Sandy by the numbers: trying to comprehend a stunning disaster

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 7:19 PM GMT on November 01, 2012

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The immensity of the impact of Superstorm Sandy on the Eastern U.S. is difficult to comprehend, and the scenes of devastation coming from the impact zone are stunning and heart-wrenching. To help understand the extraordinary scale of this historic storm, I've put together a list of notable statistics from Sandy:

Death toll: 160 (88 in the U.S., 54 in Haiti, 11 in Cuba)

Damage estimates: $10 - $55 billion

Power outages: 8.5 million U.S. customers, 2nd most for a natural disaster behind the 1993 blizzard (10 million)

Maximum U.S. sustained winds: 69 mph at Westerly, RI

Peak U.S. wind gusts: 90 mph at Islip, NY and Tompkinsville, NJ

Maximum U.S. storm surge: 9.45', Bergen Point, NJ 9:24 pm EDT October 29, 2012

Maximum U.S. Storm Tide: 14.60', Bergen Point, NJ, 9:24 pm EDT October 29, 2012

Maximum significant wave height: 33.1' at the buoy east of Cape Hatteras, NC (2nd highest: 32.5' at the Entrance to New York Harbor)

Maximum U.S. rainfall: 12.55", Easton, MD

Maximum snowfall: 36", Richwood, WV

Minimum pressure: 945.5 mb, Atlantic City, NJ at 7:24 pm EST, October 29, 2012. This is the lowest pressure measured in the U.S., at any location north of Cape Hatteras, NC (previous record: 946 mb in the 1938 hurricane on Long Island, NY)

Destructive potential of storm surge: 5.8 on a scale of 0 to 6, highest of any hurricane observed since 1969. Previous record: 5.6 on a scale of 0 to 6, set during Hurricane Isabel of 2003.

Diameter of tropical storm-force winds at landfall: 945 miles

Diameter of ocean with 12' seas at landfall: 1500 miles


Figure 1. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi NPP satellite acquired this image of Superstorm Sandy around 3:35 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time (7:35 Universal Time) on October 30. This image is from the “day-night band” on VIIRS, which detects light wavelengths from green to near-infrared. The full Moon lit up the tops of the clouds. Image credit: NASA.



Figure 2. Preliminary death and damage statistics for Sandy as compiled by Wikipedia on November 1, 2012.



Figure 3. Precipitation from Superstorm Sandy for the 7-day period ending at 8 am EDT Thursday, November 1, 2012. Image credit: NOAA/NWS/AHPS.



Figure 4. Top five weather-related power outages in the U.S.



Figure 5. Strong winds from Sandy blow snow in West Virginia on October 30, 2012. Image credit: Beau Dodson


Sandy's snows
Several cities set records for snowiest October day on record during Sandy: Elkin, WV (7", previous record, 4.6" in 1917) and Bluefield (4.7", previous record 3.2" in 1993.) Heavy snows caused roof collapses in West Virginia, and snows of two feet or more fell in four states--West Virginia, Tennessee, Maryland, and Virginia. However, Sandy fell short of setting the all-time record for snowfall from a hurricane. The Vermont Journal estimated that the Snow Hurricane of 1804 dumped up to 4 feet of snow in Vermont.

36" Richwood, WV
34" Mount Leconte, TN
34" Sevier, TN
33" Clayton, WV
32" Snowshoe, WV
29" Quinwood, WV
28" Frostburg, WV
28" Davis, WV
28" Huttonsville, WV
28" Flat Top, WV
26" Redhouse, MD
26" Garret, MD
26" Craigsville, WV
24" Oakland, MD
24" Alpine Lake, WV
24" Nettie, WV
24" Norton, VA
24" Quinwood, WV
24" Alexander, WV

Links
Impressive loop of 1-minute visible satellite imagery spanning 6 days of Sandy's life.

A one-day time lapse video from a New York City webcam showing Sandy's impact on the city. It's eerie to see the city suddenly plunged into darkness.

