Hottest rain on record? Rain falls at 115°F in Needles, California

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:19 PM GMT on August 15, 2012

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A searing heat wave rare even for the Desert Southwest sent temperatures soaring to record levels on Monday, with Needles, California tying its record high for the date of 118°F (47.8°C). The temperature might have gone higher in Needles, but a thunderstorm rolled in at 3:20 pm, and by 3:56 pm PDT, rain began falling at a temperature of 115°F (46.1°C). Most of the rain evaporated, since the humidity was only 11%, and only a trace of precipitation was recorded in the rain gauge. Nevertheless, Monday's rain at 115° in Needles sets a new world record for the hottest rain in world history. I don't think many people were outside to experience to experience the feeling of rain falling at 115°, but if they were, it must have been an uncomfortable, sauna-like experience! Thanks go to Dr. Warren Blier of the NWS Monterey office for pointing out this remarkable event to me.

It is exceedingly rare to get rain when the temperature rises above 100°F, since those kind of temperatures usually require a high pressure system with sinking air that discourages rainfall. Monday's rain in Needles was due to a flow of moisture coming from the south caused by the Southwest U.S. monsoon, a seasonal influx of moisture caused by the difference in temperature between the hot desert and the cooler ocean areas surrounding Mexico to the south. According to weather records researcher Maximiliano Herrera, the previous record for hottest rain, which I blogged about in June, was a rain shower at 109°F (43°C) observed in Mecca, Saudi Arabia on June 5, 2012 and in Marrakech, Morocco on July 10, 2010. The 11% humidity that accompanied Monday's rain shower at 115° in Needles was the lowest humidity rain has ever occurred at anywhere on Earth in recorded history, according to Mr. Herrera.


Figure 1. True-color MODIS satellite image of California and Arizona taken at 1:25 pm PDT August 13, 2012. Developing thunderstorms surround Needles, CA, and the line of clouds to the southwest of the city would develop into a thunderstorm that brought rain to the city at 4 pm PDT, at a temperature of 115°F. Image credit: NASA.

A "very rare" heat wave for Phoenix
The heat wave that brought Needles' record hot rain has broken an exceptional number of heat records in Phoenix, Arizona the past two weeks. According to the Phoenix NWS office, the "almost unbearable heat" of the first two weeks of August is a "very rare" event, and August 1 - 14, 2012 was the warmest such 2-week period in city history. The average temperature on August 6 - 13 was 100°F or higher each of the eight days, tying the record for most consecutive days with an average temperature of 100°. The temperature peaked at 116° on August 8, just 6° below Phoenix's all-time record of 122° set on June 26, 1990. The forecast for Phoenix call for a bit of relief--highs are expected to be a relatively modest 105° today, and down near 100° by Friday.


Figure 2. Morning satellite image of 93L over the Central Atlantic.

93L close to tropical depression status
A large tropical wave (Invest 93L) is located in the Central Atlantic about 700 miles east of Bermuda. Satellite loops this morning show a surface circulation has formed, and heavy thunderstorm activity has increased to the point where 93L should be considered a tropical depression, if the heavy thunderstorms can persist through this afternoon. Wind shear is light, and ocean temperatures are warm, near 28°C. The latest Saharan Air Layer Analysis from the University of Wisconsin shows that 93L has moistened its environment considerably, and dry air should no longer be a significant impediment to development. The 8 am EDT run of the SHIPS model predicts that wind shear will remain in the low range through the weekend, and I expect this system will become Tropical Storm Gordon by Friday. The storm will not affect Bermuda, but residents of the Azores Islands should keep an eye on 93L, which could pass through the islands as early as Sunday night. In their 8 am Tropical Weather Outlook, NHC gave 93L an 80% chance of becoming a tropical depression by Friday morning.

