Unprecedented May heat in Greenland; update on 2011 Greenland ice melt

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:53 PM GMT on May 31, 2012

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The record books for Greenland's climate were re-written on Tuesday, when the mercury hit 24.8°C (76.6°F) at Narsarsuaq, Greenland, on the southern coast. According to weather records researcher Maximiliano Herrera, this is the hottest temperature on record in Greenland for May, and is just 0.7°C (1.3°F) below the hottest temperature ever measured in Greenland. The previous May record was 22.4°C (72.3°F) at Kangerlussuaq (called Sondre Stormfjord in Danish) on May 31, 1991. The 25.2°C at Narsarsuaq on June 22, 1957 is the only June temperature measured in Greenland warmer than yesterday's 24.8°C reading. Wunderground's extremes page shows that the all-time warmest temperature record for Greenland is 25.5°C (77.9°F) set on July 26, 1990. The exceptional warmth this week was caused by the combination of an intense ridge of high pressure and a local foehn wind, said the Danish Meteorological Institute. The unusual May heat has extended to Scotland, which had its hottest May temperature on record on May 25 at Achnagart: 29.3°C (85°F). Greenland's Narsarsuaq has seen a string of 3 consecutive days over 70°F this week--the 3rd, 7th, and 12th warmest days there since record keeping began in 1941. The ridge of high pressure responsible is expected to stay in place several more days, bringing additional 70° days over Southern Greenland. The warm May temperatures could be setting the stage for a big Greenland melt season this summer--the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) is predicting a 50 - 60% that the southern 2/3 of Greenland will experience above-average temperatures this summer. They forecast just a 10 - 15% chance of below-average temperatures.


Figure 1. Difference between the number of melt days in 2011 and the average number of melt days during the period 1979 - 2010. Large sections of the island experienced twenty more days with melting conditions than average. Image credit: Arctic Report Card

Why Greenland is important
If the massive icecap on Greenland were to melt, global sea level would rise 7 meters (23 ft). Temperatures in Greenland are predicted to rise 3°C by 2100, to levels similar to those present during that warm period 120,000 years ago. During that period, roughly half of the Greenland ice sheet melted, increasing sea level by 2.2 - 3.4 meters (7.2 - 11.2 ft.) However, the 2007 IPCC report expects melting of the Greenland ice sheet to occur over about a 1,000 year period, delaying much of the expected sea level rise for many centuries. While Greenland's ice isn't going to be melting completely and catastrophically flooding low-lying areas of the earth in the next few decades (sea level is only rising about 3 mm per year or 1.2 inches per decade at present), the risk later this century needs to be taken seriously. Higher sea levels will cause increased erosion, salt water intrusion, and storm surge damage in coastal areas, in addition to a loss of barrier formations such as islands, sand bars, and reefs that would normally protect coastal zones from battering by waves and wind. Additionally, coastal zones are sites of incredible economic and agricultural activity, which would also be negatively affected by higher sea levels. Currently, melting ice from Greenland is thought to cause about 0.7 mm/year of global sea level rise, which is about 20 - 25% of the global total, according to an international research group led by the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, in an article published the latest issue of Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 1 June 2012. In 2007, the IPCC estimated that Greenland ice melt was responsible for only 10 - 15% of the total global sea level rise. Ice loss in Greenland is accelerating, and if current ice loss trends continue for the next ten years, Greenland's contribution to sea level rise will double to 1.4 mm/yr by 2022. The increased ice loss in Greenland is being driven by a combination of warmer air temperatures, warmer ocean temperatures, and loss of Arctic sea ice. Ocean temperatures surrounding Southern Greenland have increased by 1 - 2°C since 1990 (figure at right.)

Figure 2. Monthly unsmoothed values of the total mass (in gigatons, Gt), of the Greenland ice sheet from the GRACE satellites. On the horizontal axis, each year begins on 1 January. Each small + symbol is a monthly value. Between 2003 - 2009, Greenland lost an average of 250 gigatons of ice per year. In 2011, the loss was 70% greater than that. Image credit: Arctic Report Card

Update on the 2011 Greenland melt season
According to the 2011 Arctic Report Card, it was another very warm year in Greenland in 2011, which led to substantial melting of the ice. Here are some of the highlights from the report:

1) The area and duration of melting at the surface of the Greenland ice sheet in summer 2011 were the third highest since 1979.

