Photos from Climate Impacts Day

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:06 PM GMT on May 06, 2012

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On Saturday, May 5, the activist group 350.org, founded by Bill McKibben, launched a new effort to "connect the dots between climate change and extreme weather." They declared May 5 Climate Impacts Day, and coordinated an impressive global effort of nearly 1,000 events in 100 countries to draw attention to the links between climate change and extreme weather. Their new climatedots.org website aims to get people involved to "protest, educate, document and volunteer along with thousands of people around the world to support the communities on the front lines of the climate crisis." Below are photos from some of the many events on Climate Impacts Day as archived on the climatedots.org website. It is remarkable to view the slide show on their web site and see the degree of global participation this event had; 350.org has created a dedicated and creative global climate movement that will be a major force to reckon with in the coming years.


Figure 1. Volunteers in the city of Salvador, Brazil, have connected the dots have and drawn people's attention to sea level rise and what it impacts in our life.


Figure 2. Madaba, Jordan. "Drops (of water) are dots of hope". A beautiful message from King's Academy in drought-prone Jordan.


Figure 3. Activists hold a banner in front of a damaged coral reef in the vulnerable Marshall Islands. Rising temperatures and increased CO2 uptake are raising the acidity of the ocean, which bleaches and ultimately kills fragile coral reefs.


Figure 4. One thousand students in Bekaa, Lebanon make their dots into the wheels of a giant bicycle to raise awareness about the threat of air pollution, and to advocate for bike lanes.


Figure 5. In 2009, at 17,785 feet in Bolivia's Cordillera Oriental was the Chacaltaya Glacier. Before its unexpected melting, it was home to Bolivia's only ski resort and the first tow-rope ever to be built in South America. Today all that remains is a rocky mountain-top that only receives seasonal snowfall. Photo by Lauren Farnsworth.


Figure 6. Ausable Valley, NY, USA: Young people in New York understand the first-hand impacts of climate change. Hurricane Irene, the third five-hundred-year climate event in the last twelve months, devastated communities in the region and pummeled the beachfront with debris.

Jeff Masters

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Quoting weatherh98:
13-7-4


Hike!
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Quoting dogsgomoo:
Thanks. That sure looks bad.


What looks bad? I forgot what I posted.
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There was reports and papers done in the 70's about the coming Ice Age, but not supported by most scientists. It was mostly journalism and not science. Heres a part from Wiki and a link to the whole thing. It was conjecture not science based.


Global cooling was a conjecture during the 1970s of imminent cooling of the Earth's surface and atmosphere along with a posited commencement of glaciation. This hypothesis had little support in the scientific community, but gained temporary popular attention due to a combination of a slight downward trend of temperatures from the 1940s to the early 1970s and press reports that did not accurately reflect the scientific understanding of ice age cycles. In contrast to the global cooling conjecture, the current scientific opinion on climate change is that the Earth has not durably cooled, but undergone global warming throughout the twentieth century.[1]

In the 1970s, there was increasing awareness that estimates of global temperatures showed cooling since 1945. Of those scientific papers considering climate trends over the 21st century, only 10% inclined towards future cooling, while most papers predicted future warming.[2] The general public had little awareness of carbon dioxide's effects on climate, but Science News in May 1959 forecast a 25% increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide in the 150 years from 1850 to 2000, with a consequent warming trend.[3] The actual increase in this period was 29%. Paul R. Ehrlich mentioned climate change from greenhouse gases in 1968.[4] By the time the idea of global cooling reached the public press in the mid-1970s temperatures had stopped falling, and there was concern in the climatological community about carbon dioxide's warming effects.[5] In response to such reports, the World Meteorological Organization issued a warning in June 1976 that a very significant warming of global climate was probable.[6]



i sure hope i get it linked right.



Link
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13-7-4
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Quoting dogsgomoo:
Thanks. That sure looks bad.

