Sandy by the numbers: trying to comprehend a stunning disaster

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 7:19 PM GMT on November 01, 2012

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The immensity of the impact of Superstorm Sandy on the Eastern U.S. is difficult to comprehend, and the scenes of devastation coming from the impact zone are stunning and heart-wrenching. To help understand the extraordinary scale of this historic storm, I've put together a list of notable statistics from Sandy:

Death toll: 160 (88 in the U.S., 54 in Haiti, 11 in Cuba)

Damage estimates: $10 - $55 billion

Power outages: 8.5 million U.S. customers, 2nd most for a natural disaster behind the 1993 blizzard (10 million)

Maximum U.S. sustained winds: 69 mph at Westerly, RI

Peak U.S. wind gusts: 90 mph at Islip, NY and Tompkinsville, NJ

Maximum U.S. storm surge: 9.45', Bergen Point, NJ 9:24 pm EDT October 29, 2012

Maximum U.S. Storm Tide: 14.60', Bergen Point, NJ, 9:24 pm EDT October 29, 2012

Maximum significant wave height: 33.1' at the buoy east of Cape Hatteras, NC (2nd highest: 32.5' at the Entrance to New York Harbor)

Maximum U.S. rainfall: 12.55", Easton, MD

Maximum snowfall: 36", Richwood, WV

Minimum pressure: 945.5 mb, Atlantic City, NJ at 7:24 pm EST, October 29, 2012. This is the lowest pressure measured in the U.S., at any location north of Cape Hatteras, NC (previous record: 946 mb in the 1938 hurricane on Long Island, NY)

Destructive potential of storm surge: 5.8 on a scale of 0 to 6, highest of any hurricane observed since 1969. Previous record: 5.6 on a scale of 0 to 6, set during Hurricane Isabel of 2003.

Diameter of tropical storm-force winds at landfall: 945 miles

Diameter of ocean with 12' seas at landfall: 1500 miles


Figure 1. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi NPP satellite acquired this image of Superstorm Sandy around 3:35 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time (7:35 Universal Time) on October 30. This image is from the “day-night band” on VIIRS, which detects light wavelengths from green to near-infrared. The full Moon lit up the tops of the clouds. Image credit: NASA.



Figure 2. Preliminary death and damage statistics for Sandy as compiled by Wikipedia on November 1, 2012.



Figure 3. Precipitation from Superstorm Sandy for the 7-day period ending at 8 am EDT Thursday, November 1, 2012. Image credit: NOAA/NWS/AHPS.



Figure 4. Top five weather-related power outages in the U.S.



Figure 5. Strong winds from Sandy blow snow in West Virginia on October 30, 2012. Image credit: Beau Dodson


Sandy's snows
Several cities set records for snowiest October day on record during Sandy: Elkin, WV (7", previous record, 4.6" in 1917) and Bluefield (4.7", previous record 3.2" in 1993.) Heavy snows caused roof collapses in West Virginia, and snows of two feet or more fell in four states--West Virginia, Tennessee, Maryland, and Virginia. However, Sandy fell short of setting the all-time record for snowfall from a hurricane. The Vermont Journal estimated that the Snow Hurricane of 1804 dumped up to 4 feet of snow in Vermont.

36" Richwood, WV
34" Mount Leconte, TN
34" Sevier, TN
33" Clayton, WV
32" Snowshoe, WV
29" Quinwood, WV
28" Frostburg, WV
28" Davis, WV
28" Huttonsville, WV
28" Flat Top, WV
26" Redhouse, MD
26" Garret, MD
26" Craigsville, WV
24" Oakland, MD
24" Alpine Lake, WV
24" Nettie, WV
24" Norton, VA
24" Quinwood, WV
24" Alexander, WV

Links
Impressive loop of 1-minute visible satellite imagery spanning 6 days of Sandy's life.

A one-day time lapse video from a New York City webcam showing Sandy's impact on the city. It's eerie to see the city suddenly plunged into darkness.

First round of damage assessment aerial imagery collected by NOAA's National Geodetic Survey on Oct. 31 along the New Jersey coast.


Figure 6. Flooding in Haiti from Hurricane Sandy. Image credit: The Lambi Fund of Haiti.

