The 2012 Atlantic hurricane season begins: what is in store?

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:56 PM GMT on June 01, 2012

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The 2012 Atlantic hurricane season is officially underway. With two early season storms, Alberto and Beryl, having already come and gone, this year's season has gotten off to a near-record early start. Since reliable record keeping began in 1851, only the hurricane seasons of 1908 and 1887 had two named storms form so early in the year. So, will this early pace continue? What will this year's hurricane season bring? Here are my top five questions for the coming season:

1) All of the major seasonal hurricane forecasts are calling for a near-average season, with 10 - 13 named storms. Will these pre-season predictions pan out?

2) How will the steering current pattern evolve? Will the U.S. break its six-year run without a major hurricane landfall, the longest such streak since 1861 - 1868?

3) Will the 420,000 people still homeless in Haiti in the wake of the January 2010 earthquake dodge a major tropical cyclone flooding disaster for the third consecutive hurricane season?

4) How will new National Hurricane Center director Rick Knabb fare in his inaugural season?

5) Will the Republican National Convention, scheduled to occur in Tampa during the last week of August, get interrupted by a tropical storm or hurricane?


Figure 1. True-color MODIS satellite image of Beryl taken at 2:35 pm EDT May 27, 2012 by NASA's Aqua satellite. At the time, Beryl was a tropical storm with winds of 65 mph.

Quick summary of the early-season atmosphere/ocean conditions in the Atlantic
Strong upper-level winds tend to create a shearing force on tropical storms (wind shear), which tears them apart before they can get going. In June, two branches of the jet stream, the polar jet to the north, and a subtropical jet to the south, typically bring high levels of wind shear to the Atlantic. The southern subtropical jet currently lies over the Caribbean, and is expected to remain there the next two weeks, making development unlikely in the Caribbean. Between the subtropical jet to the south and the polar jet to the north, a "hole" in the wind shear pattern formed during May off the Southeast U.S. coast, and this is where both Alberto and Beryl were able to form. Their formation was aided by the fact ocean temperatures off the U.S. East coast are quite warm--about 1 - 2°C above average. A wind shear "hole" is predicted to periodically open up during the next two weeks off the Southeast U.S. coast, making that region the most likely area of formation for any first-half-of-June tropical storms. However, none of the reliable computer models are predicting tropical storm formation in the Atlantic between now and June 8.

May ocean temperatures in the tropical Atlantic are approximately the third coolest we've seen since the current active hurricane period began in 1995. SSTs in the Main Development Region (MDR), between 10 - 20°N latitude, from the coast of Africa to the Central America, were about 0.35°C above average in May, according to NOAA's Coral Reef Watch. Tropical storm activity in the Atlantic is strongly dependent on ocean temperatures in this region, and the relatively cool temperatures imply that we should see a delayed start to development of tropical waves coming off the coast of Africa and moving into the Caribbean, compared to the period 1995 - 2011. An interesting feature of this month's SST departure from average image (Figure 2) is the large area of record-warm ocean temperatures off the mid-Atlantic and New England coasts, from North Carolina to Massachusetts. Ocean temperatures are 3 - 5°C (5 - 9°F) above average in this region. This makes waters of much above-average warmth likely to be present during the peak part of hurricane season, increasing the chances for a strong hurricane to affect the mid-Atlantic and New England coast.

The upper-level jet stream pattern is critical for determining where any tropical storms and hurricanes that form might go. Presently, these "steering currents" are in a typical configuration for June, favoring a northward or northeastward motion for any storms that might form. However, steering current patterns are fickle and difficult to predict more that seven days in advance, and there is no telling how the steering current pattern might evolve this hurricane season. We might see a pattern like evolved during 2004 - 2005, with a westward-extending Bermuda High, forcing storms into Florida and the Gulf Coast. Or, we might see a pattern like occurred during 2010 - 2011, with the large majority of the storms recurving harmlessly out to sea. That's about as helpful as a weather forecast of "Sho' enough looks like rain, lessen' of course it clears up," I realize.


Figure 2. Departure of sea surface temperature from average for May 31, 2012. Image credit: NOAA/NESDIS.