2) Increased surface melting and below average summer snowfall in recent years has made the icecap steadily darker. In 2011, the icecap had the lowest reflectivity (albedo) of any year since satellite measurements of reflectivity began in 2000.

3) The area of glaciers that empty into the sea continued to decrease, though at less than half the rate of the previous 10 years.

4) Total ice sheet mass loss in 2011 was 70% larger than the 2003 - 2009 average annual loss rate of -250 gigatons per year. According to satellite gravity data obtained since 2002, ice sheet mass loss is accelerating.

Resources:
Wunderground's Greenland page.
Wunderground's sea level rise page.
Danish Meteorological Institute's extremes page for Greenland.

Jeff Masters

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FCST HODOGRAPHS...WHILE FAVORABLE IN BOTH REGIMES...DO NOT APPEAR AS LARGE OVER BROAD AREAS AS ON MOST ERN-CONUS TORNADO OUTBREAK DAYS...AND THERE ARE CONSIDERABLE UNCERTAINTIES ATTM REGARDING DENSITY/LONGEVITY OF ANY SUPERCELL MODES.

Hopefully they're right about that...but I'll be watchin out tomorrow!


Quoting VAbeachhurricanes:


GREATEST RELATIVE SPATIAL OVERLAP/DENSITY OF TORNADO POTENTIAL MAY
BE FROM N-CENTRAL/NERN NC ACROSS CENTRAL VA TO CHESAPEAKE BAY
REGION. THAT CORRIDOR REPRESENTS SPATIAL OVERLAP OF THREAT FROM 1.
EARLIER/MORE DISCRETE AND DIURNAL CONVECTION...WHERE DISCRETE OR
EMBEDDED/CLUSTERED SUPERCELLS ARE POSSIBLE BUT SPECIFIC FOCI FOR
LOW-LEVEL FORCING ARE MORE NEBULOUS AND UNCERTAIN...AND
2. MORE CERTAIN ARRIVAL OF LATER AFTERNOON/EVENING QLCS ACTIVITY
CONTAINING EMBEDDED CIRCULATIONS.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:


GREATEST RELATIVE SPATIAL OVERLAP/DENSITY OF TORNADO POTENTIAL MAY
BE FROM N-CENTRAL/NERN NC ACROSS CENTRAL VA TO CHESAPEAKE BAY
REGION. THAT CORRIDOR REPRESENTS SPATIAL OVERLAP OF THREAT FROM 1.
EARLIER/MORE DISCRETE AND DIURNAL CONVECTION...WHERE DISCRETE OR
EMBEDDED/CLUSTERED SUPERCELLS ARE POSSIBLE BUT SPECIFIC FOCI FOR
LOW-LEVEL FORCING ARE MORE NEBULOUS AND UNCERTAIN...AND
2. MORE CERTAIN ARRIVAL OF LATER AFTERNOON/EVENING QLCS ACTIVITY
CONTAINING EMBEDDED CIRCULATIONS.
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Quoting aspectre:
664 BobWallace: If you're farming a fast growing species which might be harvested in 20 years then you might be sticking a lot more carbon underground than would happen by letting a forest 'go old'. Each generation is going to create a new set of carbon-bearing roots.

Root rot. The evolutionary advantage goes to the species that allows its roots to decay into nutrients that'll feed the next generation.

Consider caribou/reindeer. The males drop their antlers, while the females do not. The primary limiting factor to growth in most tundra, grassland, and forest environments is calcium.
Dropping the antlers makes the male more vulnerable to predation. BUT it also makes it possible for vegetation and smaller animals to gain the calcium needed to achieve their own reproductive success.
Predators want the least hassle possible in obtaining their next meal: hunting injuries are expensive both metabolicly and reproductively. Even a mountain lion tends to choose mice and other small critters over big game.
So becoming more vulnerable while ensuring reproductive success of smaller mammals (and birds and lizards and etc) also ensures the successful reproduction of the caribou gene line by the still antlered (and pregnant) female caribou AND later survival of their offspring by providing "easy pickin's" for predators.


