Little change to Isaac, but storm poses a serious storm surge threat

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:25 PM GMT on August 27, 2012

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Tropical Storm Isaac has changed little in strength or organization this morning, as the storm heads northwest at 14 mph towards the Central Gulf Coast. There are two hurricane hunter aircraft in the storm, and Isaac's central pressure held steady at 989 mb at the 8:30 am and 9:15 am center fixes. Top surface winds remain near 65 mph. Infrared and visible satellite loops show that Isaac is a very large storm, but isn't very symmetric. Heavy thunderstorm activity is lacking on the southeast side, where 10 knots of wind shear is driving dry air into the circulation. The center is surrounded by a ring of echoes now, which was not the case on Sunday. However, the echoes are weak. The 8:30 am center report from the Hurricane Hunters reported about half of a ragged eyewall, but the 9:15 am report did not mention any evidence of an eyewall. Isaac will have to form an eyewall in order to intensify significantly.


Figure 1. Morning satellite image of Isaac. Note the lack of heavy thunderstorm activity on the storm's southeast side, where dry air and wind shear are combining to interfere with development.

Isaac's rains
Isaac's heaviest rains have fallen along a swath from the east coast of Florida near West Palm Beach to the center of the state, just south of Orlando. West Palm Beach received 7.57" of rain from Isaac as of 10 am EDT this morning. A trained spotter in Western Boynton Beach reported 10" of rain from midnight to midnight Sunday. Heavy rains from Isaac are lingering over Cuba but have ended in Haiti and the Dominican Republic; flash floods in Haiti from Isaac's torrential rains killed at least nineteen, and two died in the Dominican Republic.


Figure 2. Radar-estimated rainfall from Melbourne, Florida radar shows that Isaac has dumped a wide swath of 3+ inches of rain (orange colors) across the state.

Latest model runs for Isaac
The latest set of 0Z and 06Z (8 pm and 2 am EDT) model runs are fairly unified taking Isaac ashore near Southeast Louisiana late Tuesday night or early Wednesday morning, but continue to show major differences in what happens after that. It is still uncertain if a trough of low pressure passing to the north of Isaac will be able to turn the storm due north, as the ECMWF model is predicting, or bypass the storm, allowing a more west-northwest motion into western Louisiana, like the GFS model is predicting. In either case, Isaac is likely to slow down as it approaches the coast, which will increase the damage potential fro m its wind, storm surge, and rains. The latest 8-day precipitation forecast from the GFS model calls for 10 - 20 inches of rain over much of Louisiana. The ECMWF model predicts that these heavy rains will fall more over Mississippi. It appears likely that Arkansas will see some heavy rains from Isaac late in the week, which would help put a dent in the exceptional drought conditions there.


Figure 3. Predicted precipitation for the 8-day period from 2 am Monday August 27 to 2 am Tuesday September 4, from the 2 am EDT August 27 run of the GFS model. This model is predicting a wide swath of 5 - 10 inches of rain (orange colors) will affect portions of Louisiana. Additional very heavy rains are predicted for the Midwest, as moisture from Isaac interacts with a cold front. Image credit: NOAA/NCEP.

Intensity forecast for Isaac
Isaac is currently crossing over a relatively cool eddy of water, which will keep intensification slow today. By tonight, the total heat content of the waters increases, which should aid intensification. Low wind shear of 10 knots or less is likely until landfall. An analysis of upper level winds from the University of Wisconsin CIMSS shows that upper-level outflow to the north is not as strong as yesterday, which should also slow intensification today. The models forecast the upper-level outflow should improve by Tuesday. A storm this large will have trouble undergoing rapid intensification, and Isaac's most likely intensity at landfall will be as a Category 1 hurricane, which is what most of the intensity models are forecasting.


Figure 4. Track of Hurricane Gustav of 2008, which followed a path very similar to that of Isaac's predicted path.

