Historic 2012 U.S. drought: 6th greatest on record

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 10:59 PM GMT on July 16, 2012

Share this Blog
39
+

The great drought of 2012 is upon us. The percentage area of the contiguous U.S. covered by moderate or greater drought increased to 56% by the end of June, and ranked as the sixth largest drought since U.S. weather records began in 1895, said NOAA's National Climatic Data Center in their monthly State of the Climate drought report on Monday. The last time more of the U.S. was in drought occurred in December 1956, with 58%. June 2012 ranked as the 10th greatest U.S. drought on record, when considering the percentage area of the U.S. in severe or greater drought (33%.)


Figure 1. June 2012 ranked in sixth place for the greatest percent area of the contiguous U.S. covered by moderate or greater drought, since record keeping began in 1895. Graphic created from data from NOAA's National Climatic Data Center.

The forecast: hot and dry with increasing drought
The great drought of 2012 is going to steadily worsen during the remainder of July. Recent runs of the global computer forecast models predict a continuation through the end of July of the large-scale jet stream patterns that have brought the U.S. its hot, dry summer weather. The most extreme heat will tend to be focused over the center portion of the county. That was certainly the case Monday, with temperatures near or in excess of 100° observed from South Dakota to Michigan. High temperatures near 100°F are expected in Chicago and Detroit on Tuesday, and over much of the Midwest.


Figure 2. Comparison of drought between June 2012 (top) and June 1988 (bottom) shows that drought conditions covered a similar proportion of the contiguous U.S., but the spatial patterns were different. The 2012 drought is especially intense over the Southwest U.S., but in 1988, this region experienced a very active summer monsoon season that kept the region moist. However, in 1988, the Northern Plains were much drier than in 2012. Image credit: NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory.

A multi-billion dollar drought disaster underway
Agronomists and drought experts are comparing the scale and intensity of the 2012 drought to the 1988 drought. With the forecast offering little optimism, the costs of the 2012 drought are certain to be many billions of dollars, and the disaster could be one of the top ten most expensive weather-related disasters in U.S. history. Droughts historically have been some of the costliest U.S. weather disasters. A four-year drought and locust plague from 1874 - 1877 cost $169 billion (2012 dollars), and was arguably the most expensive weather related disaster in U.S. history (see Jeffrey Lockwood's 2004 book, Locust.) The costs of the great Dust Bowl drought of the 1930s, which displaced 2.5 million people, are incalculable. The costs of government financial assistance alone were $13 billion in 2012 dollars (Warrick, 1980.) The 1988 drought cost $78 billion (2012 dollars), the second most expensive weather disaster since 1980, behind Hurricane Katrina.

The associated heat wave of the great drought of 2012 is also a major concern. The heat waves associated with the great droughts of 1980 and 1988 killed between 7,500 - 10,000 people, according to NOAA's National Climatic Data Center. The heat waves of the 1930s are blamed for 5,000 deaths. The death toll from the 2012 heat wave is approaching 100, including 23 in Chicago, up to 19 in Wisconsin, 18 in Maryland, 17 in St. Louis, and 9 in Philadelphia. The toll will undoubtedly grow as more heat-related deaths are discovered, and as the heat continues.


Figure 3. The U.S. has seen twelve weather-related disasters costing at least $15 billion since 1980, according to NOAA's National Climatic Data Center. Two of the top three most expensive disasters have been droughts.

Tornadoes kill one, injure ten in Poland
A series of rare tornadoes hit northern and western Poland over the weekend, killing one and injuring ten. At least 100 homes were destroyed, and one of the twisters measured 1 km (0.6 miles) in diameter. Tornadoes are quite rare in Poland. According to the publication, An updated estimate of tornado occurrence in Europe by Nikolai Dotzek (2003), Poland reports about two tornadoes per year, and probably has two more per year that are unreported. Thanks go to wunderground member beell for posting this link.


Video 1. Raw footage of the weekend tornadoes that hit Poland.