Colorado State predicts a slightly above-average hurricane season
A slightly above-average Atlantic hurricane season is on tap for 2012, according to the seasonal hurricane forecast issued June 1 by Dr. Phil Klotzbach and Dr. Bill Gray of Colorado State University (CSU). The CSU team is calling for 13 named storms, 5 hurricanes, and 2 intense hurricanes, and an Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) of 80, which is 87% of average. This is very close to the 1981 - 2010 average of 12 named storms, 6 hurricanes, and 3 major hurricanes. Hurricane seasons during the active hurricane period 1995 - 2011 have averaged 15 named storms, 8 hurricanes, and 4 major hurricanes, with an ACE index 153% of the median. The forecast calls for an average chance of a major hurricane hitting the U.S., both along the East Coast (28% chance, 31% chance is average) and the Gulf Coast (28% chance, 30% chance is average). The risk of a major hurricane in the Caribbean is also average, at 39% (42% is average.) The CSU teams expects we will have a weak El Niño develop by the peak of this year's hurricane season in September, which will cut down on this year's activity by increasing wind shear over the Tropical Atlantic. However, there is considerable uncertainty in this outlook.

Analogue years
The CSU team picked four previous years when atmospheric and oceanic conditions were similar to what we are seeing this year: neutral El Niño conditions in April - May and average tropical Atlantic and far North Atlantic SSTs during
April - May, followed by August - October periods that were generally characterized by weak El Niño conditions and average tropical Atlantic SSTs . Those four years were 2009, a quiet El Niño year with only 3 hurricanes; 2001, which featured two major Caribbean hurricanes, Iris and Michelle; 1968, a very quiet year with no hurricanes stronger than a Category 1; and 1953, a moderately busy year with 14 named storms, 6 hurricanes, and 4 intense hurricanes. The mean activity for these four years was 11.5 named storms, 6 hurricanes, and 2.5 intense hurricanes.

How accurate are the June forecasts?
The June forecasts by the CSU team between 1998 and 2009 had a skill 19% - 30% higher than a "no-skill" climatology forecast for number of named storms, number of hurricanes, and the ACE index (Figure 3). This is a decent amount of skill for a seasonal forecast, and these June forecasts can be useful to businesses such as the insurance industry and oil and gas industry that need to make bets on how active the coming hurricane season will be. Unfortunately, the CSU June 1 forecasts do poorly at forecasting the number of major hurricanes (only 3% skill), and major hurricanes cause 80% - 85% of all hurricane damage (normalized to current population and wealth levels.) This year's June forecast uses a brand new formula tried in 2011 for the first time, so there is no way to evaluate its performance. An Excel spreadsheet of their forecast skill (expressed as a mathematical correlation coefficient) show values from 0.41 to 0.62 for their June forecasts made between 1984 and 2010, which is respectable.


Figure 3. Comparison of the percent improvement over climatology for May and August seasonal hurricane forecasts for the Atlantic from NOAA, CSU and TSR from 1999-2009 (May) and 1998-2009 (August), using the Mean Squared Error. Image credit: Verification of 12 years of NOAA seasonal hurricane forecasts, National Hurricane Center.


Figure 4. Comparison of the percent improvement in mean square error over climatology for seasonal hurricane forecasts for the Atlantic from NOAA, CSU and TSR from 2002-2011, using the Mean Square Skill Score (MSSS). The figure shows the results using two different climatologies: a fixed 50-year (1950 - 1999) climatology, and a 2002 - 2011 climatology. Skill is poor for forecasts issued in December and April, moderate for June forecasts, and good for August forecasts. Image credit: Tropical Storm Risk, Inc.

TSR predicts a near-average hurricane season
The British private forecasting firm Tropical Storm Risk, Inc. (TSR) calls for 12.7 named storms, 5.7 hurricanes, 2.7 intense hurricanes, and an Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) of 98, which is near average. TSR rates their skill level as 23 - 27% higher than a "no-skill" forecast made using climatology, though an independent assessment by the National Hurricane Center (Figure 3) gives them somewhat lower skill numbers, using a different metric than TSR uses. TSR predicts a 48% chance that U.S. landfalling activity will be above average, a 26% chance it will be near average, and a 26% chance it will be below average. TSR’s two predictors for their statistical model are the forecast July-September trade wind speed over the Caribbean and tropical North Atlantic, and the forecast August-September 2012 sea surface temperatures in the tropical North Atlantic.