Charities mobilize for Sandy
The outpouring of charitable donations in the wake of the devastation wrought by Hurricane Sandy has been one of the bright spots in the gloomy aftermath of the storm. The main owners of The Weather Channel have agreed to match donations of up to $1 million to the American Red Cross, if you text SANDY to 90999 ($10). I also recommend my favorite disaster relief charity, Portlight.org. They are focusing their response efforts exclusively on the post-Sandy neeeds of people with disabilities.Check out the Portlight blog to see what they're up to; donations are always needed.

Sandy's greatest devastation occurred in Haiti, where rains of up to 20 inches in 24 hours unleashed rampaging flood waters that killed at least 54, left 200,000 homeless, wiped out thousand of acres of crops, and killed massive numbers of livestock. For impoverished families in Haiti still struggling to recover from the earthquake in 2010 and Hurricane Isaac in August, Sandy was devastating.  These crops are the very essence of rural Haitian’s livelihoods, and there are fears widespread starvation will result. A disaster relief charity in Haiti that I've contributed to for many years, The Lambi Fund of Haiti, is seeking donations to help farmers purchase local seeds so that they can replant their crops in the wake of this latest terrible Haitian catastrophe.

Jeff Masters

Hurricane Sandy - Davis, W.V. (beaudodson)
Hurricane Sandy, Davis, W.V. - photos taken by Beau Dodson
Hurricane Sandy - Davis, W.V.
We Survived (teach50)
Everyone has seen photos of the damage inflicted by Hurricane Sandy that destroyed New Jersey, NYC, & Long Island as well as other areas on the East Coast. I am finally back on line after 4 days without power. It has been a long ordeal. My block was extremely fortunate. We didn't have any trees fall and no flooding but the entire area is devastated. This is a photo of a tree that fell between the street, smashed, the car, and blew out the tires. No one was hurt.
We Survived

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260. sar2401
2:59 AM GMT on November 02, 2012
Quoting prosa:
I just drove about ten miles - using up what very little gas I still have - in and around Medford, NY trying to find an open gas station. Lines or no lines. Ten of the eleven stations which I passed were out of gas. At the eleventh, the line was so enormously long that the police weren't allowing any new cars to join it.

Tomorrow I'm supposed to be at a high-priority work assignment about 20 miles away. It doesn't look as if I'll be able to go.

So why did you waste 10 miles worth of gas when you have a 20 mile "high-priority" assignment tomorrow? You might have made it if not for that 10 miles. Did you not know a storm was coming that might cause power to go off? You had no opportunity to fill up before the storm? I'm not trying to bust your chops, but it seems like some advance planning might have helped your problem.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 13458
259. Grothar
2:57 AM GMT on November 02, 2012
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 69 Comments: 25512
258. mitthbevnuruodo
2:54 AM GMT on November 02, 2012
Quoting uncwhurricane85:


you dont think they are working as hard as they can...whats pathetic is to build a city at sea level and put the pargest mass transit system and power systems under that city


Yes, but much of that was done a long long time ago! The subway's been there for 100 years and NY was built up back then as well...can't blame the gov of any time recent for that! Not much difference that mostly sea-level Florida etc either.
Member Since: October 12, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 841
257. aislinnpaps
2:44 AM GMT on November 02, 2012
Quoting Grothar:


I don't know if you are familiar with the area, but Staten Island is pretty hilly, but if I remember, most of the east coast of the island would have probably been a Zone A area. Most should have evacuated, but the devastation was far inland. Staten Island is quite large. I don't think they are getting the help they need fast enough.


I grew up with stories of Staten Island. My grandfather grew up there on the Perine Estate. I have some great pictures of him there. I wondered what had happened to it in Sandy.
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256. Civicane49
2:41 AM GMT on November 02, 2012
Member Since: July 21, 2011 Posts: 83 Comments: 7167
255. Civicane49
2:40 AM GMT on November 02, 2012
TROPICAL STORM ROSA DISCUSSION NUMBER 12
NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL EP172012
800 PM PDT THU NOV 01 2012

THERE HAS BEEN LITTLE CHANGE WITH ROSA OVER THE PAST FEW HOURS.
MICROWAVE AND LAST-LIGHT VISIBLE IMAGES SHOWED THAT THE LOW-LEVEL
CENTER IS STILL LOCATED ON THE WESTERN SIDE OF THE CONVECTION DUE
TO MODERATE WESTERLY SHEAR. THE INITIAL INTENSITY REMAINS 45 KT
BASED ON THE LATEST DVORAK ESTIMATES FROM TAFB AND SAB. THERE IS NO
CHANGE TO THE NHC INTENSITY FORECAST...AS ROSA SHOULD GRADUALLY
WEAKEN THROUGH THE PERIOD WHILE THE SHEAR INCREASES DUE TO AN
UPPER-LEVEL TROUGH. THE CYCLONE SHOULD BECOME A REMNANT LOW IN
ABOUT 3 DAYS.

