Sandy remains a hurricane, slowly leaving the Bahamas

By: Angela Fritz , 9:28 PM GMT on October 26, 2012

Share this Blog
47
+

Reuters reports that the death toll from Sandy in the Caribbean is now up to 41 people as Hurricane Sandy continues its track toward the U.S. East Coast this afternoon, slowly leaving the Bahamas. States of Emergency have been declared in North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, and New York. The hurricane is just barely still a Category 1 with surface winds of 75 mph and a minimum central pressure of 971 mb. Ocean buoys off the coasts of Florida and the Carolinas are recording sustained winds of around 45 mph this afternoon, with gusts steadily increasing and now up to 60 mph. Sandy's rainfall, which is limited to the north and northeast parts of the storm, is reaching eastern Florida, though most of it is staying offshore.

Satellite loops show an asymmetric Sandy, with almost all of the thunderstorm activity on its north side. The hurricane still has a very clear center of surface circulation which you can see on visible and infrared loops. Though the hurricane is leaving the influence of an upper level low pressure area over western Cuba, water vapor imagery shows a large area of dry air being pulled into the storm from the south, which is leading to the lack of thunderstorm activity and contributing to the weakening that Sandy is experiencing right now. The hurricane's tropical storm-force winds now extend 240 miles from the center, and could grow to 400 miles from the center by the time it reaches the East Coast.


Figure 1. Visible/infrared satellite image of Sandy as it leaves the Bahamas this afternoon. The mid-latitude trough, which Sandy will interact with over the next few days, is seen approaching from the northwest. The cold front associated with this trough is draped from upstate New York south to Louisiana, and appears as a line of clouds draped across the Midwest and South in this image.

Forecast For Hurricane Sandy

As a tropical cyclone approaches land, the worst storm surge is almost always where the winds are blowing from ocean to shore, where the wind pushes the water toward and onto the shore. In the case of Sandy's potential track, this region is on the north side of the center. In this morning's GFS scenario, Sandy's center passes over eastern Long Island, Connecticut, and Rhode Island. This would result in the highest surge north of New York City: Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and possibly Maine. The ECMWF forecast from this morning is a bit further to the south. It's suggesting Sandy's center will meet land in New Jersey. This scenario opens up New York City, Long Island, Connecticut, Rhode Island, and southern coastal Mass. to the largest surge. In general, the places that will avoid the largest storm surge are those that are south of where the center of the storm makes landfall. The National Hurricane Center's forecast is similar to the ECMWF, but most importantly, its forecast is also to not focus on the exact point of landfall because of the size of the storm, and that widespread impact is expected.

The Mid-Atlantic and Northeast coasts should be prepared for a storm surge no matter their exact location. A large portion of the coast will feel the impact of up to 60 mph winds and heavy rain. According to the most recent H*Wind analysis from the Hurricane Research Division is that storm surge has a destructive potential of 4.8 out of 6.0, which is a slight increase from previous analyses. Wind damage potential is holding steady around 2.3 out of 6.0. NOAA's HPC is forecasting rainfall totals of 5 to 10 inches in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast, and possibly more in coastal locations close to the core of the storm. Widespread power outages from Maine south to Virginia are likely, due to the combination of long-lived gale-force winds, leaves on trees, and rain that will moisten the soil and possibly increase the chances of falling trees. Snow in the Appalachians is also possible as the intense moisture meets the cold air being pulled south by the mid-latitude trough.


Figure 2. Departure of sea surface temperature from average for the Atlantic shows a large area of unusually warm waters up to 9°F above average off the U.S. mid-Atlantic coast.

