Gulf of Mexico disturbance may develop; Chris a hurricane; record Duluth flooding

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:03 PM GMT on June 21, 2012

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An area of low pressure and heavy thunderstorms entering the Southern Gulf of Mexico is bringing sporadic heavy rains to Western Cuba and Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, and winds of 20 - 25 mph to surrounding ocean areas. This disturbance will need to be watched for development as it drifts slowly northward at about 5 mph into the Central Gulf of Mexico by Saturday. The disturbance is poorly organized, and has only a modest area of heavy thunderstorms. Wind shear is a moderate to high 15 - 25 knots over the region. Ocean temperatures are 81 - 83°F in the Western Caribbean and Southern Gulf of Mexico, which is about 1°F above average, and plenty warm to support formation of a tropical storm.


Figure 1. Morning satellite image of the tropical disturbance entering the Southern Gulf of Mexico.

Forecast for Gulf of Mexico disturbance
Wind shear is predicted to remain in the moderate to high range through Friday. Water vapor satellite loops show a region of dry air over the Northern Gulf of Mexico; this dry air is probably too far away to significantly interfere with development. I expect we will see an increase in the disturbance's heavy thunderstorm activity today as a result of less interference from dry air. By Saturday, our two top models, the European model (ECMWF) and GFS, predict that wind shear could fall to the moderate range, 10 - 20 knots, which would potentially allow the disturbance to approach tropical depression status by Sunday. A trough of low pressure pushing off of the U.S. East Coast will be capable of grabbing the disturbance and accelerating it to the northeast on Sunday, as predicted by the GFS model, which takes the disturbance across Florida on Sunday, and into the waters off the coast of South Carolina by Monday. The GFS does not develop the disturbance while it is in the Gulf of Mexico, but suggests it could develop into a tropical or subtropical depression off the coast of South Carolina Monday or Tuesday. The latest ECMWF model run (00 UTC) predicts that this through will not be strong enough to pull the disturbance northeastwards across Florida, and the disturbance will instead linger in the Gulf of Mexico for many days, giving it time to develop into a tropical depression next week. The UKMET and NOGAPS models predict a more westward drift, with the disturbance affecting the Mexico/Texas border region 6 - 7 days from now. At this point, we can't rule out any location in the Gulf being affected by this system, though the Gulf coast of Florida has the highest probability of seeing impacts. NHC is giving the disturbance a 30% chance of developing into a tropical depression by Saturday morning. This is a reasonable forecast, and the odds will probably rise by Friday, and I give the disturbance a 50% chance of developing into a tropical depression by Monday morning.


Figure 2. Morning satellite image of Hurricane Chris.

Chris reaches hurricane strength; not a threat to land
Hurricane Chris has managed to intensify and form an eye-like feature surrounded by intense thunderstorms with very cold tops, despite the fact the storm is over cool waters of 22°C. NHC puts Chris at hurricane strength with 75 mph winds making it the first hurricane of the 2012 hurricane season. Chris attained hurricane strength unusually far to the north (41.1°N) for a June storm; only Hurricane One of 1893 was a June hurricane at a more northernly point (44°N) than Chris. Chris is headed northeastwards, out to sea, and will not trouble any land areas. Only twice before, in 1887 and 1959, has the third storm of the season formed earlier than June 20. Formation of three tropical storms so early in the year is not necessarily a harbinger of an active season; 1959 was close to average, with 12 named storms, 7 hurricanes, and 2 intense hurricanes (average is 11 named storms, 6 hurricanes, and 2 intense hurricanes.) Unusual levels of early season activity in the Caribbean and between Africa and the Lesser Antilles usually portends a very active hurricane season, but this year's storms have not formed in this region. Alberto, Beryl, and Chris all formed off the U.S. East Coast.


Figure 3. The St. Louis river upstream from Duluth, Minnesota reached its highest flood height on record this morning, 6.1' above flood stage. The river rose over ten feet in 24 hours. Image credit: NOAA.