Elsewhere in the tropics
In the Gulf of Mexico, a fall-like cold front is expected to stall out early next week, and the GFS model is predicting something could start to spin up near the Texas/Mexico border on Monday. Wind shear is predicted to be low to moderate, and cold fronts stalled out over the Gulf of Mexico often serve as the seed for tropical storms.

Most of the models predict development of a new tropical wave off the coast of Africa 6 - 7 days from now.

Jeff Masters

Haboob #7 (nukegm)
Another dust storm rolling into town.
Haboob #7
Strike over the Lake. (weathercts99)
A stunning bolt of lightning over a lake in Chandler.
Strike over the Lake.

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Deleted
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Did you leave for Irene?


nope because it was clear that Irene wasnt going to strike us (wilmington) head on..
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2006 Hurricane Gordon was the first tropical cyclone since 1992 to affect the Azores
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Hurricane Gordon of 2006.

I never expected it to be "Gordon"!
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Yeah...I get that a lot.
Come on is not a bad thing when you are older you will want to be young again ;)
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Snow in August? It's steamy now, but forecasters see a big winter coming


It's an August of steamy heat and rattling air conditioners, but the long-range forecasts are out: The big cities of the Northeast corridor should expect no repeat of last winter's snow drought.
By Ron Scherer | Christian Science Monitor – 8 hrs ago

Last winter, big cities like New York and Philadelphia saved a lot of money because the Northeast had a snow drought. Not so this winter.

Yes, even while air conditioners are still running, meteorologists are beginning to focus on the long-term winter weather forecast. And, it looks as if the I-95-corridor cities from Washington to Boston will need to make sure the plows are gassed up and rock salt plentiful.

“I think the East Coast is going to have some battles with some big storms,” says Paul Pastelok, Accu-Weather’s lead long-term forecaster in State College, Pa.

However, Mr. Pastelok predicts the battles won’t start until January and then will extend into February. “November in the Northeast could be above-normal temperatures and below-normal precipitation, and December could be a transition month,” he says. “By January and February it’s going to get pretty cold.”....................

Link
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Quoting oldnewmex:
Just got through the longest, most intense hailstorm I have personally experienced, right here in Truckee, CA just ease of the Sierra crest. It was about 10 minutes of increasingly hard rain, followed by 35 minutes of hail, from 1/4 to 3/4 inch diameter. When it was finished, the hail was one-and-a-half inches deep out in the open, on my gently sloping driveway. My beautiful flowers from this summer are all gone.
Sorry to hear that. In your area, how many, if any, hailstorms have you seen in previous years that left hail deeper than 1/4"?
Member Since: August 3, 2005 Posts: 10 Comments: 5618
Quoting ncstorm:


I can say in all my experiences with hurricanes, I never had to deal with the tornados that come with them..dont get me wrong, I almost rode out a Cat 4 but luckily it downgraded to a 2 before landfall..(floyd) but knowing what I know now, I will leave in a heartbeat if one comes my way..

Did you leave for Irene?
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32335



Unmanned US military hypersonic craft failed

LOS ANGELES (AP) — An unmanned experimental aircraft failed during an attempt to fly at six times the speed of sound in the latest setback for hypersonic flight.

The X-51A Waverider was designed to reach Mach 6, or 3,600 mph, after being dropped by a B-52 bomber off the Southern California coast on Tuesday. Engineers hoped it would sustain its top speed for five minutes, twice as long as an X-51A has gone before.

But the Air Force said Wednesday that a faulty control fin prevented it from starting its exotic scramjet engine and it was lost.

"It is unfortunate that a problem with this subsystem caused a termination before we could light the scramjet engine," Charlie Brink of the Air Force Research Laboratory at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio, said in a statement.

The Waverider successfully detached from the B-52 and fired the rocket booster as planned. Then its scramjet engine was supposed to take over as it attempted to climb to Mach 6. But that never happened. Fifteen seconds after separating from the rocket booster, the Waverider lost control, preventing a test of the scramjet engine...........

