Tropical Storm Debby has formed in the Gulf of Mexico

By: angelafritz , 9:18 PM GMT on June 23, 2012

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Tropical Storm Debby has been named by the National Hurricane Center this afternoon after hurricane hunters investigated Invest 96L and found a solid closed circulation, with maximum winds of 50mph and gusts up to 65mph. All interests along the Gulf of Mexico coast should pay attention to the progress of Debby. Debby is drifting north at 5mph. The storm has brought heavy rains to Western Cuba, South Florida, and Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula over the past two days, but the disturbance's heaviest rains are located well offshore over the Eastern Gulf of Mexico, where heavy thunderstorms are generating winds near tropical storm-force. A buoy 243 miles west of Naples, FL measured sustained winds of 31 mph, gusting to 38 mph, with 10-foot waves, at 8 am EDT Saturday morning. Our Wundermap for the surrounding ocean areas shows a large region of the northern and eastern Gulf of Mexico is experiencing winds of 20 - 30 mph.

Visible satellite loops show an unorganized tropical cyclone with an obvious surface circulation, though the thunderstorm activity is well displaced to the east. The heavy thunderstorm activity is slowly expanding and growing more intense. Upper-level winds out of the west continue to create moderate 10 - 20 knots of wind shear over the region, though that is expected to increase over the next few days. Water vapor satellite loops show a region of dry air over the central Gulf of Mexico, which will continue to interfere with Debby's development and make it hard for the west side of the circulation to maintain heavy thunderstorms. Ocean temperatures are about 28.5°C (83°F) in the Central Gulf of Mexico, which is about 1°F above average.


Figure 1. Saturday afternoon satellite image of Tropical Storm Debby in the Gulf of Mexico.


Figure 2. Saturday afternoon forecast track for Tropical Storm Debby.

Forecast for Debby
The National Hurricane Center is forecasting Debby to remain a tropical cyclone over the next 5 days as it drifts north and then west toward Texas. The Hurricane Center is forecasting a very slow progression of the storm, with a potential landfall not occurring until Friday. However, most of the models that predict the turn to the west suggest landfall will happen before or around Wednesday. The models are still generally split on the forecast for Debby; by Monday, the majority of the reliable models, including the ECMWF, NOGAPS, HWRF, and UKMET, agree that a ridge of high pressure will build in over the Southern U.S., forcing Debby west across the Gulf of Mexico and into South Texas by Wednesday. However, the GFS model, which has been our 2nd most reliable track model over the past two years (behind the ECMWF), has consistently been predicting that a trough of low pressure pushing off of the U.S. East Coast will be capable of grabbing the disturbance and accelerating it to the northeast across Florida north of Tampa Bay on Monday. The GFDL model splits the difference between these extremes and takes Debby north to a landfall near the Alabama/Florida border on Tuesday. The predicted track west to Texas is still the most likely outcome, though it remains a low-confidence forecast. In terms of intensity, none of the models is predicting Debby will become a hurricane, nor is the Hurricane Center. Though sea surface temperature is warm (and around 1°F above average), the actual heat content of the Gulf is relatively low. Wind shear is predicted to remain moderately strong through Sunday, but will increase to 30+ knots by Tuesday.

Debby's place in history (by Jeff Masters)
Remarkably, Debby's formation on June 23 comes a full two months ahead of the usual formation date of the season's fourth storm in the Atlantic, August 23. Debby's formation beats by twelve days the previous record for formation of the fourth named storm of the year in the Atlantic, set in 2005, when Hurricane Dennis was named on July 5. An early start to the Atlantic hurricane season has been increasingly common in recent years. In 2008, I blogged about the research of Dr. Jim Kossin of the University of Wisconsin, who published a 2008 paper in Geophysical Research Letters, titled "Is the North Atlantic hurricane season getting longer?" He concluded that yes, there is a "apparent tendency toward more common early- and late-season storms that correlates with warming Sea Surface Temperature but the uncertainty in these relationships is high". Three out of four of this year's early quartet of storms--Alberto, Beryl, and Debby--formed in ocean areas that were more than 1°F above average, which is an unusually high amount of warmth. We should expect to see more early-season Atlantic tropical storms as a consequence of global warming, since cool ocean temperatures are a key impediment to formation of such storms. However, this assumes that factors such as wind shear and atmospheric stability won't grow more hostile for tropical cyclone formation during the early part of hurricane season, and this is uncertain. If we do end up seeing a substantial increase in early-season tropical storms as a consequence of global warming, this is not necessarily a bad thing. Early-season tropical storms are often more boon than bane, bringing much-needed drought-busting rains, like Tropical Storm Beryl did for North Florida last month. With drought frequency and intensity predicted to increase for much of the Gulf Coastal states in coming decades, an increase in rainfall from early-season tropical storms may do more good than the damages inflicted by the high winds and flooding these storms may bring. There is typically a lot of wind shear around in May, June, and July, making it difficult for early season storms to reach major hurricane status. According to Wunderground's list of major early-season hurricanes, since record keeping began in 1851, there has been only one major hurricane in May, two in June, and nine in July. Three of these occurred in the past ten years, so there has not as yet been a large increase in early-season major hurricanes due to global warming.

