Superstorm Sandy intensifying, bringing record storm surges

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:54 PM GMT on October 29, 2012

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The final countdown to Hurricane Sandy's arrival has begun, and this extraordinary and historic storm is already causing havoc all along the U.S. coast from North Carolina to Massachusetts. The scale of this massive storm truly earns Sandy the title of "superstorm". Sandy's tropical storm-force winds span an area of ocean 940 miles in diameter, and both North Carolina and the island of Bermuda, 700 miles to the east, are under tropical storm warnings. The region of ocean covered by 12-foot high seas spans an area of ocean an incredible 1560 miles in diameter. Winds near hurricane force are expected to affect waters from Virginia to Massachusetts today. Record storm surge flooding has already occurred in regions along the New Jersey coast this morning, and the highest water levels recorded in over a century of record keeping are expected over much of the New Jersey and New York coasts this evening during the 8 - 9 pm EDT high tide cycle. Sandy brought sustained winds of 60 mph and waves 30 feet high early this morning to the buoy east of Cape Hatteras, NC. A wind gust of 58 mph occurred at New York City's La Guardia Airport at 9:51 am EDT, and a buoy at Robins Reef, NJ recorded sustained winds of 42 mph, gusting to 55 mph. As of 8 am EDT, Sandy has dumped heavy rains of 7.87" at Cape Hatteras, NC; 4.01" at Ocean City, MD; 3.12" at Dover, DE; and 3.22" at Virginia Beach, VA. As of 9 am EDT, peak storm surge values of 5" were observed at Lewes, Delaware, 4.2' at Cape May, NJ, 4' at Atlantic City, NJ, 2.9' at Philadelphia, and 3.9' at New York City.

Latest data from the Hurricane Hunters shows that Sandy is intensifying as its core traverses the warm waters of the Gulf Stream. At 8 am EDT, an Air Force hurricane hunter aircraft found top winds of 98 mph in the heavy thunderstorms to the southwest of Sandy's center, at a point about 150 miles east-northeast of Cape Hatteras, NC. A dropsonde released in the eye measured a central pressure of 945 mb, but observed winds of 19 knots at the surface, so Sandy is probably a 943 mb hurricane that is very close to Category 2 strength. The Hurricane Hunters did not observe an eyewall, and saw very little temperature difference from inside to outside the eye, so Sandy is not going to be able to undergo rapid intensification. The storm could still see an increase of 5 mph in its winds before landfall tonight between 6 pm - 10 pm EDT, due, in part, to interaction with the low pressure system to its west that is pulling the hurricane towards the coast. The new, higher winds of Sandy don't have a lot of time to pile up additional storm surge water, so the NHC storm surge forecasts will probably not change today. But it is clear that Sandy is not going to pull its punch, and this superstorm is going to deliver a punishing multi-billion dollar blow to a huge area of the Eastern U.S.


Figure 1. Morning satellite image of Hurricane Sandy.

Sandy already producing a record storm surge
The National Weather Service in Atlantic City, NJ said that isolated record storm surge flooding already occurred along portions of the New Jersey coast with this morning's 7:30 am EDT high tide cycle. As the tide goes out late this morning and this afternoon, water levels will fall, since the difference in water levels between low tide and high tide is about 5'. However, this evening, as the core of Sandy moves ashore, the storm will carry with it a gigantic bulge of water that will raise waters levels to the highest storm tides ever seen in over a century of record keeping, along much of the coastline of New Jersey and New York. The peak danger will be between 7 pm - 10 pm, when storm surge rides in on top of the high tide. The full moon is today, which means astronomical high tide will be about 5% higher than the average high tide for the month, adding another 2 - 3" to water levels. This morning's 9:30 am EDT H*Wind analysis from NOAA's Hurricane Research Division put the destructive potential of Sandy's winds at a modest 2.9 on a scale of 0 to 6. However, the destructive potential of the storm surge was record high: 5.8 on a scale of 0 to 6. This is a higher destructive potential than any hurricane observed since 1969, including Category 5 storms like Katrina, Rita, Wilma, Camille, and Andrew. The previous highest destructive potential for storm surge was 5.6 on a scale of 0 to 6, set during Hurricane Isabel of 2003. Sandy's storm surge will be capable of overtopping the flood walls in Manhattan, which are only five feet above mean sea level. On August 28, 2011, Tropical Storm Irene brought a storm surge of 4.13' and a storm tide of 9.5' above MLLW to Battery Park on the south side of Manhattan. The waters poured over the flood walls into Lower Manhattan, but came 8 - 12" shy of being able to flood the New York City subway system. According to the latest storm surge forecast for NYC from NHC, Sandy's storm surge is expected to be 10 - 12' above MLLW. Since a storm tide of 10.5' is needed to flood the subway system, it appears likely that portions of the NYC subway system will flood. The record highest storm tide at The Battery was 10.5', set on September 15, 1960, during Hurricane Donna.


