June 2012: Earth's 4th warmest June; heavy rains in Beijing kill 37

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 12:19 PM GMT on July 23, 2012

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June 2012 was the globe's 4th warmest June on record, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). NASA rated May 2012 the 3rd warmest on record. June 2012 global land temperatures were the warmest on record; this makes three months in a row--April, May, and June--in which record-high monthly land temperature records were set. Global ocean temperatures were the 10th warmest on record. June 2012 was the 328th consecutive month with global temperatures warmer than the 20th century average; the last time global temperatures were below average was February 1985. We've now had three consecutive top-five warmest months on record; April 2012 was the 5th warmest April on record, and May 2012 was the 2nd warmest May on record. The increase in global temperatures relative to average, compared to March 2012 (16th warmest March on record) is due, in part, to warming waters in the Eastern Pacific, where a La Niña event ended in April, and borderline El Niño conditions now exist. Global satellite-measured temperatures in June for the lowest 8 km of the atmosphere were 4th or 3rd warmest in the 34-year record, according to Remote Sensing Systems and the University of Alabama Huntsville (UAH). Northern Hemisphere snow cover extent during June 2012 was the smallest in the 46-year period of record. Wunderground's weather historian, Christopher C. Burt, has a comprehensive post on the notable weather events of June in his June 2012 Global Weather Extremes Summary. Notably:

- The U.K. suffered through its wettest June since at least 1910, and coolest such since 1991.

- The monsoon season has been especially devastating so far along the banks of the Brahmaputra River in northeast India and Bangladesh. Over 2000 villages have been flooded and at least 190 deaths reported so far. Almost 20 million people in all have been displaced.

- The Korean Peninsula continued to endure its worst drought in at least 105 years.


Figure 1. Departure of temperature from average for June 2012. In the Northern Hemisphere, most areas experienced much higher-than-average monthly temperatures, including most of North America and Eurasia, and northern Africa. Only northern and western Europe, and the northwestern United States were notably cooler than average. Image credit: National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) .

Arctic sea ice has greatest June loss on record
Arctic sea ice saw its greatest-ever decrease during the month of June, and ice extent averaged over the entire month was the 2nd lowest for June in the 35-year satellite record, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). The last three Junes (2010 - 2012) have had the three smallest ice extents for the month, with June 2012 being the 21st consecutive June and the 133rd consecutive month with below-average Arctic sea ice extent. During much of June 2012 and extending into the first half of July, the Arctic Dipole pattern set up. This atmospheric circulation pattern features a surface high pressure system in the Arctic north of Alaska, and a low pressure system on the Eurasian side of the Arctic. This results in winds blowing from south to north over Siberia, pushing warm air into the central Arctic Ocean. The Arctic Dipole pattern occurred in all summer months of 2007 and helped support the record 2007 summer reduction in sea ice extent. The Arctic Dipole pattern has broken down over the past few days, and is expected to be absent through early August. This should slow Arctic sea ice loss, and ice extent may no longer be at record low levels by the first week of August.


Figure 2. Arctic sea ice area in 2012 as of July 22 (yellow line) compared to all the other years since satellite observations began in 1979. Ice area in 2012 during most of June and July has been the lowest on record. The previous record low years were 2007 and 2011. Note that sea ice area (as shown here) and sea ice extent (as measured by the National Snow and Ice Data Center) are not the same thing, but one can use either to quantify sea ice, and both show very similar behavior. Image credit: University of Illinois Cryosphere Today.

