Superstorm Sandy intensifying, bringing record storm surges

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:54 PM GMT on October 29, 2012

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The final countdown to Hurricane Sandy's arrival has begun, and this extraordinary and historic storm is already causing havoc all along the U.S. coast from North Carolina to Massachusetts. The scale of this massive storm truly earns Sandy the title of "superstorm". Sandy's tropical storm-force winds span an area of ocean 940 miles in diameter, and both North Carolina and the island of Bermuda, 700 miles to the east, are under tropical storm warnings. The region of ocean covered by 12-foot high seas spans an area of ocean an incredible 1560 miles in diameter. Winds near hurricane force are expected to affect waters from Virginia to Massachusetts today. Record storm surge flooding has already occurred in regions along the New Jersey coast this morning, and the highest water levels recorded in over a century of record keeping are expected over much of the New Jersey and New York coasts this evening during the 8 - 9 pm EDT high tide cycle. Sandy brought sustained winds of 60 mph and waves 30 feet high early this morning to the buoy east of Cape Hatteras, NC. A wind gust of 58 mph occurred at New York City's La Guardia Airport at 9:51 am EDT, and a buoy at Robins Reef, NJ recorded sustained winds of 42 mph, gusting to 55 mph. As of 8 am EDT, Sandy has dumped heavy rains of 7.87" at Cape Hatteras, NC; 4.01" at Ocean City, MD; 3.12" at Dover, DE; and 3.22" at Virginia Beach, VA. As of 9 am EDT, peak storm surge values of 5" were observed at Lewes, Delaware, 4.2' at Cape May, NJ, 4' at Atlantic City, NJ, 2.9' at Philadelphia, and 3.9' at New York City.

Latest data from the Hurricane Hunters shows that Sandy is intensifying as its core traverses the warm waters of the Gulf Stream. At 8 am EDT, an Air Force hurricane hunter aircraft found top winds of 98 mph in the heavy thunderstorms to the southwest of Sandy's center, at a point about 150 miles east-northeast of Cape Hatteras, NC. A dropsonde released in the eye measured a central pressure of 945 mb, but observed winds of 19 knots at the surface, so Sandy is probably a 943 mb hurricane that is very close to Category 2 strength. The Hurricane Hunters did not observe an eyewall, and saw very little temperature difference from inside to outside the eye, so Sandy is not going to be able to undergo rapid intensification. The storm could still see an increase of 5 mph in its winds before landfall tonight between 6 pm - 10 pm EDT, due, in part, to interaction with the low pressure system to its west that is pulling the hurricane towards the coast. The new, higher winds of Sandy don't have a lot of time to pile up additional storm surge water, so the NHC storm surge forecasts will probably not change today. But it is clear that Sandy is not going to pull its punch, and this superstorm is going to deliver a punishing multi-billion dollar blow to a huge area of the Eastern U.S.


Figure 1. Morning satellite image of Hurricane Sandy.

Sandy already producing a record storm surge
The National Weather Service in Atlantic City, NJ said that isolated record storm surge flooding already occurred along portions of the New Jersey coast with this morning's 7:30 am EDT high tide cycle. As the tide goes out late this morning and this afternoon, water levels will fall, since the difference in water levels between low tide and high tide is about 5'. However, this evening, as the core of Sandy moves ashore, the storm will carry with it a gigantic bulge of water that will raise waters levels to the highest storm tides ever seen in over a century of record keeping, along much of the coastline of New Jersey and New York. The peak danger will be between 7 pm - 10 pm, when storm surge rides in on top of the high tide. The full moon is today, which means astronomical high tide will be about 5% higher than the average high tide for the month, adding another 2 - 3" to water levels. This morning's 9:30 am EDT H*Wind analysis from NOAA's Hurricane Research Division put the destructive potential of Sandy's winds at a modest 2.9 on a scale of 0 to 6. However, the destructive potential of the storm surge was record high: 5.8 on a scale of 0 to 6. This is a higher destructive potential than any hurricane observed since 1969, including Category 5 storms like Katrina, Rita, Wilma, Camille, and Andrew. The previous highest destructive potential for storm surge was 5.6 on a scale of 0 to 6, set during Hurricane Isabel of 2003. Sandy's storm surge will be capable of overtopping the flood walls in Manhattan, which are only five feet above mean sea level. On August 28, 2011, Tropical Storm Irene brought a storm surge of 4.13' and a storm tide of 9.5' above MLLW to Battery Park on the south side of Manhattan. The waters poured over the flood walls into Lower Manhattan, but came 8 - 12" shy of being able to flood the New York City subway system. According to the latest storm surge forecast for NYC from NHC, Sandy's storm surge is expected to be 10 - 12' above MLLW. Since a storm tide of 10.5' is needed to flood the subway system, it appears likely that portions of the NYC subway system will flood. The record highest storm tide at The Battery was 10.5', set on September 15, 1960, during Hurricane Donna.


