Leslie headed towards Bermuda; Tropical Storm Michael forms

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:01 PM GMT on September 04, 2012

Share this Blog
41
+

Tropical Storm Leslie continues to suffer from moderately high wind shear of 15 - 20 knots, due to strong upper-level winds out of the northwest. The shear is keeping heavy thunderstorms confined to the southeast quadrant of the storm. Satellite loops show that Leslie has almost no heavy thunderstorm activity near its center, and the storm is crawling north at walking pace, 3 mph. Leslie's slow forward speed means that the storm is staying over the cold water stirred up by the storm's winds, inhibiting intensification. According to the latest SHIPS model forecast, the shear is expected to stay moderately high through Tuesday night, then drop to the low category, 5 - 10 knots, by Thursday afternoon. At that time, Leslie will be over warm ocean waters of 29 - 30°C, and the reduction in shear and warm waters should aid intensification. However, Leslie's motion will continue to be slow, keeping the storm over its cool water wake, and keeping any intensification slow. Once Leslie begins moving more quickly on Saturday, this effect will diminish, and Leslie could be at Category 2 strength on Sunday morning, as indicated in the official NHC forecast. Steering currents for Leslie are expected to be weak through Friday, as Leslie is stuck between two upper level lows. The latest guidance from our top computer models continues to show Leslie making a very close pass by Bermuda on Saturday. Leslie is a huge storm, and tropical storm-force winds are expected to extend outward from its center 250 miles by Friday. Bermuda is likely to see a 48-hour period of tropical storm-force winds beginning Friday night that lasts until Sunday night. The official NHC forecast shows Leslie nearly making a direct hit on Bermuda, but the uncertainty in 4-day NHC forecasts is around 200 miles. Thus, the latest 11 am EDT NHC wind probability forecast calls for just a 12% chance of hurricane force winds on Bermuda on Saturday. Nevertheless, Leslie is capable of bringing an extended period of hurricane-force winds lasting six or more hours to Bermuda Saturday night through Sunday morning, should a direct hit materialize.


Figure 1. Morning satellite image of Tropical Storm Leslie. The low-level circulation center has very little in the way of heavy thunderstorms surrounding it, thanks to strong northwest winds creating 15 - 20 knots of wind shear.

Leslie will stay stuck in a weak steering current environment until a strong trough of low pressure approaches the U.S. East Coast on Saturday. This trough should be strong enough to pull Leslie quickly to the north on Saturday and Sunday, and Leslie may be close enough to the coast that the storm will make landfall in Nova Scotia or Newfoundland, Canada on Monday, September 10. None of the reliable models have shown that a direct hit on New England will occur, but we can't rule that possibility out yet. The storm may also miss land entirely, and brush by the coasts of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. Large swells from Leslie reached Cape Hatteras, North Carolina last night, and will begin pounding the entire Eastern Seaboard today through Sunday. These waves will be capable of causing significant beach erosion and dangerous rip currents. The Hurricane Hunters are scheduled to make their first flight into Leslie on Wednesday afternoon.


Figure 2. Morning satellite image of Tropical Storm Michael.

Tropical Storm Michael forms in the Central Atlantic
Tropical Storm Michael has formed in the Central Atlantic on Monday, but is not destined for fame. Satellite loops show that this is a very small tropical cyclone, and the storm is well away from any land areas. Michael is under moderately high shear of 15 - 20 knots, and this shear is forecast to remain at 15 - 20 knots through Wednesday. Since Michael is such a small storm, just a modest increase in shear could destroy it. But if Michael survives until Thursday, when shear is expected to fall to the low range, it has the opportunity to strengthen.

Michaels's formation on September 4 puts 2012 in third place for earliest formation date of the season's thirteenth storm. The record is held jointly by 2005, which had Hurricane Maria form on September 2, and 2011, which had Tropical Storm Lee form on September 2 (there was an unnamed tropical storm that year before Lee.) None of the models show that Michael will threaten any land areas. Michael is a classic example of the type of storm that likely would have been missed before the advent of satellites, since the storm is small, far from land, and may be short-lived.