TSR projects that 3.6 named storms will hit the U.S., with 1.6 of these being hurricanes. The averages from the 1950-2011 climatology are 3.1 named storms and 1.5 hurricanes. They rate their skill at making these June forecasts for U.S. landfalls at 7 - 11% higher than a "no-skill" forecast made using climatology. In the Lesser Antilles Islands of the Caribbean, TSR projects 1.2 named storms, 0.5 of these being hurricanes. Climatology is 1.1 named storms and 0.5 hurricanes.

FSU predicts a slightly above-average hurricane season: 13 named storms
The Florida State University (FSU) Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS) issued their fourth annual Atlantic hurricane season forecast, calling for a 70% probability of 10 - 16 named storms and 5 - 9 hurricanes. The mid-point forecast is for 13 named storms, 7 hurricanes, and an accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) of 122. The scientists use a numerical atmospheric model developed at COAPS to understand seasonal predictability of hurricane activity. The model is one of only a handful of numerical models in the world being used to study seasonal hurricane activity and is different from the statistical methods used by other seasonal hurricane forecasters such as Colorado State, TSR, and PSU (NOAA uses a hybrid statistical-dynamical model technique.) The FSU forecast has been the best one over the past three years, for predicting numbers of Atlantic named storms and hurricanes:

2009 prediction: 8 named storms, 4 hurricanes. Actual: 9 named storms, 3 hurricanes
2010 prediction: 17 named storms, 10 hurricanes. Actual: 19 named storms, 12 hurricanes
2011 prediction: 17 named storms, 9 hurricanes. Actual: 19 named storms, 7 hurricanes

Penn State predicts a near-average hurricane season: 11 named storms
A statistical model by Penn State's Michael Mann and alumnus Michael Kozar is calling for an average Atlantic hurricane season with 11.2 named storms, plus or minus 3.3 storms. Their prediction was made using statistics of how past hurricane seasons have behaved in response to sea surface temperatures (SSTs), the El Niño/La Niña oscillation, the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and other factors. The statistic model assumes that in 2012 the current 0.35°C above average temperatures in the MDR will persist throughout hurricane season, the El Niño phase will be neutral to slightly warm, and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) will be near average.

The PSU team has been making Atlantic hurricane season forecasts since 2007, and these predictions have done pretty well:

2007 prediction: 15 named storms, Actual: 15
2009 prediction: 12.5, named storms, Actual: 9
2010 prediction: 23 named storms, Actual: 19
2011 prediction: 16 named storms, Actual: 19

UK Met Office predicts a slightly below-average hurricane season: 10 named storms
The UK Met Office uses a combination of their Glosea4 model and the ECMWF system 4 model to predict seasonal hurricane activity. These dynamical numerical models are predicting a slightly below-average season, with 10 named storms and an ACE index of 90.

NOAA predicts an average hurricane season: 12 named storms
As I discussed in detail in a May 24 blog post, NOAA is calling for 12 named storms, 6 hurricanes, 2 major hurricanes, and an ACE index 102% of normal.



NOAA predicts an average Eastern Pacific hurricane season
NOAA's pre-season prediction for the Eastern Pacific hurricane season, issued on May 24, calls for a near-average season, with 12 -18 named storms, 5 - 9 hurricanes, 2 - 5 major hurricanes, and an ACE index 70% - 130% of the median. The mid-point of these ranges gives us a forecast for 15 named storms, 7 hurricanes, and 3.5 major hurricanes, with an ACE index exactly average. The 1981 - 2010 averages for the Eastern Pacific hurricane season are 15 named storms, 8 hurricanes, and 4 major hurricanes. So far in 2012, there have been two named storms. On average, the 2nd storm of the year doesn't form until June 25. We had a record early appearance of the season's second named storm (Bud on May 21.) Bud was also the strongest Eastern Pacific hurricane on record for so early in the year. Records in the Eastern Pacific extend back to 1949.

Western Pacific typhoon season forecast not available yet
Dr. Johnny Chan of the City University of Hong Kong issues a seasonal forecast of typhoon season in the Western Pacific, but this forecast is not yet available (as of June 1.) An average typhoon season has 27 named storms and 17 typhoons. Typhoon seasons immediately following a La Niña year typically see higher levels of activity in the South China Sea, especially between months of May and July. Also, the jet stream tends to dip farther south than usual to the south of Japan, helping steer more tropical cyclones towards Japan and Korea. With the formation of Tropical Storm Mawar today east of the Philippines, the Western Pacific is exactly on the usual climatological pace for formation of the season's third storm.