Sandy to feed off near-record warm waters off the mid-Atlantic coast
During September 2012, ocean temperatures off the mid-Atlantic coast in the 5x10° latitude-longitude box between 35 - 40°N, 65 - 75° W were 2.3°F (1.3°C) above average, according to the UK Met Office. This is the 2nd greatest departure from average for ocean temperatures in this region since reliable ocean temperature measurements began over a century ago (all-time record: 2.0°C above average in September 1947.) These unusually warm waters have persisted into October, and will enable Sandy to pull more energy from the ocean than a typical October hurricane. The warm waters will also help increase Sandy's rains, since more water vapor will evaporate into the air from a warm ocean. I expect Sandy will dump the heaviest October rains on record over a large swath of the mid-Atlantic and New England.

Hurricane rains and climate change
Hurricanes are expected to dump 20% more rain in their cores by the year 2100, according to modeling studies (Knutson et al., 2010). This occurs since a warmer atmosphere holds more water vapor, which can then condense into heavier rains. Furthermore, the condensation process releases heat energy (latent heat), which invigorates the storm, making its updrafts stronger and creating even more rain. We may already be seeing an increase in rainfall from hurricanes due to a warmer atmosphere. A 2010 study by Kunkel et al. "Recent increases in U.S. heavy precipitation associated with tropical cyclones", found that although there is no evidence for a long-term increase in North American mainland land-falling tropical cyclones (which include both hurricanes and tropical storms), the number of heavy precipitation events, defined as 1-in-5-year events, more than doubled between 1994 - 2008, compared to the long-term average from 1895 - 2008. As I discussed in a 2011 post "Tropical Storm Lee's flood in Binghamton: was global warming the final straw?", an increase in heavy precipitation events in the 21st Century due to climate change is going to be a big problem for a flood control system designed for the 20th Century's climate.


Figure 3. Time series of the 15-yr running average (plotted at the end point of the 15-yr blocks) of the tropical cyclone Heavy Precipitation Index (red) and the associated 15-yr total of U.S. landfalling hurricanes from Atlantic HURDAT hurricane data base, from 1895 - 2008 (blue). Note the steep rise in heavy precipitation events from tropical cyclones over the past 20 years, which has not been accompanied by a corresponding increase in landfalling hurricanes. Image credit: Kunkel et al., 2010, Geophysical Research Letters.

Angela Fritz and Jeff Masters

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 156 - 106

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28Blog Index

CoopsWife,

Can you fill a bathtub for flushing water? It's easier. I fill 5 gal. buckets about half way and use those for hand washing and rinsing clothing items in an extended power outage. Everyone has their system.

Good luck from the Gulf Coast.

Steel
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Chicklit:
Thanks for the update Angela and Jeff.
Sandy looks like nothing right now on WV.

Lots of moisture to the east and southeast of Sandy waiting to be drawn into a storm system further north.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
High Voltage Linemen crews headed to the NE starting today/tomorrow. Interesting note: some major utility companies (2 I know of for sure are Xcel Energy - MN & Commonwealth - MI) are not releasing outside contractor companies from their current utility jobs to head to the East for the post-storm power restoration work. The excuse is that there is too much regular utility work to do to spare any companies for a few weeks to help restore power to the affected areas out there. Fortunately, there are many linemen who have "dragged" from their current companies and found other companies who are not contracted with those particular utilities that are going out to restore power after the storm. Still, it would seem logical that all the power companies possible go out when a storm of this magnitude is barreling toward 45-50 million people.

(Just an FYI for when people are wondering why it is taking a while to get the power restored. Just remember that the linemen themselves are working 16 hour days to get it back up to as many people as they can as quickly as possible.)

Prayers for all who are in the path of this nasty storm, too. Stay safe!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting LargoFl:
depending on how bad it gets, they may very well postpone the election, cant deprive those many millions of people their right to vote
postponing the election would cause outright chaos. I hope for the best in this situation.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting FLWeatherFreak91:
I have a sick feeling in my stomach when I think of how Hurricane Sandy may affect the elections on the sixth...

The storm will likely be immediately affecting the most populated area of our country up til a few days before the election, and there will also be numerous power outages well beyond Election Day.

You would think that polling stations would have paper ballots on hand in case of a power outage, but this is not required.