Figure 2. Observed storm tide (red line) and predicted storm surge for Hurricane Sandy at The Battery on the south shore of Manhattan, New York City, from the experimental Extratropical Storm Surge model, run by NOAA"s Meteorological Development Laboratory (green line) and the NYHOPS model from the Stevens Institute of Technology (pink curve), which uses a highly detailed 3D ocean model and even includes rainfall and tributary inflows. These models have a storm surge of 5 - 6', which brings the maximum storm tide--the water level reached as a result of the combined action of the tide and the storm surge--to 11' above MLLW (Mean Lower Low Water.) Irene brought a storm tide of 9.5' above MLLW to The Battery in 2011. At a storm tide of 10.5', water will likely pour into the Lower Manhattan subway system, unless efforts to sandbag the entrances are successful. The NWS in NYC is predicting a 10 - 12' storm tide at The Battery during tonight's 9 pm high tide cycle.


Figure 3. Observed storm tide (red line) and predicted storm surge for Hurricane Sandy at Atlantic City, New Jersey, from the experimental Extratropical Storm Surge model, run by NOAA"s Meteorological Development Laboratory (green line) and the NYHOPS model from the Stevens Institute of Technology (pink curve), which uses a highly detailed 3D ocean model and even includes rainfall and tributary inflows. These models predict a maximum storm tide--the water level reached as a result of the combined action of the tide and the storm surge--of ' above MLLW (Mean Lower Low Water.) Irene brought a storm tide of 9.5' above MLLW to The Battery in 2011. At a storm tide of 10.5', water will likely pour into the Lower Manhattan subway system, unless efforts to sandbag the entrances are successful. The NWS in Atlantic City is predicting a 9.5' storm tide for the city during tonight's 8 pm high tide cycle, which would be the highest water levels ever observed in Atlantic City.

Links for Sandy
To find out if you need to evacuate, please contact your local emergency management office. They will have the latest information. People living in New York City can find their evacuation zone here or use this map. FEMA has information on preparing for hurricanes.

People with disabilities and caregivers seeking information on accessible shelter and transportation can contact portlight.org

Atlantic City beach cam

Ocean City, MD webcam

Statue of Liberty cam

An impressive 1-minute resolution satellite loop of Sandy today is at the CSU RAMMB website.

Our Weather Historian, Christopher C. Burt, has an excellent post on Late Season Tropical Storms that have affected the U.S. north of Hatteras. He also has a post, Historic Hurricanes from New Jersey to New England.

Hurricane Sandy info from NASA.

Joe Romm at climateprogress.org has a thoughtful piece called, How Does Global Warming Make Hurricanes Like Irene More Destructive?

For those of you wanting to know your odds of receiving hurricane force or tropical storm force winds, I recommend the NHC wind probability product.

Wunderground has detailed storm surge maps for the U.S. coast.

The National Hurricane Center's Interactive Storm Surge RIsk Map, which allows one to pick a particular Category hurricane and zoom in, is a good source of storm surge risk information.

Storm Surge prediction model from the Stevens Institute of Technology, which use a highly detailed 3D ocean model and even includes rainfall and tributary inflows.

Research storm surge model run by SUNY Stonybrook for New York City.

Climate Central has a nice satellite image showing which parts of New York Harbor are below five feet in elevation.

I'll have an update this afternoon.

