Atlantic tropical cyclones between 1878 - 2012 that spent two days or less at tropical storm strength (top) and more than two days at tropical storm strength or hurricane strength (bottom.) Figure updated from Villarini, G., G. A. Vecchi, T. R. Knutson, and J. A. Smith (2011), "Is the recorded increase in short-duration North Atlantic tropical storms spurious?", J. Geophys. Res., 116, D10114, doi:10.1029/2010JD015493.

References
Landsea, C. W., C. Anderson, N. Charles, G. Clark, J. Dunion, J. Fernandez‐Partagas, P. Hungerford, C. Neumann, and M. Zimmer (2004), "The Atlantic hurricane database re‐analysis project: Documentation for 1851–1910 alterations and additions to the HURDAT database," in Hurricanes and Typhoons ‐ Past, Present, and Future, edited by R. J. Murnane and K. B. Liu, pp. 178–221, Columbia Univ. Press, New York.

Landsea, C. W., (2007), "Counting Atlantic tropical cyclones back to 1900," Eos, 88(18), 197-202.

Villarini, G., G. A. Vecchi, T. R. Knutson, and J. A. Smith (2011), "Is the recorded increase in short-duration North Atlantic tropical storms spurious?", J. Geophys. Res., 116, D10114, doi:10.1029/2010JD015493

Jeff Masters

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Well folks, we have 22 days left.

How are you going to spend each and every day like it is your last?
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Quoting lahcuts:


If one calculates the mass of the ice sheet from its volume, and using the 200 Gt/yr figure, on a linear basis, the time to melt the entire ice sheet is in the ballpark of 13000 years, as Page claims. Again, using the 6.5 m sea level rise if the entire ice sheet melts in 13K years, 118 years of melting gives approximately 5cm of sea level rise. You can discuss the reality of the linearity of melting over 13K years but the numbers are correct.


Now that's what I'm talkin about!

LOL.
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Mornin'Gang!

Evenin' Mate!
Member Since: September 23, 2006 Posts: 1 Comments: 2428
2012 Mayan Apocalypse Rumors Have Dark Side, NASA Warns

By Stephanie Pappas, LiveScience Senior Writer | SPACE.com – Wed, Nov 28, 2012

NASA scientists took time on Wednesday (Nov. 28) to soothe 2012 doomsday fears, warning against the dark side of Mayan apocalypse rumors — frightened children and suicidal teens who truly fear the world may come to an end Dec. 21.

Thus NASA's involvement. The space agency maintains a 2012 information page debunking popular Mayan apocalypse rumors, such as the idea that a rogue planet will hit Earth on Dec. 21, killing everyone. (In fact, astronomers are quite good at detecting near-Earth objects, and any wandering planet scheduled to collide with Earth in three weeks would be the brightest object in the sky behind the sun and moon by now.)

"There is no true issue here," David Morrison, an astrobiologist at NASA Ames Research Center, said during a NASA Google+ Hangout event today (Nov. 28). "This is just a manufactured fantasy."

Unfortunately, Morrison said, the fantasy has real-life consequences. As one of NASA's prominent speakers on 2012 doomsday myths, Morrison said, he receives many emails and letters from worried citizens, particularly young people. Some say they can't eat, or are too worried to sleep, Morrison said. Others say they're suicidal.

"While this is a joke to some people and a mystery to others, there is a core of people who are truly concerned," he said.

Not every 2012 apocalypse believer thinks the world will end on Dec. 21. Some, inspired by New Age philosophies, expect a day of universal peace and spiritual transformation. But it's impressionable kids who have NASA officials worried.

"I think it's evil for people to propagate rumors on the Internet to frighten children," Morrison said.

Ultimately, concerns about Earth's fate would be better focused on slow-acting problems such as climate change rather than some sort of cosmic catastrophe, said Andrew Fraknoi, an astronomer at Foothill College in California.

Mitzi Adams, a heliophysicist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, agreed.

"The greatest threat to Earth in 2012, at the end of this year and in the future, is just from the human race itself," Adams said.
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Texas braces for return of drought
Posted Thursday, Nov. 29, 2012

By Steve Campbell

sfcampbell@star-telegram.com

PERRIN -- Water managers are eyeing their gauges, farmers are watching wheat fields whither, ranchers are recalculating their herd numbers and city dwellers are dragging out their sprinklers again as drought rapidly intensifies across Texas.

A new federal survey shows the dreaded "d-word" is worming its way back as rainfall deficits mount and soil moisture, stream flows and water reserves quickly decline.