Jeff Masters

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 294 - 244

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20Blog Index

one bad thing about all this rain we have been getting, the rivers and streams are full, and the soil everywhere in florida is saturated, if we get a hurricane here anytime soon, there will be alot of flooding and tree's down everywhere, alot of damage for sure, we need a couple of weeks to dry out, and it does not look like we will get that drying off period anytime soon,thurs and friday it lets up, then the rains come back again whew....
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 39302
Good Morning everyone.

Ok so after 9 hrs of sleep, 1 gallon of water, and 3hrs of swimming in chlorine water, my sore throat is feeling better.
I hope it doesnt come back, i cant afford to be sick right now.


The tropics stay empty i see, the GFS looks less and less tropical now to me.
Setup isnt quite right
Member Since: February 11, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 9731
The Cape Verde peak of the season is going to spin off 3-4 storms, regardless of the Enso phase, at some point in August and September. El Nino will come into play at the back end of the season in terms of sheer levels and determine how many storms we get in October-November.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 39302
Quoting txag91met:
July 1934...wow. 1988 was still worse in the Midwest/Plains vs 2012.

Everyone forgets. BTW, the drought is broken in SE TX...13" of rain here last 7 days.

..I am glad texas got the rains this year, they surely needed it as bad as florida did, in my area the drought is history
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 39302
Quoting guygee:


Look for the USGS and the Army Corps of Engineers online sites, they have historical data on river levels. The concept of "normal" really only applies for man-made or dredged channels, or for natural rivers on the scale of a couple of decades. A natural river will silt over in places, islands will form, and the course of the river will change over time. If the river flow is constrained by levees, then the "normal" levels tend to rise over time.

Here is an example link for data on the Mississippi at McGregor IA : http://nwis.waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/uv/?site_no=0 5389500&agency_cd=USGS You can find historical data for the site or you can navigate up or down the river to other sites with level gauge data and find average levels for specified time periods.
Thanks a ton!

I can't believe I didn't think about changing silt levels and how rivers change over time, so there really isn't a long term 'normal'. A) felt a bit foolish and B) that'd explain why some river gauges report the current river level as negative feet, like the Mississippi River at Memphis.

Thanks for the info though, much appreciated.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
July 1934...wow. 1988 was still worse in the Midwest/Plains vs 2012.

Everyone forgets. BTW, the drought is broken in SE TX...13" of rain here last 7 days.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I know no one wants to see a tropical cyclone headed for them.But some parts of the U.S need a Debbie...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting StormTracker2K:


No, the drought last year was across the southern US and was on a much smaller scale than what is going on this year. The drought now is across the C & Northern US and not only that Drought is building across the Caribbean which is a key sign that El-nino is settling in.

That's what I said, but it was of much more severity than it is now.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting MahFL:


Also when you think about it, the greens are 10th of an inch, in the summer you lose typically 1/4 inch per day, so even the areas with a touch of rain will get worse.


That's a great point. I sorry to say but this drought is going to get worse especially once the heat of August arrives which is typically the hottest month of the year across the US.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting StormTracker2K:


No it won't be as strong storng but it doesn't have to be strong to have a big impact on this years hurricane season. All it takes is one of coarse but it does appear that we will see maybe only 12 named systems this year which is actualy about average.
Quoting StormTracker2K:


I never said August wouldn't be active. I said it may take a strong front to come down and dis-lodge this high across the C Atlantic before we get anything to form. The biggest key you can look at to see that El-nino is moving in the dry weather across the Caribbean. I know this because my granddad works all across the Caribbean as an engineer and he can tell you first hand that it is the driest in years across many areas of the Caribbean except the NW Caribbean (i.e the Caymans). Classic El-nino is drying across the Caribbean and if this isn't a key than I don't know what is.
I think El nino will shut down the activity in late September and October.Even if it is declared in late August or September their is a lag effect in the atmosphere.Right now the MJO has been sticking in the Indian ocean and the SAL has been strong which would explain why it is so dry in the caribbean.If I remember correctly wasn't 2007 dry for the caribbean and that as a La nina year?.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Good Morning. Not sure if this has been posted yet but here is this mornings AussieMet Enso update:


Tropical Pacific remains close to El Niño thresholds
Issued on Tuesday 17 July | Product Code IDCKGEWWOO

The past fortnight has seen climate indicators ease slightly, with all showing values near the threshold for an El Niño event. While indicators such as the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI), sea surface temperatures and trade winds have eased over the past two weeks, such short-term fluctuations are common and to be expected, and indicators still clearly remain near El Niño thresholds.