Jeff Masters

Hurricane Sandy 1 (gwegret)
Post-Hurricane Sandy waves pound the Deerfield Beach, FL fishing pier!
Hurricane Sandy 1
Hurricane Sandy Long Neck Delaware (mal247)
On Rehoboth Bay
Hurricane Sandy Long Neck Delaware

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Quoting presslord:


she was about 90 miles off Cape Hatteras...the approppiately named Graveyard of the Atlantic


The last I heard on CNN was that two crew members ended up in the water when trying to transfer off the Bounty to a rescue boat after they lost propulsion. The two crew members have not been found but searches are in progress and the two people were wearing some sort of protective suits designed to keep them afloat and warm. If they're found quickly they may still survive. Seas are very high in the search areas though.
I'm guessing they were trying to save The Bounty by taking it to sea. It was such a beautiful ship. So sad to lose it. Sadder still if they can't rescue those two sailers. :(
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Quoting bappit:

Those stairs are for show. Buildings have a lot of stuff underground, pipes and conduits going in and out, stairs leading to below ground entrances.
Yeah. I know that most buildings in New York have some sort of sidewalk level grates that give access to a basement/underground area. (And many of these are connected!) So I'm wondering how effective that scraggly 2 high line would be versus a targeted effort at sealing openings (doors/windows/intakes/grates). I've seen pics of flood prone areas where the openings are directly sandbagged/sheeted/rubberized and, to me, that intrinsically makes more sense. It's a smaller area to fix if it starts leaking, less of an area to fail against oncoming water, and you can go higher with the same amount of materials, etc.

I'm lucky, I've never had to sandbag anything in my life but I'm curious about this. I guess it would also be based on the type of structure/masonry you're trying to protect and what portion of it you're protecting. /rambling. overthinking sandbagging instead of working. ;)
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How long until the center reaches the coast, that storm is really moving fast now it looks like?
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BULLETIN - EAS ACTIVATION REQUESTED
FLASH FLOOD WARNING
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BALTIMORE MD/WASHINGTON DC
1239 PM EDT MON OCT 29 2012

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN STERLING VIRGINIA HAS ISSUED A

* FLASH FLOOD WARNING FOR...
CENTRAL WASHINGTON COUNTY IN NORTH CENTRAL MARYLAND...
EASTERN MORGAN COUNTY IN THE PANHANDLE OF WEST VIRGINIA...
NORTHWESTERN JEFFERSON COUNTY IN THE PANHANDLE OF WEST VIRGINIA...
BERKELEY COUNTY IN THE PANHANDLE OF WEST VIRGINIA...

* UNTIL 345 PM EDT

* AT 1239 PM EDT...NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DOPPLER RADAR INDICATED
VERY HEAVY RAIN CAPABLE OF PRODUCING FLASH FLOODING. UP TO 1 INCH
OF RAIN HAS BEEN REPORTED ACROSS PORTIONS OF THE WARNED AREA.
ADDITIONAL RAINFALL AMOUNTS OF UP TO 2 INCHES CAN BE EXPECTED.

* SOME LOCATIONS THAT ARE AFFECTED BY THE HEAVY RAIN INCLUDE
INWOOD...MARTINSBURG...LONG MEADOW...WILLIAMSPORT...GREENWOOD...
HIGHLAND RIDGE...JOHNSONS MILL...NEW HOPE...RIDGE...ROCK GAP...
SLEEPY CREEK...SPOHRS CROSSROADS...SPRUCE PINE HOLLOW...VALLEY HIGH
AND VALLEY VIEW.

EXCESSIVE RUNOFF FROM HEAVY RAINFALL WILL CAUSE FLASH FLOODING OF
SMALL CREEKS AND STREAMS...URBAN AREAS...HIGHWAYS...STREETS...
UNDERPASSES AND OTHER DRAINAGE AREAS AND LOW LYING SPOTS.

LAT...LON 3970 7769 3922 7797 3946 7833 3962 7825
3973 7822 3973 7768

$$

JE
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The exact quote:

1481. Dr. Jeff Masters, Director of Meteorology (Admin)
2:14 PM GMT on October 29, 2012 +34
Wu is getting overloaded, we are going to turn off favorites soon, and other features may need to be disabled later today.

Jeff Masters
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Member Since: August 2, 2010 Posts: 21 Comments: 9821
Quoting sar2401:

Too bad. Wrong place to run and try to ride out a storm. I know I wouldn't have chosen that area for my boat to go.


I read they were heading to Florida and were planning on being east of the storm. Not putting to sea to ride it out. Obviously they didn't get east enough and/or the shear breadth of sandy caught them.
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Quoting sar2401:

Too bad. Wrong place to run and try to ride out a storm. I know I wouldn't have chosen that area for my boat to go.


I came through there in May...it's a challenging piece of water...on the best day...
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Quoting sfranz:


Larger ships should be at sea - several days ahead and moving away from the storm.