Link
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Quoting KoritheMan:


I am definitely not inexperienced when it comes to major hurricanes and their destructive power. But it is precisely their destructive power that fascinates me. It makes me feel extremely insignificant, because we really are. We are at nature's mercy.

But I agree, the lack of electricity etcetera, is absolutely horrible.


So true, Kori!

Suffice it to say that in addition to all my emergency supplies, I also have battery operated fans...just can't ever deal with stagnant, still air ever again.

Lindy
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Dec-Jan-Feb 2012-13

Jan-Feb-Mar 2013

Feb-Mar-Apr 2013
Member Since: May 23, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 4711
Quoting VirginIslandsVisitor:


I guess that's what we pay for when living in paradise, huh? You know though, you are right. In all honesty, I'd much rather deal with a sustained wind than the fury of a tornado. Last time we dealt with a system coming through here (can't remember the name at the moment - last year), it wasn't the actual named system but the tornado that came through in front of the villa that scared the ___ out of me more than the winds.

Lindy


I can say in all my experiences with hurricanes, I never had to deal with the tornados that come with them..dont get me wrong, I almost rode out a Cat 4 but luckily it downgraded to a 2 before landfall..(floyd) but knowing what I know now, I will leave in a heartbeat if one comes my way..
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Quoting Bobbyweather:

Probably. I expect TD 8 to become Gordon in 6~12 hours.

By the way, when's the last time a hurricane has affected the Azores? when's the last landfall in the Azores?

Hurricane Gordon of 2006.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32335
Quoting allancalderini:
You are really young I thought you were 16.Right now I am 16 going to be 17 in November 1.

Yeah...I get that a lot.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32335
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Well if SAB says it's not, TAFB says it's not, and the ATFC file says it is not, then it proabably isn't.

Probably. I expect TD 8 to become Gordon in 6~12 hours.

By the way, when's the last time a hurricane has affected the Azores? when's the last landfall in the Azores?
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Quoting Bobbyweather:
Hmm... I turn 15 in a few days.

----
ADT thinks tropical storm
CI# /Pressure/ Vmax
2.4 /1008.1mb/ 34.0kt

Final T# Adj T# Raw T#
2.4 2.6 2.6

----
15/2345 UTC 30.7N 55.2W T2.0/2.0 08L -- Atlantic

SAB thinks tropical depression.
----
ATCF says 30 kt 1012 mb (TD)
----
Do you think TD 8 is Gordon right now?
Doubt it ATCF files says it still is a depression.
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Cold front descending across the high plains...

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Quoting Bobbyweather:
Hmm... I turn 15 in a few days.

----
ADT thinks tropical storm
CI# /Pressure/ Vmax
2.4 /1008.1mb/ 34.0kt

Final T# Adj T# Raw T#
2.4 2.6 2.6

----
15/2345 UTC 30.7N 55.2W T2.0/2.0 08L -- Atlantic

SAB thinks tropical depression.
----
ATCF says 30 kt 1012 mb (TD)
----
Do you think TD 8 is Gordon right now?

Well if SAB says it's not, TAFB says it's not, and the ATFC file says it is not, then it probably isn't.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32335
Quoting KoritheMan:

Oh I don't know... Maybe because they like where the live, despite the natural repercussions for being there? Maybe because they can't afford to move? There are a myriad of possibilities...



any other night, Kori I would deal with your always sarcasm but I dont feel like putting you in check as I always do so another night perhaps?



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Thanks for the laffs !

Now, about this weather...
Anyone has any idea what's going to happen?
We are supposed to be seeing Storms, man.
Not dismal globs that can't get two advantageous conditions together at the same time !

This never used to happen before TWC took over.
Nothing is Sacred anymore.
BAH !