That cat of yours, keeps distracting me. lol
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Quoting Grothar: Here's one:
Thanks. That sure looks bad.
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URGENT - IMMEDIATE BROADCAST REQUESTED
SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WATCH NUMBER 257
NWS STORM PREDICTION CENTER NORMAN OK
1250 PM CDT SUN MAY 6 2012

THE NWS STORM PREDICTION CENTER HAS ISSUED A
SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WATCH FOR PORTIONS OF

SOUTHERN ALABAMA
FLORIDA PANHANDLE
SOUTHWEST GEORGIA

EFFECTIVE THIS SUNDAY AFTERNOON AND EVENING FROM 1250 PM UNTIL
800 PM CDT.

HAIL TO 1.5 INCHES IN DIAMETER...THUNDERSTORM WIND GUSTS TO 70
MPH...AND DANGEROUS LIGHTNING ARE POSSIBLE IN THESE AREAS.

THE SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WATCH AREA IS APPROXIMATELY ALONG AND 40
STATUTE MILES NORTH AND SOUTH OF A LINE FROM 55 MILES WEST
SOUTHWEST OF EVERGREEN ALABAMA TO 30 MILES SOUTH SOUTHEAST OF
ALBANY GEORGIA. FOR A COMPLETE DEPICTION OF THE WATCH SEE THE
ASSOCIATED WATCH OUTLINE UPDATE (WOUS64 KWNS WOU7).

REMEMBER...A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WATCH MEANS CONDITIONS ARE
FAVORABLE FOR SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS IN AND CLOSE TO THE WATCH
AREA. PERSONS IN THESE AREAS SHOULD BE ON THE LOOKOUT FOR
THREATENING WEATHER CONDITIONS AND LISTEN FOR LATER STATEMENTS
AND POSSIBLE WARNINGS. SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS CAN AND OCCASIONALLY
DO PRODUCE TORNADOES.

OTHER WATCH INFORMATION...CONTINUE...WW 255...WW 256...

DISCUSSION...TSTMS ARE ORGANIZING THIS AFTERNOON IN AN ARC FROM
W-CNTRL AL TO SWRN GA WITH ACTIVITY FOCUSED ALONG A SWD-MOVING COLD
POOL. AMBIENT AIR MASS HAS BECOME MODERATELY UNSTABLE OWING TO THE
PRESENCE OF A MOIST BOUNDARY LAYER AND SEASONABLY COOL MIDLEVEL
TEMPERATURES. WHILE VERTICAL SHEAR WILL REMAIN WEAK...THE CHARACTER
OF THE THERMODYNAMIC ENVIRONMENT WILL FOSTER HAIL PRODUCTION AND
DAMAGING WINDS WITH THE MOST INTENSE STORMS.

AVIATION...A FEW SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS WITH HAIL SURFACE AND ALOFT
TO 1.5 INCHES. EXTREME TURBULENCE AND SURFACE WIND GUSTS TO 60
KNOTS. A FEW CUMULONIMBI WITH MAXIMUM TOPS TO 500. MEAN STORM
MOTION VECTOR 36020.


...MEAD
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32710
I see a million dots because of all the variables. I don't know exactly how they connect. We may know more in another 50 years or so after a lot of people rake in dollars on the craze.
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Quoting Levi32:
It's worth noting that the GFS has shown a 384-hour storm in either the Caribbean or eastern Pacific every day for the past 3 weeks. I called it an early-season quirk at the time because the GFS likes to march the MJO into phases 8 and 1 too fast early in the season. If it shows something at 384 hours now, chances are it will occur later than that, if it occurs.

The UKMET is now onboard with the GFS's timing of the MJO getting into the eastern Pacific and the Caribbean, but the JMA and ECMWF are still slow to bring it out. That is, the pattern should eventually favor tropical/monsoonal stirrings in this area of the world near the latter portion of May and early June, but until the GFS starts showing a consistent time period for activity in the area, its time table can't be trusted.



Hey Levi, what are your preliminary thoughts of the 2012 Atlantic hurricane season?
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32710
Quoting EugeneTillman:



In the 1970, scientists were telling us the next ice age is upon us. How did that one turn out?


Sorry, you've been taken in by a myth. (It happens in the best of families.)

Fact: A few scientists published papers suggesting that we might be on our way to a new ice age. Many more papers were published which made exactly the opposite predictions.

The papers/thinking predicting an upcoming ice age were shown to be flawed and that thinking died a natural death.


Context: Making incorrect predictions happens.

A good rule of thumb is to believe no new finding.