Three new billion-dollar weather disasters in June
The globe experienced three new billion-dollar weather disasters in June, bringing the total for the year to nine, said insurance broker Aon Benfield in their June Catastrophe Report. The most expensive disaster in June occurred in China, where heavy rains between the between June 20 - 29 affected northern, central, eastern and southern sections of the country. The rains left at least 50 people dead in 17 separate provinces, and caused damage estimated at CNY17.4 billion (USD2.73 billion). The U.S. suffered two billion-dollar severe weather events in June, bringing the total number of such events to six for the year. The record for most billion-dollar disasters in a year in the U.S. is fourteen (according to NOAA/NCDC) or seventeen (according to Aon Benfield.) The most costly event in June 2012 came across portions of Texas and New Mexico, where severe thunderstorms pelted areas (including the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan region) with golf ball and baseball-sized hail. The Insurance Council of Texas said that more than 100,000 claims were filed and total insured losses in the state would exceed $1 billion, with total losses near $1.75 billion. A separate hail event in Colorado and Wyoming caused more than $700 million in insured losses, and $1.25 billion in total losses.


Figure 3. Weather disasters costing at least half a billion dollars so far in 2012, according to insurance broker Aon Benfield in their June Catastrophe Report.

Heaviest rains in 60 years deluge Beijing, killing 37
China's latest billion-dollar weather disaster is a torrential rainstorm that hit Beijing Saturday night, dumping the the heaviest rains the city has seen in 60 years, according to Associated Press. The resulting flooding killed 37 people and did $1.6 billion in damage.


Figure 4. A Chinese man uses a signboard to signal motorists driving through flooded street following a heavy rain in Beijing Saturday, July 21, 2012. China's government says the heaviest rains to hit Beijing in six decades. The torrential downpour Saturday night left low-lying streets flooded and knocked down trees. (AP Photo)

Quiet in the Atlantic
There are no threat areas to discuss in the Atlantic, and none of the reliable computer models are developing a tropical cyclone over the next seven days.


Jeff Masters

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Member Since: July 21, 2011 Posts: 83 Comments: 7167
They actually have a very good Warning/Advisory system in Hong Kong and people, for the most part listen to it. However, they also listen to the Government and will be dutifully at work until told to go home - Tropical Cyclone Warning Signal # 8 was the formal trigger to close down - in fact at 4.15 PM (Hong Kong time) yesterday, Companies were advised, in advance of Tropical Cyclone Warning Signal # 8 to leave work.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting stormpetrol:


These Obs suggest a circulation with the wave just west of T &T.
breeding.grounds.
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715. VR46L
Quoting washingtonian115:
At crownweather Rob just lost a special someone to him.Really sorry to hear that.So for anyone that follows up on his daily updates he'll be out for awhile.I hope I'm not banned for this post.


I agree with ya on all your statement
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
If anyone is interested, I made a new entry on Invest 90E.
Member Since: July 21, 2011 Posts: 83 Comments: 7167
Quoting washingtonian115:
That's nothing new.If you watch videos of typhoons from over there people go to work regardless.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
712. etxwx
The only "good" news to come out of the Chinese floods:
Record Rainfall Replenishes Beijing Water Supplies
2012-07-23 14:38:09 Xinhua
The heaviest downpour to hit Beijing in 61 years has refilled the city's reservoirs over the weekend, ending a 13-year drought.

Pan Anjun, deputy head of the municipal flood control and drought relief headquarters, said Sunday that the storm added 53 million cubic meters of water to 17 mid- and large-sized reservoirs that had been plagued by drought for 13 consecutive years.
Member Since: September 4, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1532
Quoting Patrap:
Wxrisk.com

18Z NAM - WRF for Tuesday... shows the DERECHO/ MCS racing SE from northwest IND/ Chicago area into WVA in 11 hours

Oh no!.Not again.I personally hope it goes south of us.

Hey I'm comment seven-eleven.
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 18303


These Obs suggest a circulation with the wave just west of T &T.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Chicklit:
wow, what happened to the shear in the Caribbean?


Look at the SST.

How do you quantify whether this is a "real" El Nino trying to happen, or whether this is just AGW?



So what about the E.Pac nino zones? The N. Atlantic and Arctic are off the scale high in anomalies.