Over the last few months, observations have been trending toward El Niño. This is consistent with most model forecasts indicating that the tropical Pacific may approach or exceed El Niño thresholds sometime during the late southern winter or spring 2012. Some models indicate only borderline El Niño conditions may occur, but none suggest a return of La Niña.

During El Niño events, large parts of eastern Australia are typically drier than normal during winter and spring, while southern Australian daytime temperatures tend to be warmer. However, El Niño does not guarantee widespread dry conditions.

The Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) is currently neutral. Outlooks from POAMA, the Bureau’s climate model, indicates neutral IOD conditions for the remainder of winter and spring.

Weekly sea surface temperatures:

Warm sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies in the central tropical Pacific have decreased when compared to two weeks ago, while those in the eastern tropical Pacific remain relatively unchanged. The SST anomaly map for the week ending 15 July shows warm anomalies extend along the equator east of about 150°W. Tropical SSTs in the western half of the Pacific are near average for this time of the year.

Next update expected by 31 July 2012 | print version



There is continued warming anomaly in the E-pac and a leveling off in the Central-Pacific through July 15th.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting floridaboy14:
el nino settleting in? the 3.4 region has been cooling the last 2 weeks and is down from 0.6C to 0.4 the cold pdo got even stronger which is delaying the development of el nino. dont forget 2004 was warm neutral like us and it didnt have its first named storms till July 31st. that year had 15 storms 9 hurricanes and 6 majors. Jeanne Ivan and Charley were 3 major hurricanes tht made landfall in the US. 3! thats crazy. dont forget we had a 110mph frances that made landfall in florida. my point. all evidence is pointing to el nino talking longer to develop and the bulk of our activity wont form till the begining of august


That is true but the Caribbean was much more moist that year compared to this year. Not to say it can't happen but I think the key is weakening this Atlantic Ridge that has been insanely strong as of late.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
281. MahFL
Quoting StormTracker2K:
Rain for the same areas of the US while the rest of Country see's nothing!



Also when you think about it, the greens are 10th of an inch, in the summer you lose typically 1/4 inch per day, so even the areas with a touch of rain will get worse.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting washingtonian115:
When this El nino does form I highly doubt it'll be as strong as the one from 1997 like some people are screaming about(c'mon now) or the one from 2009 as we were all ready in El nino b y this time.It'll be weak when the year ends out unless it starts to intensify at a rapid past which doesn't seem like it.I think it'll intensify over the winter.


No it won't be as strong but it doesn't have to be strong to have a big impact on this years hurricane season. All it takes is one of coarse but it does appear that we will see maybe only 12 named systems this year which is actualy about average.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting washingtonian115:
Yeah so was July 2010 when we had ULL's all over the place and you know what happened the next month?.I doubt El nino will get to terribly strong to really interfere with the season until October.2004 comes to mind...Usually when a season has a inactive July they become active in August..so if we keep neutral conditions until then you all better watch out.It's nothing but climo right now causing the down conditions.


I never said August wouldn't be active. I said it may take a strong front to come down and dis-lodge this high across the C Atlantic before we get anything to form. The biggest key you can look at to see that El-nino is moving in the dry weather across the Caribbean. I know this because my granddad works all across the Caribbean as an engineer and he can tell you first hand that it is the driest in years across many areas of the Caribbean except the NW Caribbean (i.e the Caymans). Classic El-nino is drying across the Caribbean and if this isn't a key than I don't know what is.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
When this El nino does form I highly doubt it'll be as strong as the one from 1997 like some people are screaming about(c'mon now) or the one from 2009 as we were all ready in El nino b y this time.It'll be weak when the year ends out unless it starts to intensify at a rapid past which doesn't seem like it.I think it'll intensify over the winter.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting StormTracker2K:
Sure sign of El-Nino when we have drought across the Caribbean and drought across the US.




not really i think you overe react a lot of times



nino 3.4 been coooling
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting StormTracker2K:


No, the drought last year was across the southern US and was on a much smaller scale than what is going on this year. The drought now is across the C & Northern US and not only that Drought is building across the Caribbean which is a key sign that El-nino is settling in.