Figure 5. Time series of the annual number of tropical storms and typhoons in the Northwest Pacific from 1960 - 2011. Red circles and blue squares indicate El Niño and La Niña years, respectively. Note that La Niña years tend to have lower activity, with 2010 having the lowest activity on record (15 named storms.) In 2011, there were 20 named storms. The thick horizontal line indicates the normal number of named storms (27.) Image credit: City University of Hong Kong.

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1097. yqt1001
Quoting MAweatherboy1:

The astronomically high tides won't help either.


Just curious do astronomically high tides only occur when a tropical cyclone is near the US? That's what it seems like to someone who lives inland. :P
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Quoting Methurricanes:
Unfortunatly at the same time 120 hours of a 20-25mph NE/ENE Wind could cause some costal problems by Sunday night, Monday and onwards. Especially on vunerable Coasts like Pulm Island, and Sitcuate.

The astronomically high tides won't help either.
Member Since: February 11, 2012 Posts: 84 Comments: 8035
1094. Skyepony (Mod)
I question the measurements..

More than 800 villagers have been evacuated after land sank in southern China's Guangxi province, which is known for its karst topography. Saturday that the land subsidence occurred near a middle school in Nanning city's Xixiangtang district after the school dug a well to ease a water shortage. The sink hole is 1.5 meters (5 feet) deep and 2.5 meters (8 feet) wide and has caused one building to collapse, six to tilt and another to crack. There were no reports of injuries, but 844 villagers were evacuated. Sinkholes and land cracks have been common in China in recent years, partly because of intense construction and mining activities coupled with insufficient geological regulation.
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1093. Skyepony (Mod)
Thirty fishermen were missing and hundreds of travellers were stranded on Saturday after tropical storm Mawar dumped heavy rains across the Philippines, forcing flight and ship cancellations. The storm blanketed large parts of the main southern island of Luzon and central Visayas province with up to 25 millimetres (an inch) of rain an hour overnight, the state weather bureau said. At least two domestic flights were cancelled while more than 500 people were stranded in ports after the coast guard prevented passenger ferries from sailing, disaster relief agencies said. "Thirty fishermen have also gone missing from the eastern-most island of Catanduanes after apparently getting caught at sea by the storm," Benito Ramos, head of Manila's Office of Civil Defense, said over local radio. He said search and rescue operations were underway, though the coast guard could not carry out an air search due to bad visibility. About 20 storms slam into the Philippines from the Pacific every year, causing heavy casualties and damage. Mawar is the first for 2012.
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i think will see 9 too 21 name storms 7 to 12 hurricanes and 3 too 7 becomeing cat 3 or stronger
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1091. Skyepony (Mod)
I can't help but take a stab & have a little fun with the questions Masters left ..

1) All of the major seasonal hurricane forecasts are calling for a near-average season, with 10 - 13 named storms. Will these pre-season predictions pan out?
No, higher.. Vorticity abound will help the numbers..I do expect the shallow, half sheared tendency to be the trend.

2) How will the steering current pattern evolve? Will the U.S. break its six-year run without a major hurricane landfall, the longest such streak since 1861 - 1868?
Steering pattern already suggests the lucky streak is over, seems like a season for homegrowns..little concern with the global lack of majors in producing a major that can hold up to landfall, but then again the Republican National Convention is being held in Tampa in Aug.

3) Will the 420,000 people still homeless in Haiti in the wake of the January 2010 earthquake dodge a major tropical cyclone flooding disaster for the third consecutive hurricane season?
Very unlikely~ 6 died in flooding there last month.

4) How will new National Hurricane Center director Rick Knabb fare in his inaugural season?
Probably really well..well I suppose there is the outside chance he, if brainwashed by his last employers, attempts to privatizes weather completely...

