July Atlantic hurricane outlook

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 12:55 PM GMT on July 13, 2012

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It's mid-July, and we have yet to see a named storm form in the Atlantic this month. The computer models are not predicting any development through at least July 20, and if we make it all the way to the end of the month without a named storm forming, it will be the first July since 2009 without a named storm. Since the current active hurricane period began in 1995, 13 of 17 years (76%) have had a named storm form during July. The busiest July occurred in 2005, when five named storms and two major hurricanes formed. These included Hurricane Dennis and Hurricane Emily--the strongest hurricanes ever observed so early in the season. Only eight major hurricanes have formed in July since record keeping began in 1851. As seen in Figure 1, most of the last half of July activity occurs in the Gulf of Mexico and waters off the Southeast U.S. coast. These type of storms form when a cold front moves off the U.S. coast and stalls out, with the old frontal boundary serving as a focal point for development of a tropical disturbance (as happened for Alberto, Beryl, Chris, and Debby in 2012.) There will be at least two cold fronts moving off the U.S. Mid-Atlantic coast over the next two weeks. The first of these fronts will push offshore around July 20, and we will need to watch the waters offshore of North Carolina for development then. Formation potential will be aided by ocean temperatures that are about 0.7°C (1°F) above average along the U.S. East Coast.


Figure 1. Tracks of all tropical storms and hurricanes 1851 - 2006 that formed July 16-31. The U.S. coast from North to Texas are the preferred strike locations. Only a few storms have formed in the tropical Atlantic and Caribbean in July. Wind shear is typically too high and SSTs too cool in July to allow African waves in the Caribbean and tropical Atlantic to develop into tropical storms. However, a few long-track "Cape Verdes" hurricanes have occurred in July, spawned by tropical waves that came off the coast of Africa. African tropical waves serve as the instigators of about 85% of all major hurricanes.


Figure 2. The seasonal distribution of Atlantic hurricane activity shows that July typically has low activity. Image credit: NHC.

Sea Surface Temperatures: slightly above average
The departure of Sea Surface Temperatures (SST) from average over the tropical Atlantic between Africa and Central America was about 0.3°C above average during June (Figure 3.) This figure has not changed much over the first two weeks of July. These temperatures are not warm enough to appreciably affect the odds of a July named storm or hurricane. The strength of the Azores-Bermuda high has been near average over the past two weeks, driving near-average trade winds. The latest 2-week run of the GFS model predicts continued average-strength trade winds through late-July, so SSTs should remain about 0.3°C above average during this period, due to average amounts of cold water mixing up from below due to the wind action on the water.


Figure 3. Sea Surface Temperature (SST) departure from average for July 12, 2012. SSTs were 0.3°C above average over the tropical Atlantic's Main Development region for hurricanes, from Africa to Central America between 10° and 20° North Latitude. Note the large region of above average SSTs along the Equatorial Pacific off the coast of South America, the hallmark of a developing El Niño episode. Image credit: NOAA/NESDIS

El Niño on the way?
For two consecutive weeks, ocean temperatures 0.5 - 0.6°C above average have been present in the tropical Eastern Pacific, which is right at the threshold for a weak El Niño episode. NOAA's Climate Prediction Center has issued an El Niño Watch, and gives a 61% chance that El Niño conditions will be present during the August - September - October peak of the Atlantic hurricane season. The likely development of a full-fledged El Niño episode means that Atlantic hurricane activity will probably be suppressed in 2012, due to the strong upper-level winds and high wind shear these events typically bring to the tropical Atlantic.


Figure 4. Sea Surface Temperature (SST) departure from average for the the equatorial Eastern Pacific (the area 5°N - 5°S, 120°W - 170°W, also called the "Niña 3.4 region"). El Niño conditions exist when the SST in this region rises 0.5°C above average. As of July 9, 2012, SSTs in the Niño 3.4 region had risen to 0.5°C above average. To be considered an "El Niño episode", El Niño conditions must occur for five consecutive months, using 3-month averages. Image credit: NOAA Climate Prediction Center.

