Tropical Storm Debby makes landfall in Florida

By: Angela Fritz , 9:07 PM GMT on June 26, 2012

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Debby continues to weaken this afternoon, but remains a tropical storm with maximum sustained winds of 40 mph. The storm's center of circulation made landfall this afternoon near Steinhatchee, Florida. Hurricane hunters continue to find surface wind speeds that just meet tropical storm criteria and surface buoys on Wundermap are all clocking in at or below 30 mph. The storm's upper-level circulation is being stretched out into the Atlantic by the same steering forces that will transport it to the other side of Florida, and this combined with dry air has led to a messy-looking tropical cyclone over the past couple of days. Though there was no lack of rain yesterday in the Florida panhandle, Debby has certainly been weakened by the dry air that has wrapped into its center (figure 1). Water vapor imagery from satellite shows Debby's center is almost completely void of moisture, though rain continues to fall on the northeast side of the storm where moisture is still available. A 6 foot wide, 12-15 foot deep sinkhole swallowed a small portion of I-10 in Madison County west of Jacksonville, Florida, this morning, where heavy rain continues, though this hole will likely be filled and the lane reopened by tomorrow morning. Wind shear around 20 knots is also keeping Debby at bay, but the real disrupter is the lack of moisture.


Figure 1. Where's Debby? On the left: visible satellite imagery. On the right: water vapor satellite imagery, where the dry air ranges from black to rusty orange. Debby's center is almost completely void of moisture. These images were captured around 1pm EDT.

Forecast for Debby
The forecast for Debby continues to be similar to previous forecasts. The storm will likely continue to lose strength as it moves over Florida this evening and Wednesday, but could gain some momentum again when it reaches the yet untapped Atlantic water. There's a high chance Debby will be downgraded to tropical depression status this evening. The HPC continues to forecast up to 8 inches of rain for far northeast Florida over the next 5 days, likely because of the slight strengthening forecast to occur on Thursday and beyond. Debby's center will most likely be over Atlantic water Wednesday night.


Figure 2. Advisory map for the U.S. Tuesday afternoon. Heat advisories (pink) blanket the central U.S. This heat is expected to move eastward over the next few days as the ridge of high pressure advances.

The Heat Continues

Record highs continue to fall Tuesday afternoon in the central U.S., where Denver, Colorado had its fifth consecutive day of triple-digit heat after it reached 100°F at 1pm MDT, and could continue to rise this afternoon. This ties the all-time record for consecutive 100°F+ days. Nebraska and Kansas are particularly toasty this afternoon; McCook, Nebraska has reached 113°F so far, and Hill City, Kansas is up to 112°F. Though, to put that in perspective, the state record for Nebraska is 118°F, and the state record for Kansas is 121°F.

The heat moves east tomorrow, and by Thursday, many of the major Midwest cities are forecast to be in the triple-digits, including Chicago, St. Louis, and Indianapolis. By Friday the heat will be beating down on the East Coast. In the meantime out west, the forecast high in Fresno for this weekend is 82°F, which would tie as the coolest final weekend in June on record, according to the Hanford forecast office.

Angela

Tropical Storm Debby (apphotos)
Boats are sunken and thrown up on a dock at the Rock Landing Marina in Panacea, Fla., Tuesday, June 26, 2012. High winds and heavy rains spawned by the approaching Tropical Storm Debby caused the damage. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)
Tropical Storm Debby
Tropical Storm Debby (apphotos)
Jesse Deese uses his skim board to shield from blowing sand in Panama City Beach, Fla., Monday, June 25, 2012. Tropical Storm Debby raked the Tampa Bay area with high wind and heavy rain Monday in a drenching that could top 2 feet over the next few days and trigger widespread flooding. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)
Tropical Storm Debby

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Quoting weatherbro:
WMO just upped El Nino's chances to 60%!

LOL. Shouldn't that be more like 99%?
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32522
Quoting MississippiWx:


Pretty bold statement considering Nino 3.4 is at 0.4C already. LOL.
im really hoping we dont get one i hate el nino
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Quoting weatherbro:
WMO just upped El Nino's chances to 60%!