Each county can choose to postpone the election up to 14 days, but it is highly likely that any delayed votes will be questioned by the electoral college.

You also have to consider that voter turnout will be greatly reduced in the event of inclement weather and/ power outages. I have a feeling both political parties will go into a craze trying to prove why these possibly late votes should or shouldn't be counted.

Sandy may have more of an effect on our democracy and electoral system than it does on our infrastructure.
depending on how bad it gets, they may very well postpone the election, cant deprive those many millions of people their right to vote
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 36941
Quoting CoopsWife:


Dang frontloader, Wab

Try a paddling pool, baby bath and even balloons work well for storing water.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting winter123:
So what happens when this becomes non-fully-tropical? Does it keep the name Sandy? Will it just be an unnamed low? Will the weather channel rename it using their Winter Storm names?


Currently, I would call this fully tropical, but just heavily sheared. Note the outflow all along the NW and N sides, and there are still tightly concentrated surface winds with a well defined center.


It will be called post-tropical cyclone Sandy.
Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 23591
Quoting ncstorm:
we are about to get our first heavy rain band here in Wilmington from Sandy..and it begins..

wow that first squall line looks strong
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 36941
Anyone remember Nor'Ida?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I have a sick feeling in my stomach when I think of how Hurricane Sandy may affect the elections on the sixth...

The storm will likely be immediately affecting the most populated area of our country up til a few days before the election, and there will also be numerous power outages well beyond Election Day.

You would think that polling stations would have paper ballots on hand in case of a power outage, but this is not required.

Each county can choose to postpone the election up to 14 days, but it is highly likely that any delayed votes will be questioned by the electoral college.

You also have to consider that voter turnout will be greatly reduced in the event of inclement weather and/ power outages. I have a feeling both political parties will go into a craze trying to prove why these possibly late votes should or shouldn't be counted.

Sandy may have more of an effect on our democracy and electoral system than it does on our infrastructure.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting AllStar17:


You are telling me that if the storm makes landfall in Delaware that Eastport, ME is LIKELY to get power outages?


TWC is just broadbrushing at the point to get some folks prepared. I'm guessing they are basing the outages on the cone.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting winter123:
So what happens when this becomes non-fully-tropical? Does it keep the name Sandy? Will it just be an unnamed low? Will the weather channel rename it using their Winter Storm names?
they think will maintain partial tropical because its running into the gulf stream way up the carolina's, there's its energy, added to the cold fronts energy..boom..
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 36941
So what happens when this becomes non-fully-tropical? Does it keep the name Sandy? Will it just be an unnamed low? Will the weather channel rename it using their Winter Storm names?


Currently, I would call this fully tropical, but just heavily sheared. Note the outflow all along the NW and N sides, and there are still tightly concentrated surface winds with a well defined center.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Joshfsu123:
I am getting water, candles and batteries tonight (I live in DC). Will wait on food until Sunday when I see what the path looks like.

I would go ahead and take care of everything tomorrow if I were you.
This is a personal safety and quality of life issue. You don't want to be out there running around getting last minute stuff when everyone else is frantic. Plus, there will be lines, running out of stuff, and freaked out people.
Just driving alone is a hazard in the later stages of storm preparation. You're better off at home, thinking about who and how you can help if/when the storm arrives. In addition to helping yourself by being close to home and completing any last minute preps.
Member Since: July 11, 2006 Posts: 14 Comments: 11178
The center of the storm is still 450 miles away and the first rain bands are already coming on shore in Wrightsville Beach, NC. Winds are 15-20 mph. Quite the storm
Member Since: May 28, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 17
Thanks for the update Angela and Jeff.
Sandy looks like nothing right now on WV.
Member Since: July 11, 2006 Posts: 14 Comments: 11178
From NOAA NHC:

INLAND FLOODING FROM TROPICAL STORMS AND HURRICANES

When it comes to hurricanes, wind speeds do not tell the
whole story. Hurricanes produce storm surges, tornadoes, and
often most deadly of all, INLAND FRESHWATER FLOODING.

