U.S. experiences warmest 12-month period on record--again

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 9:04 PM GMT on July 09, 2012

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Thanks in part to the historic heat wave that demolished thousands of high temperature records at the end of June, temperatures in the contiguous U.S. were the warmest on record over the past twelve months and for the year-to-date period of January - June, said NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) on Monday. June 2012 was the 14th warmest June on record, so was not as extreme overall as March 2012 (first warmest March on record), April (third warmest April), or May (second warmest May.) However, temperatures were warm enough in June to set a new U.S. record for hottest 12-month period for the third straight month, narrowly eclipsing the record set just the previous month. The past thirteen months have featured America's 2nd warmest summer (in 2011), 4th warmest winter, and warmest spring on record. Twenty-six states were record warm for the 12-month period, and an additional sixteen states were top-ten warm. The year-to-date period of January - June was the warmest on record by an unusually large margin--1.2°F.


Figure 1. This time series shows the five warmest years that the contiguous U.S. has experienced, and how the year-to-date temperature evolved each month throughout those years. The time series also shows the 2012 year-to-date temperature through June, which was the warmest first half of any year on record for the lower 48. The 2012 data are still preliminary. Image credit: NOAA/NCDC.


Figure 2. Four of the top-ten warmest 12-month periods in the contiguous U.S. since 1895 have occurred since April 2011. Image credit: NOAA/NCDC.

Most extreme January - June period on record
NOAA's U.S. Climate Extremes Index (CEI), which tracks the percentage area of the contiguous U.S. experiencing top-10% and bottom-10% extremes in temperature, precipitation, and drought, was 44% during the year-to-date January - June period. This is the highest value since CEI record-keeping began in 1910, and more than twice the average value. Remarkably, 83% of the contiguous U.S. had maximum temperatures that were in the warmest 10% historically during the first six months of 2012, and 70% of the U.S. of the U.S. had warm minimum temperatures in the top 10%. The percentage area of the U.S. experiencing top-10% drought conditions was 20%, which was the 14th greatest since 1910. Extremes in 1-day spring heavy precipitation events were near average.


Figure 3. NOAA's U.S. Climate Extremes Index (CEI) for January - June shows that 2012 has had the most extreme first six months of the year on record, with 44% of the contiguous U.S. experiencing top-10% extreme weather.

Tuesday Webinar on the future of extreme weather impacts on business
I'm presenting a 12-minute Webinar talk on the future of weather-related disasters at 2 pm EDT Tuesday July 10. If you want to register (it's free) and listen in, visit the propertycasualty360.com web site. The title of the webinar is, "The Year-Round CAT Season: Is Your Business Prepared for Increasingly Frequent Severe Weather?"

"New McCarthyism" targets climate scientists
Bill Blakemore with ABC News has an interesting five-part interview with climate scientist Dr. Michael Mann, where Dr. Mann explains how a "New McCarthyism" is targeting climate scientists. I reviewed Dr. Mann's excellent book, "The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars", earlier this year.

A 1 in 1.6 million event?
I originally wrote in this post that "Each of the 13 months from June 2011 through June 2012 ranked among the warmest third of their historical distribution for the first time in the 1895 - present record. According to NCDC, the odds of this occurring randomly during any particular month are 1 in 1,594,323. Thus, we should only see one more 13-month period so warm between now and 124,652 AD--assuming the climate is staying the same as it did during the past 118 years."

It has been pointed out to me that the calculation of a 1 in 1.6 million chance of occurrence (based on taking the number 1/3 and raising it to the 13th power) would be true only if each month had no correlation to the next month. Since weather patterns tend to persist, they are not truly random from one month to the next. Thus, the odds of such an event occurring are greater than 1 in 1.6 million--but are still very rare. I appreciate hearing from those of you who wrote to point out a correction was needed.

Jeff Masters

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Member Since: March 16, 2012 Posts: 127 Comments: 7981
Quoting RitaEvac:
Bastrop was notorious for the record wild fire last year remember?


Now:

Since 500am this morning radar indicates a small area of 6-9 inches of rainfall near Webberville.

