July Atlantic hurricane outlook

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 12:55 PM GMT on July 13, 2012

Share this Blog
60
+

It's mid-July, and we have yet to see a named storm form in the Atlantic this month. The computer models are not predicting any development through at least July 20, and if we make it all the way to the end of the month without a named storm forming, it will be the first July since 2009 without a named storm. Since the current active hurricane period began in 1995, 13 of 17 years (76%) have had a named storm form during July. The busiest July occurred in 2005, when five named storms and two major hurricanes formed. These included Hurricane Dennis and Hurricane Emily--the strongest hurricanes ever observed so early in the season. Only eight major hurricanes have formed in July since record keeping began in 1851. As seen in Figure 1, most of the last half of July activity occurs in the Gulf of Mexico and waters off the Southeast U.S. coast. These type of storms form when a cold front moves off the U.S. coast and stalls out, with the old frontal boundary serving as a focal point for development of a tropical disturbance (as happened for Alberto, Beryl, Chris, and Debby in 2012.) There will be at least two cold fronts moving off the U.S. Mid-Atlantic coast over the next two weeks. The first of these fronts will push offshore around July 20, and we will need to watch the waters offshore of North Carolina for development then. Formation potential will be aided by ocean temperatures that are about 0.7°C (1°F) above average along the U.S. East Coast.


Figure 1. Tracks of all tropical storms and hurricanes 1851 - 2006 that formed July 16-31. The U.S. coast from North to Texas are the preferred strike locations. Only a few storms have formed in the tropical Atlantic and Caribbean in July. Wind shear is typically too high and SSTs too cool in July to allow African waves in the Caribbean and tropical Atlantic to develop into tropical storms. However, a few long-track "Cape Verdes" hurricanes have occurred in July, spawned by tropical waves that came off the coast of Africa. African tropical waves serve as the instigators of about 85% of all major hurricanes.


Figure 2. The seasonal distribution of Atlantic hurricane activity shows that July typically has low activity. Image credit: NHC.

Sea Surface Temperatures: slightly above average
The departure of Sea Surface Temperatures (SST) from average over the tropical Atlantic between Africa and Central America was about 0.3°C above average during June (Figure 3.) This figure has not changed much over the first two weeks of July. These temperatures are not warm enough to appreciably affect the odds of a July named storm or hurricane. The strength of the Azores-Bermuda high has been near average over the past two weeks, driving near-average trade winds. The latest 2-week run of the GFS model predicts continued average-strength trade winds through late-July, so SSTs should remain about 0.3°C above average during this period, due to average amounts of cold water mixing up from below due to the wind action on the water.


Figure 3. Sea Surface Temperature (SST) departure from average for July 12, 2012. SSTs were 0.3°C above average over the tropical Atlantic's Main Development region for hurricanes, from Africa to Central America between 10° and 20° North Latitude. Note the large region of above average SSTs along the Equatorial Pacific off the coast of South America, the hallmark of a developing El Niño episode. Image credit: NOAA/NESDIS

El Niño on the way?
For two consecutive weeks, ocean temperatures 0.5 - 0.6°C above average have been present in the tropical Eastern Pacific, which is right at the threshold for a weak El Niño episode. NOAA's Climate Prediction Center has issued an El Niño Watch, and gives a 61% chance that El Niño conditions will be present during the August - September - October peak of the Atlantic hurricane season. The likely development of a full-fledged El Niño episode means that Atlantic hurricane activity will probably be suppressed in 2012, due to the strong upper-level winds and high wind shear these events typically bring to the tropical Atlantic.


Figure 4. Sea Surface Temperature (SST) departure from average for the the equatorial Eastern Pacific (the area 5°N - 5°S, 120°W - 170°W, also called the "Niña 3.4 region"). El Niño conditions exist when the SST in this region rises 0.5°C above average. As of July 9, 2012, SSTs in the Niño 3.4 region had risen to 0.5°C above average. To be considered an "El Niño episode", El Niño conditions must occur for five consecutive months, using 3-month averages. Image credit: NOAA Climate Prediction Center.

Wind shear: above average
Wind shear is usually defined as the difference in wind between 200 mb (roughly 40,000 foot altitude) and 850 mb (roughly 5,000 foot altitude). In most circumstances, wind shear above 20 knots will act to inhibit tropical storm formation. Wind shear below 12 knots is very conducive for tropical storm formation. High wind shear acts to tear a storm apart. The jet stream has two bands of strong high-altitude winds that are currently bringing high wind shear to the Atlantic. The southern branch (subtropical jet stream) is bringing high wind shear to the Caribbean, and the northern branch (polar jet stream) is bringing high wind shear to the waters offshore of New England. This configuration often leaves a "hole" of low shear between the two branches, off the Southeast U.S. coast and over the Gulf of Mexico. The jet stream is forecast to maintain this two-branch pattern over the coming two weeks. Wind shear has been about 10 - 20% higher than average over the first two weeks of July, and is predicted to be mostly above average for the coming two weeks. This will cut down on the odds of a July storm.