Record flooding in Duluth, Minnesota
Flood waters have crested in Duluth, Minnesota this Thursday morning, and are slowly falling, in the wake of the city's all-time record 24-hour rainstorm. A series of "training" thunderstorms that followed the same path passed over a wide swath of Northern Minnesota between noon Tuesday and noon Wednesday, dropping 7.20" of rain on the city. According to wunderground's weather historian Christopher C. Burt, this far surpasses the previous 24-hour record rainfall for Duluth, the 5.79" that fell on August 22 - 23, 1978. Two rivers in the Duluth area, the Nemadji and St. Louis, hit their highest flood heights on record Thursday morning, causing destructive flooding. Sadly, major flooding occurred at the Duluth zoo, washing a seal into a neighboring street, and killing at least eleven zoo animals.

Jeff Masters

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3000. weatherh98
2:48 PM GMT on June 23, 2012
Quoting txcoastgirl:
New to this site...very interesting!

Welcome
Member Since: June 17, 2011 Posts: 11 Comments: 6439
2999. txcoastgirl
8:46 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
New to this site...very interesting!
Member Since: June 13, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 0
2998. stormpetrol
3:02 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Quoting STXHurricanes2012:
96L is relocoating near Cozemel!


I was saying that from early this morning.
Member Since: April 29, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 7506
2997. yoboi
2:47 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Quoting Patrap:
We're a lot better protected after the almost 7 years of Structure, and High Profile improvements to the Levee Protection System.

Hopefully it will 40 years between majors as it was for Betsy and K.

Vast Defenses Now Shielding New Orleans

By JOHN SCHWARTZ
Published: June 14, 2012


Construction last month on the Seabrook floodgate complex in New Orleans. The overall defense system includes the biggest pumping station on the planet.

NEW ORLEANS %u2014 Finally, there is a wall around this city.

Nearly seven years after flood waters from Hurricane Katrina gushed over New Orleans, $14.5 billion worth of civil works designed to block such surges is now in place a 133-mile chain of levees, flood walls, gates and pumps too vast to take in at once, except perhaps from space.

Individual components of the system can be appreciated from a less celestial elevation. At the new Seabrook floodgate complex, climb up three steep ladders, open a trap door, and step out into the blazing sunlight atop a 54-foot tower that was not here just two years ago. From there one looks out over a $165 million barrier across the shipping canal that links Lake Pontchartrain, the Mississippi River and the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway.

Two lift gates, 50 feet across, can be lowered to block the waters of Lake Pontchartrain. A navigation gate 95 feet wide, whose curved sides weigh 220 tons apiece, can be swung gently but mightily into place. When open which will be most of the time the gates will allow easy boat traffic.

When a storm threatens, however, they will seal off the canal from the kind of surge that devastated the Lower Ninth Ward in Katrina.

Yet all that seems puny in comparison to the two-mile Great Wall that can seal off the channel from Lake Borgne to the east, or the billion-dollar west closure complex, which features the biggest pumping station on the planet.

Now, hurricane season has returned, as it does each June. Whatever storms might approach New Orleans this year or in the future, they will encounter a vastly upgraded ring of protection. The question is whether it will be enough.

When Katrina hit New Orleans in 2005, the city's hurricane protection system became a symbol of America's haphazard approach to critical infrastructure. The patchwork of walls and levees built over the course of 40 years was still far from complete when the storm came, and even the Army Corps of Engineers admitted that this was a system in name only. Flood walls collapsed, and earthen levees built from sandy, dredged soils melted away.

What has emerged since could come to symbolize the opposite: a vast civil works project that gives every appearance of strength and permanence. No other American city has anything like it. This is the best system the greater New Orleans area has ever had said Col. Edward R. Fleming, the commander of the New Orleans district of the corps.

Marc Walraven, a district head in the Dutch ministry of transport, public works and water management, recently toured the defenses. While 100 percent safety is impossible, he said, and challenges in operations and maintenance can be expected as the corps passes the facilities over to local management in the coming year, the constructions that have been built are in my opinion adequate to defend New Orleans.