THE CURRENT MOTION APPEARS TO BE STATIONARY...AND LITTLE NET MOTION
IS EXPECTED DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS AS ROSA IS SITUATED EAST OF A
WEAKENING MID-LEVEL RIDGE AND SOUTH OF A FLAT MID-LEVEL TROUGH.
AFTER THAT TIME...THE MODEL GUIDANCE IS IN GENERAL AGREEMENT ON A
NORTHWESTWARD MOTION DEVELOPING AS A MID-LEVEL LOW FORMS WEST OF
BAJA CALIFORNIA AND RETROGRADES TO THE NORTH OF ROSA. WHILE THERE IS
STILL SOME LATERAL SPREAD IN THE GUIDANCE ENVELOPE...THE SPREAD HAS
DECREASED A BIT OVER THE PAST FEW CYCLES. SINCE THE PREVIOUS
OFFICIAL FORECAST LIES NEAR THE MIDDLE OF THE GUIDANCE ENVELOPE...
LITTLE CHANGE WAS MADE TO THE NHC TRACK. THE NHC FORECAST IS CLOSE
TO THE GEFS ENSEMBLE MEAN AND A BLEND OF THE ECMWF AND GFS MODELS
AT DAYS 3 THROUGH 5.

FORECAST POSITIONS AND MAX WINDS

INIT 02/0300Z 13.7N 118.4W 45 KT 50 MPH
12H 02/1200Z 13.6N 118.5W 40 KT 45 MPH
24H 03/0000Z 13.5N 118.6W 40 KT 45 MPH
36H 03/1200Z 13.5N 118.7W 40 KT 45 MPH
48H 04/0000Z 13.7N 118.8W 35 KT 40 MPH
72H 05/0000Z 14.9N 119.2W 30 KT 35 MPH...POST-TROP/REMNT LOW
96H 06/0000Z 16.7N 120.5W 25 KT 30 MPH...POST-TROP/REMNT LOW
120H 07/0000Z 19.0N 122.5W 20 KT 25 MPH...POST-TROP/REMNT LOW

$$
FORECASTER BRENNAN
Member Since: July 21, 2011 Posts: 83 Comments: 7167
254. Civicane49
2:40 AM GMT on November 02, 2012
BULLETIN
TROPICAL STORM ROSA ADVISORY NUMBER 12
NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL EP172012
800 PM PDT THU NOV 01 2012

...ROSA STATIONARY...


SUMMARY OF 800 PM PDT...0300 UTC...INFORMATION
----------------------------------------------
LOCATION...13.7N 118.4W
ABOUT 845 MI...1360 KM SW OF CABO SAN LUCAS MEXICO
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...50 MPH...85 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT...STATIONARY
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...1003 MB...29.62 INCHES
Member Since: July 21, 2011 Posts: 83 Comments: 7167
253. waterskiman
2:39 AM GMT on November 02, 2012
Quoting Grothar:


I don't know if you are familiar with the area, but Staten Island is pretty hilly, but if I remember, most of the east coast of the island would have probably been a Zone A area. Most should have evacuated, but the devastation was far inland. Staten Island is quite large. I don't think they are getting the help they need fast enough.

As of this afternoon, everyone from FEMA to you name it is there. Why they didn't get there faster was because the ferries or rescue boats couldn't run until the coast guard gave the all clear for boat traffic to resume normal opperation. Buoys were washed away, channel markers, and lots of debrie. They would of had to mark chanels and such with temp nav buoys so you wouldn't run aground.