I've got to admit that your comment makes no sense to me.

Are you saying that after the first generation of trees subsequent generations use that root-stored carbon rather than CO2 from the atmosphere?

Member Since: February 22, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1344
Right now, it seems that low over central America looks like it's going to develop. Tropical cyclones have developed over land before, I think?

Though it is highly likely that it won't, it sure looks like it bodes watching when i gets over water.
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Quoting CybrTeddy:


Looks somewhat impressive, but to be honest I prefer the big daytime heating thunderstorms.


I couldn't agree more.
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664 BobWallace: If you're farming a fast growing species which might be harvested in 20 years then you might be sticking a lot more carbon underground than would happen by letting a forest 'go old'. Each generation is going to create a new set of carbon-bearing roots.

Root rot. The evolutionary advantage goes to the species that allows its roots to decay into nutrients that'll feed the next generation.

Consider caribou/reindeer. The males drop their antlers, while the females do not. The primary limiting factor to growth in most tundra, grassland, and forest environments is calcium.
Dropping the antlers makes the male more vulnerable to predation. BUT it also makes it possible for vegetation and smaller animals to gain the calcium needed to achieve their own reproductive success.
Predators want the least hassle possible in obtaining their next meal: hunting injuries are expensive both metabolicly and reproductively. Even a mountain lion tends to choose mice and other small critters over big game.
So becoming more vulnerable while ensuring reproductive success of smaller mammals (and birds and lizards and etc) also ensures the successful reproduction of the caribou gene line by the still antlered (and pregnant) female caribou AND later survival of their offspring by providing "easy pickin's" for predators.
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www.hurricanes.gov/signup.shtml is a broken link. Fail?
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000
ABNT20 KNHC 010504
TWOAT

TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOK
NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL
200 AM EDT FRI JUN 1 2012

FOR THE NORTH ATLANTIC...CARIBBEAN SEA AND THE GULF OF MEXICO...

TROPICAL CYCLONE FORMATION IS NOT EXPECTED DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS.

TODAY MARKS THE FIRST DAY OF THE ATLANTIC HURRICANE SEASON...WHICH
WILL RUN UNTIL NOVEMBER 30. LONG-TERM AVERAGES FOR THE NUMBER OF
NAMED STORMS...HURRICANES...AND MAJOR HURRICANES ARE 12...6...AND
3...RESPECTIVELY.

THE LIST OF NAMES FOR 2012 IS AS FOLLOWS:

NAME PRONUNCIATION NAME PRONUNCIATION
------------------------------------------------- ------------
ALBERTO AL BAIR- TOE LESLIE LEHZ- LEE
BERYL BER- RIL MICHAEL MY- KUHL
CHRIS KRIS NADINE NAY DEEN-
DEBBY DEH- BEE OSCAR AHS- KUR
ERNESTO ER NES- TOH PATTY PAT- EE
FLORENCE FLOOR- ENCE RAFAEL RAH FAH ELL-
GORDON GOR- DUHN SANDY SAN- DEE
HELENE HEH LEEN- TONY TOH- NEE
ISAAC EYE- ZIK VALERIE VAH- LUR EE
JOYCE JOYSS WILLIAM WILL- YUM
KIRK KURK

THE ATLANTIC SEASON HAS ALREADY GOTTEN OFF TO A QUICK START...WITH
TROPICAL STORMS ALBERTO AND BERYL FORMING DURING THE MONTH OF MAY.
THIS IS THE FIRST TIME SINCE 1908 THAT TWO TROPICAL CYCLONES
DEVELOPED BEFORE 1 JUNE. TROPICAL STORM BERYL...WHICH CAME ASHORE
NEAR JACKSONVILLE BEACH EARLY ON 28 MAY...IS THE STRONGEST PRE-JUNE
TROPICAL CYCLONE TO MAKE LANDFALL IN THE UNITED STATES.