References
Kossin, J., 2008, "Is the North Atlantic hurricane season getting longer?", Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 35, L23705, doi:10.1029/2008GL036012, 2008.

Angela and Jeff

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2336. gator23
Quoting Grothar:


Usually at 2 8 and 11.


So with the 8AM advisory we should see the shift reflected correct?
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It coming for me!!:)
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2334. Grothar
Quoting Jedkins01:



lol I'm not doing that yet, but I am going to head out to the gulf of Mexico later since I only live a few miles from it. I was watching the local guys this morning and there is a large area of tropical storm force winds not far offshore, wave height is also getting over 10 ft not too far offshore now as well.


Just don't go in the water!!!!!!!!!
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Quoting ncstorm:
Good Morning Guys..Was watching TWC and they said the models moved N and E over night..which models were that real quick?

Most of them... Euro now to NOLA, CMC way east, UKMET moved east... Only NOGAPS and HWRF stayed west.
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2332. icmoore
Good morning everyone! Well it IS raining here, rain gauge had about 1.70" most of that from last night. Got all 3 dogs out with the umbrella, they are dry I am not imagine that :) Settling down with first cup of coffee to check out Debby. Barometer is down at 29.81" and we have all kinds of coastal warnings up. Should be an interesting day.
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Quoting Grothar:


That is one of the reasons I have pretty much stayed off the blog the past few days. I have been writing all week that it would go much further North and East and kept getting shot down. I usually don't mind, but it was getting a little ridiculous.

The one thing I was looking at was the 500mb maps and noticed a strong impulse moving in between the high over Texas. If if came South enough, it would pull the system to the Northeast. I believe this may have been what the GFS was holding on to.

I was with you also, I didn't say it but I thought it. I reckoned it would go right over Disney World.
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Quoting gator23:
Anyone remember Irene 1999? Was supposed to hit Tampa and whoops Hi Miami...


Yes, I remember Irene.
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2329. gator23
Quoting ncstorm:
Good Morning Guys..Was watching TWC and they said the models moved N and E over night..which models were that real quick?

CMC, the ensembles, GFDL, Euro and UKMet
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Posts 2316-2319 Thank you
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2327. LargoFl
Quoting TampaBayStormChaser:
This wind is really strong. Had some power flashes at my parents home close to the Bay. Tampa Bay waters are very rough and I would not be surprised to see flooding in Shore Acres and other low lying areas simply due to water level rise.
yeaah wind is strong and pouring rain outside my house..hope we dont lose power today
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2326. Grothar
Quoting ncstorm:
Good Morning Guys..Was watching TWC and they said the models moved N and E over night..which models were that real quick?


Here is an excerpt from the NHC

THAT TRACK
SCENARIO WAS SUPPORTED BY THE ECMWF MODEL...WHICH HAS BEEN THE
BEST-PERFORMING GUIDANCE OVER THE PAST FEW YEARS. HOWEVER...THE
0000 RUN OF THAT MODEL HAS SHIFTED SUBSTANTIALLY TO THE NORTH AND
EAST OF THE PREVIOUS RUNS. THE U.K. MET. OFFICE MODEL HAS ALSO
SHIFTED SIGNIFICANTLY TO THE RIGHT. IN FACT...ONLY THE HWRF MODEL
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2325. gator23
Anyone remember Irene 1999? Was supposed to hit Tampa and whoops Hi Miami...
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Quoting Jedkins01:



lol I'm not doing that yet, but I am going to head out to the gulf of Mexico later since I only live a few miles from it. I was watching the local guys this morning and there is a large area of tropical storm force winds not far offshore, wave height is also getting over 10 ft not too far offshore now as well.

I would love to be out there! Bro's got my car though.
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2322. Grothar
Quoting gator23:

Hey Groth I will ask you since you have had this one nailed.