Pretty bold statement considering Nino 3.4 is at 0.4C already. LOL.
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Re: #1234, what would a Modiki El Nino mean for winter in the U.S? (Great comment & graphic, BTW, MississippiWX!)
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The blast furnace continues, shifted a bit to the east from yesterday. Again, every station in Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas should see triple digits today, along with many/most stations in Iowa, Missouri, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The good news (if there is any): fire-weary Colorado should be slightly cooler today (though that's a relative term; it'll still be very hot, with a wide swath of 100-degree-plus temps in the eastern third of the state).

Hill City, KS, was already at 111 as of 1:00 PM.

hit
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Quoting VINNY04:
We do have tornados and hail. we have snow, hurricanes, heat, and cold. Plus we do have LOTS of lightning. Perfect State in my opinion.


snow? yeah whats the state record an inch?
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WMO just upped El Nino's chances to 60%!
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1252. VINNY04
Quoting weatherh98:


no!!
Yah your right. Thats the only flaw in this state. If you can call it a flaw. Second best stae is either Alabama or North Carolina.
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Quoting weatherh98:


they dont get canes? lol
its pretty much an extremes argument


That's true. Being from MS, I can attest to what a major hurricane can do to a coast line. Our entire coast line (no joke) looked exactly like this after Katrina. Thank God these type of storms are very uncommon. I guess if you went by frequency of extreme weather, West Coast states and Plains states would win. Gulf Coast states/Atlantic states could possibly experience the most widespread devastation from a weather event due to hurricanes.

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1250. pcola57
Quoting seawitch1261:
With all the flooding Florida has seen becuase of Tropical Storm Debby, it's reprehensible that Senator Rand Paul is holding up the flood insurance program:



Please link us at it's not applicable to this blog but I am very interested if what you state is true.. :)

Edit: After a re-read it is semi applicable..just sounds political :)
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I grew up in Wilson N.C. N.C is great but the heat and humidity in the summer is oppressive at times. Severe weather during the outbreak of last April really pounded the Carolina's too. Hurricanes like to target N.C and it gets just cold enough in Northern N.C to bust pipes at times in Winter. The winters are beautiful in N.C, you get just enough snow but the temps are so nice in the winter compared to where I'm now in Northern Wisconsin. North Carolina has to be in the top ten I would think.
Member Since: April 18, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 2437
1248. VINNY04
Quoting uncwhurricane85:


i was saying for all around weather experiences, if we were talking best weather for beaching/drinking yes florida wins, otherwise NOT.
We do have tornados and hail. we have snow, hurricanes, heat, and cold. Plus we do have LOTS of lightning. Perfect State in my opinion.
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The ones that warrant a circle in the Central/East Atlantic in the early portions of the season are usually the ones that develop in the west Caribbean. I'm not saying this one will though.

Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32522
Quoting uncwhurricane85:


yes even more reason for N.C. to be at the top it clearly has a definitive seasonal change 4 times each year


who needs winter when youcn have an extended summer and aspring that starts january 21?
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With all the flooding Florida has seen becuase of Tropical Storm Debby, it's reprehensible that Senator Rand Paul is holding up the flood insurance program:

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Quoting VINNY04:
Can phosphate mining hills count?


no!!
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Quoting MississippiWx:


Lol. Sorry, Louisiana is not the state for most amazing weather. It would be a state out west or in the Plains.


they dont get canes? lol
its pretty much an extremes argument
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1242. VINNY04
Quoting weatherh98:


No hills or mountains disqualified...

Louisiana is still on top
Can phosphate mining hills count?
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1241. Skyepony (Mod)
Fresh ASCAT BOC
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Quoting weatherh98:


Mandeville, Louisiana.

north of new orleans and east of Baton Rouge

on the edge of Lake Pontchartrain...

they have a beach not 2 mils from my house that everyone uses. Theres no reason that our relation to sea level should be point deducting for flooding!

atchaalaya basin baby. wiki fact
Atchafalaya Swamp at the lower end of the Mississippi River is the largest swamp in the United States. It is an important example of southern cypress swamp


Lol. Sorry, Louisiana is not the state for most amazing weather. It would be a state out west or in the Plains.
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1239. nigel20
Quoting MississippiWx:
I found this to be pretty interesting. The tropical cyclone heat potential (TCHP) chart shows a very high amount of heat in the Central Pacific at the equator. If you don't remember, the heat potential accounts for the amount of heat at great depths in the ocean. This is the TCHP anomaly map shows a bull's-eye in the Central Pacific. Why is that interesting? Well, we have been discussing the possibility of a Modiki El Nino coming in the latter half of hurricane season into the winter months. This just might be an indication of what is to come. Just a thought.