Ninety-four percent of Texas is now abnormally dry, 54 percent is stuck in severe drought and 25 percent is mired in the extreme category, up 10 percent from one week ago, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor released Thursday.

For now, one year after a record Texas drought caused $7.62 billion in agricultural losses, 6 million acres of winter wheat are the biggest concern. Forty to 45 percent of the crop is rated poor to very poor, a 15-point jump from last week, the U.S. Drought Monitor reported.

"There's not much to eat out there. I remember the drought in the 1950s and I think we are in the same situation," said Francis, whose boot-level view mirrors the pessimistic assessment of Texas state climatologist John Nielsen Gammon.

"I say we are in year three of a drought now and the short-range forecast is not promising. There's nothing out there that will distinguish this from the drought of record in the 1950s which lasted six or seven years," Nielsen Gammon said.

A grim forecast

"It's grim, it looks like Texas is going to have between the second- to fourth-driest October-November period on record," he said. "We're ahead of the drought pace from two years ago."

The state is quickly catching up with this year's dire conditions in the High Plains, where 86 percent of the region is mired in severe drought and 27 percent is in exceptional drought, the most severe category.

Nationally, 76 percent of the contiguous United States is abnormally dry.

A wet winter and spring eased a critical water crisis in Texas but since April the spigot has been turned off.

Water supply reservoirs in the state have dipped from 76 percent full six months ago to 64 percent on Thursday, according to the Texas Water Development Board. One year ago, the reservoirs were 59 percent full.

The dry conditions across Texas concern fire managers who fought wildfires on nearly 4 million acres during the 2011 fire season, said Tom Spencer, head of the predictive services department for the Texas A&M Forest Service.

"The real concern is that we are still carrying a pretty good level of drought. It doesn't seem like there is anything on the horizon that is going to help that," he said "The neutral forecast for El Niño puts some uncertainty into what to expect."

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770. whitewabit (Mod)
Quoting AussieStorm:
No rest from heat for Sydney

Sydney will struggle through a very warm night before confronting the hottest start to summer in eight years.

Temperatures soared across the Sydney Basin on Friday as a very hot air mass was drawn across the region ahead of an approaching trough.

The city managed to reach 29 degrees, which is five above average, although failed to climb higher due to a sea breeze. Further west though, Bankstown and Parramatta both reached 39, which is 14 above average and the hottest November day in three years.

Tonight will see the mercury remain in the mid-to-high twenties as heat lingers over Sydney, making for an uncomfortable night. This is around 8 degrees warmer than usual.

The warm start to Saturday will help western suburbs climb into the low-to-mid 40s during the day. The city and coastal suburbs are likely to reach the low to high 30s, thanks to strengthening northwesterly winds holding out a sea breeze. The sea breeze will bring humid conditions, particularly during the afternoon.

Saturday night will start out warm, although as the trough moves over the city during the night, southerly winds will bring cool relief.

Sunday will be significantly cooler than the previous two days, reaching a top in the mid 20s through much of the Sydney Basin.

- Weatherzone

© Weatherzone 2012


will that give a jump start to your fire season ???
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Quoting NJcat3cane:
kinda off topic but does anyone on here also doomsday prep?..

I'll worry about that on 12/22
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Quoting vanwx:


Cassandra, prophetess of doom never believed.

Pandora, who released all evil from the jar (mistranslated as box), and left Hope inside. Beats Cassie in my book
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No rest from heat for Sydney

Sydney will struggle through a very warm night before confronting the hottest start to summer in eight years.

Temperatures soared across the Sydney Basin on Friday as a very hot air mass was drawn across the region ahead of an approaching trough.

The city managed to reach 29 degrees, which is five above average, although failed to climb higher due to a sea breeze. Further west though, Bankstown and Parramatta both reached 39, which is 14 above average and the hottest November day in three years.

Tonight will see the mercury remain in the mid-to-high twenties as heat lingers over Sydney, making for an uncomfortable night. This is around 8 degrees warmer than usual.

The warm start to Saturday will help western suburbs climb into the low-to-mid 40s during the day. The city and coastal suburbs are likely to reach the low to high 30s, thanks to strengthening northwesterly winds holding out a sea breeze. The sea breeze will bring humid conditions, particularly during the afternoon.

Saturday night will start out warm, although as the trough moves over the city during the night, southerly winds will bring cool relief.

Sunday will be significantly cooler than the previous two days, reaching a top in the mid 20s through much of the Sydney Basin.

