Superstorm Sandy delivers a devastating blow to the U.S.

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:23 PM GMT on October 30, 2012

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In a stunning spectacle of atmospheric violence, Superstorm Sandy roared ashore in New Jersey last night with sustained winds of 90 mph and a devastating storm surge that crippled coastal New Jersey and New York. Sandy's record size allowed the historic storm to bring extreme weather to over 100 million Americans, from Chicago to Maine and from Michigan to Florida. Sandy's barometric pressure at landfall was 946 mb, tying the Great Long Island Express Hurricane of 1938 as the most powerful storm ever to hit the Northeast U.S. north of Cape Hatteras, NC. New York City experienced its worst hurricane since its founding in 1624, as Sandy's 9-foot storm surge rode in on top of a high tide to bring water levels to 13.88' at The Battery, smashing the record 11.2' water level recorded during the great hurricane of 1821. Damage from Superstorm Sandy will likely be in the tens of billions, making the storm one of the five most expensive disasters in U.S. history.


Figure 1. Morning satellite image of Superstorm Sandy taken at 10 am EDT Tuesday, October 30, 2012. Image credit: NASA GSFC.


Figure 2. Sandy's storm surge (green line) at New York City hit 9' near 9 pm EDT, right when water levels due to high tide (blue line.) The total storm tide (red line) reached 13.88 above Mean Lower Low Water, an all-time record for NYC. Image credit: NOAA Tides and Currents.


Figure 3. Storm surge forced the Delaware River in Philadelphia to a crest of 10.62 feet at 4 a.m. EDT this morning, breaking the previous record of 10.50 feet set Apr. 17, 2011 and Nov. 25, 1950. Image credit: NOAA.

Sandy sets all-time low pressure records
Sandy's impact has been so severe over such a wide area that it is difficult to adequately document the event. I'll start with some of the major cities that set all-time low pressure records during Sandy, with the new record followed by the old record and date of occurrence (thanks go to wunderground weather historian Christopher C. Burt for putting this list together):

Atlantic City, NJ: 28.01"/948mb 28.37"/961mb 3/6/1932

Philadelphia, PA: 28.12"/953mb 28.43"/963mb 3/13/1993

Harrisburg, PA: 28.46"/964mb 28.62"/969mb 1/3/1913

Scranton, PA: 28.69"/971mb 28.72"/973mb 2/25/1965

Trenton, NJ: 28.31"/958mb 28.43"/963mb 3/13/1993

Baltimore, MD: 28.49"/965mb 28.68"/971mb 3/3/1932

Harrisburg, PA: 28.46"/964mb 28.62"/969mb 1/3/1913

Cities that came close to setting their all-time low pressure record:

Newark, NJ: 28.51"/965mb 28.45"/963 3/13/1993

New York, NY: 28.53"/966mb 28.38"/961mb 3/1/1914

Washington D.C. 28.63"/969mb 28.54/966mb 3/13/1993

Lynchburg, VA: 29.12"/986mb 28.84"/977mb 3/6/1932

Elkins, WV: 29.22"/989mb 28.85"/977mb 2/25/1965

Sandy's snows
Sandy's snows have clobbered the town of Davis, WV with an estimated 26 - 28" of snow. Most of the town is without power, and winds are blowing 20 - 30 mph with 40 mph gusts. Sandy brought the snowiest October day on record to both Elkins, WV (7" of snow) and Bluefield, WV (4.7".)


Video 1. Multiple trees fall during powerful gusts during Superstorm Sandy's landfall in New Jersey Monday evening (warming: foul language.)

There's so much more to say about Sandy--including how the storm may have been influenced by climate change--but I'll save this for later posts, as it's time to get something posted.

Angela Fritz has a 2:30 pm EDT post that discusses the latest on Sandy's impact and forecast.