When does the NHC update the cone?


Usually at 2 8 and 11.
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2321. ncstorm
Good Morning Guys..Was watching TWC and they said the models moved N and E over night..which models were that real quick?
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Quoting TampaFLUSA:

Speaking of Charley, remember how long they took to adjust the forecast track NE? It was moving NNE for several hours before they updated the track.
Boy do I ever. Our local Mets here in SWF broke away from the NHC to inform us Charlie was headed our way.
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2319. Skyepony (Mod)
The chucked a dropsonde at that spot with the higher surface winds earlier..

Product: Air Force Temp Drop (Dropsonde) Message (UZNT13 KNHC)
Transmitted: 24th day of the month at 11:11Z
Aircraft: Air Force Aircraft (Last 3 digits of the tail number are 302)
Storm Number: 04
Storm Name: Debby (flight in the North Atlantic basin)
Mission Number: 2
Observation Number: 03

Part A...

Date: Near the closest hour of 11Z on the 24th day of the month
Highest Mandatory Level For Which Wind Was Reported: 500mb
Coordinates: 28.9N 86.6W
Location: 105 miles (168 km) to the SSW (213°) from Panama City, FL, USA.
Marsden Square: 081 (About)

Level Geo. Height Air Temp. Dew Point Wind Direction Wind Speed
1001mb (29.56 inHg) Sea Level (Surface) 23.6°C (74.5°F) 22.0°C (71.6°F) 60° (from the ENE) 55 knots (63 mph)
1000mb 13m (43 ft) 23.4°C (74.1°F) 21.8°C (71.2°F) 60° (from the ENE) 57 knots (66 mph)
925mb 692m (2,270 ft) 20.4°C (68.7°F) 16.4°C (61.5°F) 55° (from the NE) 70 knots (81 mph)
850mb 1,424m (4,672 ft) 18.8°C (65.8°F) Approximately 14°C (57°F) 45° (from the NE) 64 knots (74 mph)
700mb 3,070m (10,072 ft) 11.2°C (52.2°F) 9.2°C (48.6°F) 75° (from the ENE) 43 knots (49 mph)
500mb 5,810m (19,062 ft) -2.3°C (27.9°F) -2.7°C (27.1°F) 120° (from the ESE) 18 knots (21 mph)

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2318. LargoFl
Quoting GeoffreyWPB:
looking at that radar pic you can pretty much see where its headed
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2317. Grothar
Quoting LargoFl:
I dunno emguy was pretty much on the money yesterday, i kinda agree, debby is too far north now for a complete switch of path over to texas, but who knows, this storm is different, has a mind of its own huh


That is one of the reasons I have pretty much stayed off the blog the past few days. I have been writing all week that it would go much further North and East and kept getting shot down. I usually don't mind, but it was getting a little ridiculous.

The one thing I was looking at was the 500mb maps and noticed a strong impulse moving in between the high over Texas. If if came South enough, it would pull the system to the Northeast. I believe this may have been what the GFS was holding on to.
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Product: Air Force Tropical RECCO Message (URNT11 KNHC)
Transmitted: 24th day of the month at 11:11Z
Aircraft: Air Force Aircraft (Last 3 digits of the tail number are 302)
Storm Number: 04
Storm Name: Debby (flight in the North Atlantic basin)
Mission Number: 2
Observation Number: 04

Mandatory Data...

Observation Time: Sunday, 10:59Z
Radar Capability: Yes
Aircraft Altitude: Below 10,000 meters
Coordinates: 28.7N 85.8W
Location: 102 miles (165 km) to the S (185°) from Panama City, FL, USA.
Turbulence: None
Conditions Along Flight Route: In the clear
Pressure Altitude: 1,520 meters
Flight Level Wind: From 110° at 31 knots (From the ESE at ~ 35.6 mph)
- The above is a spot wind.
- Winds were obtained using doppler radar or inertial systems.
Flight Level Temperature: 16°C
Flight Level Dew Point: Not available, probably because the dew point hygrometer was not working.
Weather (within 30 nautical miles): Thunderstorm(s)
850 mb Surface Altitude: 1,419 geopotential meters

Remarks Section...

Surface Wind Speed (likely by SFMR): 38 knots (~ 43.7mph)
Quoting masonsnana:
Hows our HH plane doing? Any new data?
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2315. Skyepony (Mod)
.
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Quoting Jedkins01:


Maybe so, I did find that rather confusing...


BTW, those large and thick areas of convection further out in the gulf are finally starting to progress more westward.