That said, I'm not sure where you would go to get away from Sandy. Indian Ocean, maybe.

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Quoting CaicosRetiredSailor:


"We all need someone to lean on"

North Carolina

http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10151492 175074062.593034.185345054061&type=1


Where on the OuterBanks is that?
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starting to look worse imo.

im think sandy has peaked again
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WU radar has crapped out on me, so here is a NWS one.

Member Since: August 2, 2006 Posts: 46 Comments: 11669
Quoting presslord:


she was about 90 miles off Cape Hatteras...the approppiately named Graveyard of the Atlantic

Too bad. Wrong place to run and try to ride out a storm. I know I wouldn't have chosen that area for my boat to go.
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Quoting presslord:


she was about 90 miles off Cape Hatteras...the approppiately named Graveyard of the Atlantic


Yeah, not far enough off shore. My guess or hope is that she hove to and lost seaway by drifting..
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Quoting Asrock:


Dr. Masters made an anouncement over an hour ago in the last blog that favorites would go down do to overload of the site. And that other extras may also go down to keep the blog up.

I did not see that blog apparently. Just to clarify, are you saying that things like Favorites are going to be down to help keep this blog running? If that's true, that's silly. The average person just needs to get to his city's forecast quickly to get updates from the NWS office, which seems like they will be handling all the life-threatening updates. This blog is just a bunch of us amateur weather geeks discussing/arguing/pontificating on things. This blog is the least important thing to keep running.
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364. Skyepony (Mod)
Click pic for loop.
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Quoting ncstorm:
some of the statements reporters say..on TWC..

"sometimes it feels like the rain is hitting your skin"

That's a moment when you say:

No sh!t sherlock!
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Quoting sar2401:

That's correct. Almost any vessel has a better chance of surviving in the open sea than tied up in an unprotected port. The key words are "open sea". You've got to get far enough out that the wave dynamics don't interact with the seabed. I don't know exactly where the Bounty is, but it seems like it must not have made it to deep water in time. I hope the sailors and the vessel make it out of this.


she was about 90 miles off Cape Hatteras...the approppiately named Graveyard of the Atlantic
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Does anyone know if NYC OEM has a table/chart that illustrates wind levels up the wind column (to height of highest buildings in NYC), relative to ground level?
The potential over/under pressures and Bernouli effect down some of the NYC "canyons" could be significant.
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Quoting MrstormX:


can people indicate the location when they post photos please? The URL indicates this is from cape may, btw.
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Quoting SSideBrac:


In theory, during a coastal storm, it is the best place for any seaworthy vessel provided you can get out in a timely manner - hence piers at Norfolk are pretty empty. But does not always fare well for all vessels - Hurricane Mitch tall ship tragedy springs to mind.


read a book on that...was a great read...forget the title...
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Quoting JNCali:
uh-oh.. wunderground link on Drudge.....


The world is ending.
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some of the statements reporters say..on TWC..

"sometimes it feels like the rain is hitting your skin"
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uh-oh.. wunderground link on Drudge.....
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Quoting presslord:
There is a credible school of thought that the very best place for a sailing vessel to be during a storm is at sea...

That's correct. Almost any vessel has a better chance of surviving in the open sea than tied up in an unprotected port. The key words are "open sea". You've got to get far enough out that the wave dynamics don't interact with the seabed. I don't know exactly where the Bounty is, but it seems like it must not have made it to deep water in time. I hope the sailors and the vessel make it out of this.
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Quoting CaicosRetiredSailor:



North Carolina



Omfg that's horrible!
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Quoting presslord:
There is a credible school of thought that the very best place for a sailing vessel to be during a storm is at sea...


In theory, during a coastal storm, it is the best place for any seaworthy vessel provided you can get out in a timely manner - hence piers at Norfolk are pretty empty. But does not always fare well for all vessels - Hurricane Mitch tall ship tragedy springs to mind.
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Quoting presslord:


yea...them, too...


Larger ships should be at sea - several days ahead and moving away from the storm. The fleet at Norfolk put out a couple of days ago.

They are still probably having a very rough day.

My brother rode out Hurricane Hugo in a navy ship. It was safer for the ship but very hard on the crew.

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Quoting sar2401:
Anyone else seeing this?
Favorites have been temporarily disabled due to high site load.
Seems like WU servers need an upgrade. It might help a little if some posters here would stop posting a graphic on this predicted storm surge that's already been posted three times. Links to pictures instead of embedded graphics might also help.