Jeff Masters

Hurricane Sandy (Biskitten)
Amazing waves at high tide and the storm is just beginning here in Seacoast NH!
Hurricane Sandy
Downed Sycamore (deltabird)
Weehawken NJ
Downed Sycamore
Davis, West Virginia - 4 PM (beaudodson)
Snow increasing in intensity.
Davis, West Virginia - 4 PM
Corn Neck Road, Block Island, RI (JudyGray)
Corn Neck Road, Block Island, RI
Harlem, NYC (ArsenalNYC)
Part of the roof of my building ripped off during Hurricane Sandy and landed on two cars across the street
Harlem, NYC

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That advisory was soon corrected to 110 mph. Note that there are two updates shown as issued at 130 AM.

Quoting NatureIsle:
Good night All- Observation:

I have been looking intently at the wind/ intensity analysis for Sandy just Prior to Landfall at Santiago de Cuba and noted that there was an Intermediate advisory (about 1:30a.m.EDT)which indicated that the storm had attained maximum sustained winds of 115mph which would have designated Sandy as a low end Category three Storm at Landfall. This advisory was issued shortly after the first critical intensity update which put top winds intially at 110mph. Therefore It is puzzling as to why -it seems to have been disregarded and consensus seems to be holding on to Sandy's top sustained winds at 0nly 110mph rather than 115mph before imminent landfall in Cuba...
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Quoting MAweatherboy1:
Watching some pretty nasty storm roll through a little ways east of me:



We saw the lightning but it was never close enough to hear the thunder. Glad those 60 mph winds will bo north of us. We still do not have power.
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Quoting Pirate999:


You're right. They do show a good short term trend. Curious though that during the hight of the industrial revolution around the turn of the century, when there was massive air pollution, even greater than today, the temps were lower... As they say.. Just sayin.


In 1900, 112 years of carbon dioxide had not been released yet, almost all of which is still there.

Do you really believe that 2 billion persons with low technology could mine as much coal as 7 billion people now with heavy machinery? (and it was mostly coal, now we just drill deep enough and the oil is pumped automatically) The industrialized world population has also grown.

And notice how the temperature seems to rise several decades after the CO2.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
All recon flights into the Superstorm otherwise known as Sandy.



One flight was granted permission to fly over Cuba...
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Good night All- Observation:

I have been looking intently at the wind/ intensity analysis for Sandy just Prior to Landfall at Santiago de Cuba and noted that there was an Intermediate advisory (about 1:30a.m.EDT)which indicated that the storm had attained maximum sustained winds of 115mph which would have designated Sandy as a low end Category three Storm at Landfall. This advisory was issued shortly after the first critical intensity update which put top winds intially at 110mph. Therefore It is puzzling as to why -it seems to have been disregarded and consensus seems to be holding on to Sandy's top sustained winds at 0nly 110mph rather than 115mph before imminent landfall in Cuba...
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Quoting JTDailyUpdate:
In Other Non-Weather Related News:
Disney Buys Lucasfilm; Eyes Release Of 'Star Wars: Episode 7' For 2015

Link


Read about that today, can't wait to see Star Wars Episode 7, being written by the guy I hear who did the Avengers.

Back to topic.
Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 24574
600. mobal
Why the heck are people here comparing their so called hurricane problems from the past....."I was out of electricity for XX days" etc.. Who cares. This is a new storm, lets help them and stop thinking about your own small world.
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599. wjdow
Quoting Pirate999:


Very true. Good point and they do reflect. But co2 doesn't reflect and there was arguably more raw co2 ejected with the pollution then than there is now. Just curious. I see trends over millenniums, not the short life time of humans on earth and defiantly not 20 or 100 years. We think we can explain this, on both sides, but we can't explain it any more than we can explain the rest of the weather. If we think we can than we are truly a delusional breed.
What is raw CO2? And what is your evidence that there was more of it emitted during the Industrial Revolution?
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Quoting carlakid50:
One more note then I will go back to just reading (ha!) Watch those generators fires etc. People down here die after the storm from CO.

Carbon monoxide is very dangerous indeed.
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Quoting CaicosRetiredSailor:



I just came across the following quote on the france24.com site:

quote:

By Tuesday afternoon, the number of US homes and businesses without power had risen to 8.1 million, according to the Department of Energy - a figure fast approaching the 8.4 million outage peak during last year%u2019s Hurricane Irene.

http://energy.gov/articles/responding-post-tropic al-cyclone-sandy-doe-situation-reports


http://www.france24.com/en/20121030-sandy-another -storm-blackout-usa-aging-power-grid-new-york-elec tricity-energy

----------

Going to DOE website I find quote:

As of 2:00 pm EDT October 30, the impacted States report a total of 8,204,914 customers without power in the affected areas. There is some increase in outages as the storm moves west-northwest. See State totals below.