Wind shear: above average
Wind shear is usually defined as the difference in wind between 200 mb (roughly 40,000 foot altitude) and 850 mb (roughly 5,000 foot altitude). In most circumstances, wind shear above 20 knots will act to inhibit tropical storm formation. Wind shear below 12 knots is very conducive for tropical storm formation. High wind shear acts to tear a storm apart. The jet stream has two bands of strong high-altitude winds that are currently bringing high wind shear to the Atlantic. The southern branch (subtropical jet stream) is bringing high wind shear to the Caribbean, and the northern branch (polar jet stream) is bringing high wind shear to the waters offshore of New England. This configuration often leaves a "hole" of low shear between the two branches, off the Southeast U.S. coast and over the Gulf of Mexico. The jet stream is forecast to maintain this two-branch pattern over the coming two weeks. Wind shear has been about 10 - 20% higher than average over the first two weeks of July, and is predicted to be mostly above average for the coming two weeks. This will cut down on the odds of a July storm.


Figure 5. Vertical instability over the Caribbean Sea in 2012 (blue line) compared to average (black line.) The instability is plotted in °C, as a difference in temperature from near the surface to the upper atmosphere. Thunderstorms grow much more readily when vertical instability is high. Instability has been lower than average, due to an unusual amount of dry air in the atmosphere, reducing the potential for tropical storm formation. Image credit: NOAA/NESDIS/CIRA.

Dry air: above average
As seen in Figure 5, there has been an unusual amount of dry, stable air in the Caribbean this year creating low levels of vertical instability. This has occurred due to a combination of dry air from Africa, and upper-atmosphere dynamics creating large areas of sinking air that dry as they warm and approach the surface. The Gulf of Mexico and tropical Atlantic between the coast of Africa and the Lesser Antilles have also seen low vertical instability this summer. June and July are the peak months for dry air and dust coming off the coast of Africa, and the Saharan dust storms have been quite active over the past two weeks. Expect dry air to be a major deterrent to any storms that try to form in the tropical Atlantic during July.

Steering currents: average
The predicted steering current pattern for the next two weeks is a typical one for July. We have an active jet stream bringing many troughs of low pressure off the East Coast of the U.S. These troughs are frequent enough and strong enough to recurve any tropical storms or hurricanes that might penetrate north of the Caribbean Sea. Steering current patterns are predictable only about 3 - 5 days in the future, although we can make very general forecasts about the pattern as much as two weeks in advance. There is no telling what might happen during the peak months of August, September, and October--we might be in for a repeat of the favorable 2010 and 2011 steering current pattern, which recurved most storms out to sea--or the unfavorable 2008 pattern, which steered Ike and Gustav into the Gulf of Mexico.

Summary: a below average chance of a July tropical storm
Given that none of the computer models are forecasting tropical storm formation in the coming seven days, SSTs are only slightly above average, and wind shear and vertical stability are above average, I'll go with a 30% chance of a named storm forming in the Atlantic during the remainder of July.


Figure 6. Hurricane Emilia over the Eastern Pacific at 20:35 UTC July 10, 2012. At the time, Emilia was a Category 3 hurricane with 125 mph winds. Emilia peaked earlier in the day as a Category 4 storm with 140 mph winds--the strongest hurricane in the East Pacific so far in 2012. Image credit: NASA.

An active Eastern Pacific hurricane season
It's been a very active start to the Eastern Pacific hurricane season, where we've already had six named storms, four hurricanes, and three intense hurricanes. A typical season has 4 named storms, 2 hurricanes, and 0 intense hurricanes by July 14. The formation of Tropical Storm Fabio on July 12 marks the 4th earliest formation of the Eastern Pacific's season's sixth storm. The record is held by the year 1985, when the season's sixth storm formed on July 2. Record keeping began in 1949.

Have a great weekend, everyone, and I'll be back Monday with a new post.

Jeff Masters

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FLOOD ADVISORY
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SAN JUAN PR
150 PM AST FRI JUL 13 2012

PRC019-039-054-073-091-101-107-149-132045-
/O.NEW.TJSJ.FA.Y.0277.120713T1750Z-120713T2045Z/
/00000.N.ER.000000T0000Z.000000T0000Z.000000T0000 Z.OO/
BARRANQUITAS PR-CIALES PR-FLORIDA PR-JAYUYA PR-MANATI PR-MOROVIS PR-
OROCOVIS PR-VILLALBA PR-
150 PM AST FRI JUL 13 2012

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN SAN JUAN HAS ISSUED AN

* URBAN AND SMALL STREAM FLOOD ADVISORY
FOR THE FOLLOWING MUNICIPALITIES...

