Lessons on Persuasion from Jesus, Shakespeare, Lincoln, and Lady Gaga: a Book Review

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 4:46 PM GMT on November 21, 2012

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With a name like "Language Intelligence: Lessons on Persuasion from Jesus, Shakespeare, Lincoln, and Lady Gaga", a book with a title like that compels one to pick it up and see what the heck the author is talking about. And Joe Romm's new book on how to communicate doesn't disappoint--it's a thoughtful and compelling look at the techniques used by some of history's great communicators to help persuade. Joe Romm is author of the climateprogress.org blog, the most visited climate change blog on the Internet, and the main blog that I use to stay current on climate change and energy news. Romm defines Language Intelligence as "the ability to convince people of something both intellectually and emotionally, at both a conscious and unconscious level." He goes on to say, "If facts were sufficient to persuade people, then experts in science would rule the world. But facts are not, and scientists do not. We filter out all the facts that do not match our views." At the heart of great communication lies great story telling, and Romm give us these tips on how to tell a story people will want to read:

- Write a great headline: Newspaper readers read 56% of the headlines, but only 13% of the stories are at least half-read. Headlines are even more important on-line, since they are what show up on Google searches and tweets. An example of one the most re-tweeted headlines Romm used in 2011: "Mother Nature is Just Getting Warmed Up: June 2011 Heat Records Crushing Cold Records by 13 to 1" (Romm uses a pun and personification to help create an eye-catching headline.)

- Short words are the best words.

- Slogans sell.

- If you don't repeat, you can't compete. Repetition and rhyming help people remember your message.

- The golden rule of speech-making is: "Tell 'em what you're going to tell 'em; tell 'em; then tell 'em what you told 'em."

- Repeated distortions and smears are as effective as repeated truths, so beware of these sorts of attacks.

- If you want to de-bunk a myth, you need to focus on stating the truth, not repeating the myth.

- If you want to be more noticed and remembered, use more figures of speech (metaphors.) Examples of metaphors I've used include comparing our melting Arctic to the attic of a house that is on fire (Earth's attic is on fire: Arctic sea ice bottoms out at a new record low) and comparing the impact of global warming on extreme weather to the impact steroids have on a baseball slugger (Extreme events of 2011: climate change a major factor in some, but not all).

- Create an extended metaphor when you have a big task at hand. Countless books and articles underscore that extended metaphors are at the core of human thinking.



Video 1. National Center for Atmospheric Research scientist Dr. Jerry Meehl uses a metaphor to explain how climate change's impact on extreme weather is similar to how steroids affect a baseball slugger's ability to hit a ball out of the park.

At 183 pages, the book only took me about two hours to read, and I was very glad I did. It was very entertaining and informative, and anyone involved in public communication can learn from this book. I give it my highest rating: four stars out of four. Language Intelligence: Lessons on Persuasion from Jesus, Shakespeare, Lincoln, and Lady Gaga is $9.67 from Amazon.com.

Have a great Thanksgiving Holiday, everyone, and I'll have a new post for you on Friday.

Jeff Masters

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Quoting hurricane2013:
Why don't we just discuss ENSO & the 2013 Atlantic hurricane season? Because the setup this year seems to be interesting. For the first time since 2004 I can say that we are in a very weak "Modiki".
Quoting hurricane2013:
Why don't we just discuss ENSO & the 2013 Atlantic hurricane season? Because the setup this year seems to be interesting. For the first time since 2004 I can say that we are in a very weak "Modiki".

You wanted to get your point across so much you said the same thing twice.


Slow down, we ain't finish technically with the 2012 season yet.
Member Since: September 30, 2007 Posts: 9 Comments: 15749
211. yoboi
Quoting Neapolitan:
You're clearly missing the point. Of course Fox would avoid airing a story on truthful scientific research that suggests that Fox avoids airing stories on truthful scientific research. And that means I had to search elsewhere.