Adding together the peak outages for each state (and D.C.) from the link your provided shows that 8,459,620 customers had been without power at some point as of 3:00PM this afternoon. I can only image the numbers have climbed since then.
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13796
Quoting Tropicsweatherpr:
00z Best Track for Rosa.

EP, 17, 2012103100, , BEST, 0, 144N, 1168W, 40, 1003, TS


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the last thing the east coast needs is more rain..low that exits off into the atlantic

12z CMC


12z Euro


18z Nogaps
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Quoting sar2401:

Yes, that transition from tropical cyclone to non-tropical was very confusing to a lot of users. I thought the NHC was going to post updates on the storm until winds dropped below tropical storm strength, but it seems like there are some clear lines of responsibility that the local NWS offices felt belong to them, and the NHC shouldn't keep posting updates. Maybe this will prompt the NWS to think about the idea of a single site resource to track serious storms over land rather than have to hunt through each individual NWS site for details. Once it devolves to individual NWS offices, you are trapped with some offices that do really good updates and others that are marginal at best. Don't know what the answer is but I clearly see it as a problem.
That was a big mistake. Brian Norcross had some choice comments about that as it was happening. I think many, many people (including Bloomberg) underestimated this thing because they were not under a hurricane warning, as they should have been. That decision/process needs to be revisited, especially since these hybrid storms will become more likely in the future.
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00z Best Track for Rosa.

EP, 17, 2012103100, , BEST, 0, 144N, 1168W, 40, 1003, TS
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One more note then I will go back to just reading (ha!) Watch those generators fires etc. People down here die after the storm from CO.
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Does anyone know what the NYC surge from Donna was with out the tide factored in. Or how close to high/low tide she hit?

I want to see for myself just how anomalous Sandy was. For me, part of that involves looking at her actual surge.

Battery topped out around 14 feet, five of that was from tide... yields a 9 foot surge.

I was looking at Gloria which hit at low tide and brought a seven foot sea level, so i figure she must have brought about 7 feet in pure surge.

Given Sandy's size advantage over Gloria, I would say that the two surge levels are fairly comparable. But I want to do the comparison with other storms like Donna. I haven't taken into account the Jersey Shore and other specific readings yet, but based on the comparisons that I have experienced and have been able to draw to other storms, the only truly anomalous aspect of Sandy was her size.

...I'm open to discussion.
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LGA
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Quoting lhwhelk:
This may have been true in Houston, but more places than Galveston and the Bolivar Peninsula were affected by Ike. Surfside and Quintana were badly hit, and roofs (and more) were damaged up as far at least as Pearland. The blue tarps were everywhere; my roof in Lake Jackson had to be replaced, partly because a neighbor's tree fell on the garage roof, but partly because shingles blew off. Fences were down all over my neighborhood--probably a derecho. In any storm, there's going to be damage that the media will not cover because it's not in well-known locations or because it's not as serious as the damage elsewhere. But that doesn't mean it was "very little."


I'm in Vernon Parish, La and my house had new shingles from Rita, Ike and Gustav. I also had a tree down from Ike. And of course, loss of electric.
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Quoting GeoffreyWPB:
For Frances, I lost power for seven days. As soon as power was restored, Jeanne came along and another five days without juice. The ironic thing is after Wilma, which ripped my roof off, I had power the next day.


You said the 'W' storm...