First round of damage assessment aerial imagery collected by NOAA's National Geodetic Survey on Oct. 31 along the New Jersey coast.


Figure 6. Flooding in Haiti from Hurricane Sandy. Image credit: The Lambi Fund of Haiti.

Charities mobilize for Sandy
The outpouring of charitable donations in the wake of the devastation wrought by Hurricane Sandy has been one of the bright spots in the gloomy aftermath of the storm. The main owners of The Weather Channel have agreed to match donations of up to $1 million to the American Red Cross, if you text SANDY to 90999 ($10). I also recommend my favorite disaster relief charity, Portlight.org. They are focusing their response efforts exclusively on the post-Sandy neeeds of people with disabilities.Check out the Portlight blog to see what they're up to; donations are always needed.

Sandy's greatest devastation occurred in Haiti, where rains of up to 20 inches in 24 hours unleashed rampaging flood waters that killed at least 54, left 200,000 homeless, wiped out thousand of acres of crops, and killed massive numbers of livestock. For impoverished families in Haiti still struggling to recover from the earthquake in 2010 and Hurricane Isaac in August, Sandy was devastating.  These crops are the very essence of rural Haitian’s livelihoods, and there are fears widespread starvation will result. A disaster relief charity in Haiti that I've contributed to for many years, The Lambi Fund of Haiti, is seeking donations to help farmers purchase local seeds so that they can replant their crops in the wake of this latest terrible Haitian catastrophe.

Jeff Masters

Hurricane Sandy - Davis, W.V. (beaudodson)
Hurricane Sandy, Davis, W.V. - photos taken by Beau Dodson
Hurricane Sandy - Davis, W.V.
We Survived (teach50)
Everyone has seen photos of the damage inflicted by Hurricane Sandy that destroyed New Jersey, NYC, & Long Island as well as other areas on the East Coast. I am finally back on line after 4 days without power. It has been a long ordeal. My block was extremely fortunate. We didn't have any trees fall and no flooding but the entire area is devastated. This is a photo of a tree that fell between the street, smashed, the car, and blew out the tires. No one was hurt.
We Survived

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Quoting kwgirl:
Yeah, you should try sh..ty or Keys Energy(used to be City Electric so you get the drift of the er other name we still call it despite the name change.).
kwgirl........Keys coop has it's problems also
Member Since: October 3, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 5887
Quoting PalmBeachWeather:
Nea...... You are not complaining about the utility company but let me just throw this in.... Currently I have "Lake Worth utility, When I lived in Myrtle Beach I had Santee Cooper utility, when I lived in Ohio I had DPL........ Trust me, FPL is great.
Yeah, you should try sh..ty or Keys Energy(used to be City Electric so you get the drift of the er other name we still call it despite the name change.).
Member Since: March 28, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 1532
Quoting wjdow:
Does the fact of 69 mph max sustained on-shore winds change anyone's thought about whether NHC should have issued hurricane warnings? At least it makes it a close call about which they deserve a break from some of the harshest criticisms, do you agree?
That is not hurricane strengh winds. Sorry! Yes I agree with you Edited to clarify.
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Watching from afar: Sandy quiets our airspace


121029 1310 – 1615 UTC visible imagery and ASDI flight routes
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Quoting Neapolitan:
Yes.
Nea...... You are not complaining about the utility company but let me just throw this in.... Currently I have "Lake Worth utility, When I lived in Myrtle Beach I had Santee Cooper utility, when I lived in Ohio I had DPL........ Trust me, FPL is great.
Member Since: October 3, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 5887
Quoting kwgirl:
I agree with you and have been thinking that all along once I saw the subways flooded. That in itself is major. They are not just going to dry everything off and run the trains. Then talk about restoring the Jersey shore, or even just hardening it against rising seas. Major money and time. 10 years for Jersey. I am not too up on subways and what is actually down there and the type of work it will take, but 1 year would be my guess, saying they have to rip out and replace. One good thing ( you must always look on the bright side of life, ta da, ta da da da da da!) is that there will be plenty of work to do. This will get people working.