As my kids would say: "Well, duh." ;-)

I'm finished with the pies (save for a few touches), and now the three dressing loaves are in the oven. I also just started the first rise on the dough for eight dozen Parker House rolls. In an hour or so, I'll unbag the turkeys, truss them up, and set them to chill/dry overnight in preparation for going in the oven in the morning. Then I'll form the rolls and cover them for their second rise. After that, a quick ride around the neighborhood to drop off the pies I'm not sharing with family. Then back home to bake the rolls, have a beer, and write my to-do list for tomorrow. The home stretch is in sight!



i figured you would have taken a walk around the neighborhood to redistribute the pies....instead of driving.....have you ever tried frying a turkey? or do you just bake them?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Neapolitan:
You're clearly missing the point. Of course Fox would avoid airing a story on truthful scientific research that suggests that Fox avoids airing stories on truthful scientific research. And that means I had to search elsewhere.

As my kids would say: "Well, duh." ;-





Blah blah blah blah blah.......yyaaawwwwnnnn....
Member Since: July 25, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 519
The last 4 GFS runs have all shown accumulating snowfall in the 162-168hrs time frame in SE MI, 6z and 18z showed the most. This isn't fantasy land and snow could happen, especially with a more negative NAO.

18z at 162hrs:


06z at 168hrs:
Member Since: March 16, 2012 Posts: 123 Comments: 7886
207. yoboi
Quoting Patrap:
Climate Reports Forecast Dire Future, Even If Action Is Taken
Posted: 11/21/2012 9:40 am EST Updated: 11/21/2012 1:21 pm EST



In the absence of aggressive government policies aimed at curbing greenhouse gas emissions, a number of leading organizations, including the United Nations, the World Bank and others, have begun issuing analyses that regard potentially dangerous temperature elevations as not just a possibility should the status quo prevail, but a near certainty even if things start to change.

The latest report, released Wednesday by the United Nations Environment Program, suggested that greenhouse gas emissions levels are currently around 14 percent above where they need to be by the end of the decade in order to avoid what many analysts believe could be a risky level of planetary warming.

That report comes on the heels of a study issued Tuesday by the Geneva-based World Meteorological Organization, which stated that human civilization has pumped roughly 375 billion tonnes, or metric tons, of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere since the dawn of the industrial age, when the extraction and combustion of fossil fuels began in earnest.

"These billions of tonnes of additional carbon dioxide in our atmosphere will remain there for centuries, causing our planet to warm further and impacting on all aspects of life on earth," said WMO Secretary-General Michel Jarraud, in a statement issued Tuesday. "Future emissions will only compound the situation."

On Sunday, the World Bank issued a report suggesting that the climate could warm a full 4 degrees by the end of the century -- less than 90 years from now -- even if countries fulfill the modest emissions-reduction pledges they've already made.

A 4-degree uptick in temperatures is significantly higher than what has long been deemed the maximum amount -- 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit -- that average global temperatures could rise while still maintaining a climate similar to that in which human civilization has evolved.

That number, measured against things as they existed before the industrial-scale use of fossil fuels got underway, was not considered absolute. But the best evidence seemed to suggest that keeping the Earth's average temperature from rising much beyond 2 degrees was a worthy goal, not least because larger increases would raise the odds of many unpleasant things: forbidding sea levels, searing heat waves, grinding droughts and the like.

In subsequent years, some prominent scientists argued that even 2 degrees of warming would be disastrous.

But increasing evidence suggests that such distinctions may no longer matter.

Nearly 30 years after the benchmark was proffered, about half the distance to a 2-degree temperature increase, or about 0.8 degrees, has already been achieved. Further, enough carbon dioxide, the chief planet warming gas that arises when coal, oil and natural gas are burned, is already in the atmosphere to raise future temperatures by another 0.8 degrees, even if all the pollution stopped immediately.

As it is, atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide are at an all-time high and are projected to continue booming.