Figure 5. Vertical instability over the Caribbean Sea in 2012 (blue line) compared to average (black line.) The instability is plotted in °C, as a difference in temperature from near the surface to the upper atmosphere. Thunderstorms grow much more readily when vertical instability is high. Instability has been lower than average, due to an unusual amount of dry air in the atmosphere, reducing the potential for tropical storm formation. Image credit: NOAA/NESDIS/CIRA.

Dry air: above average
As seen in Figure 5, there has been an unusual amount of dry, stable air in the Caribbean this year creating low levels of vertical instability. This has occurred due to a combination of dry air from Africa, and upper-atmosphere dynamics creating large areas of sinking air that dry as they warm and approach the surface. The Gulf of Mexico and tropical Atlantic between the coast of Africa and the Lesser Antilles have also seen low vertical instability this summer. June and July are the peak months for dry air and dust coming off the coast of Africa, and the Saharan dust storms have been quite active over the past two weeks. Expect dry air to be a major deterrent to any storms that try to form in the tropical Atlantic during July.

Steering currents: average
The predicted steering current pattern for the next two weeks is a typical one for July. We have an active jet stream bringing many troughs of low pressure off the East Coast of the U.S. These troughs are frequent enough and strong enough to recurve any tropical storms or hurricanes that might penetrate north of the Caribbean Sea. Steering current patterns are predictable only about 3 - 5 days in the future, although we can make very general forecasts about the pattern as much as two weeks in advance. There is no telling what might happen during the peak months of August, September, and October--we might be in for a repeat of the favorable 2010 and 2011 steering current pattern, which recurved most storms out to sea--or the unfavorable 2008 pattern, which steered Ike and Gustav into the Gulf of Mexico.

Summary: a below average chance of a July tropical storm
Given that none of the computer models are forecasting tropical storm formation in the coming seven days, SSTs are only slightly above average, and wind shear and vertical stability are above average, I'll go with a 30% chance of a named storm forming in the Atlantic during the remainder of July.


Figure 6. Hurricane Emilia over the Eastern Pacific at 20:35 UTC July 10, 2012. At the time, Emilia was a Category 3 hurricane with 125 mph winds. Emilia peaked earlier in the day as a Category 4 storm with 140 mph winds--the strongest hurricane in the East Pacific so far in 2012. Image credit: NASA.

An active Eastern Pacific hurricane season
It's been a very active start to the Eastern Pacific hurricane season, where we've already had six named storms, four hurricanes, and three intense hurricanes. A typical season has 4 named storms, 2 hurricanes, and 0 intense hurricanes by July 14. The formation of Tropical Storm Fabio on July 12 marks the 4th earliest formation of the Eastern Pacific's season's sixth storm. The record is held by the year 1985, when the season's sixth storm formed on July 2. Record keeping began in 1949.

Have a great weekend, everyone, and I'll be back Monday with a new post.

Jeff Masters

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 1711 - 1661

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48Blog Index

Member Since: March 16, 2012 Posts: 127 Comments: 7940
Member Since: March 16, 2012 Posts: 127 Comments: 7940
Fabio:

Member Since: July 21, 2011 Posts: 83 Comments: 7167
Member Since: March 16, 2012 Posts: 127 Comments: 7940
1707. nigel20
Barbados radar
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: July 21, 2011 Posts: 83 Comments: 7167
15/0000 UTC 15.7N 133.7W T2.0/3.0 EMILIA -- East Pacific
15/0000 UTC 16.3N 115.4W T5.0/5.0 FABIO -- East Pacific

CI# /Pressure/ Vmax
5.8 / 954.6mb/109.8kt


Final T# Adj T# Raw T#
5.6 5.8 5.8

CI# /Pressure/ Vmax
2.2 /1008.4mb/ 32.0kt


Final T# Adj T# Raw T#
1.7 1.7 1.5

Member Since: March 16, 2012 Posts: 127 Comments: 7940
1703. nigel20
Fabio
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1702. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
Japan Meteorological Agency
Tropical Cyclone Advisory #4
TROPICAL DEPRESSION 08
12:00 PM JST July 15 2012
=====================================

SUBJECT: Tropical Depression Near The Marianas

At 3:00 AM UTC, Tropical Depression (1008 hPa) located at 19.3N 143.1E has 10 minute sustained winds of 30 knots with gusts of 45 knots. The depression is reported as moving west northwest slowly.