Tim Doody, the president of the levee board that oversees Orleans and St. Bernard Parishes, disagrees. While the construction appears to be strong, he said, the level of protection authorized by Congress for the corps to build is woefully inadequate.

The new system was designed and constructed to provide what is informally known as 100-year protection, which means it was built to prevent the kind of flooding that has a 1 percent chance of occurring in any given year. That standard is used by the Federal Emergency Management Agency to determine whether homeowners and businesses must buy flood insurance to qualify for federally regulated or insured mortgages.

But New Orleans has seen storms far more damaging than the 100-year standard. Katrina is generally considered to have been a 400-year storm, and rising seas and more numerous hurricanes predicted in many climate-change models suggest harsher conditions to come.

It's what the country will pay for; it's what FEMA insures for,%u201D Mr. Doody said. But our thought and belief is that we all need to be behind protection thats greater than that.

Still, corps officials insist, the new system has been designed with far greater strength and resiliency than anything that went before it. While a major storm could lead to street flooding something New Orleans, much of which is below sea level, sees even with heavy rainfall the kind of catastrophic, explosive wall of water resulting from the failure of sections of flood wall and the dissolution of poorly-built levees that devastated so much of the city after Katrina should not occur again, they say.




wow so nola is safe to what storm surge?
Member Since: August 25, 2010 Posts: 6 Comments: 1983
2996. dearmas
2:37 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Quoting Jeff9631:


Heard you live in CFL too? I'm thinking the models will shift towards the CFL solution as well, we shall see.

Im in C Fl (Pasco County, Wesley Chapel Fl)
Member Since: August 23, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 120
2995. SELAliveforthetropic
2:36 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Quoting pensacolastorm:


Yep. If Santore is on your beach you are safe. Storms seem to hit the other TWC guys.

Cantore was in Houma for Gustav. Right smack in the middle of it.
Member Since: August 12, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 59
2993. FLWeatherFreak91
2:30 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Quoting wpb:
a reformation to the east in the heavy rain and ts would kickstart development
We were saying this yesterday too lol.
Member Since: December 1, 2006 Posts: 2 Comments: 3616
2992. FLWeatherFreak91
2:29 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Quoting Stoopid1:


How do you figure? All of the Gulf Coast is a possibility, and most models show 96 on a path toward Central Florida at the moment.
Ignore him. If he were to back up his opinions with some type of facts then he deserves a space on this blog.
Member Since: December 1, 2006 Posts: 2 Comments: 3616
2991. wpb
2:29 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
a reformation to the east in the heavy rain and ts would kickstart development
Member Since: May 28, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 572
2990. StormHype
2:29 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Quoting stormpetrol:
Will be an interesting mission for HHs today I think.


Yeah... they'll be gathered around pitchers of brew at Hooter's by noon..... cause they got scrubbed.
Member Since: May 31, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 1189
2989. Stoopid1
2:28 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Quoting seriousman1:


great post i agree this should not be happening..florida is not in the mix anyway...


How do you figure? All of the Gulf Coast is a possibility, and most models show 96 on a path toward Central Florida at the moment.
Member Since: August 6, 2007 Posts: 24 Comments: 2682
2988. Gorty
2:27 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
GFS has a weak-moderate TS to FL.

nogaps has it as a weak TS heading to Mexico.

SREF is crazy wow. Has it meandering. Then idk where it will take it, model run ended.

cmc has is close to hurricane and on the coastline of LA and on east to Panhandle of FL then it has it going over to TX.
Member Since: November 8, 2008 Posts: 12 Comments: 1058
2987. WunderAlertBot (Admin)
2:27 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
JeffMasters has created a new entry.
2986. Minnemike
2:27 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Quoting hydrus:
Looks like at least one of the low centers is meandering over the northern tip of the Yucatan. There is a weaker low north of the western tip of Cuba...Hard to see here..P.S. There may be high pressure trying to build over this thing.
looking at precipitable water motion, i buy the winner being north off the tip of Yucatan.. consolidation throughout the day bringing COC there
Member Since: July 31, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 1320
2985. Birthmark
2:27 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Quoting StormTracker2K:
First baby!