Carbon dioxide is, of course, naturally present in the atmosphere -- and necessary for retaining some of the sun's warmth and creating a habitable climate. But all that extra, human-produced carbon dioxide is amplifying the natural greenhouse effect, and driving up the planetary thermostat.

So much so that PricewaterhouseCoopers, the global business consultancy, issued a report earlier this month that makes the 2-degree Celsius threshold appear quaint. That analysis, titled "Too Late for Two Degrees?," suggested that while efforts to reduce the carbon intensity, or the amount of emissions per unit of GDP, of the world's economies are making some modest gains, they are unfolding so slowly as to be negligible.

"Even doubling our current rate of decarbonization, would still lead to emissions consistent with 6 degrees of warming by the end of the century," noted Leo Johnson, a partner in PwC's Sustainability and Climate Change unit, in the report. "To give ourselves a more than 50 percent chance of avoiding 2 degrees will require a six-fold improvement in our rate of decarbonization."

Put another way, the PwC researchers concluded, to have even a modest chance of staying within the 2-degree threshold, the global economy would need to reduce overall carbon intensity by 5.1 percent every year for the next 40 years.



Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii.
Reductions in overall carbon intensity have occurred -- particularly during times of steep recession, when economies are producing less and, as such, burning fewer fossil fuels. But reductions of 5 percent have never been achieved in any year since World War II, the PwC report noted, much less year after year for decades. And given the fast-expanding and fossil-fuel dependent economies of countries like China and India, such reductions are exceedingly unlikely, the authors suggested.

"Governments and businesses can no longer assume that a 2-degree Celsius warming world is the default scenario," the PwC authors declared. "Any investment in long-term assets or infrastructure, particularly in coastal or low-lying regions, needs to address more pessimistic scenarios. Sectors dependent on food, water, energy or ecosystem services need to scrutinize the resilience and viability of their supply chains."

The findings roughly echoed those of the Paris-based International Energy Agency, which suggested this month in its annual World Energy Outlook that even accounting for the policy commitments already made or contemplated by world governments, energy-related emissions are expected to rise precipitously over the next two decades, pointing to what the organization called a "long‐term average temperature increase of 3.6 degrees Celsius.

"A lower rate of global economic growth in the short term," IEA reported, "would make only a marginal difference to longer‐term energy and climate trends."

Should these bleak scenarios prove accurate, the World Bank said on Sunday, a variety of unpleasant end-of-century outcomes would seem all but unavoidable: Increasingly acidic oceans that will fundamentally alter the aquatic food chain; rapidly rising oceans; freshwater scarcity, diminished agricultural yields; and a variety of other impacts -- most of them landing particularly hard on the world's poorest.

"Lack of action on climate change threatens to make the world our children inherit a completely different world than we are living in today," said World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim in a statement accompanying the report. "Climate change is one of the single biggest challenges facing development, and we need to assume the moral responsibility to take action on behalf of future generations, especially the poorest," he said.

So-called non-linear outcomes are also a threat, the World Bank noted:

As global warming approaches and exceeds 2-degrees Celsius, there is a risk of triggering nonlinear tipping elements. Examples include the disintegration of the West Antarctic ice sheet leading to more rapid sea-level rise, or large-scale Amazon dieback drastically affecting ecosystems, rivers, agriculture, energy production, and livelihoods. This would further add to 21st-century global warming and impact entire continents.
To be sure, no scientific model can pinpoint exactly when any particular temperature level will be reached, nor predict with precision just how the planet will respond. And some experts remain hopeful -- albeit increasingly cautiously -- that dramatic action could still forestall the most dire implications of rising temperatures, though they say the window for doing so will not be open for long.

"It is still possible to avoid 2-degree warming, and arguing it is too late could very easily be a self-fulfilling prophecy," said Michael E. Mann, a climatologist and director of the Earth System Science Center at Pennsylvania State University. "That having been said, the real issue is whether or not we have the political will."

That sentiment was echoed by Jonathan Koomey, a research fellow at the Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance at Stanford University, and the co-author of the first comprehensive analysis of the 2-degree limit back in 1989.