While storm surge is always a potential threat with land-
falling hurricanes, many more people have died from inland
freshwater flooding. Inland flooding can be a major threat
to communities hundreds of miles from the coast as heavy rain
falls from these huge tropical air masses. Of the 56 people
who perished 10 years ago in 1999 from Hurricane Floyd, 50
drowned due to inland flooding.

Thirty nine years ago, in 1972, Hurricane Agnes produced
floods in the Northeast United States which contributed to
122 deaths and $6.4 billion in damages. And in 1955, long
after the winds from Hurricane Diane had subsided, the storm
brought inland flooding to Pennsylvania, New York, and New
England contributing to nearly 200 deaths and $4.2 billion in
damages.

Freshwater floods accounted for more than half of U.S.
tropical cyclone deaths from 1975-2004 years and more than
75% of the children killed by tropical cyclones. Flooding is
also the reason why 63% of U.S. tropical cyclone deaths
during that period occurred in inland counties. At least 23%
of U.S. tropical cyclone deaths are people who are attempting
to drive through flooded roadways.
[...]
(Full Story Here)
(Link to PDF version)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
138. whitewabit (Mod)
Quoting CoopsWife:


Dang frontloader, Wab


Darn ..
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 36941
we are about to get our first heavy rain band here in Wilmington from Sandy..and it begins..

Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 14556
Quoting whitewabit:


Don't forget to fill up the washer .. water can be used for hand washing ...


Dang frontloader, Wab
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
For those wondering about the how strong the winds will be in your area; NBC News has a Hurricane Tracker that also includes a 5 Day Storm forecast that gives a cumulative probability of storm winds reaching 39 mph; 58 mph; and 74 mph
Link
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Although all the coastal preparations are good and sensible, chances are that the worst personal catastrophes will take place in some almost random inland area, far from any great windstorm or storm surge, that is inundated by a sustained band of heavy rain. During Camille, more people died in remote and lightly-populated Nelson County, Virginia (which lost over 1% of its population) than in Biloxi, Mississippi. Even now, unbeknownst to many, catastrophic flooding is continuing in Hispaniola.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
there's really not much more we can post to warn the people about, if they havent taken it to heart yet they will be in big trouble when it hits..this is NO ordinary nor'easter, this is coming ashore and its going to be HUGE in area..that pretty much sums it up..prepare now..monday morning you'll start to feel the tropical storm winds..it goes way downhill after that.....good luck to you folks,i mean that
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 36941
130. whitewabit (Mod)
Quoting CoopsWife:
The model shift down the coastline is beneficial to me (we're in Newport, RI now) but I prepped just the same. Who cares if the lawn furniture goes down cellar a few weeks early? Major concern in my neighborhood is that we all have wells - and no power means no water. My genset will help with a lot, but the well pump is hard wired 220 - and I'm not messing with that. So - plenty (and I mean plenty) of bottled water, and we'll fill a batch of 5 gal containers for flush water.


Don't forget to fill up the washer .. water can be used for hand washing ...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
High-resolution models are showing a significant uptick in convection in outer bands and near the center of Sandy over the next 12 hours.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31502
Quoting bappit:

Nice to hear from someone who is preparing. I heard too many whiners on the blog during Isaac.


Thanks, Bappit. We lived in VaBeach the past eight years, and Charleston, and Mobile, etc. I know the drill, just didn't think I would be using it this fall, LOL.

Worst part is the temp drops after the storm passes - with no power for the wells, you can't run your radiator based heat, either. If it comes down to it, we'll dewinterize the camper and drag it back into service for a couple of weeks. Tiny but has a great furnace, LOL.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting JRRP:
Santo Domingo... Dominican Republic

Interesting picture. I'm not sure what the people with houses and buildings along that street thought of that. One thought that comes to mind is tire spikes.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

The perfect storm did not even make landfall. This is worse than the perfect storm, and will probably be worse than the Northeast has ever seen in decades.