It's only a "real" El Nino if it actually produces persistent El Nino conditions for 5 consecutive months. As it stands, this could just be hot water from AGW or "weather," just like the rest of the northern hemisphere.

I mean look at that, the anomalies are ridiculous everywhere in the N. Hemisphere anyway.
Member Since: January 25, 2012 Posts: 33 Comments: 1520
Quoting RTSplayer:




I realize there is no such thing as an ideal place to live, but Bangladesh is uninhabitable.


Bangladesh has a complicated history. They've been an independent nation(from India) since 1970. I saw a documentary "Water Wars". It seems that Indian dams hold and release water which complicates the problem. Too much rain and India releases water, flooding Bangladesh. During droughts India withdraws water leaving Bangladesh dry. I got the impression relations between India and Bangladesh weren't very good with India being the powerful one.
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Wxrisk.com

18Z NAM - WRF for Tuesday... shows the DERECHO/ MCS racing SE from northwest IND/ Chicago area into WVA in 11 hours

Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 429 Comments: 130497
Quoting Articuno:

..you just noticed?
Nah been noticed since Saturday when some bloggers went off their rockers.
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 18303

Member Since: July 11, 2006 Posts: 14 Comments: 11434
Quoting Chicklit:
wow, what happened to the shear in the Caribbean?

That wave looks like it may needed to be watched
since the shear is decreasing.
Member Since: October 22, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2559
Quoting SFLWeatherman:
look at that high!!!


At least TD strength storm, and High is suggestive of a persistent westward track for at least the next several frames beyond that frame in the model.
Member Since: January 25, 2012 Posts: 33 Comments: 1520
wow, what happened to the shear in the Caribbean?
Member Since: July 11, 2006 Posts: 14 Comments: 11434
701. Articuno
9:40 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
Quoting washingtonian115:
The blog needs a storm to track..

..you just noticed?
Member Since: October 22, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2559
700. Articuno
9:40 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
Quoting Patrap:
Sad news to report.

Former Astronaut Sally Ride Dies

Sally Ride, the first American woman in space, died today after a 17-month battle with pancreatic cancer.



Sad.
My great-grandpa who I knew very well died of the same cancer. :*(
Member Since: October 22, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2559
699. washingtonian115
9:39 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
The blog needs a storm to track..
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 18303
698. etxwx
9:39 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
Quoting txjac:


That's awful. How is it that they even went in to work? Seems like if they were up to go to work they would havent known how severe this was?


I know...that really got my attention. I kept picturing Houston when the glass would pop out of the skyscrapers during bad storms. Truly frightening.
Not much news coming out so far...most sites are quoting the Reuters and the AFP stories as the latest news, and those are a few hours old.
Member Since: September 4, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1532
697. Patrap
9:37 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
LOL

NOLA was here long befo' the Purchase, and will be here long after this era passes as well.

Super Bowl is here in Feb, our 10th..bring yer Life rafts and Dinghy's.

: )

How many times has New Orleans Hosted the Super Bowl?

9 times.
3 times in Tulane stadium. 70,72,75.
6 times in Louisiana Superdome. 78,81,86,90,97,02,

Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 429 Comments: 130497
696. RTSplayer
9:34 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
Quoting Tribucanes:
Strong four or category five and NO would have to worry though. Had the worst case happened in Katrina, there would have been serious talk about abandoning the city all together I think. Would a four or category five do the damage now that Katrina did then; or has the new system been designed strong enough to mitigate even a category four or five?


Unless it's the worst thing imaginable, it should not do anywhere near the damage Katrina did inside the protected zone anyway, at least during the next several decades.


If you had a Labor Day 1935 storm, or a peak intensity Wilma hit directly on the city, I think wind damage would be more of a concern than the water anyway, even if it was some ludicrous 30 or 40 feet of water level rise, because at that point many of the high rise buildings may be threatened with collapse from 200mph sustained and 225mph gust winds.