Jeff Masters

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 787 - 737

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26Blog Index

Quoting percylives:
Hurricanes come, tear up the place, and go away. I've gotten over several of them.

If you want something to keep you up nights think of the ramifications of this year's Arctic Ocean Ice Melt. The remaining ice area is presently 16% lower than the previous record low and it's still dropping.



Yep.

This is nothing. Wait another 10 to 15 years.

I figure 10 years to guarantee getting rid of all the Arctic ice (though it may happen much sooner at hte present rate, perhaps in 3 or 4 years,) so just to use round numbers, 5 to 10 years to meltdown in summer for arctic sea ice.

Then 5 years after the first complete meltdown you will expect the self-reinforcing positive albedo feedback to start to each chunks out of other ice structures on the globe, or else extend the melt season farther and farther in both directions on the calendar.

Based on this post on Neven's site, and the articles he's linking to, it appears the majority of sea ice volume is being lost in such a manner so that the first complete meltdown within the end of JULY is probably not that much harder than the first meltdown in September. If the June 1 to July 31 melt gets bad enough in a particularly bad "down year," like 2007 or 2010, then it may actually just melt down all in one year.

Although he doesn't SAY that, it's an obvious conclusion from the data presented.

Neven's Arctic Sea Ice Blog Site


After 10 years, we'll have about another 16 melting days in Canada and Alaska, 8 in the arctic sea, 12 in Greenland, Europe, and Asia (all above 60N). Obviously this will provide tremendous positive albedo feedback, fueling further melting of Greenland, as well as earlier and earlier sea ice meltdowns.


You just THINK the Great Lakes melted out early this past spring.

One year soon, they won't freeze over at all.
Member Since: January 25, 2012 Posts: 33 Comments: 1520
pre-Katrina or post-Katrina? (post...was lurking until after)
pre-TWC or post-TWC? (pre)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting victoria780:
THE WEATHER MAY AFFECT PRESIDENT OBAMA SPEECH.MOVING TO A SMALLER VENUE TO SPEAK IN NORTH CAROLINA /.FROM A 70,000 AREA TO A 20,000 SEAT ARENA.Report: Democrats Scramble to Move Obama Speech to Smaller Venue

Report: Democrats Scramble to Move Obama Speech to Smaller Venue

DIDNT KNOW IT WAS GOING TO RAIN?



Good Luck Getting A Ticket!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting help4u:
PIN HOLE EYE TAZ WILL NEVER BE BANNED!!!



LOL
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
PIN HOLE EYE TAZ WILL NEVER BE BANNED!!!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Tazmanian:




am still here lurking today



back too lurking


Hello, Taz, I saw you over in that corner, behind the drapes. :)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting SFLWeatherman:
WOW 18Z GFS ENSEMBLE




Lol 957 mb hitting cape cod? That would go real well.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting SFLWeatherman:
WOW 64 as a LOW in WPB!!! =:)
Monday Night
Partly cloudy with a chance of a thunderstorm. Fog overnight. Low of 64F. Winds from the WNW at 10 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 30%.

I doubt it. It was supposed to get down to the high 50's in central AL Sunday night and now they've bumped it up to the low 60's. Still a pretty good front for September, and WPB might get down to 68 or so.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:


Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31463
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Probably not. If he did, it is not permanently.




am still here lurking today



back too lurking
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Stu Ostro's Meteorology Blog
Link
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

How does that make any sense? A displacement in the low-level circulation and the mid-level circulation will prevent significant intensification regardless of how big or small the cyclone is.


That's what I said. Leslie's not intensifying because shear keeps displacing the MLC to the SE. My point is that, even with the COC displacement, the COC still looks pretty good on microwave due to the size of the storm.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

How does that make any sense? A displacement in the low-level circulation and the mid-level circulation will prevent significant intensification regardless of how big or small the cyclone is.
That makes sense to me. A big low level circulation (llc) has a lot more low-level convergence, so it will maintain convection more easily in the face of the shear. The shear will act to ventilate the storm at the upper levels unless it is very strong...the large llc takes a lot longer to wind down then a tiny one. A large persistent llc will re-develop its structure when the shear eases.