I lost power for 3 weeks after the 'W' storm.
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I may miss the answers but did "we" get data that can be used in the future. I have heard that some of the weather satellites are old or useless. Also I know some stations on earth go out for one reason or another. Props to this blog and Dr Masters. I have counted on u for hurricane forecasts for a long time. I also count on you to let me know what happens in Haiti and those other foreign places like Maine;)

Well now I know why I read not post. Great map of the recon flights. Props to all of u
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Quoting RetiredChiefP:


You are spot-on Carla. My subdivision was without power for 14 days after Ike because we had a tree on a feeder line in a hard-to-access area. The power company told our department that they had a priority list...after the hospitals, police departments, and fire departments...to restore power to the largest amount of customers with the least amount of difficulty; then tackle the "tough problems". Unfortunatley, the fire station I was stationed at during Ike was only open one week before Ike, so it was not on "the list"...much to the chagrin of the houses surrounding our station ;). Luckily, our station had a natural gas generator that performed flawlessly, 24 hours a day, for over 17 days until power was restored to it's area.


Addition to post...

Our gas bill for that month was over $7,000 dollars! Ouch!
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Quoting sonofagunn:


That actually makes sense. Solid particulates in the air reflect sunlight and cool the environment.
Actually, they did not have any pollution controls, releasing a lot of soot, they were not releasing as much CO2 in 1880 - 1940s as we do today.
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Quoting carlakid50:

Don't know how it works back east but my parents had no structure damage in ike and I think it took 3 weeks to get the power back on. Problem was twofold. Their electric pole only served 2 houses in a well populated area and it was destroyed. Also they had to make sure the lines did not get damaged at the house connecftion. Fuses will blow on the lines so power will go on and off. They will try to get the most people they can get on the fastest; so the easy lines will be fixed first. I give major props to our local crews; they worked tirelessly but there is only so much daylight. Also watch out for fires when the power comes back on.



You are spot-on Carla. My subdivision was without power for 14 days after Ike because we had a tree on a feeder line in a hard-to-access area. The power company told our department that they had a priority list...after the hospitals, police departments, and fire departments...to restore power to the largest amount of customers with the least amount of difficulty; then tackle the "tough problems". Unfortunatley, the fire station I was stationed at during Ike was only open one week before Ike, so it was not on "the list"...much to the chagrin of the houses surrounding our station ;). Luckily, our station had a natural gas generator that performed flawlessly, 24 hours a day, for over 17 days until power was restored to it's area.
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Quoting GeoffreyWPB:
For Frances, I lost power for seven days. As soon as power was restored, Jeanne came along and another five days without juice. The ironic thing is after Wilma, which ripped my roof off, I had power the next day.

That's funny.
Member Since: October 22, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2556
For Frances, I lost power for seven days. As soon as power was restored, Jeanne came along and another five days without juice. The ironic thing is after Wilma, which ripped my roof off, I had power the next day.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
All recon flights into the Superstorm otherwise known as Sandy.


That's neat.
Member Since: October 22, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2556
All recon flights into the Superstorm otherwise known as Sandy.

Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32806
Quoting NJ2S:

they showed this picture on TWC

I know more then them. :P
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Quoting Pirate999:


Maybe and maybe not. In Houston during Ike we had 4 million people without power and in some cases it took 10 days or more to restore. Except for Galveston and Bolivar, we had very little home damage despite the massive and long power outages. So, I'd say it depends. Houses tend to be more resilient than the power lines.

Don't know how it works back east but my parents had no structure damage in ike and I think it took 3 weeks to get the power back on. Problem was twofold. Their electric pole only served 2 houses in a well populated area and it was destroyed. Also they had to make sure the lines did not get damaged at the house connecftion. Fuses will blow on the lines so power will go on and off. They will try to get the most people they can get on the fastest; so the easy lines will be fixed first. I give major props to our local crews; they worked tirelessly but there is only so much daylight. Also watch out for fires when the power comes back on.

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Just another blobservation that has to do with earlier today, but that mass in the eastern Caribbean still looks to be going strong. It seems Sandy drew it up and was kind of unraveling it, and now it seems it's escaped her influence and is going into the central Caribbean.