IN PUERTO RICO
BARRANQUITAS...CIALES...FLORIDA...JAYUYA...MANATI. ..MOROVIS...
OROCOVIS AND VILLALBA

* UNTIL 445 PM AST

* AT 145 PM AST...DOPPLER WEATHER RADAR INDICATED AN AREA OF SHOWERS
AND THUNDERSTORMS WITH VERY HEAVY RAIN IN THE ADVISORY AREA.
RAINFALL AMOUNTS OF AROUND 1 INCH HAVE FALLEN ACROSS THESE
MUNICIPALITIES IN THE LAST HOUR AND ADDITIONAL 1 TO 2 INCHES ARE
POSSIBLE IN THE NEXT FEW HOURS.

MOST FLOOD DEATHS OCCUR IN AUTOMOBILES. NEVER DRIVE YOUR VEHICLE INTO
AREAS WHERE THE WATER COVERS THE ROADWAY. FLOOD WATERS ARE USUALLY
DEEPER THAN THEY APPEAR. JUST ONE FOOT OF FLOWING WATER IS POWERFUL
ENOUGH TO SWEEP VEHICLES OFF THE ROAD. WHEN ENCOUNTERING FLOODED
ROADS MAKE THE SMART CHOICE...TURN AROUND...DONT DROWN.

&&

LAT...LON 1821 6631 1817 6635 1817 6639 1816 6640
1817 6643 1815 6643 1827 6660 1828 6660
1830 6657 1832 6658 1833 6661 1841 6654

$$

FIGUEROA
Member Since: April 29, 2009 Posts: 75 Comments: 14002
Quoting 1900hurricane:

Lake Travis is much further west than the rain is. It has hardly been touched unfortunately.


Geesh. I heard that Lake Travis pretty much supplies water for many areas around Lake Travis. Is this true?
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Quoting StormTracker2K:




I bet Lake Travis has filled up nicely over the last few weeks.


Lake Travis is much further west than the rain is. It has hardly been touched unfortunately. For Lake Travis to rise, the rain would have to fall in the counties to the west of Austin.

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308. MTWX
Quoting ncstorm:


well its in purple for some type of formation..it has a huge spin and my NWS actually spoke about it





The one off of the NJ coast has more organization then that mess!
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Quoting DavidHOUTX:
Uh Oh





I bet Lake Travis has filled up nicely over the last few weeks.

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14 KEHCharleston: A question, if you please.
My granddaughter just asked a question that has me stumped (though I should probably know the answer).
Can there be lightning without rain (meaning rain clouds, not that it is actually raining)?


July 31, CANONSBURG, Pa. (AP) -- An 11-year-old western Pennsylvania girl is recovering after she was struck by a bolt from the blue. Lisa Wehrle tells the Observer-Reporter newspaper of Washington, Pa., that the sun was shining when her daughter, Britney, was struck by lightning Friday, apparently from a storm several miles away.
Lisa Wehrle says, "There was no rain. It was a beautiful day. All she heard was some thunder."
The lightning hit Britney as she was walking down a hill in North Strabane Township with a friend about 2:30 p.m. that day. The bolt hit her on the left shoulder, leaving a burn-like mark and exited her wrist, where it left another mark. She was treated at a Pittsburgh hospital. Doctors discovered her arm was broken, but otherwise she's OK.

Bolts from the Blue [can] travel more than 25 miles away from the thunderstorm cloud. Bolt from the Blue lightning flashes are a particularly dangerous type of lightning flash, as they appear to come out of clear sky. This type of lightning is why it is dangerous to be outside when thunderstorms are in the region, even when skies are still clear. Lightning can, and does, strike many miles away from the thunderstorm cloud itself. It is a good idea to wait 30 minutes or more after the rain ends before resuming outdoor activities.

As a kid exploring the neighborhood "forest" on a bright sunny Tennessee day, I was "shock&awe"d by a tremendous BOOM and a FLASH that lit up the immediate landscape even more than the Sun. Then there was a heavy THUD immediately behind me.
Turned around and discovered that a major tree limb had almost fallen on top of me.
A smouldering tree limb. And when I looked up, a smoking tree.
Hied it to the nearest house and had them call the fire department.
Near as we could tell, I had come way too darn close to being hit by clear-air lightning.
There was no thunder either before or after that bolt from the blue.
And the clouds far away did not appear to be raining: ie there was no grayish area beneath them indicative of rain or virga (rain that evaporates before it hits the ground).
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Uh Oh

Member Since: August 18, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 598


Central and East Pacific RGB.
Loopable
Member Since: September 3, 2011 Posts: 13 Comments: 3468
Melting of the Greenland ice sheet may be picking up.