:):))
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Quoting MontanaZephyr:


Ya... I was lving a little ways north of Corning / Elmira then. It was kind of fun in that it was nearly as much looking forward to it as when it actually came. At least a week out the best meteoroligist in the area was saying "Gee... it looks like a helluva storm coming in a week or so... only... the mode;s are suggesting that it will be SO big that no one believes it... there must be an error somewhere....". Then, starting about three days ahead of it, the meteorologists all switched over from showing real interest and enthusiasm to carrying on like old testament prophets, grim with tales of certain doom, death and destruction. As it was I was reading a novel called "The Blizzard of '88" (which refers to a similar blizzard in 1888, but which was dwarfed by the impending storm.

So it was just as fine a meteorological time as a weather watcher might hope to enjoy! I faced the prospect f being holed up for days watching it storm, with three good dogs, a great wood stove, decent scotch, cigars.... I even took the phone off the hook to prevent any interruption of the blessed isolation with the storm.

Having grown up in the snowbelt upstate, I wasn't all that impressed with the couple-three feet of snow, though the drifts were wonderful. I was impressed though, that the same storm had flood my best friend in Bradenton Florida.

But the most awesomest snow, with one exception that I have known, was the great lakes snow belts... the weirdest things happen in the center of those snow rivers, as they were called then, where you can get like eight inches an hour falling at the center. North or south of that east=westish river about thirty miles away, there would only be broken clouds, and driving though the snow river from south to north was a trip... it would begin snowing, then snowing heavier, and then it would be, on occasion, literally like driving into a wall of milk. Most awesome!. If there are any streetlights at all, you can see just fine if you turn off your headlights.

When I was a kid we used to go out and play in those storms, which are quite tame if you aren't driving. We'd blow up balloons and let them sail off in the wind, wonder where they would go with nothing hard to pop on on their journey.

But by far the worst blizzard I have ever seen was in western Nebraska. I like going out in storms but one look out the door and it was OMFG to the max... I wouldn't even try to go to the barn... a mere 20 feet away. I was told later that in the olden days, when a storm was coming, they used to actually string up stout ropes to the barn and chicken coops (as they HAD to get to them then to take care of the animals). A person just held on to the rope to guide him to his destination. That was the only time in my life I actually feared being out in the weather. And I once had the pleasure of swimming in the gulf in a tropical storm... actually it was a hurrican that had come up the gulf and had passed the area (Sarasota) already .... things were such that the flooding was not too bad, there was a good deal of sun, the water was mysteriously free of debris like broken piers and so on. the wind was around in the 50 MPH range and the waves were awesome... the water and the air were warm... there were people all over the beach. I couldn't resist... pulled off my clothes and jumped in! You just dive under the breakers of course and once you get on the other side of them there's no worries. ... just pure fun. A bunch of other people came in after that too. I was maybe a hundred yards from shore (sand bars) and the sun was low in the west. and I discovered that, turning around and facing the land, if I smacked the water the wind would hurl the spray toward the land and each spray burst had its own rainbow. That was a good day for a weather aficianado too!


Growing up in the Catskills, we did tie ropes to the chicken coop and others did to their barns when we knew a blizzard was coming. Pitch black at night and snowing, you needed to know where you were going.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Recently turned 15.
You are really young I thought you were 16.Right now I am 16 going to be 17 in November 1.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Hmm... I turn 15 in a few days.

----
ADT thinks tropical storm
CI# /Pressure/ Vmax
2.4 /1008.1mb/ 34.0kt

Final T# Adj T# Raw T#
2.4 2.6 2.6

----
15/2345 UTC 30.7N 55.2W T2.0/2.0 08L -- Atlantic

SAB thinks tropical depression.
----
ATCF says 30 kt 1012 mb (TD)
----
Do you think TD 8 is Gordon right now?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting ncstorm:


I see these types of comments and wonder if people have such anguish with hurricanes, then why are you still living in hurricane prone areas?..