- Weatherzone

© Weatherzone 2012
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Quoting trHUrrIXC5MMX:
Don went like this



Lol. I don't think Don's demise was that pretty.
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Don went like this

Member Since: April 23, 2011 Posts: 104 Comments: 14869
Ya got me Kori. Apparently made landfall as a depression. According to Wiki. Couldn't get into the TCR. Although the third link on the list was Koritheman's tcr on TS Beryl. :)

Tropical Storm Don was the fourth named storm of the 2011 Atlantic hurricane season and the first tropical cyclone to make landfall in the United States during the 2011 season. Forming from an area of low pressure along a tropical wave, Don was operationally upgraded straight to tropical storm intensity on July 27, after a reconnaissance aircraft noted the presence of tropical-storm-force winds. It tracked across the Gulf of Mexico and reached a peak intensity of 50 mph (85 km/h) before moving ashore in Texas on July 30 as a tropical depression. Initially, Don was a possible catalyst for relief to the drought-stricken state, but the system dissipated rapidly after making landfall, providing very little in the way of help to the state.
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Quoting KoritheMan:

Don?


He went puff before even coming close
Member Since: April 23, 2011 Posts: 104 Comments: 14869
Quoting KoritheMan:

Don?


I think they took him off as officially hitting TX. Could be wrong? Lol. But yep, forgot poor Don. Of course there wasn't much tropical left of him after that whoopin' by the ridge. :)
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I dont think we will be seeing this level of honesty again. Really.
Worshipping the computer models....I am glad they cannot be hacked by men and that the -data- is just magically computer generated out of raw honest data.


Bryan Norcross

"Isn't it strange that a hurricane in the Bahamas would somehow turn into a monster mega-storm and slam into the Northeast at the end of October? Aren't hurricanes supposed to weaken as they move north over cold water? What the hell is going on?

The answers are... yes, yes, and we're not completely sure. This is a beyond-strange situation. It's unprecedented and bizarre. Hurricanes almost always bend out to sea in October, although there have been some exceptions when storms went due north, but rarely. No October tropical systems in the record book have turned left into the northeast coast.

The strong evidence we have that a significant, maybe historic, storm is going to hit the east coast is that EVERY reliable computer forecast model now says it's going to happen. The only way we can forecast the weather four or five days days from now is with the aid of these super-complex computer programs run on supercomputers. The two best, the European and the U.S. GFS (Global Forecast System) run by NOAA, are now in reasonable agreement that there IS going to be an extraordinarily unusual confluence of events that results in a massive storm.

The upper-air steering pattern that is part of the puzzle is not all that unheard of. It happens when the atmosphere gets blocked over the Atlantic and the flow over the U.S. doubles back on itself. Sometimes big winter storms are involved.

The freak part is that a hurricane happens to be in the right place in the world to get sucked into this doubled-back channel of air and pulled inland from the coast.

And the double-freak part is that the upper level wind, instead of weakening the storm and simply absorbing the moisture - which would be annoying enough - is merging with the tropical system to create a monstrous hybrid vortex. A combination of a hurricane and a nor'easter.

At least that's what the models are saying. And since all of the independent models are saying something similar, we have to believe them and be ready."
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Quoting AtHomeInTX:
But I'll have to look up what the record is for no tropical anything to hit TX. Four years on that too.
Don?
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Ah, so 2007's list will be back next year. Keep an eye on Humberto. He's a sneaky ummmm fella. We had Eduoard 08 too. Hope they both lost my address. :) Four years with no TX hurricane hits is still 6 shy of the longest hurricane drought. But I'll have to look up what the record is for no tropical anything to hit TX. Four years on that too.
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Quoting NJcat3cane:
kinda off topic but does anyone on here also doomsday prep?..


What kind of doomsday are you talking about?

If your talking about emergency preparation for hurricanes and such, a number of people on here think about and post about at the beginning of every hurricane season.

If you're talking about Extinction Level Event (ELE) type of doomsday scenarios (massive asteroid impact, supervolcanic eruptions, etc.) then you're wasting your time and your money. Such events are exceedingly rare, and most of them would kill you no matter where you decided to hole up. They're called extinction level events for a reason.

If you're talking about socio-economic collapse, it's still a waste of time and money, but not nearly as bad as trying to prepare for ELE type doomsday scenarios (assuming such destabilization doesn't cause global nuclear war). If a world nuclear war results, then you're back to an ELE type of event.