Don't follow big sis, Blobby! Although it would be interesting to see a Valerie out of this or the wave in the eastern Atlantic. They both seem to have a moderate spin to them.
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Quoting Pirate999:


In Houston during Ike we had 4 million people without power and in some cases it took 10 days or more to restore. Except for Galveston and Bolivar, we had very little home damage despite the massive and long power outages.
This may have been true in Houston, but more places than Galveston and the Bolivar Peninsula were affected by Ike. Surfside and Quintana were badly hit, and roofs (and more) were damaged up as far at least as Pearland. The blue tarps were everywhere; my roof in Lake Jackson had to be replaced, partly because a neighbor's tree fell on the garage roof, but partly because shingles blew off. Fences were down all over my neighborhood--probably a derecho. In any storm, there's going to be damage that the media will not cover because it's not in well-known locations or because it's not as serious as the damage elsewhere. But that doesn't mean it was "very little."
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Quoting JeffMasters:
From very unofficial sources, I put together this list of largest Weather-related power outages in U.S. history:

1. "Superstorm" Blizzard 1993 10,000,000 customers
2. Hurricane Ike 2008 7,500,000
3. "Superstorm" Sandy 2012 7,400,000
4. Hurricane Isabel 2003 6,000,000
5. Hurricane Frances 2004 6,000,000

If anyone has a better source of info on this, I'd like to hear about it.

Jeff Masters
jmasters@wunderground.com



I just came across the following quote on the france24.com site:

quote:

By Tuesday afternoon, the number of US homes and businesses without power had risen to 8.1 million, according to the Department of Energy - a figure fast approaching the 8.4 million outage peak during last year%u2019s Hurricane Irene.

http://energy.gov/articles/responding-post-tropic al-cyclone-sandy-doe-situation-reports


http://www.france24.com/en/20121030-sandy-another -storm-blackout-usa-aging-power-grid-new-york-elec tricity-energy

----------

Going to DOE website I find quote:

As of 2:00 pm EDT October 30, the impacted States report a total of 8,204,914 customers without power in the affected areas. There is some increase in outages as the storm moves west-northwest. See State totals below.



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Quoting sar2401:

One of our biggest problems in emergency management was rumor control. Now we have FB and twitter spreading rumors, gossip, and just plain lies at the speed of light. Because of the sickos that photoshop up pictures to look realistic to the untrained eye, those same people on FB and twitter now say "No, it's true, just look at this picture". Storms tend to bring out the best and worst in us as a society. The worst of us now have ways to cause way more problems than even five years ago. I'm glad I'm retired. :)


Amen SAR! I retired 5 months ago as a District Chief in our local fire department. TS Allison, Hurricane Katrina (recovery outside of my jurisdiction), Hurricane Rita, and Hurricane Ike are firmly planted in my past experiences...from pulling citizens out of the San Jacinto River, to 12 hour a day shifts on an ambulance at the Astrodome, to assisting in damage assessment and SAR on Galveston Island, to running a FEMA Pod...I am glad I have retired also. Rumors and the "Grapevine" were like an infectious disease in our community due to social media blasts from panicked and mischevious people. My department relied on Weather Underground, during Ike, to keep us up to date and well-informed on what we would be dealing with after it was over. For this...I thank everyone on here now...and especially Dr Masters. I have been saying prayers and sending them with the wind up North. I know, professionally, what the Eastern Seaboard will be going through for the next few weeks and months, and would like everyone here to remember to pray for every emergency services worker, every power company employee, every volunteer community response task force, every Red Cross worker...and the untold thousands of people involved in restoring a large portion of our great county back to some sense of normalcy.
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Quoting MAweatherboy1:
Watching some pretty nasty storm roll through a little ways east of me:



Darn.. I think my brothers house is under that red area.. Need to drop him a line.
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570. redux
Quoting stormchaser19:
I disagree with this article, Yes it's true the European model was the best with sandy, But the american GFS it's been better all the season
Link


why was it the best? because it latched onto the blocking high forming when everyone else took it out to sea.
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569. redux
id also like to point that metro baltimore has a different power company than washingtons pepco.

bge still has 120K without power. a total of 300 K out of 1,200,000 customers lost power.

http://www.bge.com/customerservice/stormsoutages/ currentoutages/pages/default.aspx
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Watching some pretty nasty storm roll through a little ways east of me:

Member Since: February 11, 2012 Posts: 84 Comments: 8033
Quoting sonofagunn:


That actually makes sense. Solid particulates in the air reflect sunlight and cool the environment.