5) Will the Republican National Convention, scheduled to occur in Tampa during the last week of August, get interrupted by a tropical storm or hurricane?
Definitely..they are already hyping this.. With Heartland flailing a major to the Republican convention should throw the whole election & energy debate...
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Quoting MAweatherboy1:

Doing well Nigel... Watching the rain come down...
The negative NAO has unfortunately created a block which will be keeping a storm over the Northeast all week so nothing but clouds, showers, wind, and upper 50s/lower 60s for the next week. Oh well... We need the rain.
Unfortunatly at the same time 120 hours of a 20-25mph NE/ENE Wind could cause some costal problems by Sunday night, Monday and onwards. Especially on vunerable Coasts like Pulm Island, and Sitcuate.
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Quoting Levi32:
Looking at analog years is one of the most useful long-range forecasting techniques currently available to us due to the still generally poor performance of seasonal-range forecast models.

The trick, however, is in how historical references are picked. It is very easy to simply go with ENSO analogs, but is that the only relevant parameter? Usually it is not. Picking analog years based on irrelevant or uninfluential parameters will lead to a bad forecast, but picking the appropriate things to look at can lead a forecaster to invaluable insight that computer models will miss. It is a tool that you have to learn to use, just as the computer models are.
good point levi although i want to ask is it important to notice the pdo is much cooler than it was in 2009 2006 and 2002 which were all el nino years or is there something more to predict the enso for the peak months
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Quoting GeorgiaStormz:


they are overdue.
Irene doesn't count as their major hurricane strike since, besides heavy rainfall, it was more of a bust than a disaster.
Well, Irene wasn't a major when it made landfall, true. But it did kill 56, cause nearly $19 billion in damage, lead to historic flooding, and practically shut down our nation's largest city for a day, inconveniencing millions. In fact, it was so bad that it had its named retired. Don't you think calling it a "bust" might just be a bit of a stretch? ;-)
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I honestly would find it hard to believe that there wont be another named storm until August. Just doesnt seem right for this type of year.
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Another Antarctic Ice Shelf at risk of melting

http://hot-topic.co.nz/another-antarctic-ice-shel f-at-risk-of-melt/
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1083. Levi32
Looking at analog years is one of the most useful long-range forecasting techniques currently available to us due to the still generally poor performance of seasonal-range forecast models.

The trick, however, is in how historical references are picked. It is very easy to simply go with ENSO analogs, but is that the only relevant parameter? Usually it is not. Picking analog years based on irrelevant or uninfluential parameters will lead to a bad forecast, but picking the appropriate things to look at can lead a forecaster to invaluable insight that computer models will miss. It is a tool that you have to learn to use, just as the computer models are.
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Quoting BahaHurican:
Hmmmm.

Been reading a few of the comments from earlier in the day, and I have a little concern with the single analogue year concept some bloggers are employing. I find it hard to believe only one year in the record demonstrates the qualities we can expect this year to have. Shouldn't there be more data?



You'll get your "more data" a few hundred years from now. You have to recognise that not too long ago we didn't even have satellites or live tracking.
Member Since: August 21, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 666
Quoting JeffMasters:


We average one June storm every other year, and I give a 50% chance we'll see a June storm this year, since conditions are pretty average this year.

Jeff Masters
Thank you Dr. M. Sorry to interrupt your Saturday but you know how us wx geeks can be. Thanks for clearing things up.
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fwiw....for our younger members still in school...take some classes in statistics and statistical probability analysis while you have the opportunity, even as an elective. It's something that helps in so many diverse aspects of life. From better understanding predicting weather to a better understanding of managing your money, and 100 points between.
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1079. hydrus
It is ten days out, but...
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1078. LargoFl
Member Since: August 6, 2011 Posts: 4 Comments: 42085
Quoting MAweatherboy1:
18z GFS shows high pressure in control of the area the Euro was showing that storm at around 240 hours



There you have no consensus for now. Let's see if they start to show the same in future runs.
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1076. hydrus
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Quoting BahaHurican:
But what I saw wasn't so much to support track as to suggest certain other conditions - number, frequency of storms, etc. Wouldn't similar conditions to those in the single selected analogue year likely be found in other years as well? What happened in those years?

I thought the point of the analogue years was to suggest a range of possibilities that we know have already occurred.