Storm surge forecast for Isaac
Storm surge is the primary damage threat from Isaac. Isaac is a huge storm, with tropical storm-force winds that extend out 205 miles from the center. For comparison, Hurricane Katrina at landfall had tropical storm-force winds that extended out 230 miles from its center. Isaac's large size will enable it to set a large area of the ocean into motion, which will generate a large storm surge once the storm approaches land on the Gulf Coast. Water levels at Shell Beach, Louisiana, just east of New Orleans, were already elevated by 1' this morning. Conversely, water levels have fallen by 2' this morning at St. Petersburg, Florida, where strong offshore winds due to Isaac's counter-clockwise circulation have carried water away from the coast. The latest 6:30 am EDT Integrated Kinetic Energy analysis from NOAA's Hurricane Research Division put the destructive potential of Isaac's winds near 0.6 on a scale of 0 to 6, but the destructive potential of Isaacs's storm surge was 2.1 on a scale of 0 to 6. I expect this destructive potential will rise above 3 by time Isaac makes landfall, making Isaac's storm surge similar to that generated by Category 2 Hurricane Gustav of 2008, which followed a path very similar to Isaac's predicted path. Gustav brought a storm surge characteristic of a Category 1 hurricane to New Orleans: 9.5' to Lake Borgne on the east side of the city. A higher Category 2-scale surge occurred along the south-central coast of Louisiana, and was 12.5' high in Black Bay, forty miles southeast of New Orleans. Recent model runs indicate Isaac may slow down to a forward speed under 5 mph on Tuesday evening and Wednesday morning, close to the coast. If Isaac is just offshore at this time, the coasts of Southeast Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and the Florida Panhandle will be exposed to a large storm surge with battering waves for two high tide cycles. This sort of extending pounding will be capable of delivering more damage than the storm surge of Hurricane Gustav of 2008.

The affect of storm size and angle of approach on storm surge
A 2008 paper by Irish et al., The influence of storm size on hurricane surge, found that large storms like Isaac are capable to delivering a 30% larger storm surge to the coast than a smaller storm with the same maximum wind speeds. The angle with which the storm hit the coast is important, too--a storm moving due north or slightly east of north will deliver a storm surge about 10% greater than a storm moving NNW or NW. Consult our Storm Surge pages for detailed information on what the risk is for the coast. I expect that Isaac's storm surge will be about 30% higher than the typical surge one would expect based on the maximum wind speeds.

Isaac's storm surge will provide the first test of the newly-completed New Orleans levee system upgrade. In the wake of the disastrous storm surge flooding from Hurricane Katrina in 2005, Congress appropriated $14.5 billion to upgrade the New Orleans levee system to withstand a Category 3 hurricane storm surge. Katrina was a Category 3 storm at landfall, but the storm passed far enough to the east of the city that its storm surge was characteristic of a Category 1 - 2 storm at the places where the city's flood walls and levees failed. The new flood defenses were only partially completed in time for the arrival of Hurricane Gustav in 2008, which hit Central Louisiana as a Category 2 storm. Gustav brought a storm surge characteristic of a Category 1 hurricane to New Orleans: 9.5' to Lake Borgne on the east side of the city. Since that time, the imposing 2-mile long IHNC Flood Barrier has been completed to block off the funnel-shaped pair of canals on the east side of the city. I expect New Orleans' new flood defenses will be able to hold back Isaac's surge, but areas outside the levees are at risk of heavy storm surge damage.


Figure 5. A portion of New Orleans' new $14.5 billion dollar flood defenses, as taken from an Army Corps of Engineers map.

New Orleans flood defense info
Army Corps of Engineers map of the new flood defenses
Army Corps of Engineers video showing the flood defenses
New York Times article, Vast Defenses Now Shielding New Orleans

Invest 97L off the coast of Africa
A tropical wave (Invest 97L) is located in the Middle Atlantic, about 1050 miles west-northwest of the Cape Verde Islands. The storm has a modest amount of spin and heavy thunderstorms, and is under moderate wind shear. In their 8 am EDT Tropical Weather Outlook, NHC gave 97L a 30% chance of developing by Wednesday morning. None of the reliable models foresee that 97L will be a threat to the Lesser Antilles Islands, and high wind shear should begin to tear the disturbance apart on Tuesday.