Wait until at least a couple other papers confirm the findings and the greater body of scientists have had a chance to mull over the issue. Scientists are people and people do make mistakes. (Remember the recent particles traveling faster than the speed of light?)

Important point: When it comes to climate change and the role of greenhouse gases we're into the territory of thousands of supporting papers and extreme (~97%) agreement among climate scientists.

It's no longer a question of whether mankind has caused climate change by burning fossil fuels. That's settled science. The remaining questions are how bad will it get and how quickly.
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Quoting EugeneTillman:



In the 1970, scientists were telling us the next ice age is upon us. How did that one turn out?
That canard is older than you are, Cat5; as has been shown to you and many others many times, the large majority of climate scientists in the 1970s--and earlier--were aware of and predicting warming, not cooling. To believe and/or repeat otherwise is revisionist wishful thinking.
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Thanks to all the links and photos of the Tokyo tornado. They really seem to underscore the unique and concentrated forces at work inside tornadic winds that are coupled with battering ram debris when compared to the forces exerted by other "larger" natural disasters like hurricanes or earthquakes.

Japan's east cost gets hit on a regular basis with strong winds and hurricanes and in the north by extremely heavy snow and winds. All of Japan shakes on a regular basis. No matter what criteria one uses, their buildings are built to withstand some forces.

After the 95 Kobe Earthquake I recall reading a lot of follow up studies that noted how many of the older buildings were top heavy, with the roofs pancaking down during an earthquake. Lots of recommendation and changes came out of that to retrofit frames to hold up in swaying/jiggling conditions. But for winds it seems that these are heavy and sturdily anchored roofs. A quality (along with anchoring mechanisms) that could prevent them from being pried up and lifted off by the same sort of winds that blow standard American roofs off? (Conjecture here. I have no idea really.)
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Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 12 Comments: 8421
Quoting BobWallace:


Yes, we most likely would.

All over the world people have been collecting weather data for a long time. Weather historians are quite good at digging out data from all sorts of sources.

A lot of our early weather information comes from ship logs.

The Central England temperature record started in 1659.

Newspapers appeared in China in 1582. In Japan newspapers began in the 1600s.


Thats all well and good, but these were centralized locations and weather reports and events were very vague back then. Weather stations and reporting ASOS are everywhere now, and don't forget backyard weather stations. All that I'm saying is that nothing gets missed today, every weather event is documented and that of course includes what we have pegged as extreme. Also the media loves to blow this stuff up. I am part of the media, and therefore part of the problem, although I'm on the forecast side, not the reporting side of things. Diane Sawyer of ABC News took some heat back in January when she reported that "tornadoes struck without warning". This couldn't be further from the truth as most had ample warning of 20-30 minutes.

Link
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Thanks Dr. Masters...Good afternoon all. I'm not feeling too well this afternoon...it feels as if i'm coming down with the Flu
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 12 Comments: 8421
Quoting PolishHurrMaster:
Tomorrow I'll be going for my 1st ever job practises. Cross your fingers for me!
PS. Nice to see a hurricane in EPAC on GFS run. Wishing for one in the Caribbean!
My first numbers for season(can change):15-8-3
Quoting HurricaneDean07:

Still sticking to 14-6-2 for now, if we get a storm or two in late may to late june, then ill be willing to change it. :P

I'm sticking with 12-6-3 for now.

A full blog covering my predictions for the 2012 Atlantic hurricane season will be released by Thursday...I'm in the process of making it now.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32710
Quoting aspectre:
15 jonger1150: This website is quickly becoming a joke.
500 year hurricane in NY? How the heck do you know what happened beyond 100 years ago in regard to hurricanes... No satellite or radar.


Grothar is better than radar. Everybody knows that.


Thanks, aspectre, but beyond 300 years ago, my memory is a little rusty.
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Quoting Chucktown:


Yea, the trend is more people are now on this planet and there are more eyes to see what is happening. Not a day goes by here in the US that a tornado is "missed" by the public or a local NWS. Lets go back to the May 1910 tornado outbreak over western Nebraska, wait, was there a tornado outbreak over western Nebraska in 1910, i don't know, but I can guarantee that there were tornadoes that year in tornado alley that went uncounted, maybe several. Don't you think that this may be a reason why the frequency of "these weather events" is increasing world wide? Its just common sense.