Dvorak Intensity: T2.0

Forecast and Intensity
=========================

24 HRS: 21.5N 138.7E - 35 knots (Tropical Storm/CAT 1) - South Of Japan
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: March 16, 2012 Posts: 127 Comments: 7940
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Hit the nail on the head. Where is this from?




Link



next time you guys look for the link



this put EL nino news in the seach box in yahoo or google




and now am off night
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Dull2012:
BREAKING NEWS: Ron Paul OFFICIALLY Endorses Mitt Romney for president.

Go mitt; Romney 2012!


NO POLITICS
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1697. nigel20
Good night/evening everyone!

Daily SOI: 8.9
30 Day SOI: -7.1
90 Day SOI: -3.4

Recent (preliminary) Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) values

SST Anomaly
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Thousands lose electric power in U.S. northeast as substation goes down in fire
Posted on July 14, 2012
July 14, 2012 – SALINA, NY – Thousands of National Grid customers were in the dark during a major power outage on Friday. The outage had the greatest affect on customers in Syracuse and Salina, and was sparked by a fire at a National Grid substation in Liverpool. The substation caught fire around 12:30am on Friday. A National Grid spokesperson says the fire is believed to be specifically caused by bushlings, which allow energy to pass between pieces of equipment and are a vital component of substations.

Link

Newt Gringrich Warns Of Vulnerable Power Grid
Posted: July 13, 2012

United States Power Grid Threats
After recent storms knocked out power for more than 3 million people in the middle of a record heat wave former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich decided to open up about America’s vulnerable power grid. In an opinion piece posted on The Washington Post Gingrich writes:

“Without power, the comforts of home become worthless. You sit in the sweltering heat, realizing you are living in a box that, without electricity, is a trap. You pray for the “juice” to return before your groceries go bad. You either make do in the heat or find refuge with friends who have electricity.”

Newt claims that the power grid is created in such a ways that doomsday-level damage could be caused if the United States were to be hit with an electromagnetic pulse (EMP) strike or even a major solar storm.

The former speaker is worried that a nuclear weapon detonated over the atmosphere of the continental United States could cause an EMP that would knock power out for months, perhaps even years. Gingrich also points tot he Carrington Event of 1859, a solar storm that since that time has caused geomagnetic disturbances every 75 years. While we make think the possibility of a solar storm causing major issues is not possible in 1089 a space storm knocked out power to millions of people in Quebec for several hours.

Read more at http://www.inquisitr.com/276160/newt-gringrich-war ns-of-vulnerable-power-grid/#sOZ0dykumWErmj4g.99
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Tazmanian:
El Nino Delayed

The longer this Drought of 2012 has gone on, it seems like there’s been more discussion about what’s happening in the Pacific related to El Nino. That’s not a surprise—everyone now, not just in the ag world, is looking for some way for this withering event to end.

And, for awhile in late June and early July, measurements used to track the El Nino-La Nina state of affairs gave the impression that things were starting to click for the development of El Nino, with the hope that jet stream winds fueled by El Nino would start to sweep in from the west, with at least some rain; preferably, lots of it. Temperatures were warming up in the eastern part of the ocean; and the barometric feature called the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) was indicating a move into the “minus” category.

A reminder here that the SOI tracks the relationship between barometric readings on the island of Tahiti and at Darwin in far northern Australia. A quick definition of this relationship: a consistent “plus” value points to the Tahiti barometric trend being stronger than on Tahiti. Conversely, a consistent “minus” reading indicates a stronger Darwin barometric trend versus Tahiti. Values of either +8.0 or -8.0 or greater in either positive or negative direction on a 30-day running average point to either La Nina (positive) or El Nino (negative).

However—research has shown that for either El Nino or La Nina to be a factor in the Midwest weather pattern, the SOI values need to be at the -8.0 (El Nino) or +8.0 (La Nina) on the 90-day calculation. So it takes a real sustained move in that pressure relationship out in the ocean to truly make a difference in what happens with Midwest weather.

Now, back to the trends. At the end of June, the SOI monthly calculation seemed to point to a bona fide developing El Nino, with a monthly figure of -10.2. And in late June, the barometer really seemed to be cranking into El Nino as well, with these daily SOI numbers: June 24 -41.19; June 25 -49.35; June 26, -46.96. The readings June 27 and 28 were also suggestive of and El Nino trend at -34.44 on the 27th and a -19.96 reading on the 28th of June.