Another tropical wave that moved off the coast of Africa on Sunday is located just south of the Cape Verde Islands. This disturbance is moving west at 10 - 15 mph, and could arrive in the Lesser Antilles around September 2. Several models develop the disturbance into a tropical depression late this week, and NHC is giving the disturbance a 10% chance of becoming a tropical depression by Wednesday morning.

Angela Fritz will have a new post here by 6 pm EDT. I'm in Atlanta to help out The Weather Channel with their on-air hurricane coverage, and will doing a few 3-minute tropical updates at 30 minutes past the hour between 2:30 - 7:30 pm EDT today.

Jeff Masters

Tropical Storm Isaac (chelina)
View from the north side of the Sunshine Skyway Bridge.
Tropical Storm Isaac
our street at noon today (seflagamma)
Aug 26, 2012: Isaac floods our street really bad. Now nearly 11
our street at noon today

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1759. sporteguy03
3:42 AM GMT on August 29, 2012
yep
Member Since: July 7, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 5306
1758. HimacaneBrees
11:08 AM GMT on August 28, 2012
Nice here in Denham Springs La. this morning. Enjoying the breeze and a cup of coffee. 24 hours from now, likely a different story.
Member Since: August 23, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 1005
1757. 2ifbyC
1:46 AM GMT on August 28, 2012
Quoting WetBankGuy:
Why We're Staying

Mark Folse


You, sir, are my hero!
Member Since: September 18, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 254
1756. BahaHurican
12:07 AM GMT on August 28, 2012
oops... lol
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22087
1755. WetBankGuy
11:52 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Why We're Staying

A number of people have expressed surprise or dismay at the number of New Orleanians who are not leaving. There are several reasons for this, but primarily it is tied to former Mayor's Ray Nagin's poorly executed phased return policy.

Under this policy after Gustav (hardly a disaster for New Orleans) people were denied the ability to return and secure their homes from any damage on the theory that we couldn't possibly get by without full restoration of Cox Digital and a chance for the beer to get cold at Rouse's Supermarket.

We know how to get buy without power and with a boil water order. We're not going to grab a downed power line. We're not children, and the older of us have experience of this back to Betsy. Even the lead editorialist of the Times-Picayune (writing in a personal column) announced he would not leave for a mandatory evacuation order unless he thought it product and the phased return regime was eliminated.

It didn't help that FEMA went on national television promising to cover people's hotel bills, etc. during the whole phased return thing and then reneged on that promise.

We all watched anxiously during Gustav as the lake battered at the east side seawall of the Industrial Canal as a heroic few men secured a loose barge. Everything held.

We're not all throwing hurricane parties. We all learned that lesson from the people on the coast who died during Camille, thank you very much. People are hunkering down, well supplied (if they can afford it at the end of the month) in houses secured as best they can. We are following the directives of our local officials to shelter in place.

We are the survivors. We are the people who came home. We are not easily giving up what we have reclaimed.

The Tragedy of St. Bernard

-- Mark Folse
ToulouseStreet.net
Member Since: September 19, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 288
1754. TreasureCoastFl
11:20 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Quoting Dakster:


No mandatory evacuations that I have heard about either. Last statement I heard was that 900 people living outside the levees protection zone were asked to leave -- and if anyone else was thinking of leaving 'Now would be a good time.'

Again, look for official news releases from NOLA public officials and do not rely on this blog when making life or death decisions.

FWIW, I would be one of those people deciding to leave... and I do not live in NOLA and have never even been there. But seeing what happened with that 'K' storm I wouldn't chance it... (I am getting better at not mentioning the full name)
I would definitely leave!
Member Since: August 18, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 469
1753. leftlink
11:00 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Quoting NCHurricane2009:


There are 981 mb cyclones frequently across the globe in non-tropical form...yet they are not as windy as a hurricane. Its about pressure gradient...not central pressure. If a storm is spread out...it has a lower pressure gradient (and lower wind) for same central pressure.