Just going to add a bit. It takes at least 3 to 4 days no matter if you are on an island or not for authorities to 1. get over the shock. 2. get on the phone to get things started. Thats why we need at least 4 days of food and beer before the help arrives in most cases.
Member Since: June 6, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 4429
252. aislinnpaps
2:38 AM GMT on November 02, 2012
Quoting sar2401:

Indeed, I'm not picking on the Northeast. It seems like after every crisis or disaster, when gas lines are completely predictable, emergency management agencies develop amnesia about something like this ever happening before. They will roll out a plan just when everyone has already filled up and supplies start returning to normal. Drivers who waited in lines this week because of a lack of planning will wait in line next week because of too much planning. I keep hoping, after nearly 35 years of being part of law enforcement and emergency planning, that some agencies may get ahead of the power curve. So far, I'm turning blue from holding my breath. :)


I'm sorry, I understood. I was agreeing with you, didn't say it well. They do these things after the fact no matter what the experiences they've already had most of the time.
Member Since: August 22, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 3115
251. Grothar
2:35 AM GMT on November 02, 2012
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 69 Comments: 25512
What astounds me about this is that Hurricane Andrew stood as the costliest atlantic hurricane for 12 years. And before that Agnes was first for twenty years, and then second for Andrew's 12.

But in the past eight years we have just completely DESTROYED those figures to the point where individual storms now cost more than entire seasons used to cost.

I mean, I remember when 2004 became the most costly season with a price tag of like 52 billion dollars or something.

It's just amazing. and horrifying.
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Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
do ya think that will work cause mom has sure given him one

LOL I was talking about Cumo whatsisname, who you talkin about
Member Since: June 6, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 4429
227 prosa: Tomorrow I'm supposed to be at a high-priority work assignment about 20 miles away. It doesn't look as if I'll be able to go..

Suck it up. That's only a couple of hours away. People pay good money to run 26miles.
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Quoting sar2401:

Gro, this is totally tragic, especially in the shadow of the biggest city in the US. Was Staten Island in an evacuation zone? If not, why not? Did people have any idea that a storm surge of this magnitute was coming? Why did so many people die in this one relatively small place? Something went horribly wrong. :(


I don't know if you are familiar with the area, but Staten Island is pretty hilly, but if I remember, most of the east coast of the island would have probably been a Zone A area. Most should have evacuated, but the devastation was far inland. Staten Island is quite large. I don't think they are getting the help they need fast enough.
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 69 Comments: 25512
Quoting waterskiman:

Relax man, The power comapanies have being doing a great job getting the power back on, they got to work from the outside in, takes time. There are utility companies coming from so many states can't list them to help.

What doesn't help is Gov Cumo or what ever his name is threating them with sactions or such if they don't hurry the hell up. The dude needs a serious reality check and a dang boot up his azz for being a clueless putz.
do ya think that will work cause mom has sure given him one
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53308
Quoting 900MB:
Long few days here in the big city. Our utility company, Con Ed, sucks! We still have 3 million people in the 5 boroughs without power. This is not good! Over the past 15 hours, no, none, zero customers have regained power. The 721k people in Manhattan have been promised power by 11:59 on Sat night. 5 days. The other 2.3 Million people- Nov 11th- 15 days! Pathetic!
I wrote a blog post on my trip from normalcy to zombieville here in manhattan yesterday: Link
Enjoy.

Relax man, The power comapanies have being doing a great job getting the power back on, they got to work from the outside in, takes time. There are utility companies coming from so many states can't list them to help.

What doesn't help is Gov Cumo or what ever his name is threating them with sactions or such if they don't hurry the hell up. The dude needs a serious reality check and a dang boot up his azz for being a clueless putz.
Member Since: June 6, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 4429
Quoting Neapolitan:
I didn't bother with technical details when I originally posted the story, but I'll tell you: not a single one of those cords was connected to a generator. No one tried to connect anything to those cords that would draw too many amps--ACs, refrigerators, and the like. And plywood signs were posted every three or four houses reminding drivers to slow down.

(On a side note, and apropos of nothing, the cross-street neighbor to whom I supplied electricity was brother to a man who a few years later was elected president of a large Caribbean nation, making him the only high-ranking politician I've ever had in my home.)

Nea, it's a great story, and things like that need to remembered at times like this. We can get through anything by just being decent people and good neighbors.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 13458
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
winter comes soon

51 days
But who's counting? :)
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 13458
Hurricanes and New York City


New York City is at risk for high winds, coastal flooding and rainfall related flooding.