But that trend has not continued. Almost this entire week, from July 8-13, those daily SOI readings have been positive, and the past 3 days have seen daily SOI values of +12.25 on Wednesday July 11; +18.22 Thursday July 12; and +15.82 Friday July 13. (Note—the SOI values are calculated and catalogued by the Australia Bureau of Meteorology.)

The result is that the 30-day SOI number is actually LESS than the strict-definition El Nino threshold at -7.2. And the 90-day reading is only about half that at -3.4.

Things can change quickly, even in the ocean temperature and pressure categories (relatively speaking of course). But the past couple weeks’ developments suggest that El Nino’s presence is either very weak or perhaps not really going on yet in the Pacific basin. And, most troubling for the interior U.S., the timetable for a real El Nino effect has been put back compared to what I perceive to be the hopes of at least a few in agriculture for sustained El Nino-related rains during late July and August.

El Nino prospects were featured prominently in my recent series of article on the midsummer weather outlook, and I’ll conclude this blog posting with this comment from the article that dealt with El Nino. The comment is from Dr. Dennis Todey, South Dakota state climatologist, who did the research into the El Nino-La Nina time frame for Midwest weather impact during his grad student days at Iowa State University:

"I don't look for El Nino patterns to show up on time to help things out. It looks more like fall—September into October," he said. "And right now this El Nino does not look like a very strong one, so that is not a big winner for us.

Hit the nail on the head. Where is this from?
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31858
Quoting GeorgiaStormz:
nite all
nightssss.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Maybe Fabio like his name sake wants to go to Hollywood. And become famous a star on Hollywood Boulevard.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting GeorgiaStormz:
nite all


NITE, BRO
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Right now is 9:58 in my country and I am so bored.anyone think we will see Ernesto of a trough split?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
nite all
Member Since: February 11, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 9724
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting winter123:

It's a dry dust storm though. I'm looking at the wave behind it.


Member Since: Posts: Comments:
El Nino Delayed

The longer this Drought of 2012 has gone on, it seems like there’s been more discussion about what’s happening in the Pacific related to El Nino. That’s not a surprise—everyone now, not just in the ag world, is looking for some way for this withering event to end.

And, for awhile in late June and early July, measurements used to track the El Nino-La Nina state of affairs gave the impression that things were starting to click for the development of El Nino, with the hope that jet stream winds fueled by El Nino would start to sweep in from the west, with at least some rain; preferably, lots of it. Temperatures were warming up in the eastern part of the ocean; and the barometric feature called the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) was indicating a move into the “minus” category.

A reminder here that the SOI tracks the relationship between barometric readings on the island of Tahiti and at Darwin in far northern Australia. A quick definition of this relationship: a consistent “plus” value points to the Tahiti barometric trend being stronger than on Tahiti. Conversely, a consistent “minus” reading indicates a stronger Darwin barometric trend versus Tahiti. Values of either +8.0 or -8.0 or greater in either positive or negative direction on a 30-day running average point to either La Nina (positive) or El Nino (negative).

However—research has shown that for either El Nino or La Nina to be a factor in the Midwest weather pattern, the SOI values need to be at the -8.0 (El Nino) or +8.0 (La Nina) on the 90-day calculation. So it takes a real sustained move in that pressure relationship out in the ocean to truly make a difference in what happens with Midwest weather.

Now, back to the trends. At the end of June, the SOI monthly calculation seemed to point to a bona fide developing El Nino, with a monthly figure of -10.2. And in late June, the barometer really seemed to be cranking into El Nino as well, with these daily SOI numbers: June 24 -41.19; June 25 -49.35; June 26, -46.96. The readings June 27 and 28 were also suggestive of and El Nino trend at -34.44 on the 27th and a -19.96 reading on the 28th of June.

But that trend has not continued. Almost this entire week, from July 8-13, those daily SOI readings have been positive, and the past 3 days have seen daily SOI values of +12.25 on Wednesday July 11; +18.22 Thursday July 12; and +15.82 Friday July 13. (Note—the SOI values are calculated and catalogued by the Australia Bureau of Meteorology.)

The result is that the 30-day SOI number is actually LESS than the strict-definition El Nino threshold at -7.2. And the 90-day reading is only about half that at -3.4.