That's due to lack of snow and rainfall this past winter-spring.If you notice the annual M.S river valley didn't flood as severely as last year or the past few years.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
el nino settleting in? the 3.4 region has been cooling the last 2 weeks and is down from 0.6C to 0.4 the cold pdo got even stronger which is delaying the development of el nino. dont forget 2004 was warm neutral like us and it didnt have its first named storms till July 31st. that year had 15 storms 9 hurricanes and 6 majors. Jeanne Ivan and Charley were 3 major hurricanes tht made landfall in the US. 3! thats crazy. dont forget we had a 110mph frances that made landfall in florida. my point. all evidence is pointing to el nino talking longer to develop and the bulk of our activity wont form till the begining of august
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting StormTracker2K:
You can tell El-Nino is coming by the way the Atlantic Basin looks right now. Upper level lows all over the place then Dry Saharan dust coming across the Atlantic in response to a impressive high pressure ridge across the Atlantic. We may not see a named system I'm afraid until mid to late August.


Yeah so was July 2010 when we had ULL's all over the place and you know what happened the next month?.I doubt El nino will get to terribly strong to really interfere with the season until October.2004 comes to mind...Usually when a season has a inactive July they become active in August..so if we keep neutral conditions until then you all better watch out.It's nothing but climo right now causing the down conditions.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting AussieStorm:

there was exceptionally severe drought in southern USA last year. I doubt El Nino is the cause. I suspect La Nina is the cause.


No, the drought last year was across the southern US and was on a much smaller scale than what is going on this year. The drought now is across the C & Northern US and not only that Drought is building across the Caribbean which is a key sign that El-nino is settling in.


Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Rain for the same areas of the US while the rest of Country see's nothing!

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting StormTracker2K:
Sure sign of El-Nino when we have drought across the Caribbean and drought across the US.


there was exceptionally severe drought in southern USA last year. I doubt El Nino is the cause. I suspect La Nina is the cause.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Sure sign of El-Nino when we have drought across the Caribbean and drought across the US.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
May take a strong front to come down and stall over FL before anything forms in the Atlantic Basin which looks like that won't happen for several weeks. We need something to break this ridge across the Atlantic before we even get an invest.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
The latest southern Europe/east Asia heat wave is continuing today, with many readings of 100 or more throughout Russia and the Middle East. And even normally comfortable places are getting in on the action. For instance: the average July high in Tenerife is 77. The temperature today and tomorrow is expected to reach around 107, according to the BBC--not too bad for an island situated in the moderating waters of the Atlantic. (It's currently over 100 degrees there, which is actually not all that surprising; Marrakech in Morocco, not so many miles to the northeast of Tenerife, is currently at 116, and could come close to an all-time record high today or tomorrow.)

hot
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13567
Quoting HurrikanEB:



Quick check of wiki says that the mississppi flooding of April and May 2011 was only in the 2 to 4 billion dollar range

and area-wise, last years drought was much smaller than this year's.. a bit less than half the size of the current one. The extent of sever drought however was about 14% higher this same week last year. Link So, the 2011 drought was a smaller, but more intense drought.. so it depends on what you use to rank them: area or intensity.

July 12, 2011:


Currently (July 10, 2012):

I always thought the worse the drought the more costly it was. The Mississippi flood of last year was only $2-4 billion? They had to open a level that flooded a huge area of farm land and it also swamped many towns, made that farmland useless for decades.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I'm welling to bet by the end of the summer this will go down as the hottest and driest summer EVER for the US.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Folks the drought is only going to get much worse over the coming weeks. No relief from the heat or the dry weather.


Member Since: Posts: Comments:
264. beell
Tabular data-Percent area of US under drought conditions (07/11/2011 through 07/05/2012)-US Drought Monitor.


D0 Abnormally Dry
D1 Moderate
D2 Severe
D3 Extreme
D4 Exceptional
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
The Gulf region however is extremely moist but winds are unfavorable so this maybe the area where we get multiple storms form this year.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Just to give you an idea on just how dry the Atlantic Basin well look at the PWAT's. THe PWAT across PR is around 1" to 1.25" which is almost historically low across this region during the middle to end of July.


Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: September 10, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 11279
Mexico was affected by last year's drought. I'm not sure what the total area affected was.
Member Since: May 18, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 6061
You can tell El-Nino is coming by the way the Atlantic Basin looks right now. Upper level lows all over the place then Dry Saharan dust coming across the Atlantic in response to a impressive high pressure ridge across the Atlantic. We may not see a named system I'm afraid until mid to late August.


Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Good morning it looks like the Atlantic Basin is shutdown for business thru the end of the month.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting AussieStorm:
I have two questions on Dr Masters blog.

1. Where does the 2011 Drought rate?
2. Why isn't the flooding of the Mississippi River System from way up north to GOM, listed on the US$15 billion weather disasters.

Surely these were both notable droughts and weather disasters.



Quick check of wiki says that the mississppi flooding of April and May 2011 was only in the 2 to 4 billion dollar range

and area-wise, last year's drought was much smaller than this year's (in the US anyway).. a bit less than half the size of the current one. The extent of severe drought however was about 14% higher this same week last year. Link So, the 2011 drought was a smaller, but more intense drought.. so it depends on what you use to rank them: area or intensity.

July 12, 2011:


Currently (July 10, 2012):


It'll be interesting to compare the price tags on the two drought though.. im not sure what 2011 cost.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting AussieStorm:

The drought in Tx and Fla were worse last year than this year.
Yes, but I believe it affected a much smaller area.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Good morning.

The uptick of the daily SOI continues and now is 10 days in a row. I think is now more than a noise thing.

Link
Member Since: April 29, 2009 Posts: 75 Comments: 14337
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 39302
has it ever happened....one year NO tropical systems came over from africa?..with all that dry dust storms over there and the cooler and drier atlantic.....could this happen THIS year..and all storms formed this year were local storms?
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 39302
Member Since: March 16, 2012 Posts: 127 Comments: 7950
would be nice if one or two of those pacific storms went into california then spreads their rains eastward into the drought stricken states, I know it wont happen but....
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 39302
Quoting FLWeatherFreak91:
Maybe they didn't cost $15 billion+

The drought in Tx and Fla were worse last year than this year.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting AussieStorm:
I have two questions on Dr Masters blog.

1. Where does the 2011 Drought rate?
2. Why isn't the flooding of the Mississippi River System from way up north to GOM, listed on the US$15 billion+ weather disasters.

Surely these were both notable droughts and weather disasters.
Maybe they didn't cost $15 billion+
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
And so it begins...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I have two questions on Dr Masters blog.

1. Where does the 2011 Drought rate?
2. Why isn't the flooding of the Mississippi River System from way up north to GOM, listed on the US$15 billion+ weather disasters.

Surely these were both notable droughts and weather disasters.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Excessive Heat Warning
URGENT - WEATHER MESSAGE
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DETROIT/PONTIAC MI
346 AM EDT TUE JUL 17 2012

...DANGEROUS HEAT WILL IMPACT THE AREA TODAY...

.SOUTHWEST WINDS WILL BRING THE HOT AIRMASS THAT WAS LOCATED OVER
THE DAKOTAS INTO SOUTHERN MICHIGAN TODAY. THE DAY WILL BEGIN ON
THE WARM SIDE AS EARLY MORNING TEMPERATURES WILL BE NEAR 80.
TEMPERATURES WILL THEN RAPIDLY WARM DURING THE LATE MORNING...WITH
READINGS LIKELY REACHING OR EXCEEDING 100 DEGREES DURING THE
AFTERNOON. THE AIRMASS WILL NOT BE EXCESSIVELY HUMID...BUT
DEWPOINTS IN THE MID TO POSSIBLY UPPER 60S WILL ALLOW THE HEAT INDEX
TO RANGE FROM 103 TO 110 DEGREES. A STRONG COLD FRONT WILL MOVE
ACROSS SOUTHEAST MICHIGAN FROM LATE AFTERNOON THROUGH
TONIGHT...BRINGING RELIEF FROM THE HEAT.