The bridge (and some other infrastructure) at Kangerlussaq has been wiped out by a flooded river which originates in the ice.

Flow measurements are now about 3,500,000 liters per second. The former record was around 2,000,000 liter/second.

Don't know if this a generalized or only a localized event, but best to start paying attention. If generalized then sea level rise estimates might need an update and upsizing.

Or perhaps we can get the North Carolina legislature to write a bill forbidding the Greenland ice sheet from melting....
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Quoting weatherneophyte:


You're too young to have gone through the endless climate scares that the media and "scientists" have tried to heap upon the public throughout the years. When I was in high school, we were going to be in an ice age by now, starving to death because we wouldn't be able to grow enough food. Now (when we were supposed to all be frozen in ice) they're telling us, no, no, it's going to be too hot. We'll all be starving to death because we can't grow enough food. Remember these days when you hit your 50's and 60's. You'll have an entirely different set of life experiences to draw upon when the newest major "scare" starts coming out of the media. I'm reminded of the bird flu epidemic that should've taken most of us out by now. Or the AIDS virus that should've decimated the population. Both are definite concerns and should be treated as such. But the breathless panic that the media sensationalizes is unneeded.
I'm certainly not too young to have gone through "...the endless climate scares that the media and 'scientists' have tried to heap upon the public throughout the years". Yet I remember no such scares. Perhaps you can indulge the forum by providing us a list? Now, I recall that a few mid-70s articles in Newsweek spoke of how aerosol pollution--heavier at the time--could result in worldwide cooling. I also remember much talk of the ozone hole and the danger of fluorocarbons, but that wasn't a "scare"; it was a real and dangerous issue which the Montreal Protocol helped ameliorate. That leaves only talk of the recent unprecedented warming, also not a "scare", since it's real, and if anything has been vastly under-reported by a complicit press lazily addicted to false equivalency, as though pro-environment scientists and Big Oil CEOs were equally as credible on the issue.

So, again, please refresh my memory by presenting your list of "endless climate scares". I look forward to what you have to say.
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Quoting StormTracker2K:


I think he's bored and is just trying to stir up trouble.



trouble?
bored?

naawww.

I just speak the truth.
Im Objective, not biased to da swirls
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i miss sunshine, its been cloudy for 3 days...
At least its been cooler than the upper 90s we had, but it is humid and warm enough to feel like you will grow mold in your lungs from staying outside...
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299. etxwx
What a difference a year makes...
In August 2011, the pond looked like this:

Now in July 2012:


We missed the deluge that hit south of here but lucked out with about 4 inches of slow rain over the last few days.
Hard to stay dry in SE Texas today...but hope everyone stays safe.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Empty? What is this nonsense?


I think he's bored and is just trying to stir up trouble.

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Remnant Daniel, TS Imilia, and TS Fabio......
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Member Since: September 3, 2011 Posts: 13 Comments: 3468
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Empty? What is this nonsense?


Scientific Facts.
Let the Denialists say what they want ;)

jk, but its empty, sorry to dash anyone's hopes
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MSNBC story on the landslide in Alaska. Melting permafrost (on a large scale) as a possible culprit:

Sharman, the park ecologist, echoed that sentiment, saying he's heard from experts that "they would not be surprised" to see more such landslides inside the national park if temperatures continue to warm.

"Certainly we are seeing an increase in large landslides over the past decades," Geertsema said, citing his 2006 study that found between 1973 and 2003 the average in northern British Columbia increased from 1.3 large landslides per year to 2.3.

Moreover, he said, most of the slides in northern British Columbia are happening in the warmest years.


Just adding another dimension to the issues.......
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Quoting GeorgiaStormz:


purple is just showing up from rotation, typical TCFP.
And the NWS mentions just about all rotations as well.

The tropical atlantic is empty

Empty? What is this nonsense?
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31444
12z Euro running
24 hours


48 hours
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Quoting ncstorm:


well its in purple for some type of formation..it has a huge spin and my NWS actually spoke about it





purple is just showing up from rotation, typical TCFP.
And the NWS mentions just about all rotations as well.