I think the salt water intrusion in the subways alone will be an expensive corrosive headache for NYC. And I wonder how many folks carried flood insurance.
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Quoting CybrTeddy:
FWIW, it should be Hurricane Sandy, not just Superstorm Sandy, to avoid confusion.
Does the fact of 69 mph max sustained on-shore winds change anyone's thought about whether NHC should have issued hurricane warnings? At least it makes it a close call about which they deserve a break from some of the harshest criticisms, do you agree?
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Quoting PalmBeachWeather:
FPL?
Yes.
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13549
Why turn off the electricity and not the natural gas?

It smells of poor planning, and poor management. Bloomberg should be fired. If not for that, then for his hesitation at evacuating the low lying areas.

Who knows how long he would have waited if Cuomo hadn't stepped up to the plate.
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Quoting FtMyersgal:


My bad. $55Bil is still light IMO
I agree with you and have been thinking that all along once I saw the subways flooded. That in itself is major. They are not just going to dry everything off and run the trains. Then talk about restoring the Jersey shore, or even just hardening it against rising seas. Major money and time. 10 years for Jersey. I am not too up on subways and what is actually down there and the type of work it will take, but 1 year would be my guess, saying they have to rip out and replace. One good thing ( you must always look on the bright side of life, ta da, ta da da da da da!) is that there will be plenty of work to do. This will get people working.
Member Since: March 28, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 1532
Quoting Neapolitan:
Speaking of electrical outages, a garbage truck just pulled out of a neighboring parking lot with the Dumpster raised, pulling down the line and the power pole to which it was attached. Power in the entire neigbhorhood is gone, and now they have us evacuating as the truck is on fire. Very inconvenient. And that's just a single pole in a single neighborhood. I can't help but think how bad it is for folks in the Northeast ffacing tens of thousands of similar situations.
FPL?
Member Since: October 3, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 5887
Quoting kwgirl:
I am glad you explained that. It was going over this blonde's head!:)
I just dyed my hair blonde last week, You should have asked me a week ago and I would have got it..........Dammit Jim
Member Since: October 3, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 5887
Quoting PalmBeachWeather:
And I have a picture gal


Very nice! :)
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Quoting PalmBeachWeather:
It's with a "B" gal


My bad. $55Bil is still light IMO
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In the wake of this Catastrophy that had its effect in the eastern U.S. we share the pain and struggles of our brothers and sister that are suffering. But at least we know that there is hope, since there lots of resourses,to recuperate. But a few hundred miles to the south-east of Florida exist the most unfortunate, country in our hemisphere. The poorest one as well. But also it seems that mother nature has something against them, no other place in America has suffered as much as Haiti, ....just saying , REMEMBER HAITI !!!
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Quoting washingtonian115:
I would like to see a few flakes here in D.C all though the chances of that happening are slim.

I'm not to sure why people are getting on me saying "Peoplr cared about where you were and you slam them".Never asked anyone to care and I'm sure most of them would have loved to see me gone.I'll e-mail you ncstorm.


Dont worry about it Wash! I always get "told off" but I dont let it bother me..continue posting and be you!
Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 15650
Quoting MrMixon:


Ah ha! If you take that number (945) and subtract a number created from the first three integers arranged in descending order (i.e. 3, 2, 1 or 321) and then if you subtract the resulting number (624) from 666 you get... 42! Which we all know is the answer to Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything.

So, (keeping in mind that humor is an effective antidote for stress*), this storm was clearly planned out.