You can argue that some of the US was sparsely populated in the 1800s, but that is not true of most of Asia.

And how do you deal with the increasing occurrence of extreme weather over the last few decades in the US? Are you going to try to tell us that people were not paying attention to the weather in the 1970s and 1980s?

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Quoting Levi32:
It's worth noting that the GFS has shown a 384-hour storm in either the Caribbean or eastern Pacific every day for the past 3 weeks. I called it an early-season quirk at the time because the GFS likes to march the MJO into phases 8 and 1 too fast early in the season. If it shows something at 384 hours now, chances are it will occur later than that, if it occurs.

The UKMET is now onboard with the GFS's timing of the MJO getting into the eastern Pacific and the Caribbean, but the JMA and ECMWF are still slow to bring it out. That is, the pattern should eventually favor tropical/monsoonal stirrings in this area of the world near the latter portion of May and early June, but until the GFS starts showing a consistent time period for activity in the area, its time table can't be trusted.



Does this mean, you'll make a video? Pleaseeee tell me it does. lol
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Quoting Chucktown:


If this happened in 1930, would we even know here in the states or other parts of the world. Probably not because there would be no proof except from the eyewitness accounts and those that were directly affected.


Yes, we most likely would.

All over the world people have been collecting weather data for a long time. Weather historians are quite good at digging out data from all sorts of sources.

A lot of our early weather information comes from ship logs.

The Central England temperature record started in 1659.

Newspapers appeared in China in 1582. In Japan newspapers began in the 1600s.
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Quoting TemplesOfSyrinxC4:
Is this the same 350.org that implied that skeptics be exploded in pools of thier own blood and guts by pushing a red button, and they say Heartland Institute stoops to some new lows? That Unabomber billboard was tasteless, to be sure, but I don't actually remember them calling for the murder or AGW believers for their thought crimes as 350.org kind of did with their infamous "No Pressure" video.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQtFyvqqnj4
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Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32710
Quoting PolishHurrMaster:
Tomorrow I'll be going for my 1st ever job practises. Cross your fingers for me!
PS. Nice to see a hurricane in EPAC on GFS run. Wishing for one in the Caribbean!
My first numbers for season(can change):15-8-3

Still sticking to 14-6-2 for now, if we get a storm or two in late may to late june, then ill be willing to change it. :P
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Quoting BobWallace:


That's an interesting page.

In the 1800s two tornadoes were reported in all of Asia.

=== 0.02 per year.

(Yes there were lots of people living there and people knew how to write.)

Between 1900 and 1950 there were 3.

=== 0.06 per year.

Between 1900 and 1990 there were 19.

=== 0.2 per year.

Between 1990 and today there were 29. Including the two that were just reported.

=== 1.3 per year.

Might there be a trend?


Yea, the trend is more people are now on this planet and there are more eyes to see what is happening. Not a day goes by here in the US that a tornado is "missed" by the public or a local NWS. Lets go back to the May 1910 tornado outbreak over western Nebraska, wait, was there a tornado outbreak over western Nebraska in 1910, i don't know, but I can guarantee that there were tornadoes that year in tornado alley that went uncounted, maybe several. Don't you think that this may be a reason why the frequency of "these weather events" is increasing world wide? Its just common sense.
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Quoting weatherh98:



Shoot that's a cane! 991 millibars

No... more like strong TS, close though. Probably 70 mph.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
In fact, look what the GFS shows on May 22.


Well looky there...
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
This may be what we need to get both Aletta and Alberto.



As it stands, I think we will see Aletta between May 15-25.

Alberto between May 21-June 2.

Posted that yesturday, yep... i agree
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Quoting Grothar:
This was about 4 years ago, I believe. I would translate what the young men were saying, but I don't think it would be appropriate.




Excuse me while I pick my mouth up from the floor.... WOW
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Quoting dogsgomoo:
Huh. From the learn something new everyday department. The deadliest tornado on record occurred in Bangladesh. Daulatpur-Saturia Tornado April 26, 1989, killing ~1300 people.