The tropical atlantic is empty
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vorticity with it as well

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Quoting weatherneophyte:


Ok, I know I'll be banned, but here goes.

We be trollin!
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Quoting StormTracker2K:


Pretty boring weather this afternoon. El-nino just may keep this years hurricane season in check.



The only flies in the ointment are this gulf low and this upper level low east of the Bahamas. Sometimes these upper lows can burrow down to the surface. Either way it looks like a rain maker for FL come Sunday and Monday.



well its in purple for some type of formation..it has a huge spin and my NWS actually spoke about it



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Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31444
Looks like nino 3.4 has warmed over the last couple of days.

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I know El nino is going to develop but please people don't make it seem as though it's going to save us all.I thought people learned that lesson in 1992...
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 16406
Quoting weatherneophyte:


Me too.


ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz.
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Fabio should be a hurricane at the next advisory.



CURRENT ESTIMATE
Date (yyyymmddhh): 2012071311
SATCON (2mem): MSLP = 980 hPa MSW = 72 kt
ADT: 984 hPa 72 kt Scene: UNFRM
CIMSS AMSU: 980 hPa 72 kt Bias Corr: 0 (MW)
CIRA AMSU: NA hPa NA kt Tmax: NA

CIMSS/NESDIS-USAF/NRL AMSU TC Intensity Estimation:
TROPICAL STORM FABIO
Friday 13jul12 Time: 1142 UTC
Latitude: 15.02 Longitude: -110.29
Storm position corresponds to AMSU-A FOV 28 [130]
-------------------------------------------------- ---------------
| Estimated MSLP: 980 hPa
| Estimated Maximum Sustained Wind: 72 kts
| Estimate Confidence: Fair ( /- 10mb /- 12kts )
-------------------------------------------------- ---------------
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31444
Quoting Patrap:
Who Dat.


Drew Brees signs 5 yr 100 million deal


WE DAT
ATLANTA FOREVER

Quoting washingtonian115:
The GFS appears to develop a weak area of low pressure of of Africa.at least a T.D.

Ah he's at it again :).Hater hater alligator.


no development ;)
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Quoting Chucktown:


yawn....


Pretty boring weather this afternoon. El-nino just may keep this years hurricane season in check.



The only flies in the ointment are this gulf low and this upper level low east of the Bahamas. Sometimes these upper lows can burrow down to the surface. Either way it looks like a rain maker for FL come Sunday and Monday.

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Quoting ncstorm:


LOL..You are one of the nicest bloggers here on this blog!!
I like to give everyone a chance.I use to argue to with bloggers that got on my nerves.But now I just put them on ignore.And when I do I just do it silently without the whole blog knowing about it.I like almost everyone on here.including the GW crowed.
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 16406
Quoting SteveDa1:


Yea, I also find it tiring. :S


Me too.
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277. yoboi
Quoting ncstorm:


Dont forget the African Killer Bee Swarm that was heading here to the US..I actually saw an article the other day of the impending doom of those bees..If I listen to every sensationalized news story, I would be putting my life savings in a fortified bus to have built in my backyard 30 feet in the ground waiting on the mayan countdown..


i think 43 feet is the proper depth for that event...
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Quoting Chucktown:


yawn....


Yea, I also find it tiring. :S
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.
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Quoting AtHomeInTX:


Yep. Took me a long, long time to learn this lesson.

Words of Wisdom.
Member Since: August 14, 2010 Posts: 10 Comments: 16406
Quoting AtHomeInTX:


Yep. Took me a long, long time to learn this lesson.



LOL..You are one of the nicest bloggers here on this blog!!
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Quoting weatherneophyte:


You're too young to have gone through the endless climate scares that the media and "scientists" have tried to heap upon the public throughout the years. When I was in high school, we were going to be in an ice age by now, starving to death because we wouldn't be able to grow enough food. Now (when we were supposed to all be frozen in ice) they're telling us, no, no, it's going to be too hot. We'll all be starving to death because we can't grow enough food. Remember these days when you hit your 50's and 60's. You'll have an entirely different set of life experiences to draw upon when the newest major "scare" starts coming out of the media. I'm reminded of the bird flu epidemic that should've taken most of us out by now. Or the AIDS virus that should've decimated the population. Both are definite concerns and should be treated as such. But the breathless panic that the media sensationalizes is unneeded.