Figure 2. Observed storm tide (red line) and predicted storm surge for Hurricane Sandy at The Battery on the south shore of Manhattan, New York City, from the experimental Extratropical Storm Surge model, run by NOAA"s Meteorological Development Laboratory (green line) and the NYHOPS model from the Stevens Institute of Technology (pink curve), which uses a highly detailed 3D ocean model and even includes rainfall and tributary inflows. These models have a storm surge of 5 - 6', which brings the maximum storm tide--the water level reached as a result of the combined action of the tide and the storm surge--to 11' above MLLW (Mean Lower Low Water.) Irene brought a storm tide of 9.5' above MLLW to The Battery in 2011. At a storm tide of 10.5', water will likely pour into the Lower Manhattan subway system, unless efforts to sandbag the entrances are successful. The NWS in NYC is predicting a 10 - 12' storm tide at The Battery during tonight's 9 pm high tide cycle.


Figure 3. Observed storm tide (red line) and predicted storm surge for Hurricane Sandy at Atlantic City, New Jersey, from the experimental Extratropical Storm Surge model, run by NOAA"s Meteorological Development Laboratory (green line) and the NYHOPS model from the Stevens Institute of Technology (pink curve), which uses a highly detailed 3D ocean model and even includes rainfall and tributary inflows. These models predict a maximum storm tide--the water level reached as a result of the combined action of the tide and the storm surge--of ' above MLLW (Mean Lower Low Water.) Irene brought a storm tide of 9.5' above MLLW to The Battery in 2011. At a storm tide of 10.5', water will likely pour into the Lower Manhattan subway system, unless efforts to sandbag the entrances are successful. The NWS in Atlantic City is predicting a 9.5' storm tide for the city during tonight's 8 pm high tide cycle, which would be the highest water levels ever observed in Atlantic City.

Links for Sandy
To find out if you need to evacuate, please contact your local emergency management office. They will have the latest information. People living in New York City can find their evacuation zone here or use this map. FEMA has information on preparing for hurricanes.

People with disabilities and caregivers seeking information on accessible shelter and transportation can contact portlight.org

Atlantic City beach cam

Ocean City, MD webcam

Statue of Liberty cam

An impressive 1-minute resolution satellite loop of Sandy today is at the CSU RAMMB website.

Our Weather Historian, Christopher C. Burt, has an excellent post on Late Season Tropical Storms that have affected the U.S. north of Hatteras. He also has a post, Historic Hurricanes from New Jersey to New England.

Hurricane Sandy info from NASA.

Joe Romm at climateprogress.org has a thoughtful piece called, How Does Global Warming Make Hurricanes Like Irene More Destructive?

For those of you wanting to know your odds of receiving hurricane force or tropical storm force winds, I recommend the NHC wind probability product.

Wunderground has detailed storm surge maps for the U.S. coast.

The National Hurricane Center's Interactive Storm Surge RIsk Map, which allows one to pick a particular Category hurricane and zoom in, is a good source of storm surge risk information.

Storm Surge prediction model from the Stevens Institute of Technology, which use a highly detailed 3D ocean model and even includes rainfall and tributary inflows.

Research storm surge model run by SUNY Stonybrook for New York City.

Climate Central has a nice satellite image showing which parts of New York Harbor are below five feet in elevation.

I'll have an update this afternoon.

Jeff Masters

Hurricane Sandy 1 (gwegret)
Post-Hurricane Sandy waves pound the Deerfield Beach, FL fishing pier!
Hurricane Sandy 1
Hurricane Sandy Long Neck Delaware (mal247)
On Rehoboth Bay
Hurricane Sandy Long Neck Delaware

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I've rode out more than 1 hurricane onboard a US Navy ship (a frigate at that) and it's a lot safer for the ship than sitting in port taking a beating. If we get underway in time we can usually outrun the worst parts of the storm and circle around in behind it to come back home.