During the past century, several hurricanes have brought hurricane force gusts.

During August 28, 2011, Irene tracked over the city as a tropical storm. The eye of
Hurricane Belle in 1976 passed through the eastern suburbs, and the western edge of
Hurricane Donna's eye in 1960 clipped the city.

Tropical systems occasionally generate double-digit rainfall.

The following are some of New York City's significant tropical cyclones:

1821 The Norfolk and Long Island Hurricane of September 3-4 tracked over New York City,
leaving long-lasting impressions. Based on a damage comparison to hurricanes of known
strength at this latitude, it was likely a Category 1, with sustained winds in the 74 to 95 mph
range and higher gusts. (Although wind related damage was widespread, the storm was not
catastrophic, contrary to myth.)

1882 Several times each century the metropolitan area experiences extensive hurricane
related flooding. During September 22-23, Central Park collected 10.62 inches of rain. Amounts
were even heavier in the western suburbs. The deluge fell on ground previously soaked by a
tropical system on September 11-12. (The 16.85 inches that fell in September makes it the
wettest month in city history.)

1893 This was an especially active year, as hurricanes repeatedly targeted the East Coast.
New York City received notable effects from three storms, with the strongest making landfall in
the metropolitan area on August 24. Minimal sustained hurricane force winds battered the area.
The ocean ravaged nearby beach resorts.

1903 On September 16, a tropical storm/borderline hurricane made landfall near Atlantic
City, New Jersey. Gale-force winds extended north to the New York City area. A more destructive
tropical system stalled and gradually dissipated south of Long Island during October. On October
9, a total of 8.01 inches of rain drenched Central Park. Rainfall on October 8-9 topped 10
inches throughout the metropolitan area.

1938 The geographic position of New York City reduces the likelihood of a direct hit by an
intense hurricane. Cooler ocean water and several hours with most of the storm's circulation
swirling over land before the center (eye) comes on shore saps the strength of the rare tropical
system that approaches from the sea. Nevertheless, powerful Category 3 hurricanes have made
landfall on Long Island, within 50 or 60 miles of downtown. The "Long Island Express" or "Great
New England Hurricane" of September 21 killed more than 600 people after striking eastern
Long Island. The barometer in Manhattan bottomed at a September record low of 28.72 inches.
Gusts of hurricane force caused various damage in the city, but losses were modest compared
to sections east of the storm center and from torrential rainfall in the highlands of eastern New
England.

1944 The "Great Atlantic Hurricane" tracked about 60 miles east of the city on September
14, making landfall very near the same location as the Great New England Hurricane of 1938.
High winds and heavy rain (more than 10 inches in some metropolitan locations from September
12-14) caused more damage in the city than the 1938 storm.

1954 Hurricane Hazel tracked about 150 miles west on October 15. Hazel brought a record
peak sustained wind of 99 mph and a gust of 113 mph to the Battery weather station on top the
Whitehall Building, 400 feet above street level. Winds at street level were about 30 to 40 mph
less. About an inch of rain fell in the metropolitan area.

1955 Hurricane Connie dropped 12.20 inches of rain on La Guardia Airport from August 11-
13 during a period of 38 hours. Hurricane Diane arrived on August 18-19, dropping 2 to 4
inches in the metropolitan area, but much higher amounts 50 to 100 miles west and north. Diane
caused one of New England's most destructive floods.

1960 Hurricane Donna struck Long Island as a Category 2 hurricane on September 12. An
elongated eye brushed eastern sections of the metropolitan area. Gusts in the city reached
hurricane force, and Donna caused a record tide. Rainfall in some places topped five inches.

1976 Hurricane Belle tracked 20 miles east of New York City on August 9, making landfall
with sustained winds of 80 mph and gusts of around 100 mph. Sustained winds were generally
50 to 60 mph with higher gusts in the metropolitan area.

1991 On August 19, Hurricane Bob struck Long Island, accompanied by 100 mph winds.
New York City, about 50 miles west of Bob's track, experienced several hours of gales. Bob is
the last hurricane to make landfall on Long Island.

1999 Hurricane Floyd brought a deluge on September 16, more than five inches of rain to
much of the New York metropolitan area. In northwestern New Jersey and southeastern New
York totals in some places topped ten inches, resulting in severe flooding.