Dr. Masters made an anouncement over an hour ago in the last blog that favorites would go down do to overload of the site. And that other extras may also go down to keep the blog up.
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CHANGES SINCE LAST LOCAL STATEMENT
----------------------------------
* THE TIMING OF THE PEAK WINDS FROM SANDY ARE NOW EXPECTED FROM
LATE THIS AFTERNOON TO DAYBREAK ON WEDNESDAY.
* RAINFALL AMOUNTS HAVE BEEN INCREASED. THE GREATER BALTIMORE
METRO AREA IS NOW FORECAST TO RECEIVE 8 TO 12 INCHES OF
RAIN...WITH LOCALLY HIGHER AMOUNTS.
* THE POTOMAC RIVER IS LIKELY TO GO INTO FLOOD STAGE BEGINNING
AROUND WEDNESDAY AND LASTING THROUGH FRIDAY.

HIGH WINDS
----------
* WINDS WILL INCREASE STEADILY TODAY...WITH THE MAXIMUM WIND GUSTS
OCCURRING LATE THIS AFTERNOON THROUGH TUESDAY MORNING.
* GENERALLY...SUSTAINED WINDS OF 30 TO 50 MPH WITH GUSTS TO 60 MPH
CAN BE EXPECTED ACROSS THE ENTIRE REGION.
* HURRICANE FORCE WIND GUSTS OF 70 AND POSSIBLY 80 MPH ARE
EXPECTED TO IMPACT A REGION LOCATED BETWEEN BEL AIR MD...POINT
LOOKOUT MD...AND HAGERSTOWN MD BETWEEN 6 PM THIS EVENING TO 6 AM
TUESDAY. THIS INCLUDES THE GREATER BALTIMORE AND WASHINGTON
METROPOLITAN AREAS.
* COUPLED WITH HEAVY RAINS FROM SANDY...THE HIGH WINDS WILL RESULT
IN SIGNIFICANT TREE DAMAGE AND POWER LINE DAMAGE.

RAINFALL AND FLOODING
---------------------
* 8 TO 12 INCHES OF RAIN IN NORTHEAST AND NORTH CENTRAL MD
INCLUDING THE BALTIMORE METRO AREA AND ALONG THE WEST SHORE OF
THE BAY.
* 5 TO 10 INCHES OF RAIN IS EXPECTED ACROSS THE FREDERICK...
WASHINGTON AND FREDERICKSBURG METRO AREAS.
* 3 TO 6 INCHES OF RAIN IS EXPECTED FOR EASTERN WEST VIRGINIA AND
VIRGINIA...WITH THE EXCEPTION OF THE DC METRO COUNTIES...AS WELL
AS WESTERN MARYLAND WEST OF HANCOCK MD.
* THIS AMOUNT OF RAIN WILL LIKELY RESULT IN EXTENSIVE AND DANGEROUS
FLOODING OF LOCAL STREAMS AND CREEKS STARTING THIS AFTERNOON AND
LASTING INTO WEDNESDAY.

MAIN-STEM RIVER FLOODING
------------------------
* THE POTOMAC RIVER WILL LIKELY START FLOODING TUESDAY NIGHT AND
CONTINUE THROUGH THE END OF THE WEEK.
* THE MONOCACY RIVER IS FORECAST TO FLOOD LATER TODAY AND CONTINUE
TO BE IN MAJOR FLOOD THROUGH EARLY THURSDAY. LEVELS FORECAST
HAVE NOT BEEN SEEN SINCE AGNES IN 1972.

COASTAL FLOODING
----------------
* WITH THE FULL MOON ON MONDAY...ASTRONOMICAL TIDES ARE ALREADY
HIGHER THAN NORMAL. COUNTER TO THE HIGHER THAN NORMAL
ASTRONOMICAL TIDES...STRONG NORTH AND NORTHWESTERLY WINDS
TODAY WILL CAUSE A BLOW-OUT TIDE ALONG THE WESTERN SHORE OF THE
CHESAPEAKE AND THE TIDAL POTOMAC RIVER TODAY. EAST FACING BEACHES
ALONG THE TIDAL POTOMAC WILL EXPERIENCE WIND-DRIVEN WAVES THAT
WILL GIVE THE APPEARANCE OF TIDAL FLOODING AND RESULT IN SIMILAR
IMPACTS.
* AS WINDS BECOME SOUTHWESTERLY TUESDAY...WATER WILL RETURN BACK
INTO THE BAY AND TIDAL POTOMAC AND BEGIN TO PILE UP IN THE BAY
NORTH OF POOLES ISLAND AND IN THE UPPER REACHES OF THE TIDAL
POTOMAC AND ALONG SOUTH FACING SHORES.
* THE HIGHEST TIDES FOR MOST WILL BE WITH THE HIGH TIDES TUESDAY.