"We tend to underestimate the possibility for change," Koomey said "At certain times, when people perceive a crisis, things can change very, very rapidly."

Koomey pointed, by way of example, to World War II, when initially reluctant automobile factories, under federal orders, converted operations in a matter of months to the manufacture of planes, tanks and other defense products. "People have been able to make very rapid changes," Koomey said, "and I think we have to be very careful in thinking about, or in taking literally, people's assessments of feasibility."

Still, he added, "We have to separate the lessons that this way of thinking can teach us and the realities of politics and interest groups. Urgent action is required."

The climate activist Bill McKibben, who is currently traveling the country in an effort to highlight the hard math that is making the 2-degree benchmark an increasingly fleeting possibility, agreed.

"It would take an incredible effort, but that's what we're trying to spur," he said when asked if the recent proliferation of analyses suggests an inescapably dire future. "Given the damage that 1 degree is doing, we're already at 'dire,'" McKibben said. "We dearly don't want to see what 2 degrees looks like, much less 3."


the bright side should help the shrimp,oysters and crabs....more for the gumbo....
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting TomballTXPride:


What makes you think those studies you posted (the same studies calling Fox's viewers stupid) would be found on Fox's website? LOL

Nice try, Nea.
You're clearly missing the point. Of course Fox would avoid airing a story on truthful scientific research that suggests that Fox avoids airing stories on truthful scientific research. And that means I had to search elsewhere.

As my kids would say: "Well, duh." ;-)

I'm finished with the pies (save for a few touches), and now the three dressing loaves are in the oven. I also just started the first rise on the dough for eight dozen Parker House rolls. In an hour or so, I'll unbag the turkeys, truss them up, and set them to chill/dry overnight in preparation for going in the oven in the morning. Then I'll form the rolls and cover them for their second rise. After that, a quick ride around the neighborhood to drop off the pies I'm not sharing with family. Then back home to bake the rolls, have a beer, and write my to-do list for tomorrow. The home stretch is in sight!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Dakster:
Gro - You would need a totally opaque filter for that.


I think that remark deserves a twit.
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 63 Comments: 23703
Climate Reports Forecast Dire Future, Even If Action Is Taken
Posted: 11/21/2012 9:40 am EST Updated: 11/21/2012 1:21 pm EST



In the absence of aggressive government policies aimed at curbing greenhouse gas emissions, a number of leading organizations, including the United Nations, the World Bank and others, have begun issuing analyses that regard potentially dangerous temperature elevations as not just a possibility should the status quo prevail, but a near certainty even if things start to change.

The latest report, released Wednesday by the United Nations Environment Program, suggested that greenhouse gas emissions levels are currently around 14 percent above where they need to be by the end of the decade in order to avoid what many analysts believe could be a risky level of planetary warming.

That report comes on the heels of a study issued Tuesday by the Geneva-based World Meteorological Organization, which stated that human civilization has pumped roughly 375 billion tonnes, or metric tons, of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere since the dawn of the industrial age, when the extraction and combustion of fossil fuels began in earnest.

"These billions of tonnes of additional carbon dioxide in our atmosphere will remain there for centuries, causing our planet to warm further and impacting on all aspects of life on earth," said WMO Secretary-General Michel Jarraud, in a statement issued Tuesday. "Future emissions will only compound the situation."

On Sunday, the World Bank issued a report suggesting that the climate could warm a full 4 degrees by the end of the century -- less than 90 years from now -- even if countries fulfill the modest emissions-reduction pledges they've already made.

A 4-degree uptick in temperatures is significantly higher than what has long been deemed the maximum amount -- 2 degrees Celsius, or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit -- that average global temperatures could rise while still maintaining a climate similar to that in which human civilization has evolved.