2011 On August 28, Irene, downgraded to a tropical storm, tracked through the city.
Damage was less than expected. However, the storm caused large-scale power outages. It also
caused historic flooding in nearby sections of New Jersey and in upstate sections of eastern
New York and adjacent sections of New England.
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Quoting Grothar:
The images out of Staten Island are terrible. The death toll is 19 on Staten Island alone.


Gro, this is totally tragic, especially in the shadow of the biggest city in the US. Was Staten Island in an evacuation zone? If not, why not? Did people have any idea that a storm surge of this magnitute was coming? Why did so many people die in this one relatively small place? Something went horribly wrong. :(
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 13458
Online nbc chanel 4 new york has had great coverage, they have a reporter in every place in the Tri state that got hit the hardest and some that are just without power to the MTA and road reports. They have inlisted sister station reporters, some of them are stuck on islands before the storm even hit, most are reporting with little sleep. They are live streaming non stop during the day and have stopped at night. If you need info it is a great resource if you have net. Cudos to them for still being online for days afterwards. New Orleans when Issac hit they stopped streaming info with in a day after the storm not their fault but people without power and cable need the net these days.

So what I am saying really is the net has all the info you need on every place every resource they have available to you that the cable is just not giving you.

Link
Member Since: June 6, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 4429
Quoting 900MB:
Long few days here in the big city. Our utility company, Con Ed, sucks! We still have 3 million people in the 5 boroughs without power. This is not good! Over the past 15 hours, no, none, zero customers have regained power. The 721k people in Manhattan have been promised power by 11:59 on Sat night. 5 days. The other 2.3 Million people- Nov 11th- 15 days! Pathetic!
I wrote a blog post on my trip from normalcy to zombieville here in manhattan yesterday: Link
Enjoy.


you dont think they are working as hard as they can...whats pathetic is to build a city at sea level and put the pargest mass transit system and power systems under that city
Member Since: August 4, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 570
Quoting 900MB:
Long few days here in the big city. Our utility company, Con Ed, sucks! We still have 3 million people in the 5 boroughs without power. This is not good! Over the past 15 hours, no, none, zero customers have regained power. The 721k people in Manhattan have been promised power by 11:59 on Sat night. 5 days. The other 2.3 Million people- Nov 11th- 15 days! Pathetic!
I wrote a blog post on my trip from normalcy to zombieville here in manhattan yesterday: Link
Enjoy.


They don't suck...its an overwhelming problem and the scope and the scale of devastation is far more than any single utility could cope with. The linespeople, tree clearers and electricians are working as hard as they can. I have no doubt its frustrating. In the 90's there was a huge ice storm in the NE. Again, millions without power, trees down all over the roads, and hard to get in to since it takes power to pump gas. My Mum and Dad cooked in the garage for 9 days and otherwise stayed in bed under half a dozen blankets and toques on their heads - no heat and it was 25 F outside...house got to 33. Geez, I could have ended up with another sib!
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Quoting Jedkins01:



I hiked Grandfather Mountain NC, and many other regions around there in the fall several years back, thank God I didn't do that trip in late October 2012 :)


multiple locations in NC mountain recieved over 2 feet...go to raysweather.com for totals
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Quoting Tazmanian:
the E cost is going to have fun next weekend in the weather
Hey, Taz. When will it snow at your house?
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Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53308
Quoting imipak:


Hrrrrrm. ISTR Governor Christie's widely reported remarks along the lines of "If it looks stupid, it IS stupid. That's a good New Jersey rule to live by", before Sandy arrived, were in reply to a question along the lines of "So, if my neighbour's power goes out, and I have a gennie, should I string a long extension cable through my yard and over the fence into their place?"
Gov Christie is a changed man, as are many who did not see through a glass darkly but now are face to face.
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Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53308
Quoting imipak:


Hrrrrrm. ISTR Governor Christie's widely reported remarks along the lines of "If it looks stupid, it IS stupid. That's a good New Jersey rule to live by", before Sandy arrived, were in reply to a question along the lines of "So, if my neighbour's power goes out, and I have a gennie, should I string a long extension cable through my yard and over the fence into their place?"
I didn't bother with technical details when I originally posted the story, but I'll tell you: not a single one of those cords was connected to a generator. No one tried to connect anything to those cords that would draw too many amps--ACs, refrigerators, and the like. And plywood signs were posted every three or four houses reminding drivers to slow down.