*The sole purpose of my posting this is to illicit one or two chuckles.
I am glad you explained that. It was going over this blonde's head!:)
Member Since: March 28, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 1532
Quoting FtMyersgal:
Thank you Dr Masters. I hope I'm wrong but I thing $55 Mil is light
And I have a picture gal
Member Since: October 3, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 5887
Quoting Neapolitan:
Anyway, a bone for the numerologists among us to gnaw on. I'm not one, but couldn't help but notice the following in the above list:

9.45: in feet, Sandy's maximum storm surge at Bergen Point, NJ
945: in millibars, Sandy's minimum pressure at Atlantic City, NJ
945: in miles, Sandy's diameter of tropical storm-force winds at landfall


Ah ha! If you take that number (945) and subtract a number created from the first three integers arranged in descending order (i.e. 3, 2, 1 or 321) and then if you subtract the resulting number (624) from 666 you get... 42! Which we all know is the answer to Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything.

So, (keeping in mind that humor is an effective antidote for stress*), this storm was clearly planned out.




*The sole purpose of my posting this is to illicit one or two chuckles.

EDIT - Holy mackerel... I just noticed this ended up being comment 42. Now I'm scared...

EDIT #2 - You people rock! I'm just getting ready to leave work for the day and this comment about the number 42, which is comment number 42, officially has 42 pluses. I'm sure somebody is gonna plus this up to 43 at some point and mess up this lovely symmetry, but for now y'all have made my evening. If you like symmetry and want to show your support without messing it up, please just plus my next comment down. Speaking of which, my comment count for the day is officially 666 (a number included in my calculations above). With this numerological nexus I will be walking out of my office with a smile on my obsessive-compulsive face (and my tongue planted firmly in my cheek, because I know this is all purely arbitrary...). Thanks, friends!
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Quoting FtMyersgal:
Thank you Dr Masters. I hope I'm wrong but I thing $55 Mil is light
It's with a "B" gal
Member Since: October 3, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 5887
Quoting Neapolitan:
Absolutely astounding numbers, and very sobering ones.

I did just notice that the government of Jamaica is estimating eventual damages to that island of about $5 billion, roughly 300 times more than the smallish $16.5 million shown in the Wikipedia graph. I'll go make, or at least suggest, the change. (Jamaica Information Service)

Anyway, a bone for the numerologists among us to gnaw on. I'm not one, but couldn't help but notice the following in the above list:

9.45: in feet, Sandy's maximum storm surge at Bergen Point, NJ
945: in millibars, Sandy's minimum pressure at Atlantic City, NJ
945: in miles, Sandy's diameter of tropical storm-force winds at landfall


From Wiki:

In number theory, an abundant number or excessive number is a number for which the sum of its proper divisors is greater than the number itself. 12 is the first abundant number. Its proper divisors are 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6 for a total of 16. The amount by which the sum exceeds the number is the abundance. 12 has an abundance of 4, for example.

The smallest odd abundant number is 945.

Hope that helps.
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FWIW, it should be Hurricane Sandy, not just Superstorm Sandy, to avoid confusion.
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Speaking of electrical outages, a garbage truck just pulled out of a neighboring parking lot with a Dumpster raised, pulling down the line and the power pole to which it was attached. Power in the entire neighborhood is gone, and now the police have asked us to evacuate, as the truck is on fire. Very inconvenient. And that's just a single pole in a single neighborhood; I can't help but think how bad it is for folks in the Northeast facing tens of thousands of similar situations, and for far longer a period of time than this one little neighborhood will.
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13549
Thank you Dr Masters. I hope I'm wrong but I thing $55 Bil is light

modified to correct typo
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Quoting ncstorm:


It looks like it unfortunately..I think the cold air will be in place on the coast for snow
I would like to see a few flakes here in D.C all though the chances of that happening are slim.

I'm not to sure why people are getting on me saying "Peoplr cared about where you were and you slam them".Never asked anyone to care and I'm sure most of them would have loved to see me gone.I'll e-mail you ncstorm.
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The scale is staggering: Superstorm Sandy flooded New York City’s network of underground and vehicular tunnels with up to 400 million gallons of water. On Thursday, the U.S. military began to bring some of its heavy equipment into place – from generators to powerful water pumps to trucks flown from across the country. But, as the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers emphasized to Danger Room, they’re just getting started with the cleanup.