The storms that have struggled the most this year are the ones that had a weak low-level circulation.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
WOW 64 as a LOW in WPB!!! =:)
Monday Night
Partly cloudy with a chance of a thunderstorm. Fog overnight. Low of 64F. Winds from the WNW at 10 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 30%.
Member Since: May 23, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 4392
Quoting BDADUDE:
Did Tazmanian get banned?

Probably not. If he did, it is not permanently.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31463
Leslie is supposed to have a vigorous anticyclone developing above her. Has not happened yet.
Member Since: August 2, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1773
Did Tazmanian get banned?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: May 23, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 4392
Quoting sar2401:


But she's also a huge storm, so the displacement is not having as much effect on her as it would on a smaller storm. The COC still looks decent on microwave, even though it not completely vertically stacked. The models are calling for her to finally pick up speed when shear abates, at which time her core should become vertically stacked. As I wrote, her relative size has saved her so far, and that's partially because the core is remaining mostly intact, if not perfect.
Well it is having an effect. Had the two been stacked under lighter shear, this storm would be a hurricane.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting hunkerdown:

If we are talking landfall...Andrew was far more powerful at landfall in SFla then Katrina was in LA/MS. Forget the size, the windspeed difference between the two is/was exponentially more devastating and destruction in favor of Andrew.


What was the change in central pressure of andrew in the last 3 hours before landfall? In the last 6 hours?

I just noticed that Leslie already has the same size wind field as Hurricane Katrina, by the way.

Under the intensity scale draft I posted HERE, Andrew and Katrina could both be upgraded, Andrew from 4 to 5 and Katrina from 3 to 4 (at landfall).

However Katrina would be close to Category 6 at its peak intensity. Still trying to obtain the numbers for that to see if it was.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Im just glad that Bermuda is not going to be stripped clean by Leslie.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting eliteforecaster:
Go ahead and check my join date while your at it. I have posted on occasion but my comments were reset last summer. Regardless, microwave imagery reveals the strong low level circulation. I suppose there is no written definition of a core, but when people refer to a core it is generally referring to the central thunderstorm complex directly over the LLC, as the LLC and MLC couple together to form a core. As I already noted the MLC has been displaced with Leslie for some time, so to say Leslie has had a solid core is wrong. She has had a vigorous LLC and a vigorous MLC.


Sorry, I see yur join date, but this is your first post I remember, and I've been here a few years. See my other comments that I wrote. I would say that Leslie has a solid core in that the shear is not impinging on the LLC, although it does seem to be moving the MLC off to the SE a bit. Still, given the size of Leslie, I'd describe it as a pretty solid core, just not perfect.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
WOW 18Z GFS ENSEMBLE



360HR
Member Since: May 23, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 4392
Hurricanes come, tear up the place, and go away. I've gotten over several of them.

If you want something to keep you up nights think of the ramifications of this year's Arctic Ocean Ice Melt. The remaining ice area is presently 16% lower than the previous record low and it's still dropping.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting stormchaser19:
2013 La Nina year again ?


Wouldn't surprise me at all if next year was a La Nina, they got it right this time last year saying this year would be trending towards El Nino come April-May 2012. Too early to speculate on that though, this season has quite a bit more juice left in it.
Member Since: July 8, 2005 Posts: 259 Comments: 23573
Quoting sar2401:


But she's also a huge storm, so the displacement is not having as much effect on her as it would on a smaller storm. The COC still looks decent on microwave, even though it not completely vertically stacked. The models are calling for her to finally pick up speed when shear abates, at which time her core should become vertically stacked. As I wrote, her relative size has saved her so far, and that's partially because the core is remaining mostly intact, if not perfect.