THIS PRODUCT...THE TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOK...BRIEFLY DESCRIBES
SIGNIFICANT AREAS OF DISTURBED WEATHER AND THEIR POTENTIAL FOR
TROPICAL CYCLONE FORMATION DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS. THE ISSUANCE
TIMES OF THIS PRODUCT ARE 2 AM...8 AM...2 PM...AND 8 PM EDT. AFTER
THE CHANGE TO STANDARD TIME IN NOVEMBER...THE ISSUANCE TIMES ARE 1
AM...7 AM...1 PM...AND 7 PM EST.

A SPECIAL TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOK WILL BE ISSUED TO PROVIDE
UPDATES...AS NECESSARY...IN BETWEEN THE REGULARLY SCHEDULED
ISSUANCES OF THE TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOK. SPECIAL TROPICAL
WEATHER OUTLOOKS WILL BE ISSUED UNDER THE SAME WMO AND AWIPS
HEADERS AS THE REGULAR TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOKS.

A STANDARD PACKAGE OF PRODUCTS...CONSISTING OF THE TROPICAL CYCLONE
PUBLIC ADVISORY...THE FORECAST/ADVISORY...THE CYCLONE DISCUSSION...
AND THE WIND SPEED PROBABILITY PRODUCT...IS ISSUED EVERY SIX HOURS
FOR ALL ONGOING TROPICAL CYCLONES. IN ADDITION...A SPECIAL
ADVISORY PACKAGE MAY BE ISSUED AT ANY TIME TO ADVISE OF SIGNIFICANT
UNEXPECTED CHANGES OR TO MODIFY WATCHES OR WARNINGS.

THE TROPICAL CYCLONE UPDATE IS A BRIEF STATEMENT TO INFORM OF
SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN A TROPICAL CYCLONE OR TO POST OR CANCEL
WATCHES OR WARNINGS. IT IS USED IN LIEU OF OR TO PRECEDE THE
ISSUANCE OF A SPECIAL ADVISORY PACKAGE. TROPICAL CYCLONE
UPDATES...WHICH CAN BE ISSUED AT ANY TIME...CAN BE FOUND UNDER WMO
HEADER WTNT61-65 KNHC...AND UNDER AWIPS HEADER MIATCUAT1-5.

ALL NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER TEXT AND GRAPHICAL PRODUCTS ARE
AVAILABLE ON THE WEB AT WWW.HURRICANES.GOV. SIGN UP FOR PRODUCT
UPDATES BY EMAIL AT WWW.HURRICANES.GOV/SIGNUP.SHTML ...IN ALL LOWER
CASE. YOU CAN ALSO INTERACT WITH US ON FACEBOOK AT
WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/US.NOAA.NATIONALHURRICANECENTER. GOV. NOTIFICATIONS
ARE AVAILABLE VIA TWITTER WHEN SELECT NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER
PRODUCTS ARE ISSUED. INFORMATION ABOUT OUR ATLANTIC TWITTER FEED
IS AVAILABLE AT WWW.HURRICANES.GOV/TWITTER.SHTML ...IN ALL LOWER
CASE.

$$
FORECASTER BERG

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165 Caner: Regardless, you also fail, Earth was in a ice age with CO2 levels thousands of times today's level, so explain that.

No, the (what are now multiple) continents were closer to the equator. The mostly floating ice-sheets at the poles would have experienced strong yearly melting from below; severely limiting their maximum semi-permanent size.
And no again...
...even the highest CO2 level on the chart you provided is only ~17 of times that of presentday levels. And the margin of error is HUGE at that point: coulda been closer to 8times that of today.
1) CO2 levels do not have a 1-to-1 correspondence with the amount of greenhousing. Every doubling of CO2-level increases the temperature by ~3degreesCelsius. The Cambrian Greenhouse effect of 8-to-17 times the presentday CO2 level would produce a maximum* 9degreesC to (a wee-bit-over) 12degreesC of increase.
2) The Sun does evolve noticeably in half a billion years. eg It'll be so much hotter in 500million years that Earth's presentday multicellular life could no longer exist... except for some thermophiles.
The Sun was cooler -- producing less light energy -- 500million years ago than it is now. Meaning that the natural blackbody temperature of an object orbiting at Earth's distance would have been colder.
3) So that extra 9-to-12degreesC from greenhousing would have been added to an Earth that would have been colder from that lower amount of direct sunlight alone.