I have been through major hurricanes and I will go through them any day over a tornado that you may have 15 minutes of warning..so yes, a tornado is an extreme weather event that I wouldnt put myself through or live in an area like Kansas where you see them more than corn in spring..with a hurricane, you can prepare and evacuate to shelter in reasonable time..Im not going to wake up tomorrow and find a Cat 4 off my coast as opposed to a tornado threat with less warning or preparation for..its weather..sometimes its good and sometimes its bad..


I guess that's what we pay for when living in paradise, huh? You know though, you are right. In all honesty, I'd much rather deal with a sustained wind than the fury of a tornado. Last time we dealt with a system coming through here (can't remember the name at the moment - last year), it wasn't the actual named system but the tornado that came through in front of the villa that scared the ___ out of me more than the winds.

Lindy
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Quoting aislinnpaps:


My 'favorite', if you can have a favorite hurricane, was Lily, who hit in early October. Four days with no electric, but with cool temperatures, wasn't difficult to go through.
I remember Lili because that was the first year I started tracking hurricanes. I recall the hype to New Orleans.
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Quoting jascott1967:


Sneaky, that one. Prototypical African wave.

And then a butterfly opened it's wings.


This does look like the one to watch.
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Quoting ncstorm:


I see these types of comments and wonder if people have such anguish with hurricanes, then why are you still living in hurricane prone areas?..
Oh I don't know... Maybe because they like where the live, despite the natural repercussions for being there? Maybe because they can't afford to move? There are a myriad of possibilities...
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Quoting HurrikanEB:


4.4 inches of snow fell across Newfoundland on October 28-29, 1991 in association with the 1991 Halloween Noreaster (aka UnNamed storm of 1991 or Should-have-been-Henri).


Neither the wiki page, nor the Canadian Weather service's archive is really clear on exactly what factors were at play with the actual snow, but from what I gather, the main extratropical storm in which the actual hurricane formed was probably what was most responsible for the snow, but imo it was really all one big messy weather event--- sorta like how Stan (2005) didn't really drop all that rain on Central America by himself.

Link


AKA, The Perfect Storm. Componants of it dropped 30+ inches of snow in Duluth, swept to the northeast and absorbed Hurricane Grace.
Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 614
Quoting jascott1967:
Funny thing with Levi, he lives in Alaska and was once fascinated with blizzards/snow storms but has shifted his focus to the tropics. I was born and raised in Houston, was fascinated with tropics until I moved to Duluth for 11 years and am more interested in blizzards/snow storms.

There is such a wonderful beauty left by blizzards. Walking outside in the wilderness of Minnesota after a big storm was like looking at the world with a new set of eyes, the lanscape was wonderful, peaceful, tranquil. Walking outside after a hurricane...there is no beauty to it and I've been through 3.

In 1993, the beauty of the snow met the destruction of a hurricane. Anyone remember The White Hurricane?


Ya... I was living a little ways north of Corning / Elmira then. It was nearly as much looking forward to it as when it actually came. At least a week out the best meteorologist in the area was saying "Gee... it looks like a helluva storm coming in a week or so... only... the models are suggesting that it will be SO big that no one believes it... there must be an error somewhere....". Then, starting about three days ahead of it, the meteorologists all switched over from showing real interest and enthusiasm to carrying on like old testament prophets, grim with tales of certain doom, death and destruction. As it was I was reading a novel called "The Blizzard of '88" (which refers to a similar blizzard in 1888, but which was dwarfed by the impending storm) at the time.

So it was just as fine a meteorological time as a weather watcher might hope to enjoy! I faced the prospect of being holed up for days watching it storm, with three good dogs, a great wood stove, decent scotch, cigars.... I even took the phone off the hook to prevent any interruption of the blessed isolation with the storm.

Having grown up in the snowbelt upstate, I wasn't all that impressed with the couple-three feet of snow, though the drifts were wonderful. I was impressed though, that the same storm had flooded my best friend in Bradenton Florida.