How does that make any sense? A displacement in the low-level circulation and the mid-level circulation will prevent significant intensification regardless of how big or small the cyclone is.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31463
Quoting eliteforecaster:
A core is a built up ring or center of thunderstorms over the low level center of a storm. Leslie has had a vigurous MLC displaced to the SW of the LLC as a result of shear. If the two aren't stacked, or at least closely stacked, you don't have a core.


But she's also a huge storm, so the displacement is not having as much effect on her as it would on a smaller storm. The COC still looks decent on microwave, even though it not completely vertically stacked. The models are calling for her to finally pick up speed when shear abates, at which time her core should become vertically stacked. As I wrote, her relative size has saved her so far, and that's partially because the core is remaining mostly intact, if not perfect.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
63W, just saying because there is no easward component in the NHC forecast, and it is heading West of North, so the Lower cape ought to be aware of the situation, sitting at 69.9 W. more or less.
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 679
2013 La Nina year again ?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting hunkerdown:

First of all, the major flooding in LA was from the levees, an indirect cause from Katrina. Again, forget the size as the size does not make a storm stronger. You can look it up, as wind speed increases so does the resulting damage, and exponentially. As for storm surge, the Gulf Coast will naturally ALWAYS have a greater surge due to the Continental Shelf, again, look it up. If yo are comparing monetary damage, 1992 vs 2005...big difference (yes, they devised a formula to compare but that is on paper, not reality). If Andrew came into LA as an increasing Cat 5, the wind and surge damage in the affected areas would have been far more devastating.

Bottom line, you said which was a stronger storm, no comparison, Andrew (stop comparing the size as size does NOT equal strength).

If yo want to compare like you are currently doing, then Wilma, at her peak intensity in the Caribbean, would have out done both Andrew and Katrina.
ANYTHING OVER A CAT 3 WOULD FLOOD NEW ORLEANS.THEY BEEN SAYING THIS FOR 20 YEARS.THE ARMY CORP ENGINEERS DOESNT BUILD PROTECTION FOR ANYTHING OVER CAT 3 ..NO MATTER WHERE YOU LIVE ON THE COAST.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting sar2401:


First post, huh? Conevection has nothing to do with the central core. You can have fabulous convection and a lousy central core. As Aussie posted, Leslie has had a good looking core on microwave for days. She can't get convection going because she's constantly being sheared. OTOH, she's big enough to protect her central core. If she was smaller, there's a good chance she would have already dissipated.
Go ahead and check my join date while your at it. I have posted on occasion but my comments were reset last summer. Regardless, microwave imagery reveals the strong low level circulation. I suppose there is no written definition of a core, but when people refer to a core it is generally referring to the central thunderstorm complex directly over the LLC, as the LLC and MLC couple together to form a core. As I already noted the MLC has been displaced with Leslie for some time, so to say Leslie has had a solid core is wrong. She has had a vigorous LLC and a vigorous MLC.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting sar2401:


Happy Birthday as well. Wait until your Medicare card arrives in the mail. That's when you know you are officially elderly {Gasp!}


Thank you and LOL my husband's arrived a few months ago and we both Gasped!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting HurricaneHunterJoe:


Hi Gro!


Yo, Joe.
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 69 Comments: 25369
Quoting leftlink:


Wish I had the original measurements in nautical miles... but I was able to do a conversion anyway and calculate the "size and wind field power factor" for the two storms, plus Hurricane Isaac:



Have you calculated these numbers using the model you proposed? Fyi, I used the Isaac advisory numbers from here: Link


Where do you get Andrew's wind speed at landfall as 121.7??

And by your "expert" opinion, the Fujita scale is meaningless also. You people are completely clueless as far as the amount of destruction that will occur when wind speeds are at 160+ mph.
Member Since: August 15, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2515
Quoting AussieStorm:


Guys, build a bridge and get over it. Both Hurricanes where very destructive to the area they hit and the people they effected. If you asked the same question to an Andrew survivor and to a Katrina survivor, what will they both say. The same thing. No two hurricanes are exactly alike and trying to compare them is futile. Put it to rest please.