* Actually less: the higher the concentration of any particular greenhouse gas, the closer to spectrum saturation it is inregard to reflecting the particular InfraRed(heat)frequencies that the gas interacts with.
Kinda like silvered glass. The thicker the silver layer, the more sunlight it reflects and the less it allows into the building. (Think two-way mirrors.) Thick enough, and (close enough to) 100% of the visible sunlight is reflected and no visible sunlight enters the building.
Increasing the thickness past that point doesn't increase the reflectivity. Similarly, increasing the CO2 concentration past a certain level fails to produce any noticeable greenhousing increase.
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Quoting wxmod:


Sequestering carbon ten feet underground is not really productive, in my humble opinion. You don't happen to work for the timber industry do you?


Why do you ask?
Member Since: February 22, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1344
Quoting VirginIslandsVisitor:


Keeper....

Yer killin' me. Don't know if you'll see this post, but...

I've watched the countdown to today and now I'll watch the next countdown....

Lindy
as one countdown ends another begins so its the way with time
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672. wxmod
Quoting BobWallace:


Something that I don't see addressed is the amount of carbon sequestered by root systems. Some trees have as much mass underneath the ground as above it.

If you're farming a fast growing species which might be harvested in 20 years then you might be sticking a lot more carbon underground than would happen by letting a forest 'go old'. Each generation is going to create a new set of carbon-bearing roots.


Sequestering carbon ten feet underground is not really productive, in my humble opinion. You don't happen to work for the timber industry do you?
Member Since: October 4, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1752
Thank you very much for the compliments.

Have a great night!
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Quoting AllStar17:


Thank you very much for the compliment. It makes it seem like making them is worthwhile. I love making them and appreciate the feedback. I just try to add more useful info to the blog. In fact, last year somebody mentioned that they were showing the graphics to their students to explain what was going on in the tropics (maybe during Irene?).
There you go your work is going far. Keep up the good work, your contributions here are greatly appreciated.
Member Since: August 31, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 5628
Quoting AllStar17:


Thank you very much for the compliment. It makes it seem like making them is worthwhile. I love making them and appreciate the feedback. I just try to add more useful info to the blog. In fact, last year somebody mentioned that they were showing the graphics to their students to explain what was going on in the tropics (maybe during Irene?). I don't remember who it was, though.


Congrats. That's quite an accolade.
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Quoting nigel20:
Good night...hopefully y'all have a good 1st of June!
Good night Nigel!
Member Since: August 31, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 5628
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
182 DAYS REMAIN


Keeper....

Yer killin' me. Don't know if you'll see this post, but...

I've watched the countdown to today and now I'll watch the next countdown....

Lindy
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Good night...hopefully y'all have a good 1st of June!
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Quoting GTcooliebai:
I'm just so in love with your graphics man. And yeah I want to know who had Beryl making landfall on Jacksonville Beach? And Bud ended up being a dud like Don last year. The competition is on now to see which basin will get to the third storm first.


Thank you very much for the compliment. It makes it seem like making them is worthwhile. I love making them and appreciate the feedback. I just try to add more useful info to the blog. In fact, last year somebody mentioned that they were showing the graphics to their students to explain what was going on in the tropics (maybe during Irene?). I don't remember who it was, though.
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Quoting aspectre:
Then it's time to use the new calender. Being unwilling to change calenders every few thousand years goes a bit beyond healthy frugality.

136 PlazaRed: Adding trees is good.
Replanting them may not be good!
I am all in favour of planting new trees where there are none at the moment.
The reason for my comment using a quoted reference was to emphasize the possible error of going headlong into replanting.
Managed planting and replanting of trees often leads to the destruction of most if not all of the other ground plants which in themselves take up large amounts of CO2. This has been shown to have happened in parts of the Amazon rainforest. Pine plantations are another example.
A return to natural vegetation of areas would seem a more useful long term approach.
The end results of some tree planting and replanting may be less CO2 being taken up by the trees than allready is by the present vegetation.