SNOWFALL
--------
* IN THE POTOMAC HIGHLANDS ABOVE 2000 FEET HEAVY WET SNOW IS
EXPECTED. * THE COMBINATION OF STRONG WIND AND HEAVY WET SNOW WILL
DOWN TREE LIMBS AND POWER LINES. BLIZZARD CONDITIONS ARE
FORECAST WITH VISIBILITY NEAR ZERO IN PERIODS OF HEAVY SNOW. * THE
HIGHEST ELEVATIONS OVER 3000 FEET ARE EXPECTED TO SEE 18 TO 24
INCHES BETWEEN LATE THIS AFTERNOON AND WEDNESDAY MORNING. SOME
ADDITIONAL ACCUMULATION IS EXPECTED THROUGH FRIDAY.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS
----------------------------------
* BE PREPARED FOR EXTENDED POWER AND COMMUNICATIONS OUTAGES.
* IF YOU LIVE NEAR LARGE TREES...REMAIN IN THE LOWER LEVEL OF YOUR
HOME OR SEEK SHELTER ELSEWHERE IF POSSIBLE AND RIDE SANDY OUT.
* REFRAIN FROM ANY UNNECESSARY TRAVEL.
* ENSURE LOOSE ITEMS ON YOUR PROPERTY ARE SECURED.
* IF POWER LINES ARE DOWN...STAY AWAY FROM THEM AND REPORT IT TO YOUR
LOCAL ELECTRICAL UTILITY COMPANY.
* IF YOU SHOULD HAVE EMERGENCY TRAVEL...IF YOU COME UPON FLOODED
ROADWAYS DO NOT ATTEMPT TO CROSS SUBMERGED ROADWAYS. TURN AROUND
AND DON`T DROWN.
* IF YOU USE A PORTABLE POWER GENERATOR...PLEASE FOLLOW
MANUFACTURERS INSTRUCTIONS AND ENSURE THAT IT IS PROPERLY
VENTILATED.
* DO NOT USE CHARCOAL GRILLS IN ENCLOSED AREAS.
* MARINERS SHOULD ENSURE THAT THERE IS ENOUGH SLACK LINE IN THEIR
BOAT`S MOORINGS TO ACCEPT A BLOW OUT TIDE TODAY AND HIGH TIDES
TUESDAY.
* PERIODICALLY CHECK ON YOUR ELDERLY NEIGHBORS AND FAMILY MEMBERS
TO ENSURE THEY ARE SAFE.

FOR ADDITIONAL PRECAUTIONARY AND PREPAREDNESS INFORMATION...
PLEASE REFER TO THE DETAILED RECOMMENDATIONS RELATIVE TO YOUR
LOCATION AS FURTHER DESCRIBED BY YOUR LOCAL NATIONAL WEATHER
SERVICE OFFICE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT OFFICE.

&&

.NEXT UPDATE...
THE NEXT LOCAL STATEMENT WILL BE ISSUED BY THE NATIONAL WEATHER
SERVICE BALTIMORE/WASHINGTON WEATHER FORECAST OFFICE AT 5 PM EDT
TODAY OR SOONER IF CONDITIONS WARRANT.

$$

LEE
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Member Since: August 2, 2010 Posts: 21 Comments: 9821


"We all need someone to lean on"

North Carolina

http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10151492 175074062.593034.185345054061&type=1


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Sitting here reading and looking at various images of the effects of Sandy so far.
Dreadful and Horrendous.

What an Incredible storm.
And what an Incredible Experience to be able to see it all unfolding in real time.

Thanks for the great input from all concerned. Thanks Wunderground.