That number, measured against things as they existed before the industrial-scale use of fossil fuels got underway, was not considered absolute. But the best evidence seemed to suggest that keeping the Earth's average temperature from rising much beyond 2 degrees was a worthy goal, not least because larger increases would raise the odds of many unpleasant things: forbidding sea levels, searing heat waves, grinding droughts and the like.

In subsequent years, some prominent scientists argued that even 2 degrees of warming would be disastrous.

But increasing evidence suggests that such distinctions may no longer matter.

Nearly 30 years after the benchmark was proffered, about half the distance to a 2-degree temperature increase, or about 0.8 degrees, has already been achieved. Further, enough carbon dioxide, the chief planet warming gas that arises when coal, oil and natural gas are burned, is already in the atmosphere to raise future temperatures by another 0.8 degrees, even if all the pollution stopped immediately.

As it is, atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide are at an all-time high and are projected to continue booming.

Carbon dioxide is, of course, naturally present in the atmosphere -- and necessary for retaining some of the sun's warmth and creating a habitable climate. But all that extra, human-produced carbon dioxide is amplifying the natural greenhouse effect, and driving up the planetary thermostat.

So much so that PricewaterhouseCoopers, the global business consultancy, issued a report earlier this month that makes the 2-degree Celsius threshold appear quaint. That analysis, titled "Too Late for Two Degrees?," suggested that while efforts to reduce the carbon intensity, or the amount of emissions per unit of GDP, of the world's economies are making some modest gains, they are unfolding so slowly as to be negligible.

"Even doubling our current rate of decarbonization, would still lead to emissions consistent with 6 degrees of warming by the end of the century," noted Leo Johnson, a partner in PwC's Sustainability and Climate Change unit, in the report. "To give ourselves a more than 50 percent chance of avoiding 2 degrees will require a six-fold improvement in our rate of decarbonization."

Put another way, the PwC researchers concluded, to have even a modest chance of staying within the 2-degree threshold, the global economy would need to reduce overall carbon intensity by 5.1 percent every year for the next 40 years.



Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii.
Reductions in overall carbon intensity have occurred -- particularly during times of steep recession, when economies are producing less and, as such, burning fewer fossil fuels. But reductions of 5 percent have never been achieved in any year since World War II, the PwC report noted, much less year after year for decades. And given the fast-expanding and fossil-fuel dependent economies of countries like China and India, such reductions are exceedingly unlikely, the authors suggested.

"Governments and businesses can no longer assume that a 2-degree Celsius warming world is the default scenario," the PwC authors declared. "Any investment in long-term assets or infrastructure, particularly in coastal or low-lying regions, needs to address more pessimistic scenarios. Sectors dependent on food, water, energy or ecosystem services need to scrutinize the resilience and viability of their supply chains."

The findings roughly echoed those of the Paris-based International Energy Agency, which suggested this month in its annual World Energy Outlook that even accounting for the policy commitments already made or contemplated by world governments, energy-related emissions are expected to rise precipitously over the next two decades, pointing to what the organization called a "long‐term average temperature increase of 3.6 degrees Celsius.

"A lower rate of global economic growth in the short term," IEA reported, "would make only a marginal difference to longer‐term energy and climate trends."

Should these bleak scenarios prove accurate, the World Bank said on Sunday, a variety of unpleasant end-of-century outcomes would seem all but unavoidable: Increasingly acidic oceans that will fundamentally alter the aquatic food chain; rapidly rising oceans; freshwater scarcity, diminished agricultural yields; and a variety of other impacts -- most of them landing particularly hard on the world's poorest.

"Lack of action on climate change threatens to make the world our children inherit a completely different world than we are living in today," said World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim in a statement accompanying the report. "Climate change is one of the single biggest challenges facing development, and we need to assume the moral responsibility to take action on behalf of future generations, especially the poorest," he said.