Yep, old growth forests are over twice as efficient as tree plantations at converting CO2 and sunlight into biomass. And even more so because organic debris produced in old forests is converted with high efficiency into detrivores and saprophytic plants that have low need for sunlight as well as fungi such as mushrooms that store the main of their bodies underground or within rotting trunks.
Even a natural meadow is more efficient than tree plantations or other agricultural uses.

It's nice to talk about planting ornamental trees, but for most of the time their existence, nearly-all-to-most of the available sunlight is hitting the ground. Ornamental trees are unlikely to ever have anywhere near the sunlight&CO2 biomass-production efficiency as even an old orchard.
And again, the ground beneath ornamental trees is unlikely to have even half the sunlight&CO2-to-biomass production efficiency as a natural meadow, or near that of old orchards for that matter, let alone the natural undergrowth of old forests.


Something that I don't see addressed is the amount of carbon sequestered by root systems. Some trees have as much mass underneath the ground as above it.

If you're farming a fast growing species which might be harvested in 20 years then you might be sticking a lot more carbon underground than would happen by letting a forest 'go old'. Each generation is going to create a new set of carbon-bearing roots.
Member Since: February 22, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1344
Quoting AllStar17:
So who predicted this for June 1st?


...and who had this?
I'm just so in love with your graphics man. And yeah I want to know who had Beryl making landfall on Jacksonville Beach? And Bud ended up being a dud like Don last year. The competition is on now to see which basin will get to the third storm first.
Member Since: August 31, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 5628
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
182 DAYS REMAIN


Lol
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So who predicted this for June 1st?


...and who had this?
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Quoting Jedkins01:


Watch the radar, its looking pretty good, I'm not ensuring anything till it really starts pouring around here, but it looks good overnight.


Looks somewhat impressive, but to be honest I prefer the big daytime heating thunderstorms.
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Member Since: August 31, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 5628
Quoting CybrTeddy:


They might have to be severe systems just in order to bring some rain.


Watch the radar, its looking pretty good, I'm not ensuring anything till it really starts pouring around here, but it looks good overnight.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Isn't it past your bedtime? Somebody seems a little grumpy.


Lol
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That line of storms to the west is growing larger and stronger practically with each frame. You can see how the upper energy is inducing large scale lift across all the moisture now.


Moisture is getting really high so expect high rainfall rates 2 inches an hour with average cells and 3 to 5 inch per hour with strong cores, just like we expect heading into June.
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Quoting Jedkins01:



lol, well think of it this way it's not really about us getting severe weather its about rainfall, if we get a lot of heavy rain over night then who cares? Rain is rain.

I don't think the front it self will have much with it as it will be weakening a lot, the front is just helping to life the tropical moisture north, and jet energy riding along the front and lifting this tropical moisture is going to be the main source of rainfall I believe. You can see the energy moving into the eastern gulf beginning to interact with the moisture lifting into our area.


They might have to be severe systems just in order to bring some rain.
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Quoting KoritheMan:


Nope. I do it too, and everything I do is right. Eh, Cody? ;)

Yes, your highness
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Then it'll be time to use the new calender. Being unwilling to change calenders every few thousand years goes a bit beyond healthy frugality.

136 PlazaRed: Adding trees is good.
Replanting them may not be good!
I am all in favour of planting new trees where there are none at the moment.
The reason for my comment using a quoted reference was to emphasize the possible error of going headlong into replanting.
Managed planting and replanting of trees often leads to the destruction of most if not all of the other ground plants which in themselves take up large amounts of CO2. This has been shown to have happened in parts of the Amazon rainforest. Pine plantations are another example.
A return to natural vegetation of areas would seem a more useful long term approach.
The end results of some tree planting and replanting may be less CO2 being taken up by the trees than allready is by the present vegetation.


Yep, old growth forests are over twice as efficient as tree plantations at converting CO2 and sunlight into biomass. And even more so because organic debris produced in old forests is converted with high efficiency into detrivores including saprophytic plants that have low need for sunlight as well as fungi such as mushrooms that store the main of their bodies underground or within rotting trunks.
Even a natural meadow is more efficient than tree plantations or other agricultural uses.