The ground is already saturated, if those do make it in around here I expect plenty of flood advisories to go up. Those cells are anywhere from 30000 to 50000 ft tall at times and with this much water in the air they could dump a payload.


It's funny how much tropical cyclones can vary in size. We are literally getting significantly more wind from Debby than Charley produced for us, yet it cut right through Polk County as still a category 3 hurricane.

Speaking of Charley, remember how long they took to adjust the forecast track NE? It was moving NNE for several hours before they updated the track.
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Quoting Articuno:

Yeah,
remember how the east coast had a 5.8 earthquake about a week before irene?
and now that you mention there was an earthquake before Rita...
I don't know its just really interesting.


Been wondering about that myself. Can't remember which year but there was an EGOM earthquake when there was a storm passing Florida's east coast. Interesting as you say. :)
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2312. LargoFl
see 10 to 12 inches of rain or more for up north florida..going to be a flooding event
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2311. emguy
Quoting TXCaneCrasher:


I know it's your opinion but I am not sure how you can say "Texas option is gone now" and that "it's too far north to consider Texas anymore". Just a ridiculous comment. But your entitled to it.


Thanks for your comment. I do appreciate it. I understand the objection to the comment, as some folks are defensive to their own forecast/wants/desires for storms, but can affirm I wouldn't want to mislead anyone and wouldn't say it if I didn't mean it. In the mean time, my forecast all along was from Apalachicola souetheast to Tampa. They are definately getting a lot of impacts, but it looks like the landfall call may be a bust and the area between Apalachicola to the Mississippi River Delta os a more liekly landfall point (So...If that does happen, I would not take credit for calling it, because I made my forecast days ago for the other area and I stick to my convictions right or wrong)
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Quoting Grothar:


Jed, I had this mental picture of you running around outside in the rain. Becareful, now, it could get a little worse.




lol I'm not doing that yet, but I am going to head out to the gulf of Mexico later since I only live a few miles from it. I was watching the local guys this morning and there is a large area of tropical storm force winds not far offshore, wave height is also getting over 10 ft not too far offshore now as well.
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2307. WxLogic
Quoting Skyepony:
Dvorak noting a significant jog NE by Debbie.


Definitely looks to be the case. Rain bands already in Central FL.

I would expect the SPC to issue some Tornado Watches soon.
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Hows our HH plane doing? Any new data?
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Quoting Articuno:

There is however this
Link


Cool. Thanks. :)
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2304. gator23
Quoting Grothar:


Jed, I had this mental picture of you running around outside in the rain. Becareful, now, it could get a little worse.


Hey Groth I will ask you since you have had this one nailed.

When does the NHC update the cone?
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2303. LargoFl
FLOOD WATCH
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE TALLAHASSEE FL
405 AM EDT SUN JUN 24 2012

...TROPICAL STORM DEBBY MAY LEAD TO EXTREMELY HEAVY RAINFALL RATES
AND FLASH FLOODING...

.TROPICAL STORM DEBBY CONTINUES TO SPIN OVER THE NORTH-CENTRAL
GULF OF MEXICO EARLY THIS MORNING. REGARDLESS OF THE EVENTUAL
TRACK...MODEL GUIDANCE CONSISTENTLY SHOWS HEAVY RAINFALL OVER
PARTS OF THE FLORIDA PANHANDLE AND BIG BEND. GIVEN THE MOISTURE
RICH TROPICAL AIR MASS...THERE MAY BE SOME VERY HEAVY RAIN RATES.
THEREFORE...FLASH FLOODING WILL BE POSSIBLE FROM TODAY THROUGH
MONDAY AS RAIN BANDS FROM DEBBY CONTINUE TO IMPACT THE AREA.

FLZ012>015-017-018-026-027-112-114-115-118-127-24 2100-
/O.NEW.KTAE.FF.A.0002.120624T0805Z-120626T0000Z/
/00000.0.ER.000000T0000Z.000000T0000Z.000000T0000 Z.OO/
INLAND BAY-CALHOUN-INLAND GULF-INLAND FRANKLIN-LEON-
INLAND JEFFERSON-LIBERTY-INLAND WAKULLA-COASTAL BAY-COASTAL GULF-
COASTAL FRANKLIN-COASTAL JEFFERSON-COASTAL WAKULLA-
INCLUDING THE CITIES OF...YOUNGSTOWN...BLOUNTSTOWN...WHITE CITY...
WEWAHITCHKA...TALLAHASSEE...SPRING HILL...MONTICELLO...
SWEETWATER...CRAWFORDVILLE...PANAMA CITY...PARKER...
PORT SAINT JOE...APALACHICOLA...CARRABELLE...SOPCHOPPY...
SAINT MARKS
405 AM EDT SUN JUN 24 2012 /305 AM CDT SUN JUN 24 2012/

...FLASH FLOOD WATCH IN EFFECT THROUGH MONDAY EVENING...