At some point on the high end of Cat 5 it starts to not matter any more, as anyone who evacuated is safe anyway, and anyone who stayed behind is probably going to die either way unless they are in something like a bomb shelter or a concrete paneled building (not cinder blocks because 200mph wind for several hours will eventually destroy cinder block walls due to debris).
Member Since: January 25, 2012 Posts: 33 Comments: 1520
695. Tribucanes
9:34 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
History is one of my first loves Patrap. I agree it'll never be abandoned. Even when it burned to the ground it rose like a Phoenix again. Love the city, it's just one GIANT financial American sinkhole. It's one of America's enduring symbols of hope and rebirth. It's always been a disaster waiting to happen too. A category five hitting St. Pete/Tampa or a five hitting NO has always been my top two hurricane concerns. A five hitting NY city would be up there too, but the chances of that are much lower than the other two.
Member Since: April 18, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 2437
694. carcar1967
9:32 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
Quoting RTSplayer:



They did this right this time too.

Although it could conceivably get over-topped or wave action splash over it, or maybe some seepage in some places, but from what I've seen of it, there should be never any concern for a breach or total collapse of a levee as in Katrina.

With proper maintenance, this system should last for many generations or until AGW raises the sea level high enough to make it obsolete.


NO has more to worry about than AGW. A lot of NO is below sea level because the land is sinking. Combine that with rising sea levels and NO is in a lot of trouble.
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693. washingtonian115
9:27 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
Quoting txjac:


That's awful. How is it that they even went in to work? Seems like if they were up to go to work they would havent known how severe this was?
That's nothing new.If you watch videos of typhoons from over there people go to work regardless.
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 18303
692. Patrap
9:25 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
Abandoning New Orleans, was/is never a option.


New Orleans: A Geopolitical Prize

maybe note the date and Author


By George Friedman
September 01, 2005 22 30 GMT --

The American political system was
founded in Philadelphia, but the American nation was built on the
vast farmlands that stretch from the Alleghenies to the Rockies.
That farmland produced the wealth that funded American
industrialization: It permitted the formation of a class of small
landholders who, amazingly, could produce more than they could
consume. They could sell their excess crops in the east and in
Europe and save that money, which eventually became the founding
capital of American industry.

But it was not the extraordinary land nor the farmers and ranchers
who alone set the process in motion. Rather, it was geography -- the
extraordinary system of rivers that flowed through the Midwest and
allowed them to ship their surplus to the rest of the world. All of
the rivers flowed into one -- the Mississippi -- and the Mississippi
flowed to the ports in and around one city: New Orleans. It was in
New Orleans that the barges from upstream were unloaded and their
cargos stored, sold and reloaded on ocean-going vessels. Until last
Sunday, New Orleans was, in many ways, the pivot of the American
economy.

For that reason, the Battle of New Orleans in January 1815 was a key
moment in American history. Even though the battle occurred after
the War of 1812 was over, had the British taken New Orleans, we
suspect they wouldn't have given it back. Without New Orleans, the
entire Louisiana Purchase would have been valueless to the United
States. Or, to state it more precisely, the British would control
the region because, at the end of the day, the value of the Purchase
was the land and the rivers - which all converged on the Mississippi
and the ultimate port of New Orleans. The hero of the battle was
Andrew Jackson, and when he became president, his obsession with
Texas had much to do with keeping the Mexicans away from New
Orleans.


"New Orleans is not optional for the United States' commercial
infrastructure. It is a terrible place for a city to be located, but
exactly the place where a city must exist. With that as a given, a
city will return there because the alternatives are too devastating.
The harvest is coming, and that means that the port will have to be
opened soon. As in Iraq, premiums will be paid to people prepared to
endure the hardships of working in New Orleans. But in the end, the
city will return because it has to.