But the most awesomest snow, with one exception that I have known, was the great lakes snow belts... the weirdest things happen in the center of those snow rivers, as they were called then, where you can get like eight inches an hour falling at the center. North or south of that east-westish river, about thirty miles away, there would only be broken clouds, and driving though the snow river from south to north was a trip... it would begin snowing, then snowing heavier, and then it would be, on occasion, literally like driving into a wall of milk. Most awesome!. If there are any streetlights at all, you can see just fine if you turn off your headlights.

When I was a kid we used to go out and play in those storms, which are quite tame if you aren't driving. We'd blow up balloons and let them sail off in the wind, wonder where they would go with nothing hard to pop them on on their journey..... just snow for miles and miles.

But by far the worst blizzard I have ever seen was in western Nebraska. I like going out in storms but one look out the door in THAT one and it was OMFG to the max... I wouldn't even try to go to the barn... a mere 20 feet away. I was told later that in the olden days, when a storm was coming, they used to actually string up stout ropes to the barn and chicken coops (as they HAD to get to them then to take care of the animals). A person just held on to the rope to guide him to his destination. That was the only time in my life I actually feared being out in the weather. And I once had the pleasure of swimming in the gulf in a tropical storm... actually it was a hurricane (sept 2000) that had come up the gulf and had passed the area (Sarasota) already .... things were such that the flooding was not too bad, there was a good deal of sun, the water was mysteriously free of debris like broken piers and so on. The wind was around in the 50 MPH range and the waves were awesome... the water and the air were warm... there were people all over the beach. I couldn't resist... pulled off my clothes and jumped in! You just dive under the breakers of course and once you get on the other side of them there's no worries. ... just pure fun. A bunch of other people came in after that too. I was maybe a hundred yards from shore (sand bars) and the sun was low in the west. and I discovered that, turning around and facing the land, if I smacked the water with my hand the wind would hurl the spray toward the land and each spray burst had its own rainbow that flew away at 50 MPH as well. That was a good day for a weather watcher too!
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Quoting KoritheMan:


I am definitely not inexperienced when it comes to major hurricanes and their destructive power. But it is precisely their destructive power that fascinates me. It makes me feel extremely insignificant, because we really are. We are nature's mercy.

But I agree, the lack of electricity etcetera, is absolutely horrible.


My 'favorite', if you can have a favorite hurricane, was Lily, who hit in early October. Four days with no electric, but with cool temperatures, wasn't difficult to go through.
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Is it safe to come out now?

I hope everyone got their political frustrations out and over with.

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Quoting VirginIslandsVisitor:


I apologize, Grothar, because yes, I did read your blog and found it absolutely fascinating, both the blog and the comments.

I actually tried to add my two cents worth, but typical of island internet connections, when I went to post, the internet crashed.

I will try again. Thank you again (although you didn't see my reply)for the blog. It was well thought out and, in my opinion, well worth the read and thoughts that it provoked.

Lindy


Well, thank you. I appreciate that. I wrote it when the blog was getting a little, you know....tilted.
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Quoting VirginIslandsVisitor:


I don't know about your comment. Have you faced a major hurricane before? Have you any idea what kind of devistation you could be in the midst of? Have you gone through weeks or months without power or running water? It's horrible. That's the only way I can describe it. (Hugo and Marilyn)

What kind of extreme weather could possibly be worse than them?

As an aside, I also went through, believe it or not, the Ice Storm of '98.

On a scale of 1-10, on anxiety/fear level, I'd put them all on a pretty close level.

The one positive thing about being in the Caribbean is that you're not dependent upon power for heat/warmth. Being stuck in Quebec in the middle of January with no heat for weeks on end was not a pretty thing either. Devastating losses, both financially and personally.

Both scenarios VERY different but EQUALLY as devastating.

Lindy


I am definitely not inexperienced when it comes to major hurricanes and their destructive power. But it is precisely their destructive power that fascinates me. It makes me feel extremely insignificant, because we really are. We are at nature's mercy.

But I agree, the lack of electricity etcetera, is absolutely horrible.
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Quoting allancalderini:
How old are you if you don`t mind telling me?