I live in Hampton Roads and the Navy ships here left Friday afternoon so they should have been able to get out away from the worst parts of Sandy, but I guarantee they are having a rough ride right now. They'll be safe, but I don't envy them the trip.
Member Since: September 29, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 65
Quoting LostTomorrows:


That's pretty, and pretty terrifying at once.
*sigh* Not real : http://www.snopes.com/photos/natural/nystorm.asp.
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People know how to Party in Naraganesett, RI, TWC in the middle of it, lol.
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i swear i am looking at footage of it snowing in RI right now...omg...this is a wierd storm
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The TWC coverage in RI reminding me of Galveston..
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Quoting LostTomorrows:


That's pretty, and pretty terrifying at once.

Not from Sandy, from a Severe Thunderstorm in 2010.
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Quoting LostTomorrows:


That's pretty, and pretty terrifying at once.
That's not real but it looks like something coming from out of The Day After Tomorrow.
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Quoting LostTomorrows:


That's pretty, and pretty terrifying at once.


Looks like a shot from the movie Independence Day!

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From NOAA WP-3D Hurricane Hunter NOAA42 (Kermit) 10/28/2012 : Spiral banding around the eye as seen from the on board radar.
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422. 900MB
Kind of amazingly quiet here in NYC (Manhattan/high ground). We've had a couple of gusts in the mid 40's but mainly calm or breezy. Amazing considering the scenes as close by as coastal Brooklyn.
Member Since: June 11, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 684
Quoting StarnzMet:
A faster moving storm will be better right? If Sandy makes landfall at 5 or 6pm now that will be well before the 8:30pm high tide.

True.
But faster forward speed will increase the surge heights as it will be pushing more water ahead of it.
Probably cancell each other out.

Bad situation.
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Quoting LostTomorrows:


That's pretty, and pretty terrifying at once.


Shopped.
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Quoting LostTomorrows:


That's pretty, and pretty terrifying at once.


Is that real?
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Quoting hurricanejunky:
Franklin (from the NHC) on the Ed Schultz show now!


Oh no. We'll see how old Ed spins this.
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Quoting presslord:


if my boat were my home...or my livlihood...I may very well choose to saty aboard...


VERY valid point.
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Quoting presslord:


most of the deaths are on dry land ;-)


Most dead people are in cemeteries and most car accidents are on roads.

Better to have the ship at sea, there it has a chance, otherwise it's just going to be bashed against the pier or shore, potentially becoming a danger to others.
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Franklin (from the NHC) on the Ed Schultz show now!
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413. sigh
Quoting RitaEvac:
Based on the latest data, the storm surge values for New York City have been increased into the 12-14 foot level! Previous storm surge records will be exceeded by 1-4 feet over the entire region
Aren't you the same person who posted phony baloney storm surge numbers last night?

Do you have a source for these 12-14 numbers, or is this another lie?




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Things are pretty calm here in Northern VA, rain has all but stopped and the wind is gusting to the 20's.
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Quoting presslord:
Just for the record, y'all...I'm not sayin' it's the decision I'd make...only that it's a topic given serious discussion within' the sailing/cruising community...and that there is a reasonable argument to be made...


I have always heard that also Press. This storm is something no one has seen before apparently. I never thought i would ever see a hurricane inside a noreaster, if thats what this, this...THING is
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still amazed by sandy...the rain, wind, blizzards, etc...sounds ever so strange to associate a hurricane with cold wind and rain let alone to be causing blizzard conditions in some places...absolutely amazing
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Quoting K8eCane:


Now be honest...would you set sail in one? Whatever they were doing, Im sure they probably considered it pretty urgent. Everyone misjudges and unfortunately it cost a couple lives this time. Certainly not placing blame. They have been through enough without me doing that or even thinking that.


if my boat were my home...or my livlihood...I may very well choose to saty aboard...
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Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley just stated on WBAL radio here in Baltimore to "stay off the roads for the next 36 hours".
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Quoting presslord:
Just for the record, y'all...I'm not sayin' it's the decision I'd make...only that it's a topic given serious discussion within' the sailing/cruising community...and that there is a reasonable argument to be made...