Very true. Good point and they do reflect. But co2 doesn't reflect and there was arguably more raw co2 ejected with the pollution then than there is now. Just curious. I see trends over millenniums, not the short life time of humans on earth and defiantly not 20 or 100 years. We think we can explain this, on both sides, but we can't explain it any more than we can explain the rest of the weather. If we think we can than we are truly a delusional breed.
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566. redux
Nea--

i don't see how those rants could ever be forgivable.

i was really annoyed the 2 mins i flipped to fox news, bastardi was on giving an editorial about global warming AS new york was flooding.

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Quoting MontanaZephyr:
Quoting JeffMasters:
From very unofficial sources, I put together this list of largest Weather-related power outages in U.S. history:

1. "Superstorm" Blizzard 1993 10,000,000 customers
2. Hurricane Ike 2008 7,500,000
3. "Superstorm" Sandy 2012 7,400,000
4. Hurricane Isabel 2003 6,000,000
5. Hurricane Frances 2004 6,000,000

If anyone has a better source of info on this, I'd like to hear about it.

Jeff Masters
jmasters@wunderground.com


Here ya go Doc:Link

ore than 8.4 million people in Sandy’s path, 7% of the U.S. population, remain without power Tuesday afternoon, even as the worst of the storm has passed. Here are the latest updates on power outages in the Northeast and mid-Atlantic states. Click your utility to see the latest figures from your provider. For up-to-the minute news, visit our live blog.

Updated: Oct. 30, 3:15 p.m.

New York City and Westchester:
Consolidated Edison
811,039 people affected

New Jersey:
Jersey Central
966,978 people affected
PSE&G
1.4 million people affected
Atlantic City Electric
182,197 people affected

Long Island:
LIPA
942,633 people affected

Connecticut:
Connecticut Light & Power
458,355 people affected

Massachussetts:
National Grid
162,113 people affected

Delaware:
Delmarva
42,070 people affected

Pennsylvania:
West Penn Power
215,604 people affected
PPL
378,875 people affected

West Virginia:
APCO
149,015 people affected

Maryland and Washington D.C.:
Pepco
11,221 people affected

Virginia:
Dominion Electric
77,204 people affected

New Hampshire:
PSNH
105,594 people affected

Rhode Island:
National Grid
109,690 people affected



So Maines 34,000 number is too small to be included??? THERE ARE SOME PEOPLE ON THIS BLOG WHO LIVE HERE!!!!!! I hate it how TWC and lots of other people totally ignore Maine like it is some distant province. The only thing we can do to get on the national news is a prostitution scandal???? Shame on you news people and whoever else leaves us out in a disaster that affected us pretty bad!!
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Link

NASA Hurricanes web page headlines "Sandy was still a hurricane after landfall". Hmmm


Sandy Was Still a Hurricane After Landfall

On Oct. 29, 2012 at 11 p.m. EDT, the center of Hurricane Sandy was just 10 miles (15 km) southwest of Philadelphia, Penn., near 39.8 North and 75.4 West. Sandy was still a hurricane with maximum sustained winds near 75 mph (120 kph) and moving northwest at 18 mph (30 kph). Sandy's minimum central pressure had risen to 952 millibars. The hurricane-force-winds extended 90 miles (150 km) east of the center of circulation. Tropical-storm-force winds, however, went much further, as far as 485 miles (780 km).

NASA's GOES Project created a "full-disk view" of NOAA's GOES satellite data, that captured a global view of Hurricane Sandy's birth to landfall. The animation of NOAA's GOES-13 and GOES-15 satellite observations were combined from Oct. 21-30, 2012 and showed the birth of Tropical Storm Sandy in the Caribbean Sea, the intensification and movement of Sandy in the Atlantic Ocean along the U.S. East Coast, and Hurricane Sandy make landfall in N.J. on Oct. 29 and move inland to Penn.
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Quoting Pirate999:


Maybe and maybe not. In Houston during Ike we had 4 million people without power and in some cases it took 10 days or more to restore. Except for Galveston and Bolivar, we had very little home damage despite the massive and long power outages. So, I'd say it depends. Houses tend to be more resilient than the power lines.