Things can change quickly, even in the ocean temperature and pressure categories (relatively speaking of course). But the past couple weeks’ developments suggest that El Nino’s presence is either very weak or perhaps not really going on yet in the Pacific basin. And, most troubling for the interior U.S., the timetable for a real El Nino effect has been put back compared to what I perceive to be the hopes of at least a few in agriculture for sustained El Nino-related rains during late July and August.

El Nino prospects were featured prominently in my recent series of article on the midsummer weather outlook, and I’ll conclude this blog posting with this comment from the article that dealt with El Nino. The comment is from Dr. Dennis Todey, South Dakota state climatologist, who did the research into the El Nino-La Nina time frame for Midwest weather impact during his grad student days at Iowa State University:

"I don't look for El Nino patterns to show up on time to help things out. It looks more like fall—September into October," he said. "And right now this El Nino does not look like a very strong one, so that is not a big winner for us.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: July 21, 2011 Posts: 83 Comments: 7167
Quoting ilovehurricanes13:
look at the low on land!!

It's a dry dust storm though. I'm looking at the wave behind it.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting stormchaser19:
Some patterns of la nina still present, so El NINO maybe take his time......look how strong is the high pressure in east pacific






I think some are attributing the Pacific high pressure too much to La Nina. The high pressure in the North Pacific has a lot to do with a cold PDO signature. It is the reason anomalies are so warm in the center with a horseshoe shape ring of cold anomalies near the coast and around the center of warm anomalies. Yes, high pressure is a signature of La Nina in the North Pacific, but La Nina is not the main driver of this high of which you speak.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Wow, it just got quiet...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1676. yoboi
Quoting goosegirl1:


Say, how about we put together some of our pepperoni rolls, gumbo file and that 151? I'll bring the mule kick and we 'll throw a heck of a culture clash!



sounds good....i will even throw in some boudain...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting WxGeekVA:


You should have been:


And yeah, missing someone isn't a great feeling at the time, but then it makes seeing them feel even better than it already does.
Yeah I have been hoping to see him but he is on vacation on other city.:(
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Some patterns of la nina still present, so El NINO maybe take his time......look how strong is the high pressure in east pacific




Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting yoboi:




yeah it does...but movies are just movies...


Say, how about we put together some of our pepperoni rolls, gumbo file and that 151? I'll bring the mule kick and we 'll throw a heck of a culture clash!
Member Since: December 17, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 1228
Quoting WxGeekVA:


I sure hope so. I really do. I haven't seen her in 5 days cause she's been busy and I miss her already.
awwww that is so sweet I actually haven`t seen the person I date since may when we finish high school I know how hard can it be when you don`t see the person you like.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1670. yoboi
Quoting WxGeekVA:


They can but he'd probably circumvent it too...


challenge him to a cage match....sometimes the only way too solve things..
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting allancalderini:
Like they say the third time is the one. hope you can go out with her on tuesday. ;)


I sure hope so. I really do. I haven't seen her in 5 days cause she's been busy and I miss her already.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1668. yoboi
Quoting goosegirl1:




yeah it does...but movies are just movies...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting yoboi:


oh ok, they don' do an IP ban on here??


They can but he'd probably circumvent it too...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting WxGeekVA:


Mine got cancelled again... because her parents grounded her for something stupid... we are gonna do that on Tuesday though
Like they say the third time is the one. hope you can go out with her on tuesday. ;)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting MississippiWx:


You got me all wrong...I wasn't talking about actual twinkle twinkle stars. LOL.


Oh I know. I thought you were referencing my dating problems lol but I do see what you did there.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1664. yoboi
Quoting WxGeekVA:


A troll who has been on this blog for some time and comes back after bring banned with new usernames... Some of the other members of the blog can probably fill you in better than I can.


oh ok, they don' do an IP ban on here??
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Dull2012:


Absolutely! Say as it is, ma'am.

Listen to this wise, middle age, married woman over here.

She could give you quite a bit of advice on the sanctity of marriage and of life as well.
Come on Marriage??? really I am actually not fond to marry someone one day.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting yoboi:


i don't knock mountain people, i am cajun so we probably sort of the same breed we know how to survive...

Cool, another misunderstood cultural group:) I always felt the media was to blame for creating a sterotypical hillbilly, when the reality is you don't meet very many who even begin to fit the description. "Deliverence" and "Wrong Turn" didn't help our reputation. But, hey, we did invent pepperoni rolls. Does that help? ;)
Member Since: December 17, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 1228
1661. pcola57
Hey washingtonian115 you got mail..
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Viewing: 1711 - 1661

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

Local Weather

Partly Cloudy
66 °F
Partly Cloudy