I know at one point, Wilmington was considering paying for some decommision ships from the navy to use as shelters during hurricanes..
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Quoting K8eCane:



Thats because MORE PEOPLE dont set sail in a hurricane than do


Now be honest...would you set sail in one? Whatever they were doing, Im sure they probably considered it pretty urgent. Everyone misjudges and unfortunately it cost a couple lives this time. Certainly not placing blame. They have been through enough without me doing that or even thinking that.

I will add that they probly all had more common sense than me for sure. Yet look what can happen
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I got this off facebook from 5 State Weather..

Kitty Hawk, NC

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Tropical Storm Son-Tinh kills 30 in the Philippines
Posted on October 29, 2012



October 29, 2012 – PHILLIPINES – As Hurricane Sandy lashes the East Coast of the United States with wind and rain, Southeast Asia is dealing with the trail of death and damage from a powerful storm that has killed at least 30 people in the region over the past few days. Tropical Storm Son-Tinh was moving northeast along the northern Vietnamese coast on Monday after tearing the roofs off hundreds of houses and breaching flood defenses overnight, the state-run Vietnam News Agency (VNA) reported. Son-Tinh was at typhoon level when it thumped into northern Vietnam late Sunday with winds as strong as 133 kilometers per hour (83 mph). It left three people dead and two injured, according to an initial estimate from the Office of the National Search and Rescue Committee reported by (VNA). More than a 1,300 rescue workers and soldiers have been deployed to work with local authorities on search and rescue efforts in the aftermath of the storm, VNA said. Helicopters were on standby for a search and rescue mission for an oil rig with 35 people on board that became disconnected from its towboats miles out at sea amid strong waves generated by the storm, according to VNA. And five people were missing Sunday after winds from Son-Tinh sank an engineering vessel near a cargo terminal in Sanya, a city on the southern Chinese island of Hainan, China’s state-run news agency Xinhua reported. Son-Tinh is expected to gradually weaken over the course of Monday, regional weather agencies said. At least 260,000 people in Vietnam had been relocated to safer areas as it approached Sunday. The storm had already killed 27 people when it swept across the central Philippines during the second half of last week, causing flash floods and landslides, according to the Philippine National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council. Nine people remain missing, the council said Monday. East Asia is buffeted for several months a year by heavy storms that roll in from the western Pacific Ocean. In August, a big typhoon, named Bolaven, killed more than 60 people on the Korean peninsula. -CNN
Member Since: August 2, 2010 Posts: 21 Comments: 9887
Just for the record, y'all...I'm not sayin' it's the decision I'd make...only that it's a topic given serious discussion within' the sailing/cruising community...and that there is a reasonable argument to be made...
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Quoting presslord:


most of the deaths are on dry land ;-)



Thats because MORE PEOPLE dont set sail in a hurricane than do
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A faster moving storm will be better right? If Sandy makes landfall at 5 or 6pm now that will be well before the 8:30pm high tide.
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Quoting hurricanejunky:
GOOD LORD!!! Not much to look at on satellite but the windfield! Has anyone seen a larger windfield than this?
From 11 am NHC Public Advisory:
HURRICANE-FORCE WINDS EXTEND OUTWARD UP TO 175 MILES...280 KM...MAINLY SOUTHWEST OF THE CENTER...AND TROPICAL-STORM-FORCE WINDS EXTEND OUTWARD UP TO 485 MILES...780 KM. SUSTAINED WINDS TO TROPICAL STORM FORCE ARE OCCURRING FROM LONG ISLAND SOUTHWARD ALONG THE COASTS OF NEW JERSEY...DELAWARE...AND EASTERN VIRGINIA...AND EXTEND AS FAR INLAND AS THE CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN CHESAPEAKE BAY AND DELAWARE BAY. A WEATHERFLOW REPORT INDICATES A SUSTAINED WIND OF 53 MPH...85 KM/H...WITH A GUST TO 63 MPH...102 KM/H...HAS RECENTLY
OCCURRED ON LONG ISLAND AT EATONS NECK NEW YORK.

Stay Safe!

Wiki says no.