Congrats. You should teach her to point at you and say, "OWNED!" as soon as possible.

It was a real time-saver in our house.
Member Since: October 30, 2005 Posts: 7 Comments: 5184
2984. FLWeatherFreak91
2:26 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Quoting Articuno:

So whats this mean?
This means they aren't going to fly into 96l at this time. It is obvious per satellite and radar data that the system isn't developed enough yet to get any useful data out of the recon flight.

The system must develop a dominate low level circulation before the models will be any good
Member Since: December 1, 2006 Posts: 2 Comments: 3616
2983. Stormchaser2007
2:26 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Quoting TampaFLUSA:

In the short term I don't see this developing.


Probably not for another 24 hours.
Member Since: June 9, 2007 Posts: 4 Comments: 15718
2982. TampaFLUSA
2:25 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Quoting Stormchaser2007:
RECON CANCELLED:

3. REMARK: LOW LEVEL INVEST FOR 22/1800Z CANCELED
BY NHC AT 22/1230Z.

In the short term I don't see this developing.
Member Since: June 21, 2007 Posts: 10 Comments: 1657
2981. Patrap
2:25 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Quoting Articuno:

So whats this mean?


It means today's Mission at 18Z to investigate 96L is cancelled.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 414 Comments: 125572
2980. stormpetrol
2:25 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Will be an interesting mission for HHs today I think.
Member Since: April 29, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 7506
2979. weatherh98
2:25 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Member Since: June 17, 2011 Posts: 11 Comments: 6439
2978. gordydunnot
2:25 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Well my spin on things today. Levi mentioned that 850 mb height low that is in the central gulf, it is obvious. There is a strong 500mb low around the Yucatan. The 850 would be the one to develop but the shear is to high. Convergence, divergence and shear are just right between Cuba and the Yucatan. I think the final small tropical system and I'm talking geographically is going to be just northeast of the Yucatan. Unfortunate how strong it gets will probably determine it's course. If I was going to guess mid-Fl. Now if the system hasn't already formed and hit where ever it's going before i finish this typing, Thanks.
Member Since: August 18, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 3109
2976. Patrap
2:24 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
96L Long Floater - RGB Color Imagery Loop
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 414 Comments: 125572
2975. pcola57
2:24 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Quoting Stormchaser2007:


FULL


Wow thats alot of convection...
If that was in the US land mass that would be quite a large mess not to mention the attention it would get..
I wounder how much rain Cuba?Yuctan has already gotten from this..
Anyone have a precip. total?
Member Since: August 13, 2009 Posts: 13 Comments: 6641
2974. ProgressivePulse
2:24 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
As expected, shear is abating with deep convection firing in the N and W quadrants.

Member Since: August 19, 2005 Posts: 5 Comments: 4863
2973. Articuno
2:24 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Quoting Patrap:
3. REMARK: LOW LEVEL INVEST FOR 22/1800Z CANCELED
BY NHC AT 22/1230Z.

So whats this mean?
Member Since: October 22, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2179
2972. weatherh98
2:24 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Quoting Stormchaser2007:
RECON CANCELLED:

3. REMARK: LOW LEVEL INVEST FOR 22/1800Z CANCELED
BY NHC AT 22/1230Z.


NNNOOOOOOOOOOOO
Member Since: June 17, 2011 Posts: 11 Comments: 6439
2971. Stoopid1
2:23 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Ah they did call off the recon then. Probably was a bit early, but this still has potential no doubt.
Member Since: August 6, 2007 Posts: 24 Comments: 2682
2970. hydrus
2:23 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Quoting Patrap:
Looks like at least one of the low centers is meandering over the northern tip of the Yucatan. There is a weaker low north of the western tip of Cuba...Hard to see here..P.S. There may be high pressure trying to build over this thing.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 19521
2969. weathermanwannabe
2:23 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Who knows where a good COC will consolidate but looking at the hi-rs loops, I am starting to see some rotation right on the leading edge of the main convective complex right around 24N-86W. Whether this area is the one that emerges victorious (it is well to east of the tip of the Yucatan) is yet to be seen but it is headed in the direction of that weaker area of sheer and trying to wrap come convection.