Bastrop County OEM has issued an evacuation order for all residents on Comanche Trail off of FM 969. If trapped residents should call 911%u2026the fire department is en route to conduct swift water rescues.

Radar shows a small area of very heavy rainfall continuing along the Bastrop/Travis County line nearly stationary. Additional rainfall of 1-2 inches may occur and this will worsen ongoing flooding of small creeks that are already out of banks.

Yup, that area right here:



I actually drove through there just the other day.
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Quoting txjac:


I think that right now the lack of people making the change is the economy and afforability.

I'm a single parent of two children in college ...three car family with a single income. By the time I pay bills and college costs there isnt a whole lot to put aside for a "new-fangled" vehichle.

All three of us drive used cars, four cylinder of course.

Until things become more affordable or when my kids get out of my bank account then I can think about changing my vehichle.


Sure. Right now you have to do what you can do.

Drive the most efficient (lowest MPG) cars you can afford. More efficient gas/diesel cars are being manufactured, with time they will be available as used cars.

EVs seem to be dropping in price. Rumors are out that the 2013 Nissan Leaf will see a price drop. Some years from now used EVs will be sitting in lots the way used gasmobiles are now.



Member Since: February 22, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1344
Hey, y'all! What's going on in Pacific right now?
Member Since: August 1, 2011 Posts: 28 Comments: 8119
We can build a elevated Bullet Train in the Median of the Current Interstate system, power it my Solar.

If one has 3 cars and commute to school or work less than 50 mile total a day each,...then EV is the best solution over the 4 cyl.

Plus the Tax Credit is Huge.

I sold my Saturn SL-1 this am and am going EV soon.

Till then I'm on streetcar and Bicycle
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 431 Comments: 131960
Quoting Tropicsweatherpr:
The ImpactWeather webinar was not good news for those who want to track many Tropical systems in the North Atlantic basin . They have 12/5/2 and development mainly according to them will occur in the Western Atlantic (NE of Bahamas) and in Western Caribbean/SGOM. The CV season will be almost nonexistant they say.
No big news there, especially ITO the formation potential. Bloggers here have been saying since April that CV season was likely to be down and CAR / GoM season up. Best concensus we got here pre-season [i.e. APR] was
1) early and often [though I don't think anybody expected 2 storms in May] and
2) close to home.
A lot of pple are still holding on to their 14 NS predictions, while others are falling in line with the 12 the "experts" are calling for.

I still think this is going to turn out to be an interesting season, though not necessarily because of strong or numerous storms in the ATL...
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22872
Quoting captainktainer:


Well, with respect to weather and climate he's more knowledgeable than Stephen Hawking... because Hawking is an astrophysicist. With respect to William Gray, Jeff is superior due to his ability to not make wildly stupid predictions- such as Gray's prediction that the globe would start cooling as of a few years ago, in contravention of literally all the science and actual reality.

It is not "propaganda" to show the truth. It is not "propaganda" to show the data and connect it to the peer reviewed research that has come before. The fact of the matter is that the globe is warming - feel free to question it if you have the background to do so, but the scientific community is more solidly certain of this fact than they are that the Higgs boson has been found. The fact of the matter is that anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions, as shown by changes in the isotopes of carbon present in the atmosphere, are up hugely. The fact of the matter is that atmospheric carbon dioxide, by the laws of thermodynamics, is a major greenhouse gas.

If you persist in trying to run away from weather sites that acknowledge these facts, all out of some misguided attempt to prevent your worldview from being challenged, you will find yourself retreating further and further into a dark mental corner of bitterness and ignorance, and in the process will deny yourself many pleasant opportunities to interact with wonderful people and expand your understanding of this complex world we live in. You do not have to be like that. You have an opportunity to choose evidence-based thinking over political noise. I can only hope that you will do so.


I echo these sentiments! Deniers trying to sell to the sheep, but we ain't sheep and we ain't buying.
Member Since: April 18, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 2437
Member Since: March 16, 2012 Posts: 127 Comments: 7981
Bastrop was notorious for the record wild fire last year remember?


Now:

Since 500am this morning radar indicates a small area of 6-9 inches of rainfall near Webberville.

Bastrop County OEM has issued an evacuation order for all residents on Comanche Trail off of FM 969. If trapped residents should call 911…the fire department is en route to conduct swift water rescues.