I don't follow media, I follow science, but thanks for the tip!

If I'm correct (and I may entirely be incorrect because I'm too young) only a few scientists predicted an Ice Age back then because they saw a pattern of ice ages over the last hundreds of thousands of years and concluded that we might be heading into an ice age... now I don't know if this, translated to the media, was changed to "SCIENTISTS SAY AN ICE AGE IS COMING"... I don't know much about back then.

What I do know now, is if I follow the real SCIENCE, I know the earth is warming much too fast for our own good.

The bird flu epidemic, again probably exaggerated by tenfold by the media.

It's a real shame though that most people follow the media and not the science and this may be the number one reason why today so many people deny global warming...
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Quoting SteveDa1:


If I may paraphrase Neapolitan's earlier post...

Sigh...


yawn....
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Quoting ncstorm:


He was baiting you..thats what they do..its hard to not say something..I know for a fact..


Yep. Took me a long, long time to learn this lesson.

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Quoting weatherneophyte:


You're too young to have gone through the endless climate scares that the media and "scientists" have tried to heap upon the public throughout the years. When I was in high school, we were going to be in an ice age by now, starving to death because we wouldn't be able to grow enough food. Now (when we were supposed to all be frozen in ice) they're telling us, no, no, it's going to be too hot. We'll all be starving to death because we can't grow enough food. Remember these days when you hit your 50's and 60's. You'll have an entirely different set of life experiences to draw upon when the newest major "scare" starts coming out of the media. I'm reminded of the bird flu epidemic that should've taken most of us out by now. Or the AIDS virus that should've decimated the population. Both are definite concerns and should be treated as such. But the breathless panic that the media sensationalizes is unneeded.


Dont forget the African Killer Bee Swarm that was heading here to the US..I actually saw an article the other day of the impending doom of those bees..If I listen to every sensationalized news story, I would be putting my life savings in a fortified bus to have built in my backyard 30 feet in the ground waiting on the mayan countdown..
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FLOOD STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE JACKSONVILLE FL
1022 AM EDT FRI JUL 13 2012

...THE FLOOD WARNING CONTINUES FOR THE FOLLOWING RIVERS IN FLORIDA...

SANTA FE RIVER AT FORT WHITE AFFECTING ALACHUA...BRADFORD...
COLUMBIA...GILCHRIST...SUWANNEE AND UNION COUNTIES


PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

SAFETY MESSAGE...RESIDENTS AND THOSE WITH INTERESTS ALONG THE RIVER
SHOULD TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT THREATENED PROPERTY. HIGH AND FAST
FLOWING RIVERS ARE NOT SUITABLE FOR RECREATION OF ANY KIND. KEEP
CHILDREN AWAY FROM FLOODED AREAS. DO NOT DRIVE VEHICLES THROUGH
FLOODED AREAS. TURN AROUND...DON`T DROWN.
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........................................I am wondering if we are ever going to get a west coast sea breeze today. dont look like it so whatever comes our way will come from the east coast i guess
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ahhh I love the fresh smell of reorganized weather bookmarks in the afternoon!
Member Since: September 3, 2011 Posts: 13 Comments: 3468
265. yoboi
Quoting 19N81W:
dont need a hurricane but some good afternoon tstorms would be nice! not even getting those....


fly to 29N95W and ya should get all ya want....
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Quoting SteveDa1:


If I may paraphrase Neapolitan's earlier post...

Sigh...


You're too young to have gone through the endless climate scares that the media and "scientists" have tried to heap upon the public throughout the years. When I was in high school, we were going to be in an ice age by now, starving to death because we wouldn't be able to grow enough food. Now (when we were supposed to all be frozen in ice) they're telling us, no, no, it's going to be too hot. We'll all be starving to death because we can't grow enough food. Remember these days when you hit your 50's and 60's. You'll have an entirely different set of life experiences to draw upon when the newest major "scare" starts coming out of the media. I'm reminded of the bird flu epidemic that should've taken most of us out by now. Or the AIDS virus that should've decimated the population. Both are definite concerns and should be treated as such. But the breathless panic that the media sensationalizes is unneeded.
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<-- Slides out to Henry's for a er, early "meeting".
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Who Dat.


Drew Brees signs 5 yr 100 million deal
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Happy Birthday Harrison Ford!

Member Since: September 3, 2011 Posts: 13 Comments: 3468

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About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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