Assuming such wars don't occur, and you survive the initial destabilization process (not good odds depending on where you live) then you'll have to be able to sustain yourself for quite some time (longer than canned foods are going to last) until some semblance of social order is restored.

If you really want to prepare for a socio-economic collapse, go live in an Amish community for a couple of years. You'll probably learn a lot more long-term survival skills there, and you don't need to fork over $25,000 dollars to some charlatan selling the ultimate doomsday survival package or train yourself like Rambo.
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757. vanwx
Quoting NJcat3cane:
kinda off topic but does anyone on here also doomsday prep?..


Yep.
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756. vanwx
Quoting TropicTraveler:


Whatever we call it, it will still be what it is. Sweet little Sandy was false advertising. What would a good name for her have been? Who is the worst and most destructive female in mythology?


Cassandra, prophetess of doom never believed.
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755. vanwx
628. Neapolitan
Quoting Neapolitan:
Indeed. I've run through the full PNAS article three times, and all I can say is that Lewis Page, the author of the piece in the Register, appears to have gotten just one thing right--his name. And given how badly he mangled the PNAS article's conclusion, I might need to see his birth certificate before I believe even that.


L. Page used to have something to say on tech but has consistently been anti-sustainable anti-climate and anti-anything not microsoft or Intel. I quit reading it except for the cartoon and the space project. Do you think it's some sort of English phenom? He seems to have a board of like minded types.
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Saturn boasts some unique features in its atmosphere. When the Voyager missions traveled to the planet in the early 1980s, it imaged a hexagon-shaped cloud formation near the north pole. Twenty-five years later, infrared images taken by Cassini revealed the storm was still spinning, powered by jet streams that push it to speeds of about 220 mph (100 meters per second). At 15,000 miles (25,000 km) across, the long-lasting storm could easily contain an Earth or two.

via space.com

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Quoting allancalderini:
Chantal Nestor and Van are the names we should be aware I accept Humberto too,but I feel Ingrid will be a fail this is the least threatening I name imo of the six lists in use.

true... Ingrid is not...would we want a surprise this year??
Member Since: April 23, 2011 Posts: 104 Comments: 14869
hey guys
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Chantal Nestor and Van are the names we should be aware I accept Humberto too,but I feel Ingrid will be a fail this is the least threatening I name imo of the six lists in use.
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Quoting goosegirl1:


:)
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749. wxmod
Quoting MrMixon:


There was a significant amount of natural water vapor over the Midwest today. Look:



Can you share the location and approximate time of the image you posted?


Satellite photo times are available at the MODIS website. It takes a bit of work to pinpoint them. I would guess aprox 10AM central time. While you are at their site, take a look at the way the clouds are forming and their color. http://earthdata.nasa.gov/data/near-real-time-dat a
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Bedtime in this zone. Thanks to the gang for being here for my weather fix.
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Quoting TropicTraveler:

4-1/2 minutes of pure amazement - and then came Sandy. Thanks for posting this.


Your welcome.
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guys...look at this.. from NWS. For anyone wanting to go there
completely ridiculous at Mt. Shasta, CA

Tonight Snow. The snow could be heavy at times. Steady temperature around 22. Wind chill values as low as -5. Windy, with a south southwest wind 85 to 95 mph, with gusts as high as 115 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. Total nighttime snow accumulation of 36 to 42 inches possible.

there are already over 50" of snow on the ground... look at the major hurricane gusts A total of 80-90" of snow

Friday Snow showers. Temperature falling to around 15 by 4pm. Wind chill values as low as -12. Windy, with a south southwest wind 80 to 85 mph decreasing to 70 to 75 mph in the afternoon. Winds could gust as high as 115 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New snow accumulation of 21 to 27 inches possible.

now between 100-130 inches

Friday Night Snow. Temperature rising to around 19 by midnight. Wind chill values as low as -14. Windy, with a south southwest wind 70 to 80 mph, with gusts as high as 115 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New snow accumulation of 21 to 27 inches possible.

now between 125-150 inches

Saturday Snow. High near 20. Wind chill values as low as -14. Windy, with a southwest wind 75 to 80 mph, with gusts as high as 115 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New snow accumulation of 20 to 26 inches possible.

now 145-185 inches

Saturday Night Snow. Low around 19. Windy, with a south southwest wind 70 to 80 mph increasing to 85 to 95 mph in the evening. Winds could gust as high as 115 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New snow accumulation of 28 to 34 inches possible.

now 170-215 inches

Sunday Snow. High near 18. Windy. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New snow accumulation of 12 to 18 inches possible.