Here is the NHC still shot (I can't post my hi-res vis loop but someone on here will)

Link
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2968. GeoffreyWPB
2:23 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
CARCAH, NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER, MIAMI, FL.
1015 AM EDT FRI JUN 22 2012
SUBJECT: TROPICAL CYCLONE PLAN OF THE DAY (TCPOD)
VALID 23/1100Z TO 24/1100Z JUN 2012
TCPOD NUMBER.....12-035

I. ATLANTIC REQUIREMENTS
1. SUSPECT AREA (GULF OF MEXICO)
FLIGHT ONE -- TEAL 70 --
A. 23/1800Z
B. AFXXX 01AAA INVEST
C. 23/1615Z
D. 25.5N 888.5W
E. 23/1715Z TO 23/2130Z
F. SFC TO 10,000 FT

FLIGHT TWO -- TEAL 71 --
A. 24/1200,1800Z
B. AFXXX 0204A CYCLONE
C. 24/1015Z
D. 27.1N 88.5W
E. 24/1100Z TO 24/1800Z
F. SFC TO 10,000 FT

2. OUTLOOK FOR SUCCEEDING DAY: CONTINUE 6-HRLY FIXES.
3. REMARK: LOW LEVEL INVEST FOR 22/1800Z CANCELED
BY NHC AT 22/1230Z.
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2967. Patrap
2:22 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
3. REMARK: LOW LEVEL INVEST FOR 22/1800Z CANCELED
BY NHC AT 22/1230Z.
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 414 Comments: 125572
2966. Stormchaser2007
2:22 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Recon:

3. REMARK: LOW LEVEL INVEST FOR 22/1800Z CANCELED
BY NHC AT 22/1230Z.
Member Since: June 9, 2007 Posts: 4 Comments: 15718
2965. Stoopid1
2:22 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
I visit the NHC site out of curiosity and see 96L is pegged at 70% for formation now. Interesting. I took some time to see why, and I can kind of agree with them on that. Might be a little high but who am I to judge them. I'll be monitoring this one carefully.
Member Since: August 6, 2007 Posts: 24 Comments: 2682
2964. earthlydragonfly
2:22 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
I had to do it... LOL
Member Since: July 1, 2005 Posts: 10 Comments: 1681
2963. WeatherNerdPR
2:21 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Quoting Stormchaser2007:


FULL
That looks much better. Very cold cloud tops.
Member Since: July 7, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 5521
2962. Patrap
2:21 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
POD just Updated


Plan of the Day


000
NOUS42 KNHC 221415
WEATHER RECONNAISSANCE FLIGHTS
CARCAH, NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER, MIAMI, FL.
1015 AM EDT FRI JUN 22 2012
SUBJECT: TROPICAL CYCLONE PLAN OF THE DAY (TCPOD)
VALID 23/1100Z TO 24/1100Z JUN 2012
TCPOD NUMBER.....12-035

I. ATLANTIC REQUIREMENTS
1. SUSPECT AREA (GULF OF MEXICO)
FLIGHT ONE -- TEAL 70 --
A. 23/1800Z
B. AFXXX 01AAA INVEST
C. 23/1615Z
D. 25.5N 888.5W
E. 23/1715Z TO 23/2130Z
F. SFC TO 10,000 FT

FLIGHT TWO -- TEAL 71 --
A. 24/1200,1800Z
B. AFXXX 0204A CYCLONE
C. 24/1015Z
D. 27.1N 88.5W
E. 24/1100Z TO 24/1800Z
F. SFC TO 10,000 FT

2. OUTLOOK FOR SUCCEEDING DAY: CONTINUE 6-HRLY FIXES.
3. REMARK: LOW LEVEL INVEST FOR 22/1800Z CANCELED
BY NHC AT 22/1230Z.