Radar shows a small area of very heavy rainfall continuing along the Bastrop/Travis County line nearly stationary. Additional rainfall of 1-2 inches may occur and this will worsen ongoing flooding of small creeks that are already out of banks.
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According to an article in New Scientist, five of six 2011 extreme weather events looked at carefully by scientists can, indeed, be blamed on climate change to a greater or lesser extent. "We can never say 100 per cent absolutely that this is due to climate change," [Peter] Stott [of the UK Met Office] says. "But we are very confident.". Among the findings:

--The 2011 Texas heat wave and drought was 20 times more likely to occur in 2011 than it was in the 1960s.

--November, 2011, was the second warmest since records began in 1659. Such an anomaly was 60 times more likely to occur than it was in the 1960s.

--"Continental Europe had an unusually warm spring and autumn in 2011. This was partly the result of westerly winds bringing warm air from the tropics, but these circulation patterns cannot explain all the heat. "It wouldn't have been that unusual without the long-term warming," says Stott."

--"Famine struck East Africa last summer, after both the region's rainy seasons failed and caused a severe drought. Several studies linked this to changes in sea surface temperatures in the western Pacific and Indian Oceans, but it was not clear if this was part of a long-term trend. Stott now says there is "initial evidence" that climate change has, indeed, affected ocean temperatures, and partly caused the drought."

So much for the oft-heard, wishy-washy, noncommital "We can't blame any single weather event on climate change" line. The fact is, our profligate and unimpeded burning of fossil fuels is "loading the dice" for such events to happen--and there'll be a hefty price to pay for allowing that to happen.
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Quoting BahaHurican:
Much agreed... would love to hear some happy news...

I came into this "debate" on pyrate's side of things... extremely skeptical about all the hoo-ha... unfortunately, very little that I've read on the topic [and I've read extensively from just about everybody I can find out there, not just on this blog] makes me feel confident about the skeptic position anymore. I still have a lot of skepticism about the "millions of years of records" part; however, looking at what we DO have in more recent records, there's enough to suggest that human activity is impacting local patterns in our wx and climate.

And, as always, my concern is considerably less on "did we cause it" and considerably more on "how are we going to deal with it". IMO, using up every bit of oil we have before we decide to change to alternative energy sources is just an unwise way of taking civilization forward. OTOH, expecting people to quit oil "cold-turkey" is just unrealistic.



No one that I've seen has called for a cold-turkey quit. It's impossible. People would not stand for it. Plus, it would crash our economies and cause great suffering, famine, and all other sorts of problems.

The most extreme call I've seen is for a World War II like effort to move us to renewable energy in 20 years.

We've waited longer than we should have to start working on the problem. Now we're going to have to do a bunch of "adapting" - abandon buildings in flood plains, give up farming/ranching in the driest places, install more AC, etc.

The choice we have now is whether we work at reducing fossil fuels or sentence ourselves to more expensive "adapting".


Member Since: February 22, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1344

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Gotta ban setting up to my west

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Quoting Neapolitan:
I'm sorry that went over your head. But I'm not always so verbally uneconomical; you'd be surprised with just how much I can say with only two words...
To quote press, "I don't care who you are, that's funny".

LOL
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22872


Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 33837
Quoting LargoFl:
Not to bring politics here but..in GW's first term he added a dollar to every gallon of gas at the pumps..supposedly..to help the oil companies build new refineries..ok..its been how long now?..way over ten years..how many new refineries do you know of..thats been built?....nada that i know of..the dollar went to to you know who's pockets..gas now should be 2.00 something instead of 3.00 something...for people trying to just get by in this life..this really hurts them


Whole point is to make you get used to it and then you never know. Get accustomed to it and whallla, your suckered in for the long haul permanently
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Quoting BahaHurican:
Can't expect much of anything else until Sep is on the wane...
yes we havent had a big storm in the gulf lately to cool the water down, mid to high 80's that water is
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Quoting HurricaneHunterJoe:


Not in Southern California where I live. My electricity provider is San Diego Gas and Electric( Sempra Energy )
My cost's go up with the more I use! The first 400KW is like .06 or .08 per KW and then like doubles after 400KW.
I always thought if ya buy a higher volume you get a better price like at Costco


It costs utility company significant money to bring peak generation on line. They're just charging you based on their costs.