Yeah, that's very interesting...thanks for the info, Mississippi.
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Quoting Tribucanes:
Best weather should include a state that experiences all four seasons. And it's so speculative. Some states have fairly great weather year round, but it's crazy hot. Some states in the Midwest have beautiful seasons but Winter can be brutal and Summer sweltering too. Virginia/Michigan/California would be up there for me. Southern California if we can name a specific part of a state would probably take the cake hands down.


yes even more reason for N.C. to be at the top it clearly has a definitive seasonal change 4 times each year
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Quoting uncwhurricane85:


yall get 1/2 inch snow storms we get 2 feet snowstorms, your beaches are swamps that have sand spits at the edge of the gulf that arent pretty, our beaches are white sand barrier island that go on for thousands of miles that millions of people actually use, and you flood because you are bascially sea level. We have the great dismal swamp, bascially east of i-95 is a swamp... although i do love how if it wasnt for Louisiana nat geo, a&e, animal planet,and discovery basically wouldnt exist today. i want to visit louisiana, it is a very interesting place! where are you in LA


Mandeville, Louisiana.

north of new orleans and east of Baton Rouge

on the edge of Lake Pontchartrain...

they have a beach not 2 mils from my house that everyone uses. Theres no reason that our relation to sea level should be point deducting for flooding!

atchaalaya basin baby. wiki fact
Atchafalaya Swamp at the lower end of the Mississippi River is the largest swamp in the United States. It is an important example of southern cypress swamp
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
1236. VINNY04
Quoting allancalderini:
I know but every time a hurricane pass near here not even near here because a example is when Carlotta forms in the eastern pacific the local newspaper was saying that it would make landfall and people should be prepare and all that stuff and at the end Carlotta made landfall in Mexico.
Yah thats the one problem with living where i am. I want some storms ( not too big mind you) but they always move away from Tampa.
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Best weather should include a state that experiences all four seasons. And it's so speculative. Some states have fairly great weather year round, but it's crazy hot. Some states in the Midwest have beautiful seasons but Winter can be brutal and Summer sweltering too. Virginia/Michigan/California would be up there for me. Southern California if we can name a specific part of a state would probably take the cake hands down.
Member Since: April 18, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 2437
I found this to be pretty interesting. The tropical cyclone heat potential (TCHP) chart shows a very high amount of heat in the Central Pacific at the equator. If you don't remember, the heat potential accounts for the amount of heat at great depths in the ocean. This is the TCHP anomaly map which shows a bull's-eye in the Central Pacific. Why is that interesting? Well, we have been discussing the possibility of a Modiki El Nino coming in the latter half of hurricane season into the winter months. This just might be an indication of what is to come. Just a thought.

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1233. VINNY04
Quoting gator23:


Mother nature has obviously not tried to kill you that way that she tried to kill me(andrew). If so you wouldnt be saying that.
True. I didnt think of that. I havent been in one that big. Charlie came close to us and would have killed Tampa Bay if it hadnt been for the pressure system that forced it to make landfall south of us. I guess my view would change on hurricanes too if i almost got killed by one. So i dont blame you.
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Quoting weatherbro:
Well it looks like Debby might give us a parting gift after all!!!

Debby's tight circulation is forecasted to bring drier air down the spine of the peninsula by tonight. Which means those lower dewpoints over north Florida and Georgia will be payin' us a visit by tomorrow!

Plus it appears Orlando and Tampa will get a much deserved break on the rain department until at least the second week of July!

Even though it's the rainy season down here, this is actually some great news! I wouldn't want afternoon convection rubbing salt to the wound now.