II. PACIFIC REQUIREMENTS
1. NEGATIVE RECONNAISSANCE REQUIREMENTS.
2. SUCCEEDING DAY OUTLOOK.....NEGATIVE.
JWP
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 414 Comments: 125572
2961. WeatherNerdPR
2:19 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Good morning.
I see 96L is giving everyone a headache.
This is what's left of Chris:
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2960. Abacosurf
2:19 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Quoting hydrus:
I still see a couple of low centers in there. Some people here knew this would happen over a week ago.
yes...I remember.

It's amazing to me the variables and countless possibilities that it takes for a cyclone to mature. What are we on day 7 or 8 watching this?? day 20 watching models showing this?

The vertical weather picture is what most don't see.

It's why I come here to learn

What's crazy with 96 is that she is acting like an upper level type of low with the plume of moisture to the east and mini vorticies firing here and there. The actual trough axis N. of the Yucatan just does not seem like where Debby wants to form. Time will tell.
Member Since: August 28, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 250
2959. STXHurricanes2012
2:19 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
96L is relocoating near Cozemel!
Member Since: June 4, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 767
2958. redwagon
2:19 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Quoting Stormchaser2007:
In my opinion, recon will be scrubbed for today.

96L is poorly organized, *****with possible multiple surface centers****** and very poorly organized convection. It will need some serious time to get it's act back together.

Yesterday there was one huge circulation, now you see one much smaller swirl already halfway to TX, and I'm waiting on the one SE of that one to get its own spin going.

I think the circ was just too big to be viable, had to split itself.
Member Since: August 4, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 2798
2957. FLWeatherFreak91
2:19 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Quoting Stormchaser2007:


FULL
There we go...
Member Since: December 1, 2006 Posts: 2 Comments: 3616
2956. FLWeatherFreak91
2:18 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Quoting seriousman1:


i have to disagree man right now and before recon flies into sooned to be debby texas has this over florida...florida is gaining no ground on texas...so texas like 60% la miss and alabama 30 % and florida 10%..
can you back up your opinion with any kind of facts or are you just guessing/trolling?

I have no idea where this thing is going, but you don't see me posting percentages of different landfall scenarios
Member Since: December 1, 2006 Posts: 2 Comments: 3616
2955. ILwthrfan
2:18 PM GMT on June 22, 2012

Quoting MAweatherboy1:
I don't see why recon would go today... There's no way 96L is a TD yet, a mission now would be a total waste... They should send out recon tomorrow when organization should be better.
I agree, in fact the 70% maybe a little high right now for the next 48 hrs.  I think we are seeing the exact same song and dance as yesterday.  Convection along the trough is already puttering out and we have about half dozen swirls around one very broad area of low pressure.

Member Since: February 2, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 1403
2954. Noodoggy
2:17 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
looking at this radar (not real good at all lol) not seeing much by way of development of a low under all that convection, but the radar is choppy at best:

Link
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2953. pensacolastorm
2:16 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

You've got that mixed up lol.



Now that is funny!
Member Since: July 30, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 203
2952. Stormchaser2007
2:16 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Quoting Stormchaser2007:
RAP has a very sharp wind shift near Cozumel now.


FULL
Member Since: June 9, 2007 Posts: 4 Comments: 15718
2951. GetReal
2:16 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Member Since: July 4, 2005 Posts: 204 Comments: 8802
2950. TropicalAnalystwx13
2:14 PM GMT on June 22, 2012
Quoting RTSplayer:



They should run the mission just for the heck of it, to get some real data, regardless of how poor the system looks.

I'm sick of guessing what's going on, and the models absolutely suck.

That's the spirit!
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 108 Comments: 30251

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About JeffMasters

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.