This storm will crash with two big mass of cold air!!!!!!!! Snow after that ......... oh boy !!!!!!!!!!!!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting bappit:

People have mostly learned to get away from the surge or it would be the biggest killer by far. The fresh water flooding is not as predictable I think. Hard to know ahead of time where training rains will set up. I think people get over confident in their cars, too.
I will agree with the second part about how unpredictable the training of storms and inland flooding sometimes can be, but even in the early 20th century freshwater flooding was always the biggest killer, although granted not usually as dramatic as, say, the great Galveston hurricane of 1900. Even in recent times, consider 1998 Hurricane Mitch killed over 20,000 people in flooding.

As far as I can determine in the current case of Hurricane Sandy, the majority of deaths so far have resulted from flooding and mudslides.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
124. whitewabit (Mod)
Quoting TomballTXPride:
Did a little digging. Right up to landfall, Ike's greatest tropical storm force wind radius was 275 MPH, while Irene's was 320 MPH before her second landfall in NJ.


I believe you mean miles ...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
just an area of rain

way out it shows something over bahamas going ne

hmm interesting. i see it
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
The Cape May County Emergency Management Office has issued voluntary evacuation orders for Friday and Saturday for the county’s barrier islands. Those evacuation orders will become mandatory on Sunday.

Gov. Chris Christie Friday directed cabinet officials to mobilize preparations for a coordinated response to Hurricane Sandy.

“While Sandy’s exact track is still uncertain, New Jersey has the potential to experience a major impact from high winds, heavy rain, flooding and power outages,” said Christie. “That’s why it’s important from the state level on down to prepare in advance of this serious storm. The New Jersey Office of Emergency Management’s Hurricane Survival Guide is available to residents online with important information about emergency preparedness. Now, ahead of any potential impact of Sandy, is the time for families to ensure they are prepared and are tuned in for the latest path of the storm for our coast. I encourage all of our families to stay informed, get ready, and reach out to those you know who may be isolated, or in need of extra assistance during adverse conditions.”

Also, Monmouth University announced it will close early next week because of Hurricane Sandy. There will be no classes on the West Long Branch campus on Monday and Tuesday.

Dorms will remain open, but MU is advising students to leave until Wednesday because of the strong likelihood the campus will lose electricity.

Low-lying areas along rivers tend to flood during major storms, particularly in places like Manville, where the Raritan River routinely overflows its banks and inundates large parts of the town.

Ken Otrimski, Manville’s emergency management director, said the town will activate its reverse 911 system Friday night, urging residents who live in low-lying areas to review their flood-preparation plans. Manville also was readying its six rescue boats.

“It’s a waiting game now and we’ll see what Mother Nature wants to deal us,” Otrimski said.

Borough Administrator Gary Garwacke said flooding has become second nature there.

“I think we got it down pretty well pat,” he told WCBS 880 reporter Jim Smith. “We obviously have our OEM office open, our police, fire, rescue squad are gearing up.”

A shelter at the VFW is ready to go with food arrangements and a generator on standby.

Seemingly every year, this area gets washed out.

“Basically right now, we’re telling people to prepare, take the weekend to prepare,” he said.

He said the most important thing is for residents to evacuate when ordered.

WCBS 880′s Levon Putney: River Towns Also Preparing

Download: putney_fairfield1w_midday_121026.mp3




Inland, in Fairfield, people were going about their normal business on Friday.

But since it’s right near the Passaic River and had major flooding when Irene hit, they’re going to keep monitoring the situation.

Officials in Essex County have been in contact with the National Weather Service and state police OEM.

“The last that we got was that even if it wobbles, it’s coming up the Delaware Bay and if it wobbles, it won’t wobble that much,” said Essex County Sheriff Armando Fontoura, who is also the county’s emergency management coordinator.