Link
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GOOD LORD!!! Not much to look at on satellite but the windfield! Has anyone seen a larger windfield than this?
From 11 am NHC Public Advisory:
HURRICANE-FORCE WINDS EXTEND OUTWARD UP TO 175 MILES...280 KM...MAINLY SOUTHWEST OF THE CENTER...AND TROPICAL-STORM-FORCE WINDS EXTEND OUTWARD UP TO 485 MILES...780 KM. SUSTAINED WINDS TO TROPICAL STORM FORCE ARE OCCURRING FROM LONG ISLAND SOUTHWARD ALONG THE COASTS OF NEW JERSEY...DELAWARE...AND EASTERN VIRGINIA...AND EXTEND AS FAR INLAND AS THE CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN CHESAPEAKE BAY AND DELAWARE BAY. A WEATHERFLOW REPORT INDICATES A SUSTAINED WIND OF 53 MPH...85 KM/H...WITH A GUST TO 63 MPH...102 KM/H...HAS RECENTLY
OCCURRED ON LONG ISLAND AT EATONS NECK NEW YORK.

Stay Safe!
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Quoting K8eCane:



Yes Press but the best place for the person is on dry land


most of the deaths are on dry land ;-)
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Quoting sfranz:


Sixty million people off work and the power grid is still holding.

We have flickers here in south-central Mass. I'm guessing we'll be offline in a few hours.

Same thing in NE Mass.
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High Wind Warning remains in effect until 6 pm EDT Tuesday.
Locations: New York City and immediate suburbs, including urban Northeast New Jersey, Southern Westchester, and western Long Island.
Hazards: damaging winds of long duration.
Winds: east 35 to 45 mph with gusts up to 80 mph. Higher gusts up to 85 mph possible along south facing shorelines.
Timing: through Tuesday afternoon. Strongest winds are expected this afternoon and evening.
Impacts: a significant threat to life and property exists. Damaging winds are expected. Winds will be capable of Downing trees and snapping off large tree branches. Power outages could be widespread and last at least several days. Debris will block some roads. Most poorly anchored mobile homes will be damaged. Other homes may have damage to shingles, siding, gutters and windows, especially if these items are not properly secured. Loose outdoor items will become airborne, causing additional damage and possible injury. Windows in High rise buildings could be broken by flying debris.
































Recommended actions


Dangerous conditions will occur today and tonight. Everyone should be moving to a place of safety. Once inside, ensure all windows and doors are secured before dangerous winds arrive. During the Storm, stay inside and away from windows. Do not venture outside when high winds are occurring or during temporary lulls as flying debris can easily, and suddenly, cause serious injury.

Have a well charged cell phone nearby. Keep cell phone and internet communications as open as possible for emergencies. Be aware that the loss of commercial power can happen quickly. Keep emergency Gear handy.

Closely monitor NOAA weather radio or other local news outlets for official storm information. Listen for possible changes to the forecast.
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Quoting 1900hurricane:
WU radar has crapped out on me, so here is a NWS one.



Judging by that, looks like Sandy is going to make landfall quite a bit sooner than anticipated, sometime around 5pm possibly.
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391. Skyepony (Mod)
Quoting sar2401:

I did not see that blog apparently. Just to clarify, are you saying that things like Favorites are going to be down to help keep this blog running? If that's true, that's silly. The average person just needs to get to his city's forecast quickly to get updates from the NWS office, which seems like they will be handling all the life-threatening updates. This blog is just a bunch of us amateur weather geeks discussing/arguing/pontificating on things. This blog is the least important thing to keep running.


Favorites are turned off & even other features maybe turned off later today to keep the Wunderground site running with the extra load of visitors. It's not just to keep this blog up. If you need local conditions put your location in the search window up top. If you've looked at it recently, look right under the search box in recent cities, it should still be there.
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Quoting Asrock:
Wu is getting overloaded

Jeff Masters


Sixty million people off work and the power grid is still holding.

We have flickers here in south-central Mass. I'm guessing we'll be offline in a few hours.

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Gust of 138mph just measured at 11:40am:

http://ndbc-load.nws.noaa.gov/station_page.php?st ation=demo2

The data here says 126kts at his floating buoy. The storm probably passed the buoy to the west as pressures are coming down. This high reading in the right front quadrant of the storm suggests the gust may be influenced by the forward motion of the storm.