MIZ047-048-053-060>063-068>070-075-076-082-083-17 1600-
/O.UPG.KDTX.EH.A.0002.120717T1500Z-120718T0300Z/
/O.NEW.KDTX.EH.W.0002.120717T1500Z-120718T0300Z/
MIDLAND-BAY-SAGINAW-SHIAWASSEE-GENESEE-LAPEER-ST. CLAIR-
LIVINGSTON-OAKLAND-MACOMB-WASHTENAW-WAYNE-LENAWEE -MONROE-
INCLUDING THE CITIES OF...MIDLAND...BAY CITY...SAGINAW...OWOSSO...
FLINT...LAPEER...PORT HURON...HOWELL...PONTIAC...WARREN...
ANN ARBOR...DETROIT...ADRIAN...MONROE
346 AM EDT TUE JUL 17 2012

...EXCESSIVE HEAT WARNING IN EFFECT FROM 11 AM THIS MORNING TO
11 PM EDT THIS EVENING...

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN DETROIT/PONTIAC HAS ISSUED AN
EXCESSIVE HEAT WARNING...WHICH IS IN EFFECT FROM 11 AM THIS
MORNING TO 11 PM EDT THIS EVENING. THE EXCESSIVE HEAT WATCH IS NO
LONGER IN EFFECT.


HAZARDOUS WEATHER...

* AFTERNOON HIGH TEMPERATURES WILL RANGE FROM 98 TO 105 DEGREES.

* HEAT INDICES WILL RANGE BETWEEN 103 AND 110 DEGREES.

IMPACTS...

* HEAT RELATED ILLNESS SUCH AS HEAT STROKE...HEAT EXHAUSTION...
AND DEHYDRATION WILL BE POSSIBLE

* THE CUMULATIVE EFFECT OF CONSECUTIVE HOT DAYS MAY ADD TO THE
HEAT STRESS OF THOSE MOST AFFECTED BY THE HOT TEMPERATURES.


PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

* TAKE EXTRA PRECAUTIONS...IF YOU WORK OR SPEND TIME OUTSIDE.
WHEN POSSIBLE...RESCHEDULE STRENUOUS ACTIVITIES TO EARLY
MORNING OR EVENING. KNOW THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF HEAT
EXHAUSTION AND HEAT STROKE. WEAR LIGHT WEIGHT AND LOOSE FITTING
CLOTHING WHEN POSSIBLE AND DRINK PLENTY OF WATER. TO REDUCE
RISK DURING OUTDOOR WORK...THE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH
ADMINISTRATION RECOMMENDS SCHEDULING FREQUENT REST BREAKS IN
SHADED OR AIR CONDITIONED ENVIRONMENTS. ANYONE OVERCOME BY HEAT
SHOULD BE MOVED TO A COOL AND SHADED LOCATION. HEAT STROKE IS
AN EMERGENCY - CALL 911.
Member Since: March 16, 2012 Posts: 127 Comments: 7950
Miami NWS Discussion

MODELS STILL SUGGEST THE INTRUSION OF A 595 DAM RIDGE BUILDING
ACROSS THE BAHAMAS AND INTO SOUTH FLORIDA LATE WEDNESDAY AND
PERSISTING THROUGH THE END OF THE WEEK. THIS WILL BE ACCOMPANIED
BY THE SAHARAN DUST WHICH SHOULD BE MOST NOTICEABLE THURSDAY AND
FRIDAY IN THE FORM OF A HAZY SKY. WITH THE ABSENCE OF A DEEP
MOISTURE LAYER DURING THE LATTER HALF OF THE WEEK...ESPECIALLY
DURING THIS TIME OF YEAR...TEMPERATURES SHOULD SOAR INTO THE MID AND
UPPER 90S ACROSS SOUTH FLORIDA. HEAT INDEX VALUES ARE STILL
EXPECTED TO RUN IN THE 105-109 RANGE ACROSS MAINLY INTERIOR AND
WESTERN AREAS.

THE DRY PATTERN LOOKS TO BE SHORT LIVED HOWEVER AS DEEPER
MOISTURE IS EXPECTED TO RETURN INTO THE WEEKEND.
Member Since: September 10, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 11279

Viewing: 294 - 244

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.