Geopolitics is the stuff of permanent geographical realities and the
way they interact with political life. Geopolitics created New
Orleans. Geopolitics caused American presidents to obsess over its
safety. And geopolitics will force the city's resurrection, even if
it is in the worst imaginable place."
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 429 Comments: 130497
691. txjac
9:23 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
Quoting etxwx:
'Severe' Typhoon injures 34 in Hong Kong, halts transport
AFP July 24, 2012 6:13AM
Excerpt: More than 100 trees fell and pieces of buildings were seen crashing into downtown streets as commuters made their way home from work. Many were forced to walk through the wind and rain due to public transport shortages.


That's awful. How is it that they even went in to work? Seems like if they were up to go to work they would havent known how severe this was?
Member Since: April 24, 2010 Posts: 3 Comments: 2656
690. RTSplayer
9:22 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
Quoting Patrap:
Cat Size Number is a POOR indicator of a Storms Impact,as it was designed for Wind Loading on structure's only.

That's why we now have the Surge Data Separate from it, and also have,The Inland Hurricane Warning.

I've been a big advocate for a better system for many years.

A LARGE cat 3 can do as much if not more damage that a small Cat 5 ,say like Camille was.

Size matters greatly in a Hurricane, just take the time to see K's Max Hurricane wind field, and Tropical Storm Force wind radii...and compare to other Hurricanes.



This is very true, and there is often too much focus on the eye wall in Hurricanes, although every storm is different so everyone should ALWAYS watch the eye wall. Some storms such as Katrina, Ike, or even Irene have very wide, solid wind and rain shields which make them farm more dangerous.


Inland hurricane warning is totally appropriate for any storm which would penetrate to the affected coordinates as a sustained hurricane.

Wilma is an example of where an inland hurricane warning was needed for the entire southern portion of Florida. It was originally forecast to landfall as a category 1, and instead it hit as a 3 and made a complete blow through of the state as either a 3 or 2, totally contrary to the original forecasts 2 or 3 days out.


As for the Integrated Kinetic Energy scale, it may be too confusing for the general public in some cases, and needs to be quantified in feet of expected water level rise, with flood zoning and evacuation zoning designed for those specifications, instead of the old water level rises that were tied to the old version of Saffir-Simpson hurricane category.


In general, water level rise forecasts need to be calculated in an ever more scientific fashion seperate from wind speed category, but presented to the public in warnings in terms of feet and zones that effected locals can easily understand and communicate among one another. If you say, "We can expect an IKE category 5 here," the general public doesn't know what that means in real world quantification. Heck I don't even know exactly, and the real world effects vary by topography anyway.


In general, the NHC and NWS usually does a good job with storms, but there have been a few such as Wilma, Katrina, and even this most recent one we watched, where I was infuriated by the limitations of both the science and the communication. Communication problems were probably worse than the scientific problems for Katrina, but Wilma was a science and theory problem, i.e. "Re-intensification to a major will neeeeeever happen, we're forecasting a 1..." People in Florida thought they were going to get hit by a category 1 joke storm, and instead they got hit by a top ten hurricane(measured financially.)
Member Since: January 25, 2012 Posts: 33 Comments: 1520
689. etxwx
9:21 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
'Severe' Typhoon injures 34 in Hong Kong, halts transport
AFP July 24, 2012 6:13AM
Excerpt: More than 100 trees fell and pieces of buildings were seen crashing into downtown streets as commuters made their way home from work. Many were forced to walk through the wind and rain due to public transport shortages.
Member Since: September 4, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1532
688. Patrap
9:21 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
Sad news to report.

Former Astronaut Sally Ride Dies

Sally Ride, the first American woman in space, died today after a 17-month battle with pancreatic cancer.


Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 429 Comments: 130497
687. Dakster
9:20 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
Quoting Tribucanes:
Strong four or Category five and NO would have to worry though. Had the worst case happened in Katrina, there would have been serious talk about abandoning the city all together I think. Would a four or category five do the damage now that Katrina did then; or has the new system been designed strong enough to mitigate even a category four or five?