So its not a hurricane alone by merit of central pressure value. But yeah...he is really close. Maybe 979 mb will finally get him to cat 1...


I have been saying it will take 975mb to get this to a cat 1 most likely...
Member Since: December 28, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 134
1752. WetBankGuy
10:56 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:


Look at that beautiful dry air. I see it closing up on water vapor but keep it comin'.
Member Since: September 19, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 288
1751. WetBankGuy
10:52 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Quoting NOLAGOLF:
No mandatory evacuation for New Orleans, but those who want to urged to leave now
http://www.nola.com/hurricane/index.ssf/2012/08/n o_mandatory_evacuation_for_ne.html


FB poll: all NOLA peeps are staying. Updates from the nearest station as long as the UPS keeps the phone up, which should get me through the storm. Houses are secure as they can get.

Cloud cover approaching 100%. F3 or F4 out, barometer 29.7 and falling.

Gave my sterno stove away when I thought I was leaving but everybody is invited over for cold canned mac & cheese and warm beer at the Fortress of Squalitude. Hope Patrap is getting a really nice tan somewhere.
Member Since: September 19, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 288
1750. Dakster
10:49 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
I found the wording:

-- New Orleans authorities expect Isaac to hit the city as a Category 1 hurricane early Wednesday, with tropical storm-force winds arriving shortly after midnight Monday, Mayor Mitch Landrieu said.

-- Landrieu did not issue an evacuation order for the city but urged people outside the city's protective levees to leave and told others, "If your plan is to go, now's the time to go."
Member Since: March 10, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 10282
1749. Dakster
10:48 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Quoting weatherh98:


Yes


Did they finally release one? CNN said it wasn't MANDATORY.
Member Since: March 10, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 10282
1748. Dakster
10:47 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Quoting NCHurricane2009:

Is there a mandatory evac for NOLA? I haven't been checking any news sources all day here at work....(except for this blog)...


No mandatory evacuations that I have heard about either. Last statement I heard was that 900 people living outside the levees protection zone were asked to leave -- and if anyone else was thinking of leaving 'Now would be a good time.'

Again, look for official news releases from NOLA public officials and do not rely on this blog when making life or death decisions.

FWIW, I would be one of those people deciding to leave... and I do not live in NOLA and have never even been there. But seeing what happened with that 'K' storm I wouldn't chance it... (I am getting better at not mentioning the full name)
Member Since: March 10, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 10282
1747. Dakster
10:43 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Quoting watchdog40:


What about Florida I wonder?


I haven't heard about any major damages in Florida that would require that...

FWIW, FEMA usually reimburses local governments for expenditures on natural disasters when declared. And this was declared ahead of time by Governor Rick Scott...

Member Since: March 10, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 10282
1746. WatchingThisOne
10:35 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
new blog :)
Member Since: July 15, 2005 Posts: 3 Comments: 1267
1745. WatchingThisOne
10:34 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Quoting Adamcu81:
It look look like the upper level outflow is improving on the southeast and possibly the northwest sides, but dry air also seems to be wrapping into the COC. When one variable changes to support growth, another changes to hinder it.


The dry air thing has been going on for some time now. Isaac has been fighting it since he was an invest just west of Africa. I don't recall him ever being in an environment where dry air was not an issue. So that doesn't seem like a variable.
Member Since: July 15, 2005 Posts: 3 Comments: 1267
1744. Roxanne
10:06 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Quoting watchdog40:


What about Florida I wonder?


He sent FEMA days ago to Fl. I saw it on the local news here in Orlando
Member Since: October 2, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 5
1743. watchdog40
9:49 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Quoting Bluestorm5:
@weatherchannel

BREAKING NOW: President Obama directs @FEMA to give LA, MS & AL governors the resources they need


What about Florida I wonder?
Member Since: August 30, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 42
1742. redwagon
9:47 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Quoting Elena85Vet:


Exactly

Isaac has made some progress, but that dry air could just as easily set him a step back.