Recently turned 15.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32335
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

I've got a few more years. You two are already on the way down.
How old are you if you don`t mind telling me?
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Quoting Grothar:



I guess none of you read my blog.


I apologize, Grothar, because yes, I did read your blog and found it absolutely fascinating, both the blog and the comments.

I actually tried to add my two cents worth, but typical of island internet connections, when I went to post, the internet crashed.

I will try again. Thank you again (although you didn't see my reply)for the blog. It was well thought out and, in my opinion, well worth the read and thoughts that it provoked.

Lindy
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1.2 m of snow about 4 feet of snow in Maine with Hurricane Ginny!Link
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Quoting VirginIslandsVisitor:


I don't know about your comment. Have you faced a major hurricane before? Have you any idea what kind of devistation you could be in the midst of? Have you gone through weeks or months without power or running water? It's horrible. That's the only way I can describe it. (Hugo and Marilyn)

What kind of extreme weather could possibly be worse than them?

As an aside, I also went through, believe it or not, the Ice Storm of '98.

On a scale of 1-10, on anxiety/fear level, I'd put them all on a pretty close level.

The one positive thing about being in the Caribbean is that you're not dependent upon power for heat/warmth. Being stuck in Quebec in the middle of January with no heat for weeks on end was not a pretty thing either. Devastating losses, both financially and personally.

Both scenarios VERY different but EQUALLY as devastating.

Lindy


I see these types of comments and wonder if people have such anguish with hurricanes, then why are you still living in hurricane prone areas?..

I have been through major hurricanes and I will go through them any day over a tornado that you may have 15 minutes of warning..so yes, a tornado is an extreme weather event that I wouldnt put myself through or live in an area like Kansas where you see them more than corn in spring..with a hurricane, you can prepare and evacuate to shelter in reasonable time..Im not going to wake up tomorrow and find a Cat 4 off my coast as opposed to a tornado threat with less warning or preparation for..its weather..sometimes its good and sometimes its bad..
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Quoting Tropicsweatherpr:
Big wave is getting ready to emerge West Africa. Let's see how it does once it splashes.



Sneaky, that one. Prototypical African wave.

And then a butterfly opened it's wings.
Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 614
887. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
Japan Meteorological Agency
Tropical Cyclone Advisory #29
SEVERE TROPICAL STORM KAI-TAK (T1213)
9:00 AM JST August 16 2012
====================================

SUBJECT: Category Two Typhoon In South China Sea

At 0:00 AM UTC, Severe Tropical Storm Kai-Tak (975 hPa) located at 19.0N 117.1E has 10 minute sustained winds of 60 knots with gusts of 85 knots. The cyclone is reported as moving west at 12 knots.

Dvorak Intensity: T3.5

Storm Force Winds
================
60 NM from the center

Gale Force Winds
================
210 NM from the center

Forecast and Intensity
========================

24 HRS: 20.7N 112.1E - 60 knots (CAT 2/Severe Tropical Storm) Northern South China Sea
48 HRS: 21.9N 107.3E - 40 knots (CAT 1/Tropical Storm) Overland Southern China
72 HRS: 23.6N 102.0E - Tropical Depression Overland Southern China

Additional Information
======================

Kai-Tak will move west northwestward for the next 72 hours

Final initial Dvorak number will be 4.0 after 24 hours
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Quoting jascott1967:


You were going to say "get off my yard, young fellar and I don't want to buy your cookies!" No wait, that's what I was going to say. Where am I?


They have Boy Scout cookies, now?

I still like those chocolate mint Girl Scout cookies.
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Quoting VirginIslandsVisitor:


I don't know about your comment. Have you faced a major hurricane before? Have you any idea what kind of devistation you could be in the midst of? Have you gone through weeks or months without power or running water? It's horrible. That's the only way I can describe it. (Hugo and Marilyn)

What kind of extreme weather could possibly be worse than them?