Kudos to the people who are now working round the clock and for the next couple of days to minimise the loss of life.
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Anyone else seeing this?
Favorites have been temporarily disabled due to high site load.
Seems like WU servers need an upgrade. It might help a little if some posters here would stop posting a graphic on this predicted storm surge that's already been posted three times. Links to pictures instead of embedded graphics might also help.
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Live stream abc NY, yowza, Mayor Bloomberg is going to eating his words I think, he just doesn't seem to think the storm is a threat. Gov Christie on the other hand is total opposite

Link
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Quoting JNCali:
maybe for the boat... what about the people on board!!


yea...them, too...
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Member Since: August 2, 2010 Posts: 21 Comments: 9821
Quoting presslord:
There is a credible school of thought that the very best place for a sailing vessel to be during a storm is at sea...
maybe for the boat... what about the people on board!!
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Officials have announced the following highway closures:
•The Meadowbrook State Parkway south of Merrick Road
•The Wantagh State Parkway south of Merrick Road
•The Loop Parkway (Residents of the Lido Beach and Long Beach areas will be able to access the eastbound Loop Parkway and northbound Meadowbrook Parkway for evacuation purposes)
•Robert Moses Causeway south of Montauk Highway

Nassau County Executive Edward Mangano ordered a mandatory evacuation at 2 p.m. Sunday for storm surge areas along the north and south shores. Shelters were opened at Nassau Community College, Levittown Memorial High School, Locust Valley High School and SUNY Old Westbury.

In Suffolk County, mandatory evacuations were ordered for residents of Fire Island and in surge zone areas in Babylon, Islip, Brookhaven, Riverhead, Southampton and Southold. Shelters were opened at Hampton Bays High School, Sachem East High School and the Brentwood High School Sonderling Building.

Canals around Long Island's Great South Bay area were bulging two hours before high tide. Water was about a foot deep on some streets in Lindenhurst, N.Y., by 7 a.m. Monday.

Long Island Rail Road service was suspended Sunday night.

The brunt of the storm is expected to hit Long Island Monday afternoon.

The Town of Riverhead supervisor says the greatest threat to the Long Island town is a storm surge expected to be six feet above high tide.

Supervisor Sean Walter issued a weather and travel advisory early Monday morning. He said although the town is not in the direct path of the hurricane, it will feel the storm's effect over the next 48 hours.

Walter said the storm will make landfall to the south and west of Riverhead sometime Monday afternoon.

All residents in low-lying flood prone areas have been ordered to leave their homes. A shelter has been set up at the Riverhead High School. He advised residents to seek shelter with family and friends first.

For more information, residents can call the emergency preparedness hotline at 727-3200, ext. 767.

---
Evacuations on Long Island

NASSAU COUNTY: Mandatory evacuation of all residents living in a flood or storm surge zone. This area is defined as south of Sunrise Highway, from the Queens line to Rockville Centre and South of Merrick Road, from Rockville Centre to the Nassau-Suffolk border.

SUFFOLK: Mandatory evacuation of Fire Island, which LIPA has since de-energized.

ISLIP: Mandatory evacuation for Category 1 Storm Surge Zones and all Mobile Home Parks within the Town of Islip.

SOUTHAMPTON: Mandatory Evacuation of Dune Road and low lying Category 1 flood zones.
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Quoting guygee:
Sorry if I gave the impression I was being hostile, that was not my intention. I have read that the primary mission of the NHC is the public safety, so the will make announcements based on what they perceive is best for the safety of the people that are in danger. This is only common sense. The re-analysis and scientific aspects can be postponed for a few days if the NHC believes that is what is best to preserve lives.

I guess they saw no problem with upgrading Hurricane Dolly. I do not think they will upgrade Sandy unless they do it in the post-season analysis. We will shortly see, right?


No problem! The NHC's mission is public safety, yes. They warn the public with changes like this, and they would want to warn the public if we've had a change in strength like that.
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Quoting LesBonsTemps:


Yes, I would concur, hundreds is quite likely. A lot of people's survival and swimming skills are going to be put to the test in about eight hours if they don't seek high ground very soon.
The region is so populace and with thousands living 'off grid' with marginal transportation at best...
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Quoting DocBen:


Frankenstorm Sandy.


Souped-up Superstorm Sandy.
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Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
18L/PTH/S/CXX
NEARING LANDFALL
omg no matter what they call it..THATS a hurricane
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Poughkippsee NY, Hudson approching Flood stage.
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There is a credible school of thought that the very best place for a sailing vessel to be during a storm is at sea...
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18L/PTH/S/CXX
NEARING LANDFALL
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 174 Comments: 54360

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.