Member Since: February 22, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1344
902. txjac
Quoting hurricanejunky:


Once they figure out the charging part of it, lithium air batteries will offer a 500+ mile range on a SINGLE charge. That's exciting stuff too...in addition to all that you mentioned.


I think that right now the lack of people making the change is the economy and afforability.

I'm a single parent of two children in college ...three car family with a single income. By the time I pay bills and college costs there isnt a whole lot to put aside for a "new-fangled" vehichle.

All three of us drive used cars, four cylinder of course.

Until things become more affordable or when my kids get out of my bank account then I can think about changing my vehichle.
Member Since: April 24, 2010 Posts: 3 Comments: 2817
Quoting ilovehurricanes13:
i do not like how the water temp keep getting warmer everyday look how warm the water getting on the east coast and the GOM..
Can't expect much of anything else until Sep is on the wane...
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22872
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A new Auburn University study suggests the Southeastern U.S. absorbs more carbon than it produces

Link
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Quoting Barefootontherocks:
A natural gas company serving OK but based out of state charges $25 minimum per month, even if all you use is $5.78 worth.

In the use of wind-generated energy, Oklahoma, is ranked 6th or 8th in the nation, depending on the source you look at. The state has mandated 15% of electricity be generated by means other than fossil fuels by 2015. What is the record of other U.S. states on this?

IMO, this is one area where states' rights might play a viable role. Why import oil in AZ, when you get 320 days of sunshine a year, and could potentially generate most of your own electricity from it?

To put it another way, if ALL the oil we have was being used ONLY for automobiles, and everything else we used was powered by alternative energy sources, how much longer could we drive gas engine cars before we ran out?

It doesn't have to be "all or nothing at all"....
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22872


map above was this time 2011
map below shows now
we are way way ahead on ice loss
almost to the point of no rtn



faster and faster
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Quoting RitaEvac:
I remember in 2003 when I bought my first new car, gas was something like $1.30-35. When I would get gas didn't even need to look at prices, it was not an issue, you knew what it cost to fill up and actually fill up all the way. Now, you gotta look at the actual prices to see where the cheaper gas is. And I no longer fill up all the way, haven't for years.
Not to bring politics here but..in GW's first term he added a dollar to every gallon of gas at the pumps..supposedly..to help the oil companies build new refineries..ok..its been how long now?..way over ten years..how many new refineries do you know of..thats been built?....nada that i know of..the dollar went to to you know who's pockets..gas now should be 2.00 something instead of 3.00 something...for people trying to just get by in this life..this really hurts them
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Quoting BobWallace:


What's the stated reason for the $4.99 charge?

I'm off the grid. If I had access to the grid it would be cheaper to pay $4.99 a month during the summer months when I've got way more power than I can use in order to have access to grid power when it's cloudy and I have to resort to the generator. I'd save a bunch of money.

Five bucks a month for backup? I'd pay it.


Not in Southern California where I live. My electricity provider is San Diego Gas and Electric( Sempra Energy )
My cost's go up with the more I use! The first 400KW is like .06 or .08 per KW and then like doubles after 400KW.
I always thought if ya buy a higher volume you get a better price like at Costco
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Quoting Articuno:
I wonder what's more scarier:
A megathrust earthquake
or a
EF5 tornado

Both.

Personally, I would think a megathrust quake is scarier, since the very ground you walk on is *moving*. You can at least get out of the way of an EF5.
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Who thinks about stuff like that?

Not any one over 40 dats fer sure.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 431 Comments: 131960

From WXYZ in Detroit
Member Since: March 16, 2012 Posts: 127 Comments: 7981
Quoting BobWallace:


We have the technology to embed wire in highways and run our vehicles off the electricity in those wires.

But that may not be the cheapest way to do things. We've got some very interesting things happening in the battery field. We've got batteries that can be almost fully charged in less than 20 minutes. We've got batteries that can withstand 2,000 100% depth of discharge cycles.