That depends on who you ask. Only time will tell - unfortunately.
Member Since: March 10, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 10836
686. Tribucanes
9:16 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
Strong four or category five and NO would have to worry though. Had the worst case happened in Katrina, there would have been serious talk about abandoning the city all together I think. Would a four or category five do the damage now that Katrina did then; or has the new system been designed strong enough to mitigate even a category four or five?
Member Since: April 18, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 2437
685. Tropicsweatherpr
9:13 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
Here is the wave that the models have about to emerge West Africa.

Member Since: April 29, 2009 Posts: 75 Comments: 15048
684. Chicklit
9:11 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
Quoting Patrap:
Hong Kong International, Hong Kong wunderpage


When you zoom out (minus) you can see how huge the system is.
Member Since: July 11, 2006 Posts: 14 Comments: 11434
683. washingtonian115
9:11 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
At crownweather Rob just lost a special someone to him.Really sorry to hear that.So for anyone that follows up on his daily updates he'll be out for awhile.I hope I'm not banned for this post.
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 18303
682. yoboi
9:09 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
Quoting RTSplayer:
The monsoon season has been especially devastating so far along the banks of the Brahmaputra River in northeast India and Bangladesh. Over 2000 villages have been flooded and at least 190 deaths reported so far. Almost 20 million people in all have been displaced.



I realize there is no such thing as an ideal place to live, but Bangladesh is uninhabitable. Something like half of the top 30 worst weather disasters in history, as considered by human death toll, have happened in Bangladesh often with 100k to 750k deaths per event, and most of them are typhoon or monsoon related flood events.

Why doesn't the government ban habitation of some of the worst zones or come up with some better water management systems?

There's no place in the U.S. where this would be even remotely possible, even in a category 5 hurricane, because our people would somehow get out anyway, or vertically evacuate even if they stayed behind.

Even if a cat 5 somehow popped up and hit New York or New Jersey with only a 2 day warning, it would be unlikely to kill more than a few thousand people at most.

Katrina's death toll in New Orleans was a combination of individual insolence and collective bad engineering and management, and is not typical of U.S. disaster scenarios, so it should not be used as a standard rule for cities. Katrina's death toll in Mississippi was a combination of either poverty (no means to evacuate,) or individual insolence.



If a country is having to evacuate 20 million people from a single weather disaster then some serious re-zoning and redesign of infrastructure needs to be considered. That's the equivalent of 1/3rd of California, or about 7 times the population of Louisiana.


just imagine if they could predict earthquakes imagine the impact of evacuating all of ca...
Member Since: August 25, 2010 Posts: 8 Comments: 2736
681. TropicalAnalystwx13
9:09 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
Quoting washingtonian115:
Could be talking about our first cape verde storm.GFS,Euro,UKmet,and now the CFS.

The ECMWF, CFS, and UKMET do not develop it, they just show a decent tropical wave. The GFS is the only one that shows development.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 33142
680. PalmBeachWeather
9:08 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
Quoting yoboi:



taz that is jfv....
absolutely
Member Since: October 3, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 6001
679. TropicalAnalystwx13
9:08 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
I posted this a few months ago, but I'll post it again.

This is how the real version of how we get rain.

Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 33142
678. sunlinepr
9:07 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
Member Since: August 2, 2010 Posts: 21 Comments: 9884
677. RTSplayer
9:06 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
Quoting Patrap:


I seriously doubt it.

Vast Defenses Now Shielding New Orleans

Nearly seven years after flood waters from Hurricane Katrina gushed over New Orleans, $14.5 billion worth of civil works designed to block such surges is now in place a 133-mile chain of levees, flood walls, gates and pumps too vast to take in at once, except perhaps from space.

Individual components of the system can be appreciated from a less celestial elevation.



They did this right this time too.