BBM

I love that line!!

the following is not directed at your post or anyone. i just thought these were intimate pics of Isaac that y'all may want to check out. the link looks wacky, but it works - yahoo news. i promise

http://news.yahoo.com/photos/tropical-storm-isaac -slideshow/a-boat-overturned-by-hurricane-isaac-fl oats-in-lower-plaquemines-parish-on-september-2-20 12-in-photo-1346616772.html;_ylt=Ajq4OK55DSFm1iFwc p7guIEwsa8F;_ylu=X3oDMTNxdnRiZnZnBHBrZwNjZWQwZmE4N S1iNmRiLTM3NTQtOGM1MC1jMDc3ZGViMTk5OTUEcG9zAzkEc2V jA01lZGlhQ2Fyb3VzZWxQaG90b0dhbGxlcnlDQVhIUgR2ZXIDO TM3NzQxMDMtZjUzYS0xMWUxLWJlZTctN2E1NTg3N2IwZDRk;_y lv=3#thumbnails-view
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting icmoore:


Thank you!! All I want for my B-day is no tropical storm, pretty please :) It will be the big 57 for me on thge 12th YIKES but like you I am loving my life right now, right here, except for the middle of the night anxiety and ... LOL I could begin to sound like Phyllis Diller.


Happy Birthday as well. Wait until your Medicare card arrives in the mail. That's when you know you are officially elderly {Gasp!}
Member Since: Posts: Comments:


Something might get going around 9N/41W

Link
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting eliteforecaster:
She has not had a solid core at all. She's had convection wax and wane with the diurnal cycle the past few days to her south and west as a result of shear.


First post, huh? Convection has nothing to do with the central core. You can have fabulous convection and a lousy central core. As Aussie posted, Leslie has had a good looking core on microwave for days. She can't get convection going because she's constantly being sheared. OTOH, she's big enough to protect her central core. If she was smaller, there's a good chance she would have already dissipated.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting AussieStorm:

Convection not core/COC. There is a difference.
A core is a built up ring or center of thunderstorms over the low level center of a storm. Leslie has had a vigurous MLC displaced to the SW of the LLC as a result of shear. If the two aren't stacked, or at least closely stacked, you don't have a core.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting K8eCane:


Well Happy Birthday to you! Im 53 and loving every minute of it LOL


Thank you!! All I want for my B-day is no tropical storm, pretty please :) It will be the big 57 for me on the 12th YIKES but like you I am loving my life right now, right here, except for the middle of the night anxiety and ... LOL I could begin to sound like Phyllis Diller.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Nice night here in Lake Worth. Light showers, nice breeze, nice temps.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting eliteforecaster:
She has not had a solid core at all. She's had convection wax and wane with the diurnal cycle the past few days to her south and west as a result of shear.

Convection not core/COC. There is a difference.


I'm out, back in a few hours.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting RTSplayer:


The reality is it is not.

Katrina's much larger size means that the water damage and the prolonged wind damage more than makes up for it.

Katrina's storm surge went 6 to 12 miles inland in Mississippi.


Seriusly, if Katrina took Andrew's track and hit at the same intensity as the LA/MS landfall, it would be way worse in Florida than it was for the real Andrew. It's massive size would crush areas that barely even had any effects from Andrew.


Meanwhile, if Andrew takes Katrina's path, and holds Andrew's Florida landfall intensity through Katrina's LA/MS landfall track, then NOLA doesn't flood, and I don't even get Tropical Storm force winds at my house, and probably don't even lose power, and the storm surge in Mississippi would be half as much, and Alabama and the Florida panhandle have minimal or zero impacts.

How do I know that?

Camille had almost identical track to Katrina, and it was way more intense than Andrew based on pressure and wind speed, and it was bigger than Andrew, and it didn't do the damage Katrina did. Camille had 190mph winds at landfall.