My take is Isaac is going to cash out and head back to the FL panhandle.
Member Since: August 4, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 3237
1740. Carnoustie
9:29 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Quoting TomballTXPride:

IIRC, someone mentioned on here earlier that Wilma had the lowest pressure as a TS before she became a hurricane. Not that this is Wilma. And bringing up that name still gives people chills down their spine. Either way, it's a pretty cool nugget.


she had the lowest pressure as a TS after being a hurricane.
Member Since: August 31, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 49
1738. Elena85Vet
9:26 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Quoting Michfan:
I have a feeling that dry air slot is going to limit its RI. It needs to mix that out and fast.


Exactly

Isaac has made some progress, but that dry air could just as easily set him a step back.

Member Since: August 18, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 628
1737. oracle28
9:24 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Quoting Category5HitsFl:

I am thinking a strengthening upper level or lower level Cat 1 or 2 could be worse than a Cat weakening as it comes ashore, so I think its important to note this storm most likely will be strengthening as it hits land.


Funny, I thought the opposite was true, for example... although Katrina hit as a 3, it had the "built-up" water of a 5, since it had been a 5 previously.

Member Since: July 25, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 596
1736. catastropheadjuster
9:21 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Quoting taco2me61:
I could not beleive they called Mobile Bay in MS.... OMG this guy is on Weatherunderground but was in Mobile Bay MS and showing the USS Alabama....
Come on folks at least get the city Right :o)

Taco :o)



Taco r u for real. what the TWC has people here already or something?

sheri
Member Since: August 24, 2006 Posts: 21 Comments: 3676
1735. Adamcu81
9:18 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
It look look like the upper level outflow is improving on the southeast and possibly the northwest sides, but dry air also seems to be wrapping into the COC. When one variable changes to support growth, another changes to hinder it.
Member Since: November 21, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 12
1734. hydrus
9:17 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Inland flooding associated with the slow movement.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 21191
1732. ScottLincoln
9:16 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Starting to feel a bit blustery here. Time to go take pictures of the house for insurance while I can still keep a camera level.
Member Since: September 28, 2002 Posts: 5 Comments: 3192
1730. HarryMc
9:15 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:


It has taken all day but the core has almost closed. Looking a lot more like a near-hurricane now.
Member Since: March 30, 2010 Posts: 4 Comments: 339
1728. acl8610
9:15 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Quoting CaicosRetiredSailor:



Dayton International Speedway

In preparation for Isaac DIS welcomed 5,000 workers and 2,500 trucks from as far as Wyoming, Texas and Pennsylvania before embarking on their individual assignments. This FPL Connect pre-positioning at DIS marks the largest to date.

Yes that's Daytona International Speedway... I was just there, it was crazy. I have never seen anything like that before, being from NE Ohio originally.
Member Since: October 9, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 98
1727. WCSCTVCharleston
9:15 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Quoting NCHurricane2009:

Yeah...I am suprised though that the SS scale has central pressure as a reference value...I'd have just tossed those out if I had contributed to it...because its the wind (not the pressure value) that causes the tangible damage the SS scale is based on.

I guess the pressure values on the SS scale represent the statistical 90th percentile of storms in that category...



This is jus.t one of those storms I think it will surprise in the end
Member Since: August 19, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 131
1726. GTcooliebai
9:15 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Member Since: August 31, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 5628
1725. hahaguy
9:15 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
We had some intense weather today in St. Lucie. First time since Fay did my street flood.
Member Since: August 12, 2007 Posts: 2 Comments: 2838
1724. taco2me61
9:14 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
I could not beleive they called Mobile Bay in MS.... OMG this guy is on Weatherunderground but was in Mobile Bay MS and showing the USS Alabama....
Come on folks at least get the city Right :o)

Taco :o)
Member Since: July 7, 2005 Posts: 6 Comments: 3261
1723. NCHurricane2009
9:14 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Quoting reedzone:
Isaac is the best looking Tropical Storm I've seen...