Thank you so much! :) It's crazy how this storm can affect people who don't even live there! (I live in
Florida)
Member Since: September 1, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 672
Quoting PensacolaDoug (#530):
Scientists reject Sandy/Climate Link



October 30 04:46 PM

by Joe D'Aleo

[snip]
Wow, that's quite a collection of blather, even for D'Aleo. A real Gish Gallop featuring comments from the debunked and discredited--Pielke, Hoerling, Michaels--interspersed with cherry-picked, out-of-context statements from other scientists, sprinkled with ad hominems, and thoroughly topped with obfuscatory bits of info that have no bearing on reality. That's not the first such diatribe I've seen today; with multiple-recordbreaker Sandy occurring on top of the increasing number and severity of extreme weather events the entire globe is seeing, the denialists doubtless realize their side and POV have been diminished even further, so such manufactured and dishonest rants are understandable, if not forgivable.

Anyone who tries to claim--even discounting Sandy--that the more than 3.4 million metric tons of long-lasting, heat-trapping, fossil fuel-based CO2 we humans pump into the atmosphere each and every hour of each and every day has no effect on the weather or the climate is in absolute denial of reality. Period. The climate is changing far faster than scientists predicted even a few short years ago, and there's no sign of that trend reversing.
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13796
Quoting connie1976:
Hey all! I wrote the Long Island power company to find out when they think that power will be back up and running in most neighborhoods and they told me a minimum of 10 days. If it takes that long for them to fix the power, then do you think most of the houses have hurricane damage? Thanks all!


Maybe and maybe not. In Houston during Ike we had 4 million people without power and in some cases it took 10 days or more to restore. Except for Galveston and Bolivar, we had very little home damage despite the massive and long power outages. So, I'd say it depends. Houses tend to be more resilient than the power lines.
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Quoting imipak:
The Daily Mail (a pretty unreliable source, one of the less pleasant UK tabloids) claimed 500 people were left on the barrier islands, though of course they don't give a source for that. Best hopes for all who were out there, anyway...


I believe they are talking about Brigantine, NJ. That's the barrier island where the seawall failed early afternoon yesterday with an estimated 70% of the population (I do not know #'s) ignoring mandatory evacuation orders (per local police and mayor).

I have yet to see any news from that location and the last I saw people were trapped in attics and on second floors by surge.

If anyone has any info please report it since I clearly missed it.
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Quoting Pirate999:


You're right. They do show a good short term trend. Curious though that during the hight of the industrial revolution around the turn of the century, when there was massive air pollution, even greater than today, the temps were lower... As they say.. Just sayin.


That actually makes sense. Solid particulates in the air reflect sunlight and cool the environment.
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Quoting mobiledoom:


The "news" is placating nonsense. A study was conducted after Irene almost flooded the tunnels which is easily available. Estimate was at least 4 weeks and 55 billion just to refurbish subways due mostly to the fact that electronics and steel don't mix well with salt water. Duh. NYC is just a small percentage of the affected area, at least geographically speaking, and then there's all the business lost, so it seems reasonable to extrapolate or guesstimate the losses into the hundreds of billions, which we don't have and will have to borrow. How about it gutting what was left of the economy?




Thank you, ty, ty. I posted this morning that I remembered hearing or reading that it would be at the least a month if the NY subway flooded before it would be up and running again. I could not remember where I heard/read it though. I wrote that I was pondering if the powers that be were not revealing that info this morning so as to not start a panic. I know if it were me and I lived there with no car, my place of employment was destroyed and I had a family to support, I would be begging anybody and everybody anywhere to put my family up for a while so we could get out of there.

TY again,
Dsn
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I disagree with this article, Yes it's true the European model was the best with sandy, But the american GFS it's been better all the season
Link
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Hey all! I wrote the Long Island power company to find out when they think that power will be back up and running in most neighborhoods and they told me a minimum of 10 days. If it takes that long for them to fix the power, then do you think most of the houses have hurricane damage? Thanks all!
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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