So-called non-linear outcomes are also a threat, the World Bank noted:

As global warming approaches and exceeds 2-degrees Celsius, there is a risk of triggering nonlinear tipping elements. Examples include the disintegration of the West Antarctic ice sheet leading to more rapid sea-level rise, or large-scale Amazon dieback drastically affecting ecosystems, rivers, agriculture, energy production, and livelihoods. This would further add to 21st-century global warming and impact entire continents.
To be sure, no scientific model can pinpoint exactly when any particular temperature level will be reached, nor predict with precision just how the planet will respond. And some experts remain hopeful -- albeit increasingly cautiously -- that dramatic action could still forestall the most dire implications of rising temperatures, though they say the window for doing so will not be open for long.

"It is still possible to avoid 2-degree warming, and arguing it is too late could very easily be a self-fulfilling prophecy," said Michael E. Mann, a climatologist and director of the Earth System Science Center at Pennsylvania State University. "That having been said, the real issue is whether or not we have the political will."

That sentiment was echoed by Jonathan Koomey, a research fellow at the Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance at Stanford University, and the co-author of the first comprehensive analysis of the 2-degree limit back in 1989.

"We tend to underestimate the possibility for change," Koomey said "At certain times, when people perceive a crisis, things can change very, very rapidly."

Koomey pointed, by way of example, to World War II, when initially reluctant automobile factories, under federal orders, converted operations in a matter of months to the manufacture of planes, tanks and other defense products. "People have been able to make very rapid changes," Koomey said, "and I think we have to be very careful in thinking about, or in taking literally, people's assessments of feasibility."

Still, he added, "We have to separate the lessons that this way of thinking can teach us and the realities of politics and interest groups. Urgent action is required."

The climate activist Bill McKibben, who is currently traveling the country in an effort to highlight the hard math that is making the 2-degree benchmark an increasingly fleeting possibility, agreed.

"It would take an incredible effort, but that's what we're trying to spur," he said when asked if the recent proliferation of analyses suggests an inescapably dire future. "Given the damage that 1 degree is doing, we're already at 'dire,'" McKibben said. "We dearly don't want to see what 2 degrees looks like, much less 3."
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203. etxwx
From China Daily: Leading role pledged to fight climate change
By Lan Lan and Yang Yao 2012-11-22

Excerpt: The nation's top climate-change official expressed China's readiness on Wednesday to play an active and constructive role in international efforts to combat global warming ahead of a major UN climate conference in Doha, Qatar.

China is seeking a turning point in terms of its emissions and attempting to peak its carbon emissions as early as it can, Xie Zhenhua, vice-minister of the National Development and Reform Commission, said.

The world is paying close attention to when China hits peak emissions.

"At this stage, it would be unfair and unreasonable to require China to reduce its carbon emissions in absolute terms," Xie said. But measures have been put in place to make sure emissions are curbed, he said.

The two-week UN climate change conference opens in the Qatari capital on Monday. Regarding the motion at last year's UN climate change conference in Durban, South Africa, that a climate deal would be reached by 2015, at the latest, and come into effect in 2020, Xie said China's attitude is both active and open.

"We cannot pass judgment on the possible result. But we are certain we will implement whatever final document that is adopted by all nations."

Details of this announcement here.
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202. yoboi
Quoting Grothar:


Doris Day actually slept in rubber sheets and wrapped her whole body in vaseline.


think i seen that movie but don't think it was the same doris day you are talking about....
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201. yoboi
Quoting Grothar:


What would make you think I would not know Lady Gaga? I have actually bought her CD's. I liked Amy Winehouse, too. We enjoy Adele and Alicia Keyes, and I enjoy just looking at Shania Twain I am not stuck in the 18th century, although their music wasn't bad either.



lol just looking....
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Quoting Bielle:


Doris Day used vaseline on filters to smooth out hers on camera.


Doris Day actually slept in rubber sheets and wrapped her whole body in vaseline. Don't ask me how I know that.
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 63 Comments: 23703
In thru the Outdoor?

O' Baby'
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Quoting yoboi:
is gro still looking up lady gaga????