Nah....what about Fay 2008 when she was near Lake Okechobee? Here tropical storm eye was a bit meaner than this IMO
Member Since: September 15, 2009 Posts: 474 Comments: 3668
1722. WunderAlertBot (Admin)
9:14 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
JeffMasters has created a new entry.
1721. Category5HitsFl
9:13 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Quoting AllStar17:
I'm a little worried that SOME people have kind of dismissed Isaac as potentially a non-issue. The facts are that the storm will intensify right up until landfall...and it is worth reiterating that intensity forecasts are extremely vulnerable to large errors, even in the short term.




I agree, especially since this storm could intensify into a mid level Cat 2 right as it nears the coast, which can catch people off guard.

Katrina created its most destruction with storm surge, and storm surge and flooding rains always tend to be the most devastating elements of tropical cyclones.

Due to the large nature of this storm and its general slow movement it has the capacity to be much more destructive in those elements than the actual strength of this storm would indicate.
Member Since: November 7, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 29
1720. NCHurricane2009
9:13 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Quoting WCSCTVCharleston:




Just going by SS scale and referring to tropical cyclones

Yeah...I am suprised though that the SS scale has central pressure as a reference value...I'd have just tossed those out if I had contributed to it...because its the wind (not the pressure value) that causes the tangible damage the SS scale is based on.

I guess the pressure values on the SS scale represent the statistical 90th percentile of storms in that category...
Member Since: September 15, 2009 Posts: 474 Comments: 3668
1718. weatherh98
9:13 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Traffic is HORRIBLE this is exactly why we shouldnt have had school, you add another 5000 cars to clogged roads. With clouds rolling in and winds on the rise people will start getting antsy and scared

The ants are lunatics
Member Since: June 17, 2011 Posts: 11 Comments: 6493
1717. Doppler22
9:13 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
...ok lets take a 2 second break from Isaac to say this: TD Nine E has formed and will prob bcome the next storm in the e Pac...Sorry for the interruption adn now back to Isaac
Member Since: February 13, 2012 Posts: 11 Comments: 3743
1716. TreasureCoastFl
9:13 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
I uploaded a couple flood photos to my photos here but have no idea how to post them to here
Member Since: August 18, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 469
1715. jascott1967
9:12 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Quoting STXHurricanes2012:
I still see this becoming a 105 mph Hurricane! Mid cat 2 who agrees??


Storms have been slow to develope this season and although the gulf waters are warm there are no deep water eddys for it to pass at current. I see a low to moderate CAT 1 at landfall. The NHC has pretty much had this storm pegged from the beginning and that's what they've been calling for. See no reason to deviate.
Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 614
1714. KEEPEROFTHEGATE (Mod)
9:12 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 171 Comments: 53820
1713. stoormfury
9:12 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
ANOTHER LARGE AND STRONG TROPICAL WAVE IS FOLLOWING THE TRACK OF ISAAC. THIS COULD BE THE BIG CAPE VERDE STORM
Member Since: August 22, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 2678
1712. STXHurricanes2012
9:12 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Quoting linkays:
I know this storm is NOT coming near the Corpus Christi area but does anyone think it might send some rain? I can't figure out how big it is.....size not wind speed or anything like that. I'm sorry if anyone thinks this is a dumb question but we're just so desperate for rain.

Unlikely...just increase in swells at the coast and dry air resulting in temps rising to 100 or more the next few days as the dry n/nw flow from isaac filters in.
Member Since: June 4, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 767
1711. stormchaser19
9:12 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
Quoting wxchaser97:

Cat2 is seeming more likely now, something is about to happen.

People of NOLA are lucky people that dry air is present in upper levels
Member Since: June 20, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 2159
1709. Bluestorm5
9:12 PM GMT on August 27, 2012
@weatherchannel

BREAKING NOW: President Obama directs @FEMA to give LA, MS & AL governors the resources they need
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 28 Comments: 8007

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.