Bangladesh gets the 3rd most Tornadoes after the US (1) and Canada (2)

5 days ago there was a tornado in Tripura India. (Which borders Bangladesh and is similar in climactic/geographic terms. No video or confirmation though that it was a tornado and not another type of wind. It's very isolated.


Here's one:

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12 washingtonian115: The damage is pretty significant looking from that tornado.Then again they don't have building codes for those types of things.I've visited Japan before and when I say some of their houses are built out of PAPER I literally mean that.

Far more likely than not, the surviving old shoji-screened homes are more strongly framed than nearly all of the newest-hurricane-code houses built along or near the US coastline. Except in some rural areas, the ones that weren't also weren't valuable enough to be worth saving from postWWII housing developers.
And in areas somewhat close to the coastline, all of the newer shoji-screened buildings are as "hurricane proof" as anything put up by those wealthy enough and hurricane-wary enough to indulge in building/rebuilding well beyond the minimums of the newest-hurricane-code standards. And the rest would at least meet those hurricane-code standards.
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1044 tramp96: Although I am American I grew up in Calgary so I see things a little differently. That's right I'm not a redneck.

Like heck. You sound more like a carpetbagging newcomer of the type that ends up voting in Arizona toward pariah-hood.
Overwhelmingly, those who grew up in Calgary are as proud of being a redneck as a native-born Texan; even when it is closer to an affectation than arising from a lifestyle. Admittedly the liberal amongst them also have a touch of embarrassment about Alberta being politically the northernmost section of the contiguous American BibleBelt.
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Quoting Chucktown:


Nothing is wrong, it's called weather - it happens. Here is a list of documented tornadoes in Asia, including a deadly outbreak in Moscow which killed over 30 people, oh by the way, that happened in 1904.

Link


That's an interesting page.

In the 1800s two tornadoes were reported in all of Asia.

=== 0.02 per year.

(Yes there were lots of people living there and people knew how to write.)

Between 1900 and 1950 there were 3.

=== 0.06 per year.

Between 1900 and 1990 there were 19.

=== 0.2 per year.

Between 1990 and today there were 29. Including the two that were just reported.

=== 1.3 per year.

Might there be a trend?

-------------

Note: Those are days on which tornadoes were reported. Not the number of tornadoes total, the data on the page is not accurate enough for an actual count.
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Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32710
This was about 4 years ago, I believe. I would translate what the young men were saying, but I don't think it would be appropriate.


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Quoting EugeneTillman:
The first time a tornado has occurred in Japan... Interesting times indeed.

Japan gets hit by an average of 20 tornadoes every year. Rare indeed, but not the first time the island has been hit.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32710
MESOSCALE DISCUSSION 0730
NWS STORM PREDICTION CENTER NORMAN OK
1204 PM CDT SUN MAY 06 2012

AREAS AFFECTED...WRN GA...FL PANHANDLE...SRN AL...CNTRL MS

CONCERNING...SEVERE POTENTIAL...WATCH POSSIBLE

VALID 061704Z - 061830Z

PROBABILITY OF WATCH ISSUANCE...40 PERCENT

SUMMARY...THUNDERSTORMS ARE EXPECTED TO INCREASE IN AREAL
COVERAGE/INTENSITY FROM WRN GA...ACROSS SRN AL INTO CNTRL MS OVER
THE NEXT FEW HOURS.

DISCUSSION...REMNANT MCS THAT HAS DRIFTED ACROSS THE TN VALLEY INTO
CNTRL AL HAS FORCED AN EFFECTIVE BOUNDARY INTO WRN GA...ARCING
ACROSS SRN AL INTO CNTRL MS. STRONG HEATING ALONG/SOUTH OF THIS
FEATURE HAS CONTRIBUTED TO A DEEPENING BOUNDARY LAYER WITH SFC-3KM
LAPSE RATES NOW APPROACHING 8 C/KM. WHAT LITTLE INHIBITION THAT WAS
OBSERVED THIS MORNING IS EFFECTIVELY GONE AND SFC PARCELS SHOULD
FREELY CONVECT ALONG THE AFOREMENTIONED OUTFLOW GIVEN THE
MOIST/UNSTABLE AIRMASS. IN ADDITION...MID LEVEL TEMPERATURES ARE
QUITE COOL ACROSS THIS REGION WITH 500MB VALUES BETWEEN MINUS
12-14C. THIS SHOULD CONTRIBUTE TO ROBUST UPDRAFTS DESPITE THE
MARGINAL DEEP LAYER SHEAR. LATEST THINKING IS TSTMS WILL CONTINUE
TO DEVELOP ALONG THE BOUNDARY AND UPWARD GROWTH/STORM MERGERS WILL
LIKELY AID IN A FAIRLY EXTENSIVE ARCING CORRIDOR OF CONVECTION THAT
SHOULD PROPAGATE SWD INTO THE MID-LATE AFTERNOON HOURS. HAIL/WIND
ARE THE PRIMARY THREATS WITH THIS ACTIVITY.