First of all, the major flooding in LA was from the levees, an indirect cause from Katrina. Again, forget the size as the size does not make a storm stronger. You can look it up, as wind speed increases so does the resulting damage, and exponentially. As for storm surge, the Gulf Coast will naturally ALWAYS have a greater surge due to the Continental Shelf, again, look it up. If yo are comparing monetary damage, 1992 vs 2005...big difference (yes, they devised a formula to compare but that is on paper, not reality). If Andrew came into LA as an increasing Cat 5, the wind and surge damage in the affected areas would have been far more devastating.

Bottom line, you said which was a stronger storm, no comparison, Andrew (stop comparing the size as size does NOT equal strength).

If yo want to compare like you are currently doing, then Wilma, at her peak intensity in the Caribbean, would have out done both Andrew and Katrina.
Member Since: August 15, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 2515
Quoting AussieStorm:

Why is everyone surprised Leslie looks good on Microwave. She has always looked good via microwave as it's able to look through the convection down to the core. She has always had a solid core, just her convection has been sheared for a long time now.


They keep pushing it back....
120H 08/0600Z 30.8N 64.1W 80 KT 90 MPH
120H 08/1200Z 31.5N 64.5W 80 KT 90 MPH
120H 08/1800Z 30.5N 65.0W 85 KT 100 MPH
120H 09/0000Z 31.0N 65.0W 85 KT 100 MPH
120H 09/0600Z 32.0N 65.3W 90 KT 105 MPH
120H 09/1200Z 33.0N 65.5W 90 KT 105 MPH
120H 09/1800Z 34.0N 65.8W 90 KT 105 MPH(My 23:00 prediction)


That's because it's not going to more than a strong cat 1/weak cat 2. Big storms that are under a lot of wind hear at the start have trouble getting organized, even under ideal conditions, kind of like Isaac.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting leftlink:


Wish I had the original measurements in nautical miles... but I was able to do a conversion anyway and calculate the "size and wind field power factor" for the two storms, plus Hurricane Isaac:



Have you calculated these numbers using the model you proposed? Fyi, I used the Isaac advisory numbers from here: Link



Guys, build a bridge and get over it. Both Hurricanes where very destructive to the area they hit and the people they effected. If you asked the same question to an Andrew survivor and to a Katrina survivor, what will they both say. The same thing. No two hurricanes are exactly alike and trying to compare them is futile. Put it to rest please.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting K8eCane:


Gro! Youre here....whats the latest euro?




Hi Gro!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting AussieStorm:

Why is everyone surprised Leslie looks good on Microwave. She has always looked good via microwave as it's able to look through the convection down to the core. She has always had a solid core, just her convection has been sheared for a long time now.


They keep pushing it back....
120H 08/0600Z 30.8N 64.1W 80 KT 90 MPH
120H 08/1200Z 31.5N 64.5W 80 KT 90 MPH
120H 08/1800Z 30.5N 65.0W 85 KT 100 MPH
120H 09/0000Z 31.0N 65.0W 85 KT 100 MPH
120H 09/0600Z 32.0N 65.3W 90 KT 105 MPH
120H 09/1200Z 33.0N 65.5W 90 KT 105 MPH
120H 09/1800Z 34.0N 65.8W 90 KT 105 MPH(My 23:00 prediction)
She has not had a solid core at all. She's had convection wax and wane with the diurnal convective cycle the past few days to her south and west as a result of shear.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting ncstorm:
the katrina and andrew debate has been going on since this morning..you would think someone would have conceded by now..


I will help everyone. Andrew was stronger, Katrina was bigger. Case closed.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting icmoore:


No he doesn't and I suspect his age is over rated :) unlike his status as Chief Blobologist here. I am probably ahead of him or not far behind, and alas next week another year bites the dust :)


Well Happy Birthday to you! Im 53 and loving every minute of it LOL
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Viewing: 787 - 737

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

Local Weather

Overcast
65 °F
Overcast