Although it could conceivably get over-topped or wave action splash over it, or maybe some seepage in some places, but from what I've seen of it, there should be never any concern for a breach or total collapse of a levee as in Katrina.

With proper maintenance, this system should last for many generations or until AGW raises the sea level high enough to make it obsolete.
Member Since: January 25, 2012 Posts: 33 Comments: 1520
676. RTSplayer
9:02 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
The monsoon season has been especially devastating so far along the banks of the Brahmaputra River in northeast India and Bangladesh. Over 2000 villages have been flooded and at least 190 deaths reported so far. Almost 20 million people in all have been displaced.



I realize there is no such thing as an ideal place to live, but Bangladesh is uninhabitable. Something like half of the top 30 worst weather disasters in history, as considered by human death toll, have happened in Bangladesh often with 100k to 750k deaths per event, and most of them are typhoon or monsoon related flood events.

Why doesn't the government ban habitation of some of the worst zones or come up with some better water management systems?

There's no place in the U.S. where this would be even remotely possible, even in a category 5 hurricane, because our people would somehow get out anyway, or vertically evacuate even if they stayed behind.

Even if a cat 5 somehow popped up and hit New York or New Jersey with only a 2 day warning, it would be unlikely to kill more than a few thousand people at most.

Katrina's death toll in New Orleans was a combination of individual insolence and collective bad engineering and management, and is not typical of U.S. disaster scenarios, so it should not be used as a standard rule for cities. Katrina's death toll in Mississippi was a combination of either poverty (no means to evacuate,) or individual insolence.



If a country is having to evacuate 20 million people from a single weather disaster then some serious re-zoning and redesign of infrastructure needs to be considered. That's the equivalent of 1/3rd of California, or about 7 times the population of Louisiana.
Member Since: January 25, 2012 Posts: 33 Comments: 1520
675. washingtonian115
8:56 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
Quoting trHUrrIXC5MMX:

whoa! look at that low... CV season is on the go!
Could be talking about our first cape verde storm.GFS,Euro,UKmet,and now the CFS.
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 18303
674. SFLWeatherman
8:56 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
NP
Quoting sailfish01:


Thank you!
Member Since: May 23, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 4988
673. SFLWeatherman
8:54 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
look at that high!!!
Quoting trHUrrIXC5MMX:

whoa! look at that low... CV season is on the go!
Member Since: May 23, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 4988
672. etxwx
8:52 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
From BBC: Deadly Beijing floods prompt infrastructure questions
Excerpt: Chinese media and internet users have raised questions after the heaviest rainfall to hit Beijing in 60 years left 37 people dead. Newspapers and netizens asked why drains in the capital could not cope and why more warnings were not given.
Member Since: September 4, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1532
671. 954FtLCane
8:52 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
Quoting washingtonian115:
It must be another troll.JFV wants a storm to hit him.


Yup I'm pretty sure it's JFV, he is also ernesto2012 or something like that too where he claims to be a girl from MS as well. One of his many handles.

Wait till we have Ernesto I'm sure you will see many appearances again. Right now he just pops in occasionally.
Member Since: September 30, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 108
670. trHUrrIXC5MMX
8:50 PM GMT on July 23, 2012

whoa! look at that low... CV season is on the go!
Member Since: April 23, 2011 Posts: 104 Comments: 14872
669. BahaHurican
8:50 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
Looks like the worst of whatever storm surge there is is indeed going to impact the western side of the Pearl River Estuary. I sure hope the people there were able to get to appropriate shelter....

I gotta run, ya'll.

BBL once I get home.
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22746
668. sailfish01
8:47 PM GMT on July 23, 2012
Quoting SFLWeatherman:
Link


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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

Local Weather

Light Snow
27 °F
Light Snow Mist

JeffMasters's Recent Photos

Deep Snow in Brookline, MA
Sunset at Fort DeSoto
New Years Day Sunset in Death Valley
Big Sur Clouds