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Extra inspectors sent to nuclear power plants along East Coast as Hurricane Sandy approaches

By Associated Press,

WASHINGTON — Additional inspectors are being sent to nuclear power plants in five states as Hurricane Sandy approaches the East Coast.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission says its headquarters and Northeast regional office are both closed, except for emergency personnel.

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The agency says safeguards at all nuclear plants can withstand hurricane-force winds and flooding. Still, plants will be shuttered if hurricane-force winds are expected in the area.

In New Jersey, extra inspectors equipped with satellite phones are being sent to Oyster Creek in Lacey Township, and Salem and Hope Creek in Hancocks Bridge. In Pennsylvania, Three Mile Island in Middletown, Peach Bottom in Delta and Susquehanna in Salem Township will get reinforcements. Indian Point in Buchanan, N.Y., Millstone in Waterford, Conn., and Calvert Cliffs in Lusby, Md., will also get extra inspectors.

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
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Quoting presslord:
There is a credible school of thought that the very best place for a sailing vessel to be during a storm is at sea...



Yes Press but the best place for the person is on dry land
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Twc says sandy may be moving upwards of 25 mph and will be on jersey shore this afternoon.
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Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 187 Comments: 57795
FLOOD WARNING
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NEW YORK NY
1247 PM EDT MON OCT 29 2012

NJC003-NYC071-079-087-119-301030-
/O.NEW.KOKX.FA.W.0002.121029T1647Z-121030T1030Z/
/00000.0.ER.000000T0000Z.000000T0000Z.000000T0000 Z.OO/
ORANGE NY-PUTNAM NY-ROCKLAND NY-BERGEN NJ-WESTCHESTER NY-
1247 PM EDT MON OCT 29 2012

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN UPTON NY HAS ISSUED A

* FLOOD WARNING FOR...
ORANGE COUNTY IN SOUTHEAST NEW YORK...
PUTNAM COUNTY IN SOUTHEAST NEW YORK...
ROCKLAND COUNTY IN SOUTHEAST NEW YORK...
BERGEN COUNTY IN NORTHEAST NEW JERSEY...
WESTCHESTER COUNTY IN SOUTHEAST NEW YORK...

* UNTIL 630 AM EDT TUESDAY

* AT 1237 PM EDT...STRONG WINDS AND A STRONG COASTAL STORM SURGE
INTO NEW YORK CITY HARBOR AREA WILL CAUSE A STRONG TIDAL SURGE
ALONG THE HUDSON RIVER DURING THE OVERNIGHT HIGH TIDE CYCLE.
AREAS ALONG THE HUDSON RIVER WILL EXPERIENCE MINOR TO MODERATE
FLOODING OVERNIGHT INTO TUESDAY MORNING.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A FLOOD WARNING MEANS FLOODING IS OCCURRING OR IS IMMINENT. MOST
FLOOD RELATED DEATHS OCCUR IN AUTOMOBILES. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO CROSS
WATER COVERED BRIDGES...DIPS...OR LOW WATER CROSSINGS. NEVER TRY TO
CROSS A FLOWING STREAM...EVEN A SMALL ONE...ON FOOT. TO ESCAPE RISING
WATER MOVE UP TO HIGHER GROUND.

TO REPORT FLOODING...HAVE THE NEAREST LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCY RELAY
YOUR REPORT TO THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FORECAST OFFICE.

&&

LAT...LON 4159 7405 4159 7395 4152 7399 4145 7399
4149 7393 4150 7377 4126 7379 4109 7372
4099 7365 4089 7378 4092 7391 4082 7399
4080 7406 4077 7409 4077 7413 4079 7415
4086 7412 4086 7411 4093 7414 4162 7414

$$

FIG
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Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 187 Comments: 57795
Quoting presslord:


she was about 90 miles off Cape Hatteras...the approppiately named Graveyard of the Atlantic


The last I heard on CNN was that two crew members ended up in the water when trying to transfer off the Bounty to a rescue boat after they lost propulsion. The two crew members have not been found but searches are in progress and the two people were wearing some sort of protective suits designed to keep them afloat and warm. If they're found quickly they may still survive. Seas are very high in the search areas though.
I'm guessing they were trying to save The Bounty by taking it to sea. It was such a beautiful ship. So sad to lose it. Sadder still if they can't rescue those two sailers. :(
Member Since: July 18, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 404

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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