I wouldn't mind if the normal rainy season picked up where Debby left off going forward, at least here in Orlando. Two + weeks of no rain and the resulting temps in the mid 90s each day is not the norm in the heart of our rainy season.
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Quoting VINNY04:
I disagree. I will go with Florida as being the best state. We have beaches on THREE sides plus some islands down south. It doesnt get too hot. Just 108 sometimes. No snow in most of the state. And plenty of alligators. Who cant like that? Anyone agree?


i was saying for all around weather experiences, if we were talking best weather for beaching/drinking yes florida wins, otherwise NOT.
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1230. nigel20
Good afternoon everyone!
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(click to enlarge)
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Quoting Tribucanes:
Best state to live in................New Jersey! :) What's the definition of safe sex in New Jersey?.............Placing signs on the animals that kick. Love you New Jersey, but your an easy target! :)

weather not snooki.
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Quoting VINNY04:
I disagree. I will go with Florida as being the best state. We have beaches on THREE sides plus some islands down south. It doesnt get too hot. Just 108 sometimes. No snow in most of the state. And plenty of alligators. Who cant like that? Anyone agree?


No hills or mountains disqualified...

Louisiana is still on top
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1225. ncstorm
12z Euro running

Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 16039
Whether this becomes a tropical cyclone or not, it should peak in organization on Friday. After that, wind shear will tear it apart. May become organized enough to attain invest status.

Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32522
Quoting weatherh98:


we get snow in north louisiana
weve had more hurricanes
Link

we get about twice as many tornadoes 25-13
yall? flood? LOL we get a flood every week... had one last week actually.

whoneeds mountains when you have hills? beach? yea we got beaches
according to the cencus, we have 7721 miles of coastline, NC has 3375. also twice as much....

so as i said we were flooding a few weeks ago? our grass is brown now id take a pic but i dont have a camera now.

its currently forecasted to be 99 today oooohhh yea
well actually that aint bad, but the humidity from the samp is... Do yall have swamps up there?

basically NC is the second best place, to LOUISIANA



yall get 1/2 inch snow storms we get 2 feet snowstorms, your beaches are swamps that have sand spits at the edge of the gulf that arent pretty, our beaches are white sand barrier island that go on for thousands of miles that millions of people actually use, and you flood because you are bascially sea level. We have the great dismal swamp, bascially east of i-95 is a swamp... although i do love how if it wasnt for Louisiana nat geo, a&e, animal planet,and discovery basically wouldnt exist today. i want to visit louisiana, it is a very interesting place! where are you in LA
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1222. gator23
Quoting VINNY04:
Why not? They are quite fun.


Mother nature has obviously not tried to kill you that way that she tried to kill me(andrew). If so you wouldnt be saying that.
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1221. VINNY04
Quoting uncwhurricane85:


neither. North Carolina is the best state for all around weather experiences. Noresters every year (snow), hurricanes/tropical storms every year, tornadoes every year, drought every year, floods every year, extreme heat every year, highest mountains east of miss. river beach only 4 hours from mountains. For instance 79 fayetteville nc yesterday, 105+ without heat index fri-sun. Same city had beryl a few weeks ago with flodding, now its moving back into drought, and next week it looks very stormy. basically best place on earth,. HAHHA!
I disagree. I will go with Florida as being the best state. We have beaches on THREE sides plus some islands down south. It doesnt get too hot. Just 108 sometimes. No snow in most of the state. And plenty of alligators. Who cant like that? Anyone agree?
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Another limiting factor for the Central ATL wave is the very marginal SSTs which are only in the 26C range.

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Quoting VINNY04:
Why not? They are quite fun.
I know but every time a hurricane pass near here not even near here because a example is when Carlotta forms in the eastern pacific the local newspaper was saying that it would make landfall and people should be prepare and all that stuff and at the end Carlotta made landfall in Mexico.
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Quoting Neapolitan:
Well, if it's a range of stormy weather and geography you'd want, California likely has most states beat. Blizzards; avalanches; flash floods; area floods; massive ocean storms; hailstorms; tornadoes; dust storms; droughts; hard freezes; the occasional Pineapple Express event; the highest and lowest spots in the entire Lower 48; deserts, mountains, rivers, and big cities all within an hour or less of each other; not to mention the hottest temperature ever recorded. (And since this is about weather, I won't mention earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanoes). I've personally experienced temperatures over 100 in a valley, while literally 15 minutes away at the ocean people were bundling up in the 50s. It's hard to find that elsewhere in the US.