Yeah certainly there are more similarities than just track, I thought that's what you were referring to. My point in general was that no two seasons are alike and although we may be able to gain insight on "possible" outcomes for the season based on past analogue years. It will be just that "possible" outcomes, because in reality although two seasons may have similarities, no two are alike.
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After some eye straining.... it appears that the low pressure in the ECMWF model is at 997 mbar after 10 days. 
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18z GFS shows high pressure in control of the area the Euro was showing that storm at around 240 hours

Member Since: February 11, 2012 Posts: 84 Comments: 8035
Quoting ncstorm:



sigh..For the gulf, its on one run, its been on the Euro for several runs now on the east coast..can the east coast get some love..I mean really??


they are overdue.
Irene doesn't count as their major hurricane strike since, besides heavy rainfall, it was more of a bust than a disaster.
Still, i dont see this getting very strong, but the model representation reminds me of how the ECMWF showed Bud in the E Pac

These images support a well defined COC with winds on N side:
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Quoting BahaHurican:
I'll betcha there'll be a lot of scary runs this season... there always are.

The best ones are the ones that fizzle harmlessly in the models...


One day the models will get to the point that the scary runs you see are what will really happen.

Concerning the next system, the GFS diverges from the ECMWF significantly by 3-4 days, and has not event a hint of this system.
In the past few weeks the ECMWF has been wrong in the long range, but the GFS was surprisingly correct, and then in the medium ranges the ecmwf would come into line with the GFS before surpassing the GFS in accuracy in the Mid to Short ranges.
I would expect that this could continue, given that the models are initializing with the same large scale features they have shown for the last week or so.
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Quoting ncstorm:



sigh..For the gulf, its on one run, its been on the Euro for several runs now on the east coast..can the east coast get some love..I mean really??
LOL....I feel ur pain
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Well, gaddigit... gotta run.... just as I was starting to get caught up....

BBL...
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22728
Quoting JeffMasters:


We average one June storm every other year, and I give a 50% chance we'll see a June storm this year, since conditions are pretty average this year.

Jeff Masters
That's about what I thought. We usually get rainy weather for about 6 weeks in late May and June, then a break of 3 - 6 weeks with bright sunny, breezy days in July. After that, anything's possible. While a June storm is not impossible, I get a lot more worried in August.... :o)
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22728
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Yeah, it's only one run. That's still scary though lol.
I'll betcha there'll be a lot of scary runs this season... there always are.

The best ones are the ones that fizzle harmlessly in the models...
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22728
1065. JeffMasters (Admin)
Quoting BahaHurican:
What's so problematic with this? I'm sure there's sufficient justification in the various tools we employ for this opinion to have sufficient validity. Certainly it's happened often enough that we had no storms in June and July. What I do note is that he did not RULE OUT June/July storms; he just said he doesn't expect them. So a storm over the next 6-8 weeks would get more of a "well, look at that..." reaction than an "unbelievable!"


We average one June storm every other year, and I give a 50% chance we'll see a June storm this year, since conditions are pretty average this year.

Jeff Masters
Quoting charlottefl:


I think you can use analogue years to highlight general track patterns, but no 2 seasons are alike. With track, timing of steering systems are critical. So you may be able to say one area is at an increased risk of landfalls during the season, but I don't think you can go beyond that.
But what I saw wasn't so much to support track as to suggest certain other conditions - number, frequency of storms, etc. Wouldn't similar conditions to those in the single selected analogue year likely be found in other years as well? What happened in those years?

I thought the point of the analogue years was to suggest a range of possibilities that we know have already occurred.
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22728
Quoting bappit:
Here's the National Geographic quote in question, and I see nothing remarkable about it.

" “I wouldn’t be surprised if we didn’t see another tropical storm until August,” Masters said. "

Possible and likely are two entirely different concepts. Not being surprised falls closer to possible than likely.
What's so problematic with this? I'm sure there's sufficient justification in the various tools we employ for this opinion to have sufficient validity. Certainly it's happened often enough that we had no storms in June and July. What I do note is that he did not RULE OUT June/July storms; he just said he doesn't expect them. So a storm over the next 6-8 weeks would get more of a "well, look at that..." reaction than an "unbelievable!"
Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22728
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
Whoa.

I didn't even pay much attention to its location when y'all posted it.

Well, that's scary. A high on both sides would send it straight north into the NE.


Cool!
Member Since: February 11, 2012 Posts: 84 Comments: 8035
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
Whoa.

I didn't even pay much attention to its location when y'all posted it.

Well, that's scary. A high on both sides would send it straight north into the NE.