The work for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Manhattan starts at the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel, the major underwater thoroughfare for cars passing between Brooklyn and Manhattan. Corps crews assembled at South Ferry, near the Manhattan entrance to the tunnel, have begun receiving power generators and other preliminary equipment by barge from the Navy, ahead of the high-head submersible pumps or centrifugal pumps necessary to start drainage. Task number one is to clear out the underpass to the tunnel, a task that the Corps’ Jim Pogue estimates will take about 24 hours, coming from two different sites. The expected extraction: 10 million gallons.

The crews have limited access to the submerged tunnels: there’s “only one way in and one way out,” Pogue tells Danger Room. Worse, it’s a moving target. As the water recedes, “you’re chasing it down the tunnel so the pumps have to be continuously repositioned.”


via www.wired.com/dangerroom
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Quoting ncstorm:


It looks like it unfortunately..I think the cold air will be in place on the coast for snow
Something to watch
Member Since: October 3, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 5887
Quoting washingtonian115:
Are we really doing round 2 again?.

We better get snow out of this pattern.


It looks like it unfortunately..I think the cold air will be in place on the coast for snow
Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 15650
Quoting PalmBeachWeather:
Thanks JP.........Very scary numbers
Sorry
Member Since: October 3, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 5887
Quoting hydrus:

901. hydrus 7:21 PM GMT on November 01, 2012 +0

Quoting sar2401:

I don't know about on the ball, but 27 years of law enforcement and search and rescue work did teach me a few things. :) I know for sure what doesn't work, and having us going out and arresting people doesn't work. I'm not sure why turning off utilities is such a hard concept to understand. It just takes some pre-planning on the part of utilities and emergency management. We got really good at this in California during the days of rolling blackouts, so it's not technically all that difficult.

I like the idea of shutting off utilities. By now most people living on the coast and other regions subject to natural disasters must realize that there are certain consequences for living where they do. If danger is imminent, cutting utilities not only protects expensive and vital equipment, but makes some people realize how serious the danger could be( they loose money when killing the power ). I been through many storms, the power is usually lost anyway, and could be restored to folks quicker if it was shut off in the first place.... Just my harmless opinion.


Cutting off utilities would have spared the neighborhood in Queens from losing 100+ houses.
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Quoting Neapolitan:
Absolutely astounding numbers, and very sobering ones.

I did just notice that the government of Jamaica is estimating eventual damages to that island of about $5 billion, roughly 300 times more than the smallish $16.5 million shown in the Wikipedia graph. I'll go make, or at least suggest, the change. (Jamaica Information Service)

Anyway, a bone for the numerologists among us to gnaw on. I'm not one, but couldn't help but notice the following in the above list:

9.45: in feet, Sandy's maximum storm surge at Bergen Point, NJ
945: in millibars, Sandy's minimum pressure at Atlantic City, NJ
945: in miles, Sandy's diameter of tropical storm-force winds at landfall
Thanks JP.........Very scary numbers
Member Since: October 3, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 5887
Quoting ncstorm:
12z Euro



Are we really doing round 2 again?.

We better get snow out of this pattern.
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the NOGAPS has the east coast storm but its out to sea and not up the coast..
Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 15650
Quoting LostTomorrows:
Wow, when you lay down the facts like that, it really makes one realize the scope of just how ferocious this storm really was. There are some things that I was not yet aware of, like the amount of snow, or the fact that there are still many that are missing in various countries.

Sandy sets a precedent for sure.

I wonder what's in store for the remainder of hurricane season? If it's over, it certainly went out with a bigger bang than any other season from what I can remember, but there are a few areas of interest out there, including in the central Caribbean and two out in the open Atlantic.