What would make you think I would not know Lady Gaga? I have actually bought her CD's. I liked Amy Winehouse, too. We enjoy Adele and Alicia Keyes, and I enjoy just looking at Shania Twain I am not stuck in the 18th century, although their music wasn't bad either.
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 63 Comments: 23703
Quoting Bielle:


Doris Day used vaseline on filters to smooth out hers on camera.


I thought that was from... nevermind.. This is a family blog.
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This is just outright crazy, a couple inches of snow in southern Texas and northern Mexico.
Member Since: March 16, 2012 Posts: 123 Comments: 7886
Quoting Grothar:
Almost all movies and TV shows which are filmed outside in California use special filters to reduce the smog in and haze in the background. The are usually pink or yellow. On tours to Universal studios, they actually give demonstrations on how they are used.

I've often thought of trying those filters to see if they can reduce wrinkles.


Doris Day used vaseline on filters to smooth out hers on camera.
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Gro - You would need a totally opaque filter for that.
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193. yoboi
Quoting Neapolitan:
If so, that's only because I searched but could not find the results of those studies published anywhere on Fox's website, and I had to go somewhere.True. But it's not just climate science that's a serious issue with the left; it's science in general.



do ya still follow snooki on twitter???
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Almost all movies and TV shows which are filmed outside in California use special filters to reduce the smog in and haze in the background. The are usually pink or yellow. On tours to Universal studios, they actually give demonstrations on how they are used.

I've often thought of trying those filters to see if they can reduce wrinkles.
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 63 Comments: 23703
190. yoboi
is gro still looking up lady gaga????
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Quoting Jedkins01:
I recognize that the sources you posted are mostly heavily left leaning.
If so, that's only because I searched but could not find the results of those studies published anywhere on Fox's website, and I had to go somewhere.
Quoting Jedkins01:
...climate change is often a major concern to the left because the environment is a serious value for them...
True. But it's not just climate science that's a serious issue with the left; it's science in general.
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Quoting MAweatherboy1:

Wow, that's way down. If we get into a pattern like that we could see a lot of big storms for the Mid-Atlantic.

As long as those storms bring snow to me im fine with that
Member Since: February 13, 2012 Posts: 10 Comments: 3263
.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 19504
Quoting sar2401:

Welcome to the blog. After belonging for more than one day, you'll have a better idea of how things go here. :)


No politics because we need more time to talk about Global Warming. lol
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185. yoboi
Quoting sar2401:

Believe it or not, many TV episodes were filmed either way out in the San Fernando Valley, where the smog was less, or during Santa Ana winds and clear winter days, when the smog was blown out to sea. The Chamber of Commerce had an intense interest in how any series based in LA showed the city. One of the local TV mets actually worked a side job with the Chamber, forecasting when the smog would be less, so the studios could plan fiming on days when you could still see the mountains...speaking of manipulating public perceptions. :)


thanks for the info cool story.....
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VIIRS Day/Night Band images showing areas of Sandy-related power outages.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 19504
As we all celebrate Thanksgiving tomorrow, let’s not forget about the tragic and history changing event that happened 49 years ago…

Member Since: September 10, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 10577
Quoting avthunder:
Sounds like great Thanksgiving and football weather. This has been one of the nicest Novembers I can remember here in South Florida!


Compared to last year, it is really nice! My electric bill dropped $80. I hope it continues! Looks like back in the 80's next week.
Member Since: September 10, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 10577
Lol at the last frame of the 18z GFS. Snow in the Rio Grande Valley.

Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 108 Comments: 30245
Quoting MAweatherboy1:

Not really. That's only 180 hours out, a decent ways out but not complete fantasy land. Models are showing something around that time, but don't have a clue what to do with it, they're all over the map. With a negative NAO a coastal storm seems very possible to me.

True, but the models seem to be having some problems handling coastal storms since Sandy. I seem to remember last week about this time they were calling for another big nor'easter, and that didn't happen. Of course, each day of such tranquil weather like we've had the past five days or so brings us closer the next big storm.
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Quoting GeoffreyWPB:
• By: Glenn Glazer - West Palm Beach WPTV Met....