(On a side note, and apropos of nothing, the cross-street neighbor to whom I supplied electricity was brother to a man who a few years later was elected president of a large Caribbean nation, making him the only high-ranking politician I've ever had in my home.)
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Quoting sar2401:

Right. A "pertuation" (I assume you mean perturbation) is being shown 5-7 days out on some models. It's November, and low pressure systems commonly affect the Northeast in Novemeber. It's not a Nor'easter at this point. As I also said, something to keep an eye on but nothing to push the panic button on...yet.
winter comes soon
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53308
227. prosa
I just drove about ten miles - using up what very little gas I still have - in and around Medford, NY trying to find an open gas station. Lines or no lines. Ten of the eleven stations which I passed were out of gas. At the eleventh, the line was so enormously long that the police weren't allowing any new cars to join it.

Tomorrow I'm supposed to be at a high-priority work assignment about 20 miles away. It doesn't look as if I'll be able to go.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
226. yoboi
Quoting 900MB:
Long few days here in the big city. Our utility company, Con Ed, sucks! We still have 3 million people in the 5 boroughs without power. This is not good! Over the past 15 hours, no, none, zero customers have regained power. The 721k people in Manhattan have been promised power by 11:59 on Sat night. 5 days. The other 2.3 Million people- Nov 11th- 15 days! Pathetic!
I wrote a blog post on my trip from normalcy to zombieville here in manhattan yesterday: Link
Enjoy.


2 to 3 weeks after rita and katrina it takes time.....
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Quoting Tazmanian:
the E cost is going to have fun next weekend in the weather


winter comes soon taz
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53308
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
18z GFS shows a perturation dropping from western grt lakes high cen plains down to gulf coast n fla then up and out east of the lakes just off shore ne in 7 days with another bomber in the pacfic nw on the way after the first

they got seven days if models are correct to get things in order




Right. A "pertuation" (I assume you mean perturbation) is being shown 5-7 days out on some models. It's November, and low pressure systems commonly affect the Northeast in Novemeber. It's not a Nor'easter at this point. As I also said, something to keep an eye on but nothing to push the panic button on...yet.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 13458
Quoting Walshy:
Why no love for North Carolina?

I am pretty sure 36 inches of snow fell in our mountains too. And Grandfather Mountain gusted to 105 mph.

Mt Leconte, TN had 34 inches with drifts at the roof tops.

Charlotte Observer
Link



I hiked Grandfather Mountain NC, and many other regions around there in the fall several years back, thank God I didn't do that trip in late October 2012 :)
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156 hours



Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 69 Comments: 25512
221. skook
please stop quoting taz, a lot of its have him on ignore. I've spent the last week in Schuylkill county while pushing or flight back a few days hoping freeing up our Wednesday flight for others. at the height of the power outage from dandy about 20thousand lost power, with most of it restored. which is a great thing for us because it has been pretty chilly of late and haven't seen the sun in 6days.
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Quoting charlottefl:


They have one of the highest reliability ratings in the nation. I think it's 99.98% or something crazy like that. Also the cheapest electric provider (average bill) in the state of FL. And they've been working storms for a while, so they're really good at restoration for the most part.


Up here in Central Florida we now have Progress Energy/Pike. I think Pike bought them out, at any rate, they are doing a great job. They have been redoing pretty much the entire electric grid here in Pinellas for months now, they are even replacing old high voltage pylons that are rusting with newer structures, and all the old poles all over are being replaced. They have even been replacing substation transformers.


I was honestly disturbed at how old and "gangly" the power line grid looks up north compared to here, a lot of times I would see nasty old structures that looks like they are barely holding up the wires, many times you could see where insulators are so old that current jumps across and creates burn marks on the poles, probably during heavy rain/snow.

It's no wonder such an event knocked out such a massive amount of power. I mean regardless of how good the power line grid is, you're going to have outages with such an event, but having practically archaic structures transporting power around doesn't help...
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Quoting Grothar:
The images out of Staten Island are terrible. The death toll is 19 on Staten Island alone.



water overrun it all
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53308
The images out of Staten Island are terrible. The death toll is 19 on Staten Island alone.

Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 69 Comments: 25512
Quoting aislinnpaps:


They did that up there in the 70's gas shortage. But inexperience in hurricanes means they don't realize the aftermath. However, around here after Rita it was first come first serve, same as up there.

Indeed, I'm not picking on the Northeast. It seems like after every crisis or disaster, when gas lines are completely predictable, emergency management agencies develop amnesia about something like this ever happening before. They will roll out a plan just when everyone has already filled up and supplies start returning to normal. Drivers who waited in lines this week because of a lack of planning will wait in line next week because of too much planning. I keep hoping, after nearly 35 years of being part of law enforcement and emergency planning, that some agencies may get ahead of the power curve. So far, I'm turning blue from holding my breath. :)
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 13458
Quoting Neapolitan:
[...] when returning home afterward that evening, I turned onto my street to see dozens of extension cords draped across the avenue, a three-block long, unbroken grid of bright orange cables snaked neighbor to neighbor, the haves helping the have nots. As bad as that storm was, the sight of all those extension cords was both awesome and heartwarming, and one that gave me--for at least a little while--hope for our frequently selfish species...


Hrrrrrm. ISTR Governor Christie's widely reported remarks along the lines of "If it looks stupid, it IS stupid. That's a good New Jersey rule to live by", before Sandy arrived, were in reply to a question along the lines of "So, if my neighbour's power goes out, and I have a gennie, should I string a long extension cable through my yard and over the fence into their place?"
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Quoting sar2401:

Unfortunately, this is another result of poor pre-planning. All the normal surplus supply of gas is ending up stored in vehicle gas tanks. In normal circumstances, most people fill up when their gas gets to between a half and a quarter of a tank. Now, with everyone freaked out, people will fill up at any opportunity, even if they are only a few gallons down. A rationing plan, like limiting purchases to 10 gallons and allowing purchase based on an odd-even plan nased on the last number on your license plate, should have been ready to go and put in place immediately. This is not the first time there has ever been a gas crisis anywhere, but it seems like lessons from the past are easily forgotten.


They did that up there in the 70's gas shortage. But inexperience in hurricanes means they don't realize the aftermath. However, around here after Rita it was first come first serve, same as up there.
Member Since: August 22, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 3115
214. 900MB
Long few days here in the big city. Our utility company, Con Ed, sucks! We still have 3 million people in the 5 boroughs without power. This is not good! Over the past 15 hours, no, none, zero customers have regained power. The 721k people in Manhattan have been promised power by 11:59 on Sat night. 5 days. The other 2.3 Million people- Nov 11th- 15 days! Pathetic!
I wrote a blog post on my trip from normalcy to zombieville here in manhattan yesterday: Link
Enjoy.
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the E cost is going to have fun next weekend in the weather
Member Since: May 21, 2006 Posts: 5091 Comments: 114783
Quoting sar2401:

No forecasters are predicting a Nor'easter. There are a few models that show a low off the east coast around five days from now, but many of the models aren't picking up on this at all. For right now, it's something to pay attention to, but not time to push the panic button.
18z GFS shows a perturation dropping from western grt lakes high cen plains down to gulf coast n fla then up and out east of the lakes just off shore ne in 7 days with another bomber in the pacfic nw on the way after the first

they got seven days if models are correct to get things in order



Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53308
Quoting SarasotaToo:


Thanks Grothar....I haven't been able to find much information.... Long Island hasn't gotten much national attention....


Remember, Long Island is America's best kept secret. If people new how beautiful it really is, they would all move there.
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 69 Comments: 25512
Quoting aislinnpaps:
Gas lines are bad as far away as the Catskills. My sister saw a 'short' line and figured she'd just go to another station. Now she knows that short line would have been wonderful compared to the others she found. The ones that still had gas...

Unfortunately, this is another result of poor pre-planning. All the normal surplus supply of gas is ending up stored in vehicle gas tanks. In normal circumstances, most people fill up when their gas gets to between a half and a quarter of a tank. Now, with everyone freaked out, people will fill up at any opportunity, even if they are only a few gallons down. A rationing plan, like limiting purchases to 10 gallons and allowing purchase based on an odd-even plan nased on the last number on your license plate, should have been ready to go and put in place immediately. This is not the first time there has ever been a gas crisis anywhere, but it seems like lessons from the past are easily forgotten.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 13458

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.