It's nice to talk about planting ornamental trees, but for most of the time of their existence, nearly-all-to-most of the available sunlight is hitting the ground. Ornamental trees are unlikely to ever have anywhere near the sunlight&CO2 biomass-production efficiency as even an old orchard.
And again, the ground beneath ornamental trees is unlikely to have even half the sunlight&CO2-to-biomass production efficiency as a natural meadow, or near that of old orchards for that matter, let alone the natural undergrowth of old forests.
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Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
182 DAYS REMAIN


Don't ruin our fun. We want it to be perpetual. :(
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Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 423 Comments: 127814
182 DAYS REMAIN
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Quoting WxGeekVA:
I pay more attention to the seconds on the hurricane season countdown than Indo on the New Years countdown... Is that wrong? LOL


Nope. I do it too, and everything I do is right. Eh, Cody? ;)
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I pay more attention to the seconds on the hurricane season countdown than Indo on the New Years countdown... Is that wrong? LOL
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Boom Goes the DYNAMITE!
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Quoting SLU:
It's the most wonderful time of the year!


Yes' it is!
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Actually, you and WxGeekVA were a few seconds early. I got first post of the season. :)



Let's just call it a 3-way tie, mkay?
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Well, I gave in. Here's all I have completed on my end-of-season summary blog thus far (June monthly tropical cyclone summary for the Atlantic):

-------------------------------------------------

Although out of season, tropical storms Alberto and Beryl formed in May, prior to the official start of the season. The previous incidence of two May storms was in 1887. In addition, the last time two named storms occurred before the official start of the season was in 1908.

TS ALBERTO MAY 19 - MAY 22 50 KT 60 MPH 995 mb
TS BERYL MAY 26 - MAY 30 60 KT 70 MPH 992 mb

-------------------------------------------------

Of course, there will have to be an addendum or two if some familiar faces decide to show up. But I never said wasn't preliminary.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
Welcome to the 2012 Atlantic hurricane season!

I need to wait an an hour and 47 minutes more.
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641. SLU
It's the most wonderful time of the year!

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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
Welcome to the 2012 Atlantic hurricane season!



Oh happy day!
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Hurricane season starts with UTC time... you guys are all late...
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It's here. Welcome to the 2012 Atlantic Basin hurricane season. I wonder what surprises are in store for us this year. I say lets all make a toast with FRESCA. Cheers!
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Quoting CybrTeddy:


What I worry though is if these thunderstorms persist into the morning and actually steal energy from the main show tomorrow, leaving us with once again overcast skies with some distant lightning.



lol, well think of it this way it's not really about us getting severe weather its about rainfall, if we get a lot of heavy rain over night then who cares? Rain is rain.

I don't think the front it self will have much with it as it will be weakening a lot, the front is just helping to life the tropical moisture north, and jet energy riding along the front and lifting this tropical moisture is going to be the main source of rainfall I believe. You can see the energy moving into the eastern gulf beginning to interact with the moisture lifting into our area.
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Quoting GTcooliebai:
Oh yeah that's right you guys don't set your clocks forward for daylight savings time do you? Anyways most considered this season already started since Alberto and Beryl are now long gone. I guess we're just waiting for the "official" start. Actually since the Hurricane Season goes by Zulu time it has already started.

Well, that's true!
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Quoting CybrTeddy:
Got first post in the season, do I get an award or something or does that go to first TWO? ;)

Welcome to the season guys.. if you don't believe it actually started 2 weeks ago with our two named storms.

Actually, you and WxGeekVA were a few seconds early. I got first post of the season. :)

Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31911
Quoting CybrTeddy:
And now, officially (and not just WU time) It is the 2012 Atlantic Hurricane Season.

I still have to wait an hour more
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting nigel20:

Yes, it's now 10:56PM
Oh yeah that's right you guys don't set your clocks forward for daylight savings time do you? Anyways most considered this season already started since Alberto and Beryl are now long gone. I guess we're just waiting for the "official" start. Actually since the Hurricane Season goes by Zulu time it has already started.
Member Since: August 31, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 5628

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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