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN TALLAHASSEE HAS ISSUED A

* FLASH FLOOD WATCH FOR PORTIONS OF FLORIDA...INCLUDING THE
FOLLOWING COUNTIES...CALHOUN...INLAND BAY...INLAND FRANKLIN...
INLAND GULF...INLAND JEFFERSON...INLAND WAKULLA...LEON...
LIBERTY...COASTAL JEFFERSON...COASTAL BAY...COASTAL
FRANKLIN...COASTAL GULF AND COASTAL WAKULLA.

* THROUGH MONDAY EVENING

* RAIN BANDS FROM TROPICAL STORM DEBBY WILL PRODUCE VERY HEAVY
RAINFALL RATES AND COULD LEAD TO FLASH FLOODING. PROJECTED RAIN
TOTALS THROUGH LATE MONDAY RANGE FROM AROUND 3 TO 4 INCHES NEAR
INTERSTATE-10...TO AS MUCH AS 10 TO 12 INCHES OVER PARTS OF GULF
AND FRANKLIN COUNTIES.

* FLASH FLOODING WOULD BE MOST LIKELY IN URBAN AREAS AND CITIES AS
WELL AS FLOOD PRONE LOCATIONS AND LOW LYING AREAS.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A FLASH FLOOD WATCH MEANS THAT CONDITIONS MAY DEVELOP THAT LEAD
TO FLASH FLOODING. FLASH FLOODING IS A VERY DANGEROUS SITUATION.

YOU SHOULD MONITOR LATER FORECASTS AND BE PREPARED TO TAKE ACTION
SHOULD FLASH FLOOD WARNINGS BE ISSUED.

&&

$$

08-LAMERS
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Quoting AtHomeInTX:


Yes, neither had I before lately. Guess Just another thing we can add to our natural phenomenon. :)

Yeah,
remember how the east coast had a 5.8 earthquake about a week before irene?
and now that you mention there was an earthquake before Rita...
I don't know its just really interesting.
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Quoting PensacolaBuoy:
Why would recon's flight level winds be so low (5-25 mph) while SFMR surface readings are 40-60 mph at same time? Isn't this the opposite of normal?


Shear would change net wind speed, maybe?

If you have a boat going upstream at 30mph and a downstream flow of 5mph, then it's 25mph net motion...

Maybe I'm reaching...
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2300. gator23
Quoting TXCaneCrasher:


I know it's your opinion but I am not sure how you can say "Texas option is gone now" and that "it's too far north to consider Texas anymore". Just a ridiculous comment. But your entitled to it.

Very little model support for Texas now. Also see the steering currents. Texas is less likely
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Quoting TampaFLUSA:

They have a Facebook page and email lol maybe I should ask...


Maybe so, I did find that rather confusing...


BTW, those large and thick areas of convection further out in the gulf are finally starting to progress more westward.

The ground is already saturated, if those do make it in around here I expect plenty of flood advisories to go up. Those cells are anywhere from 30000 to 50000 ft tall at times and with this much water in the air they could dump a payload.


It's funny how much tropical cyclones can vary in size. We are literally getting significantly more wind from Debby than Charley produced for us, yet it cut right through Polk County as still a category 3 hurricane.
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Quoting Articuno:

Stay safe.
I don't know, I just posted it because I never seen earthquakes in texas that much.


Yes, neither had I before lately. Guess Just another thing we can add to our natural phenomenon. :)
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2297. LargoFl
COASTAL WATERS FORECAST
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE TALLAHASSEE FL
633 AM EDT SUN JUN 24 2012

GULF COASTAL WATERS FROM THE MOUTH OF THE SUWANNEE RIVER
TO DESTIN OUT TO 60 NM

GMZ770-775-241600-
WATERS FROM APALACHICOLA TO DESTIN FL FROM 20 TO 60 NM-
WATERS FROM SUWANNEE RIVER TO APALACHICOLA FL FROM 20 TO 60 NM-
633 AM EDT SUN JUN 24 2012

...A TROPICAL STORM WARNING IS IN EFFECT THROUGH MONDAY
AFTERNOON...