Yes: California FTW. (Though if you were talking about nations instead of states, I think Japan would be at or very near the top of the list.)


what about rain tornadoes and canes?

Louisiana has below sea leveland above too.

California is disqualified
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Dude. Really?


Sorry, im on my tablet right now
Member Since: July 21, 2010 Posts: 60 Comments: 1011
Quoting plutorising:
but they're both considered trolls?



I am not Tazmanian, Tazmaniad, or a troll
Whether or not Tazmaniad is a troll, i dont know.
I dont think he is though, based on how he suonded when he first came on, but his name is suspicious.
It is also understandable if he came from Coles Bay as he said
Member Since: February 11, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 9737
Quoting MississippiWx:
A fairly vigorous low level spin exists with the wave in the Central Atlantic. The spin is located around 10.5N 37.0W. It is embedded in an area of less SAL. The moisture content is also high, but I have to wonder how much is associated with any attachment to the ITCZ. Regardless, it is a fairly healthy wave, especially for June. I would not count it out just yet. Sometimes, models weigh in on climatology and kill these early season developments too quickly. The chances of development are low, but with such a vigorous low level spin all the way to 500mb I would keep a wary eye out east.

SAL:
http://tropic.ssec.wisc.edu/real-time/sal/splitE. jpg

Water Vapor:


Yeah, I was looking at the wave just now.

It appears to have gained both in amplitude and size.

Once we get about half the system past the 45 degree line we'll have a much better idea what's going to happen with it.
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Caribbean Storm Update




Link
Member Since: July 21, 2010 Posts: 60 Comments: 1011
Couple days ago someone threatened to attack WU. Which boggles the mind, who would want to target this great site and why? It just makes very little sense. Troll who would go to that extent should be prosecuted if they can be caught.
Member Since: April 18, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 2437
1212. gator23
Quoting HurricaneDean07:

Its a Caribbean runner type season, but steering patterns would put every runner into the Yucatan or Gulf coast.
Gulf coast you better look out...


There is a speed bump between the Caribbean and the Gulf. It has about 19 million people on it. But yea who cares. LOOK OUT GULF!
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1211. ncstorm
115 degrees..CRAZY!!

From NWS, Wilmington, NC

THIS
WILL PRODUCE APPARENT TEMPERATURES ABOVE 105 DEGREES IN MOST PLACES
AND CLOSER TO 110 FURTHER INLAND. SOME PLACES MAY SEE APPARENT TEMPS
UP CLOSE TO 115 DEGREES AS SEA BREEZE CARRIES IN HIGHER DEWPOINT
AIR. SHOULD EXCEED HEAT ADVISORY CRITERIA EACH AFTERNOON THROUGH THE
WEEKEND AND POSSIBLY INTO EARLY NEXT WEEK.

Member Since: August 19, 2006 Posts: 13 Comments: 16039
Quoting uncwhurricane85:


neither. North Carolina is the best state for all around weather experiences. Noresters every year (snow), hurricanes/tropical storms every year, tornadoes every year, drought every year, floods every year, extreme heat every year, highest mountains east of miss. river beach only 4 hours from mountains. For instance 79 fayetteville nc yesterday, 105 without heat index fri-sun. Same city had beryl a few weeks ago with flodding, now its moving back into drought, and next week it looks very stormy. basically best place on earth,. HAHHA!
Well, if it's a range of stormy weather and geography you'd want, California likely has most states beat. Blizzards; avalanches; flash floods; area floods; massive ocean storms; hailstorms; tornadoes; dust storms; droughts; hard freezes; some of the densest fogs on the planet; the occasional Pineapple Express event; the highest and lowest spots in the entire Lower 48; deserts, mountains, rivers, and big cities all within an hour or less of each other; not to mention the hottest temperature ever recorded. (And since this is about weather, I won't mention earthquakes, tsunamis, and volcanoes). I've personally experienced temperatures over 100 in a valley, while literally 15 minutes away at the ocean people were bundling up in the 50s. And I've snow skiied and surfed in the ocean on the same day. In fact, in the same afternoon. It's hard to find that elsewhere in the US.

Yes: California FTW. (Though if you were talking about nations instead of states, I think Japan would be at or very near the top of the list.)
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:


we may see 20% soon
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.