He said they have shelters ready and urged those in low-lying areas to consider evacuation.
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 36941
Quoting CoopsWife:
The model shift down the coastline is beneficial to me (we're in Newport, RI now) but I prepped just the same. Who cares if the lawn furniture goes down cellar a few weeks early? Major concern in my neighborhood is that we all have wells - and no power means no water. My genset will help with a lot, but the well pump is hard wired 220 - and I'm not messing with that. So - plenty (and I mean plenty) of bottled water, and we'll fill a batch of 5 gal containers for flush water.


My family is in the Fall River/Providence area and are preparing,also.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
end of the run fantasy hour

Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53296
Hope we don't end up with another movie even though the last one is one of my favorites.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/7/ 7e/Perfect_storm_poster.jpg/220px-Perfect_storm_po ster.jpg
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Joshfsu123:
I am getting water, candles and batteries tonight (I live in DC). Will wait on food until Sunday when I see what the path looks like.
good your preparing.
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 36941
Quoting SyriboTigereyes:

My best friend and her family moved from here in Nassau out to Mastic Beach a while ago.

Things are starting to pick up around here. The word has finally gotten out on the news so everyone is paying attention.

But now, since the models are showing the center making landfall in NJ, or southern NJ, people aren't caring as much. They don't realize just how large this system is.
yes and if it does come ashore in south jersey, the worst flood surge is on the NORTH side of sandy..and the winds go way up the coast thru many states,maybe up to boston or beyond, hope they understand this
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 36941
Quoting reedzone:
It's not just hype... I really wish Long Islanders would stop blowing this off like it's some Noreaster... It's the second Perfect Storm.

The perfect storm did not even make landfall. This is worse than the perfect storm, and will probably be one of the worst, if not the worst, storm the Northeast has ever seen in decades.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31502
Quoting bigwes6844:
okay thanks keep! i thought i saw a potential valerie in the Carb. U think its heading into honduras?
just an area of rain

way out it shows something over bahamas going ne

Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53296
114. JRRP
Santo Domingo... Dominican Republic
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I am getting water, candles and batteries tonight (I live in DC). Will wait on food until Sunday when I see what the path looks like.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting CoopsWife:
The model shift down the coastline is beneficial to me (we're in Newport, RI now) but I prepped just the same. Who cares if the lawn furniture goes down cellar a few weeks early? Major concern in my neighborhood is that we all have wells - and no power means no water. My genset will help with a lot, but the well pump is hard wired 220 - and I'm not messing with that. So - plenty (and I mean plenty) of bottled water, and we'll fill a batch of 5 gal containers for flush water.

Nice to hear from someone who is preparing. I heard too many whiners on the blog during Isaac.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
That's a LARGE tropical storm wind field

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I don't want to see any westward component. As it stands now, we'll only see fringe effects, but if that NEWD turn is delayed for any period of time, that would change things a bit.

It should still stay well offshore from SC.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting reedzone:


I appreciate that.. btw, I'm a former resident of Mastic Beach

My best friend and her family moved from here in Nassau out to Mastic Beach a while ago.

Things are starting to pick up around here. The word has finally gotten out on the news so everyone is paying attention.

But now, since the models are showing the center making landfall in NJ, or southern NJ, people aren't caring as much. They don't realize just how large this system is.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
153 hrs dev poss in sw carb

okay thanks keep! i thought i saw a potential valerie in the Carb. U think its heading into honduras?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
The model shift down the coastline is beneficial to me (we're in Newport, RI now) but I prepped just the same. Who cares if the lawn furniture goes down cellar a few weeks early? Major concern in my neighborhood is that we all have wells - and no power means no water. My genset will help with a lot, but the well pump is hard wired 220 - and I'm not messing with that. So - plenty (and I mean plenty) of bottled water, and we'll fill a batch of 5 gal containers for flush water.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I cant believe I left South Carolina and came for a visit to West Virginia. I have to be the only one to do this!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Viewing: 156 - 106

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

Local Weather

Scattered Clouds
66 °F
Scattered Clouds