..DARROW.. 05/06/2012
Member Since: February 11, 2012 Posts: 84 Comments: 8001
Quoting Neapolitan:
1904? So you're agreeing with the OP's contention that destructive tornadoes in Japan are pretty rare, then? I would agree with that, too. They're not unheard of, to be sure...but they're definitely rare.


I agree they are rare, but just because one happenned yesterday has no connection to what everyone is calling "new extreme" weather. If this happened in 1930, would we even know here in the states or other parts of the world. Probably not because there would be no proof except from the eyewitness accounts and those that were directly affected. Today's technology allows this documentation to become instantaneous and available to practically everyone. This is my opinion as to why we are "seeing" more extreme weather around the globe, not due to any sort of climate change.
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Is this the same 350.org that implied that skeptics be exploded in pools of thier own blood and guts by pushing a red button, and they say Heartland Institute stoops to some new lows? That Unabomber billboard was tasteless, to be sure, but I don't actually remember them calling for the murder or AGW believers for their thought crimes as 350.org kind of did with their infamous "No Pressure" video.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Tomorrow I'll be going for my 1st ever job practises. Cross your fingers for me!
PS. Nice to see a hurricane in EPAC on GFS run. Wishing for one in the Caribbean!
My first numbers for season(can change):15-8-3
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
It's worth noting that the GFS has shown a 384-hour storm in either the Caribbean or eastern Pacific every day for the past 3 weeks. I called it an early-season quirk at the time because the GFS likes to march the MJO into phases 8 and 1 too fast early in the season. If it shows something at 384 hours now, chances are it will occur later than that, if it occurs.

The UKMET is now onboard with the GFS's timing of the MJO getting into the eastern Pacific and the Caribbean, but the JMA and ECMWF are still slow to bring it out. That is, the pattern should eventually favor tropical/monsoonal stirrings in this area of the world near the latter portion of May and early June, but until the GFS starts showing a consistent time period for activity in the area, its time table can't be trusted.


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Huh. From the learn something new everyday department. The deadliest tornado on record occurred in Bangladesh. Daulatpur-Saturia Tornado April 26, 1989, killing ~1300 people.

Bangladesh gets the 3rd most Tornadoes after the US (1) and Canada (2)

5 days ago there was a tornado in Tripura India. (Which borders Bangladesh and is similar in climactic/geographic terms. No video or confirmation though that it was a tornado and not another type of wind. It's very isolated.
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Quoting Neapolitan:
...and the 325th in a row where the mean has been above the 20th century average (the last month below that average was February 1985).


325th? Really? Wow. Is that for the whole U.S.?

My post refers to my local area, in Montreal, Quebec.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
In fact, look what the GFS shows on May 22.




Shoot that's a cane! 991 millibars
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Quoting Patrap:
..."its'a Mojo Rising"...


I love that song.

Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
In fact, look what the GFS shows on May 22.



I'm so ready for it.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
This may be what we need to get both Aletta and Alberto.



As it stands, I think we will see Aletta between May 15-25.

Alberto between May 21-June 2.


That's especially favorable
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
In fact, look what the GFS shows on May 22.


Hey you beat me to it! I thought I was the only one checking the long range GFS
Member Since: February 11, 2012 Posts: 84 Comments: 8001
Quoting Neapolitan:
1904? So you're agreeing with the OP's contention that destructive tornadoes in Japan are pretty rare, then? I would agree with that, too. They're not unheard of, to be sure...but they're definitely rare.


Especially Japan!!
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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