LostTomorrows,

I think that the hurricane season may in fact extend past November, due to the three areas of interest that you mentioned. However, I sure hope that the hurricane season does end with just Sandy because we don't need another disaster in the U.S. (And because I live in Florida, I have a high probability of being hit by a hurricane.)

WunderGirl12
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What Those Who Understand Atmospheric Physics Are Talking About After Sandy

Posted by Dan Satterfield

Asking if Hurricane Sandy was caused by climate change is like asking someone at the South Pole which way is north. This kind of storm could almost certainly form in a world where the CO2 levels have been unchanging and Arctic sea ice levels were stable. That said, anyone who claims Sandy was, or was not, caused by the changing climate just doesn’t get it.

If it seems like extreme storms are increasing over the Northeast USA, then you are right. The climate extremes index by the NOAA NCDC agrees.

It may be possible with some attribution and detection studies to say something about how much more likely it was for this storm to have occurred but that is for the future, and it will not be easy. So, what can we say about Sandy that is scientifically accurate??

Plenty.

1. The oceans are over a degree celsius warmer than they were a century ago ,and we had record warm oceans (2-3 degrees C above normal!) off the East Coast for most of the last several months.

2. The planet is a degree celsius warmer than it was a century ago, and this means the atmosphere on the whole is holding 5-7% more water vapor than it was 80 odd years ago.

3. Sea level has risen at least a foot over the past century, and along the coast of Delaware and Virginia, the sinking shorelines mean the water level is over 18 inches higher than even 60 years ago. Ask someone in Jersey who has a foot of water in their house if it would have been better if the water was 18 inches lower.

What we CAN say is this:

If a storm exactly like Sandy were to have hit in October of 1912, it would have been less wet with a storm surge that was lower. We can also say that a storm exactly like Sandy 90 years from now will be much wetter with water levels at least 24 inches higher. (The Mid-Atlantic coast is sinking at the rate of a foot a century, and the sea is rising at the same rate already. That’s two feet if nothing changes! The best science says the sea alone will rise 36 inches over the next century as the planet warms and the oceans expand.)

What meteorologists like myself, and climate researchers are talking about is the huge blocking high over Greenland. October or November hurricanes recurve into the Atlantic because of a much stronger fall jet stream, but the Greenland block turned Sandy into the coast. The track of Sandy was very RARE. Nearly unheard of actually, especially for this time of year. Dr. Jeff Masters has an excellent post about the Greenland block and how rare it is this time of year. Finish this post then read his.

Could the loss of Arctic sea ice be a factor in that big Greenland high pressure system. Dr. Jennifer Francis has research that says yes. (Andy Revkin at Dot Earth has a good post about this as well here.) Would the high have developed anyhow? Perhaps, but it would seem ridiculous to assume that the amazing loss of Arctic Ice would have little effect on the atmosphere over the Northern Hemisphere. That claim would be an extraordinary supposition that goes against the laws of physics and would require some profound evidence. The shoe is on the other foot now I think.

Rising sea levels and a warming planet are sneaking up on us little by little, but it will not be perceived that way. Instead, it will be realized in sudden and catastrophic events like floods, hurricanes and heat waves and droughts.

As I write this, 63 million people across 7 states are still in the dark…

Source
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Quoting CaicosRetiredSailor:
By Miguel Llanos, NBC News

Hundreds of thousands of people in New York City, Long Island and New Jersey may not have their power return for up to 10 more days, officials warned Thursday. Meanwhile, weather forecasters said a winter storm could hit the Northeast next week.

In New York City,  the utility ConEd said the 228,000 customers in Manhattan still without power should have it back by Saturday, but that would leave more than 400,000 elsewhere potentially in the dark beyond Saturday.

Follow @NBCNewsUS


vortex sigs indicate something dropping down from western lakes cen plains to gulf coast n fla then up and out over ne they got seven days to get things in some what of an order

Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 173 Comments: 54270
Quoting ILwthrfan:


wow 982 mb is not a weak storm at all....