With batteries that will go 2,000 cycles we drive a "100 mile range" EV further because we can sacrifice some battery life and discharge the batteries more.

100 miles w/2,000 cycles would be a 200,000 mile battery. Using the batteries harder on long trips might reduce battery life to 150,000 miles, not a big sacrifice.

Get highway range up to 150 miles and you could drive more than 400 miles with only two <20 minute recharge stops. For most people who don't do many 400 mile drives per year that would be no problem.

Batteries are going to get even better. Nighttime electricity is cheaper. It's likely to be cheaper to run off batteries than to wire roads.

Sort of reminds me of the old story about the king who wanted to do something good for his subjects.

He called in his advisers and suggested that they cover the roads with leather to make walking easier.

One of his advisers suggested it would take less leather to cover the bottom of people's feet....


Once they figure out the charging part of it, lithium air batteries will offer a 500+ mile range on a SINGLE charge. That's exciting stuff too...in addition to all that you mentioned.
Member Since: August 28, 2006 Posts: 6 Comments: 2899
I wonder what's more scarier:
A megathrust earthquake
or a
EF5 tornado
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Quoting Patrap:
from Neapolitan earlier..





FASTER AND FASTER WE GO
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I remember in 2003 when I bought my first new car, gas was something like $1.30-35. When I would get gas didn't even need to look at prices, it was not an issue, you knew what it cost to fill up and actually fill up all the way. Now, you gotta look at the actual prices to see where the cheaper gas is. And I no longer fill up all the way, haven't for years. I'm now a gas expert, and had to learn in my mid 20s how to comprehend oil prices cuz gas went thru the roof in 2005 when before never needed to.
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Quoting schistkicker:


Um, I don't think anyone's ever claimed that the planet won't survive. It certainly -has- seen far worse than what we're throwing at it: asteroid impacts, flood basalt eruptions, gamma-ray bursts...

However, while the planet keeps on turning, the biosphere usually takes quite a bit of punishment. As is happening currently as well.

If you have some reason to say that we're not the blame or that CO2 isn't the big problem, based on real data, I'd be happy to hear it. I can't speak for others, but I take no joy in worrying about the direction our planet's headed; the convergent datasets don't leave much room for optimism, though... I'd be happy to be wrong. What do you have to share that debunks the prevailing scientific consensus?
Much agreed... would love to hear some happy news...

I came into this "debate" on pyrate's side of things... extremely skeptical about all the hoo-ha... unfortunately, very little that I've read on the topic [and I've read extensively from just about everybody I can find out there, not just on this blog] makes me feel confident about the skeptic position anymore. I still have a lot of skepticism about the "millions of years of records" part; however, looking at what we DO have in more recent records, there's enough to suggest that human activity is impacting local patterns in our wx and climate.

And, as always, my concern is considerably less on "did we cause it" and considerably more on "how are we going to deal with it". IMO, using up every bit of oil we have before we decide to change to alternative energy sources is just an unwise way of taking civilization forward. OTOH, expecting people to quit oil "cold-turkey" is just unrealistic.

Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22872
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Area forecast disscusion for southeast MI:
Forecast opinion - Today and Tonight
High pressure in place over the western Great Lakes will slowly move east over the central GreatLakes by this evening. While afternoon cu development will again be possible today with cool air inthe mid levels, warm air just above 700 mb will create an inversion, severely limiting the depth thecu will be able to develop. In addition abundant low level dry air will mean a high cloud base withonly a few thousand feet available for cu development during the afternoon hours. The high mixinglayer to around 775 mb and temperatures at this layer around +6 celsius means high temperaturesshould top out in the low to mid 80s away from Lake Huron this afternoon. While the lake breeze willcool temperatures down across the southeastern forecast area later this afternoon, highs areexpected to get into the 80s before the lake breeze tracks westward. Across the Thumb the influenceof Lake Huron should limit highs to the middle to upper 70s with winds already blowing in off thelake.
With the high firmly in place winds will be light across southeast Michigan tonight. The loss ofdaytime heating will mean mostly clear skies, providing ideal radiative conditions tonight. Withthis in mind low tonight should generally be in the lower to middle 50s across the region, withtemperatures closer to 60 degrees near the Detroit urban heat island.
.
Remaining Remarks on the forecast -
The broad upper level troughing in place over the Great Lake region will give way to weak shortwaveridging for the end of the work week. This should for allow for a slow moderating trend, .as1000-500 mb thicknesses rise to around 570 dam. The amplified upper level ridge currently overwestern Canada will flatten, and main question of the extended period is if the shortwavetrough/energy over the northern California coast will be able to help draw deep moisture over thegulf coast states northward as we head into Friday, as shortwave trough axis slides through theDakotas and into the upper Mississippi River Valley over the first half of the weekend. The Canadianhas remained rather adamant with this occurring, with plenty of convection developing over southeastMichigan, while the 12z European indicated a bit more of a glancing blow, but still quite moist (1000-500 mb relative humidity of 90 percent ) clipping the Detroit metro area Friday night. Even ifshowers/thunderstorms do not materialize ( although the signs/trends are encouraging ), the increasein clouds Friday and potentially into Saturday will mute the max temp response, and likely assuringmaxes remain capped just under 90 degrees.
. . posted at 332 AM EDT Tuesday July 10 2012
Member Since: March 16, 2012 Posts: 127 Comments: 7981
Quoting Bobbyweather:
I haven't seen a tornado in my life. It doesn't happen that much here. I didn't even go through a tornado while I was in the US, although there were tornado watches.
Also, I haven't been through a hurricane. Although when I was little, I went through Typhoon Maemi (2003), and recently Typhoon Konpasu (2010) which made landfall near Seoul. Konpasu, however, just caused high winds, and little rain.

What's a tornado like? Does it really lift cows and swing them around? (sarcasm?)
Yes it can, and then drop their dead bodies back to Earth. The path of a violent tornado is clearly demarcated. Either side of it, undisturbed.
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Fire Danger Continues Across the Area
The danger for wild fires will continue to be enhanced across Southwest Lower Michigan since dry and warmer than normal weather is expected to continue for at least the next two week (see CPC forecasts below).

Climate Predication Center Forecast for days 6 through 10

Climate Prediction Center Forecast for days 8 though 14



At this time Southwest Lower Michigan is in the abnormally dry category. You can see the details at the Michigan Drought Monitor page.


Click to enlarge





Rainfall over the past two weeks is less than 5 percent of normal west of US-131 and between I-96 and I-94. Most of the storms have been tracking from central and northern Lower Michigan into the Detroit area or south Michigan near I-80.





No signifcant improvement in these conditions is seen through the rest of the summer. Below is the drought outlook through September 30th.


Below are ways that you can help prevent wildfire:

-Contact your local fire agency before burning to obtain information about the burning regulations in your area. State law requires a permit for open burning whenever the ground is not snow-covered, even on your own property. Most areas do not allow burning on warm, dry, and windy days.

-All burn barrels must be covered with a weighted metal cover, with holes no larger than 3/4 of an inch.

-Do not throw smoking materials (cigars, cigarettes, matches, etc…) out of a moving vehicle. They may ignite dry grass on the side of the road and become a wildfire.

-Extinguish all outdoor fires properly, if outdoor fires are allowed. Drown fires with plenty of water and stir to make sure everything is cold to the touch. Dunk charcoal in water until cold. Do not throw live charcoal on the ground and leave it.

-Never leave a fire unattended. Sparks or embers can blow into leaves or grass, ignite a fire, and quickly spread.

-If you do use fireworks be sure to have a hose near by and try to keep them from combustable materials.

Member Since: March 16, 2012 Posts: 127 Comments: 7981
Quoting Neapolitan:
According to a report from Bloomberg, the value of assets at risk from climate change in just Miami alone by 2070 will be $3.5 trillion.

In Miami alone.

It's funny--or it would be were it not so utterly insane--how people can complain about a switch to alternative energies costing us billions even as they nonchalantly ignore the many tens of trillions of dollars in damage and debt they'll knowingly pass onto their children and grandchildren.