then to 180-230 inches!!!! that's 15-20 FEET!
Member Since: April 23, 2011 Posts: 104 Comments: 14869
.
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20 days... Everyone should have a bug out bag.. it cost under 100 dollars and is something u throw in your closet.. it could sit there for 25 years but you still know you have it... contents are simple.. inside a book bag goes: Alot of rope. differnt sizes. hand crank flashlight. 2 pair of wool socks and thick good gloves. a machete. 2 pocket knives. small flexable tubing. only a few feet needed. a tarp. a few painters masks. a water bottle with a fliter. a pot with a lid. pre baited mouse traps(if your in the woods) a hammer. few nails. atleast one mason jar with lid. about 25 unopened lighters. 20+ cotton balls completly covered in petroleoum jelly.

this leaves you plenty of room in a normal sized book bag. this is where u make the choice if you want to fill the bag up with more clothes and only some canned food and water bottles. or you can fit a good amount of cans and water bottles in the remaining space if your not worried about cold temps.. Bags change depending on location but this bag covers pretty much all grounds.

with those items in your bags it leaves you many resorces and ways of surviving from buliding shelter to catching food and filtering water most important.
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Quoting wxgeek723:


I like Edouard too but I don't think the public would appreciate such a name, lol.

Hurricane Edouard in 1996 was actually a fond storm of mine to study and look into.


It's right up there with those legendary names like Hugo or Andrew. In other words, it has the "I'ma **** your **** up" aura, which I always enjoy in a tropical cyclone. Incidentally, I feel Chantal will carry that legacy next year.
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Quoting Bielle:


Could your potential readers put in a request for standard punctuation and sentence structure? :)



My grammar Nazi daughter loves to see "your stupid". Her answer to that is, "You may not think I'm bright, but it's not so bad yet that I own stupid." :)
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Quoting srqthymesage:
I'll bite- Eris!

I keep thinking of the woman with snakes in her hair - Medusa, but she isn't bad enough. It has to be someone who brings screaming catastrophe when she turns and fixes her gaze on you. Maybe I'm looking for someone from the kids action heros cartoons.
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Quoting KoritheMan:


I like Edouard and Isaias.


I like Edouard too but I don't think the public would appreciate such a name, lol.

Hurricane Edouard in 1996 was actually a fond storm of mine to study and look into.
Member Since: August 28, 2008 Posts: 79 Comments: 3323
Quoting TropicTraveler:


Whatever we call it, it will still be what it is. Sweet little Sandy was false advertising. What would a good name for her have been? Who is the worst and most destructive female in mythology?
I'll bite- Eris!
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Quoting TropicTraveler:


Get showered together???


not just showered...remember we are talking about a hurricane
Member Since: April 23, 2011 Posts: 104 Comments: 14869
Quoting KoritheMan:


Sandy wasn't amazing in her own right?


Oh yeah! On the speed up she just wiggled her substantial backside and went whump all over New York and New Jersey, shimmied a little and got a whole bunch of others while she was at it. Awesome, amazing, screaming power. Humbling all those who did not know to tremble when she appeared, and even those who did know. When one of these comes in, we are nothing, we can only get out of the way and pray.
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Quoting trHUrrIXC5MMX:


awkward...


Careful. Gustav is very sensitive. He may be reading.
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Quoting KoritheMan:


Something like that.


awkward...
Member Since: April 23, 2011 Posts: 104 Comments: 14869
Quoting KoritheMan:


I like Edouard and Isaias.


I like Ian.. I think that could be a so destructive cat 5 cataclysmic hurricane...
Member Since: April 23, 2011 Posts: 104 Comments: 14869
Quoting TropicTraveler:


Get showered together???


Something like that.
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Quoting TropicTraveler:


Get showered together???


I was thinking on that?
Member Since: April 23, 2011 Posts: 104 Comments: 14869
Quoting KoritheMan:


Me and Gustav... we like to do intimate things.


still..da heck???
Member Since: April 23, 2011 Posts: 104 Comments: 14869
Quoting wxgeek723:


I used to until they threw Gonzalo on the list...


I like Edouard and Isaias.
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Quoting KoritheMan:


Me and Gustav... we like to do intimate things.


Get showered together???
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Quoting TropicTraveler:

4-1/2 minutes of pure amazement - and then came Sandy. Thanks for posting this.


Sandy wasn't amazing in her own right?
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Quoting trHUrrIXC5MMX:


....da heck???


Me and Gustav... we like to do intimate things.
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About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.