I just posted the CMC as well..this doesnt look good..
Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 15650
Quoting ncstorm:
12z Euro





wow 982 mb is not a weak storm at all....
Member Since: February 2, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 1526
12z CMC





Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 15650
Quoting Neapolitan:
Absolutely astounding numbers, and very sobering ones.

I did just notice that the government of Jamaica is estimating eventual damages to that island of about $5 billion, roughly 300 times more than the smallish $16.5 million shown in the Wikipedia graph. I'll go make, or at least suggest, the change. (Jamaica Information Service)

Anyway, a bone for the numerologists among us to gnaw on. I'm not one, but couldn't help but notice the following in the above list:

9.45: in feet, Sandy's maximum storm surge at Bergen Point, NJ
945: in millibars, Sandy's minimum pressure at Atlantic City, NJ
945: in miles, Sandy's diameter of tropical storm-force winds at landfall


Wow so Sandy had about ~75% the diameter of Tropical Cyclone Tip which was 1,350 miles wide.
Member Since: February 2, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 1526
Quoting LostTomorrows:
Wow, when you lay down the facts like that, it really makes one realize the scope of just how ferocious this storm really was. There are some things that I was not yet aware of, like the amount of snow, or the fact that there are still many that are missing in various countries.

Sandy sets a precedent for sure.

I wonder what's in store for the remainder of hurricane season? If it's over, it certainly went out with a bigger bang than any other season from what I can remember, but there are a few areas of interest out there, including in the central Caribbean and two out in the open Atlantic.


I think we may see a longer season past November
Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 15650
12z Euro



Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 15650
Thanks Jeff. Amazing numbers...
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That death toll continues to unfortunately rise in the U.S and other countries are still missing people.

The irony is the fact that up until Sandy all the female storms were a complete utter joke.Sad situation all around.
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guess we will never know her landfall windspeed in s e cuba the few photos that were released showed shredded trees so im guessing 110-115 she was a tight system then
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Absolutely astounding numbers, and very sobering ones.

I did just notice that the government of Jamaica is estimating eventual damages to that island of about $5 billion, roughly 300 times more than the smallish $16.5 million shown in the Wikipedia graph. I'll go make, or at least suggest, the change. (Jamaica Information Service)

Anyway, a bone for the numerologists among us to gnaw on. I'm not one, but couldn't help but notice the following in the above list:

9.45: in feet, Sandy's maximum storm surge at Bergen Point, NJ
945: in millibars, Sandy's minimum pressure at Atlantic City, NJ
945: in miles, Sandy's diameter of tropical storm-force winds at landfall
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13549
By Miguel Llanos, NBC News

Hundreds of thousands of people in New York City, Long Island and New Jersey may not have their power return for up to 10 more days, officials warned Thursday. Meanwhile, weather forecasters said a winter storm could hit the Northeast next week.

In New York City,  the utility ConEd said the 228,000 customers in Manhattan still without power should have it back by Saturday, but that would leave more than 400,000 elsewhere potentially in the dark beyond Saturday.

Follow @NBCNewsUS
Member Since: July 12, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 6049
thanks doc
sandy will be something of intense debate
for a bit i reckon
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 173 Comments: 54270
Wow, when you lay down the facts like that, it really makes one realize the scope of just how ferocious this storm really was. There are some things that I was not yet aware of, like the amount of snow, or the fact that there are still many that are missing in various countries.

Sandy sets a precedent for sure.

I wonder what's in store for the remainder of hurricane season? If it's over, it certainly went out with a bigger bang than any other season from what I can remember, but there are a few areas of interest out there, including in the central Caribbean and two out in the open Atlantic.
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Hurricane Sandy
Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 15650
Hurricane Sandy did a lot of damage to the NE. It is kind of sad to hear about all of the damage.

WunderGirl12

P.S. I wrote a blog comparing Hurricane Sandy and Hurricane Irene. Check it out! Comments appreciated.

http://www.wunderground.com/blog/WunderGirl12/com ment.html?entrynum=1

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.