As an aside, I also went through, believe it or not, the Ice Storm of '98.

On a scale of 1-10, on anxiety/fear level, I'd put them all on a pretty close level.

The one positive thing about being in the Caribbean is that you're not dependent upon power for heat/warmth. Being stuck in Quebec in the middle of January with no heat for weeks on end was not a pretty thing either. Devastating losses, both financially and personally.

Both scenarios VERY different but EQUALLY as devastating.

Lindy



I guess none of you read my blog.
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Big wave is getting ready to emerge West Africa. Let's see how it does once it splashes.

Member Since: April 29, 2009 Posts: 75 Comments: 14406
Quoting pottery:

Have some Respect there, young fellow.
In case Grothar is not around to admonish you, on behalf of 'old and run-down' people I say.....

well, darn, I can't remember what it was I was going to say......


What a nice guy!
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Quoting washingtonian115:
Lol.We're all weird Kori.As you said I can face a major hurricane but am scared of other things related to extreme weather.


I don't know about your comment. Have you faced a major hurricane before? Have you any idea what kind of devistation you could be in the midst of? Have you gone through weeks or months without power or running water? It's horrible. That's the only way I can describe it. (Hugo and Marilyn)

What kind of extreme weather could possibly be worse than them?

As an aside, I also went through, believe it or not, the Ice Storm of '98.

On a scale of 1-10, on anxiety/fear level, I'd put them all on a pretty close level.

The one positive thing about being in the Caribbean is that you're not dependent upon power for heat/warmth. Being stuck in Quebec in the middle of January with no heat for weeks on end was not a pretty thing either. Devastating losses, both financially and personally.

Both scenarios VERY different but EQUALLY as devastating.

Lindy
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting pottery:

Have some Respect there, young fellow.
In case Grothar is not around to admonish you, on behalf of 'old and run-down' people I say.....

well, darn, I can't remember what it was I was going to say......


You were going to say "get off my yard, young fellar and I don't want to buy your cookies!" No wait, that's what I was going to say. Where am I?
Member Since: August 16, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 614
Quoting bayoubug:
What's crazy is the cold fronts coming down drives me nuts..When winter comes we sometimes can't buy a front..


Sure you can. Pay $1,000 and you can get a front.
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Quoting MississippiWx:
Calling it an early night tonight. I'm having some Grothar symptoms. You know, that old and run-down feeling. :-) Goodnight, all.


I'll have you know I still run two miles a day. OK, so I can't always find my way home, but I still run.
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Quoting lovemamatus:


You take Mary
I'll take Sue
Aint no Difference
Twixt the two
UKMET
Running all around my brain

LOL. That could be a fun game. Rewriting songs with model names. Help me GFS, help, help me GFS.
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Just got through the longest, most intense hailstorm I have personally experienced, right here in Truckee, CA just east of the Sierra crest. It was about 10 minutes of increasingly hard rain, followed by 35 minutes of hail, from 1/4 to 3/4 inch diameter. When it was finished, the hail was one-and-a-half inches deep out in the open, on my gently sloping driveway. My beautiful flowers from this summer are all gone.
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Quoting JrWeathermanFL:
Has a hurricane ever dropped snow?
Quoting HurrAndrew:


Hurricane Noel 2007 (after ex-tropical transition)

Dunno of any more but certain alot have in respect of their energy being distributed.


4.4 inches of snow fell across Newfoundland on October 28-29, 1991 in association with the 1991 Halloween Noreaster (aka UnNamed storm of 1991 or Should-have-been-Henri).


Neither the wiki page, nor the Canadian Weather service's archive is really clear on exactly what factors were at play with the actual snow, but from what I gather, the main extratropical storm in which the actual hurricane formed was probably what was most responsible for the snow, but imo it was really all one big messy weather event--- sorta like how Stan (2005) didn't really drop all that rain on Central America by himself.

Link
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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