We have 10 days to see what happens.
Despite the ECMWF being very accurate, even it doesnt verify most of the time 10 days out.
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Quoting K8eCane:



And I meant no disrespect to anyone on here.
Agreed; however, I think what you said has validity. Some of the worst situations we've had on this blog have evolved because some people discovered their wx idols had feet of clay and then went to the opposite extreme to vilify them. Some vilified anybody who disagreed with their current wx-god of the moment, while others felt one person was being excessively venerated and struck out in reaction. IN any case, nobody's infallible, especially when it comes to wx prediction.

Just take everybody's opinion as just that - opinion - and show respect when you disagree.

Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22728
1058. bappit
I've always had trouble with people posting multiple analog years, but then I think analog years are pretty useless anyway. Every year is different. If you want to say these are other years where ENSO was such and such then thank you for the historical trivia, but we don't learn about the effects of ENSO except by looking at the population of hurricane seasons as a whole.
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Quoting BahaHurican:
Hmmmm.

Been reading a few of the comments from earlier in the day, and I have a little concern with the single analogue year concept some bloggers are employing. I find it hard to believe only one year in the record demonstrates the qualities we can expect this year to have. Shouldn't there be more data?



I think you can use analogue years to highlight general track patterns, but no 2 seasons are alike. With track, timing of steering systems are critical. So you may be able to say one area is at an increased risk of landfalls during the season, but I don't think you can go beyond that.
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Taken about two hours ago:

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1053. bappit
Here's the National Geographic quote in question, and I see nothing remarkable about it.

" “I wouldn’t be surprised if we didn’t see another tropical storm until August,” Masters said. "

Possible and likely are two entirely different concepts. Not being surprised falls closer to possible than likely.
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Hmmmm.

Been reading a few of the comments from earlier in the day, and I have a little concern with the single analogue year concept some bloggers are employing. I find it hard to believe only one year in the record demonstrates the qualities we can expect this year to have. Shouldn't there be more data?

Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22728
1051. K8eCane
Quoting Minnemike:
hope that's not directed towards me, because that's certainly not how i see it. the thing that surprises me isn't an idea of it being quiet til August, but that he would remark on two months of the season in such a way. i guess the quote itself is innocent enough.. he's not predicting no storms til then, just remarking that it would not be a long shot to see that. still, i feel like on this blog and in other public forums, he's been a lot more cautious with laying expectations. that is all... yeah, he is not the NHC, i get that.



And I meant no disrespect to anyone on here.
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Afternoon, everybody. We've had a relatively rainy start to June, with a sunny, muggy Labour Day and rain and thunderstorms around 2 a.m. and 2 p.m. While I can see some validity to a tailing off of storms towards the end of the season, I seriously doubt we'll get fewer than 14 storms. 12 - 13 more makes sense. I'm hoping we get a break here in the Bahamas; island communities in the Southeast are still recouperating from last season.

Whatever does happen, I hope to be right here with my wx eye open....

Member Since: October 25, 2005 Posts: 19 Comments: 22728
Quoting K8eCane:
With all due respect, Dr Masters is not the see all end all with weather. He is very good and his name is MASTERS but give the man a break. He is allowed his opinion based on his expertise, but that doesnt make him infallible. It isnt fair to him to put him on such a pedastal.
hope that's not directed towards me, because that's certainly not how i see it. the thing that surprises me isn't an idea of it being quiet til August, but that he would remark on two months of the season in such a way. i guess the quote itself is innocent enough.. he's not predicting no storms til then, just remarking that it would not be a long shot to see that. still, i feel like on this blog and in other public forums, he's been a lot more cautious with laying expectations. that is all... yeah, he is not the NHC, i get that.
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Quoting K8eCane:
With all due respect, Dr Masters is not the see all end all with weather. He is very good and his name is MASTERS but give the man a break. He is allowed his opinion based on his expertise, but that doesnt make him infallible. It isnt fair to him to put him on such a pedastal.
There's no such thing as infallible in the uncertain science of forecasting cyclones. I think the Dr. would be the first to say so. Again, unless I'm reading wrong, he's not saying he's 100% certain. I still maintain it's a bold statement to say "I wouldn't be surprised". As a betting man, without knowing anything about what was forecast NAO/MJO/shear/SST/patterns, etc. for this particular season, I'd be inclined to take the over if the O/U number was 1 between here and MID-August. But most important imo would be for the Dr. to expound on the quoted statement here.
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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