It is such a big deal because politicians aren't pandering to voters in 2070. They are pandering to voters now. Asking the general public to grasp something that is likely to happen next year is difficult enough, much less 58 years from now. This is even more complicated with the financial faucet that is pouring half-truths and misinformation into both sides of the debate. Adding even more mud to the water is the shamelessly biased mass media that is more focused on a 10-second sound bite than actually reporting information and telling the truth.
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.................................so far the sea breeze is stuck in the stop mode,but the clouds are gathering the moisture as i looked outside towards the gulf
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10/1200 UTC 15.3N 134.3W T2.5/3.5 DANIEL -- East Pacific
10/1200 UTC 13.5N 113.4W T5.0/6.0 EMILIA -- East Pacific
Member Since: March 16, 2012 Posts: 127 Comments: 7981
Quoting BobWallace:


Well, underground is more expensive. So your $4.99 might need to be a bunch higher.

Utility companies are not charities. They have a right to make a reasonable profit.

If you think their profits are unreasonable then you need to appeal to your local/state government. That's why we form governments, to protect ourselves.


I actually think they should just provide the service for why they exist. Pay to provide the lines, power and that's it. If they're only in it for profit then it's already flawed.
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from Neapolitan earlier..



Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 431 Comments: 131960
Quoting LargoFl:
......most of the waves keep to the south and cross over mexico into the pacific this year, would be great if that continues into november but it wont
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Quoting BahaHurican:
I don't think it's cars. I think it's what we use to fuel them.

People sometimes forget how recently the gasoline-driven automobile became a part of our lives. 100 years ago there were huge numbers of Americans who swore the horse and buggy were the only real way to travel and the "newfangled" auto was practically a tool of the devil. Now their great-grandchildren are just as opposed to the next stage in automobile development.

On the other side of things, I wonder if all the EV and hybrid enthusiasts realize that it took the US around FIFTY years to move from horse to horsepower? Early cars were available from the 1890s, IIRC, but it was 1940 before one could fully claim that the horse and buggy era was done.

Solomon wasn't that far off when he said there is nothing new under the sun... especially when it comes to people and their reaction to change.


There was a "tipping point" with cars.

Henry Ford introduced the Model T in 1908. That was the first "affordable" car that could replace the horse for many people.

If you look at city street pictures from the 1930s you'll find few horses. Most will be in parades. The real switch from horse to car happened largely in two decades.

Once EVs drop a few thousand dollars in price and get their range up over 150 miles I expect a tipping point. Within five years the majority of new car sales will be electric. (It will take another 10-15 years to retire the majority of fueled cars.)
Member Since: February 22, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1344
Quoting PyrateDiver:
Been a subscriber on here on and off since I lived through Katrina.
But think I will leave this blog to the people who have made up their minds up that we are all doomed if we dont stop driving cars.

This idea too will pass.
This planet has survived much worse forces than automobiles folks. For crying out loud, you would think the entire history of this planet is based on data since we evolved enough to measure things


I wasn't really sure until now whether you were being combative or idiotic and now I realize it's both. Like most extremists, you go right off the deep end and accuse us who want to care for our planet (when did that become a bad thing?) of doing away with cars. I'm sorry but that was likely (JFV comments not withstanding) one of the dumbest statements ever made on here. Why would Bob Wallace be talking about EV's and plugin hybrids if us "greenies" (and proud of it!) wanted to eliminate driving cars. Saying that we want to stop driving cars is both unrealistic and unfounded. Why is it such a problem to want to slowly transition over to a cleaner energy source? Wouldn't it be nice not to have to worry about oil spills, pollution or any of the numerous downsides to fossil fuels? No point trying to reason with you (an unreasonable extremist) but I had to pitch in my two cents because I have a low tolerance for dumbassity.
Member Since: August 28, 2006 Posts: 6 Comments: 2899
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
Funny how you get banned for cussing in front of children (when we don't really care) but extremely rude/offensive comments are allowed to slide.


Funny thing is.... We are very used to it... Now I'm out
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I'm not sure about other Texans...but this one has been getting rain since very early and it is continuing as we speak! My garden is loving it.

Quoting HurricaneHunterJoe:


Not really doing anybody any good,raining mostly over water,maybe keep dem fishing boats clean.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I doubt one could digest my Flavors.

They a tad, er...potent potables.

Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 431 Comments: 131960

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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