...SMALL CRAFT OPERATORS SHOULD REMAIN IN PORT...

...A SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM MONDAY AFTERNOON THROUGH
MONDAY EVENING...

.TODAY...SOUTHEAST WIND 30 TO 35 KNOTS WITH GUSTS TO 45 KNOTS.
SEAS 13 TO 17 FEET. WINDS AND SEAS HIGHER IN RAIN AND ISOLATED
THUNDERSTORMS.
.TONIGHT...SOUTHEAST WIND 25 TO 30 KNOTS WITH GUSTS TO 40 KNOTS.
SEAS 11 TO 14 FEET. WINDS AND SEAS HIGHER IN RAIN AND ISOLATED
THUNDERSTORMS.
.MONDAY...SOUTHEAST WIND AROUND 25 KNOTS WITH GUSTS TO 35 KNOTS.
SEAS 10 TO 13 FEET SUBSIDING TO 9 TO 11 FEET IN THE AFTERNOON.
NUMEROUS SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS.
.MONDAY NIGHT...SOUTHEAST WIND 20 TO 25 KNOTS. SEAS 8 TO 10 FEET.
NUMEROUS SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS.
.TUESDAY...SOUTH WIND 15 TO 20 KNOTS. SEAS 6 TO 8 FEET. SCATTERED
SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS.
.TUESDAY NIGHT...SOUTH WIND AROUND 15 KNOTS. SEAS 5 TO 7 FEET
SUBSIDING TO 4 TO 5 FEET AFTER MIDNIGHT. ISOLATED SHOWERS AND
THUNDERSTORMS.
.WEDNESDAY...SOUTH WIND AROUND 10 KNOTS. SEAS 3 TO 5 FEET.
.WEDNESDAY NIGHT...SOUTH WIND AROUND 10 KNOTS. SEAS 3 TO 4 FEET.
.THURSDAY...SOUTH WIND AROUND 10 KNOTS. SEAS 2 TO 3 FEET.

$$
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2296. Grothar
Quoting Jedkins01:


Plenty of rain and gusty winds, I love this weather, lol.


Jed, I had this mental picture of you running around outside in the rain. Becareful, now, it could get a little worse.

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Quoting Grothar:
Hey Art. How did I do on this one. :)



good ;)
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2294. LargoFl
Quoting TXCaneCrasher:


I know it's your opinion but I am not sure how you can say "Texas option is gone now" and that "it's too far north to consider Texas anymore". Just a ridiculous comment. But your entitled to it.
I dunno emguy was pretty much on the money yesterday, i kinda agree, debby is too far north now for a complete switch of path over to texas, but who knows, this storm is different, has a mind of its own huh
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2293. WxLogic
Quoting Jedkins01:



Good analysis, maybe I shouldn't have been so timid with my intensity forecast for Debby though, seems like shes getting her act together quite well now.


Thanks... hey is good to go with your forecast if you feel pretty confident about it. We're not going to be right every time but is fun to take a shot at it and hope your analysis was correct. If not, you can learn from it and adjust for later events. :)
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2292. Grothar
Hey Art. How did I do on this one. :)


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2291. Skyepony (Mod)
Dvorak noting a significant jog NE by Debbie.
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Quoting Grothar:
We just got pounded by a bad one in Fort Lauderdale. Lools like you guys on the west coast are getting hammered. how is it there Largo??



Plenty of rain and gusty winds, I love this weather, lol.
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Quoting Articuno:

Stay safe.
I don't know, I just posted it because I never seen earthquakes in texas that much.

There is however this
Link
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2288. LargoFl
Quoting Grothar:
We just got pounded by a bad one in Fort Lauderdale. Lools like you guys on the west coast are getting hammered. how is it there Largo??

looking at that radar of the rains, sure looks like debby is getting closer to our shoreline then it was yesterday
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Quoting Grothar:
We just got pounded by a bad one in Fort Lauderdale. Lools like you guys on the west coast are getting hammered. how is it there Largo??


Stay safe.
Quoting AtHomeInTX:


Wow. Is this normal for there? I know there was a 5.0 in the GOM east of STX when Rita was coming ashore. Is there a fault there? Never did figure out why they had the quakes in ETX couple months ago. Anyway, interesting thanks. :)

I don't know, I just posted it because I never seen earthquakes in texas that much.
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2286. Grothar
Quoting Articuno:

I understand Gro, it's hard. :)



Thanks Art. Now you want to help me put out the garbage cans. LOL
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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