Tonight, mostly clear and cold with low temperatures in the 50s along the coast, and a few upper 40s inland. There will also be a slight wind chill with winds out of the north/northwest.

Thanksgiving Day, mostly sunny and cool, with high temperatures close to 70 degrees. Winds will be chilly and a little gusty at times out of the north/northwest.

Thursday night, clear and cold with lows in the 40s inland and low to mid 50s along the coast.

Friday, sunny with highs in the mid 70s.

Friday night, clear and cold with low temperatures in the 40s.
Sounds like great Thanksgiving and football weather. This has been one of the nicest Novembers I can remember here in South Florida!
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Quoting sar2401:

Uh oh, the models have been drinking again. :)

Not really. That's only 180 hours out, a decent ways out but not complete fantasy land. Models are showing something around that time, but don't have a clue what to do with it, they're all over the map. With a negative NAO a coastal storm seems very possible to me.
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Quoting wxchaser97:
Down down down it goes the NAO.

Wow, that's way down. If we get into a pattern like that we could see a lot of big storms for the Mid-Atlantic.
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Quoting MAweatherboy1:
This looks fun.


Uh oh, the models have been drinking again. :)
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Still a couple disturbances being watched in the Southern Hemisphere. 96S in the South Indian basin is looking better than it ever has:



97P in the South Pacific still has a TCFA out for it but it's under high shear and has lots of dry air on its west side, I'd imagine the TCFA will be dropped soon:

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Quoting yoboi:




the smog did not seem bad in CHIPS episodes...

Believe it or not, many TV episodes were filmed either way out in the San Fernando Valley, where the smog was less, or during Santa Ana winds and clear winter days, when the smog was blown out to sea. The Chamber of Commerce had an intense interest in how any series based in LA showed the city. One of the local TV mets actually worked a side job with the Chamber, forecasting when the smog would be less, so the studios could plan fiming on days when you could still see the mountains...speaking of manipulating public perceptions. :)
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Down down down it goes the NAO.
Member Since: March 16, 2012 Posts: 123 Comments: 7886
Quoting yoboi:



howdy taz



hi old fart
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Quoting sar2401:

Hi Taz, hope you'll have a very pleasant Thanksgiving Day tomorrow.



thanks
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Another beautiful day here in central La. And a rare night of good seeing as both "seeing" and transparency are gonna be excellent especially after midnight. Jupiter is gonna look awesome in our 10" mirror. Outta here. Have a great Thanksgiving all.
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This looks fun.

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Quoting hurricane2013:
Stop talking about politics!!

Welcome to the blog. After belonging for more than one day, you'll have a better idea of how things go here. :)
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Quoting Tazmanian:



NO

Hi Taz, hope you'll have a very pleasant Thanksgiving Day tomorrow.
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165. yoboi
Quoting Tazmanian:



NO



howdy taz
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• By: Glenn Glazer - West Palm Beach WPTV Met....

Tonight, mostly clear and cold with low temperatures in the 50s along the coast, and a few upper 40s inland. There will also be a slight wind chill with winds out of the north/northwest.

Thanksgiving Day, mostly sunny and cool, with high temperatures close to 70 degrees. Winds will be chilly and a little gusty at times out of the north/northwest.

Thursday night, clear and cold with lows in the 40s inland and low to mid 50s along the coast.

Friday, sunny with highs in the mid 70s.

Friday night, clear and cold with low temperatures in the 40s.
Member Since: September 10, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 10577
Quoting GeoffreyWPB:


Fox News vs. MSNBC is simply counter-programming. CNN takes the middle road, although I think that have the best coverage of International news.
MSNBC is a joke!I hope everyone a safe and Happy Thanksgiving
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162. yoboi
Quoting hurricane2013:
Stop talking about politics!!



when the Doc has lady gaga in his blog topic pretty much anything goes.....
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About JeffMasters

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.