Connecting the dots between climate change and extreme weather

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 3:15 PM GMT on May 04, 2012

Share this Blog
41
+

Connecting the dots between human-caused climate change and extreme weather events is fraught with difficulty and uncertainty. One the one hand, the underlying physics is clear--the huge amounts of heat-trapping gases like carbon dioxide humans have pumped into the atmosphere must be already causing significant changes to the weather. But the weather has huge natural variations on its own, without climate change. So, communicators of the links between climate change and extreme weather need to emphasize how climate change shifts the odds. We've loaded the dice towards some types of extreme weather events, by heating the atmosphere to add more heat and moisture. This can bring more extreme weather events like heat waves, heavy downpours, and intense droughts. What's more, the added heat and moisture can change atmospheric circulation patterns, causing meanders in the jet stream capable of bringing longer-lasting periods of extreme weather. As I wrote in my post this January, Where is the climate headed?, "The natural weather rhythms I've grown to used to during my 30 years as a meteorologist have become significantly disrupted over the past few years. Many of Earth's major atmospheric circulation patterns have seen significant shifts and unprecedented behavior; new patterns that were unknown have emerged, and extreme weather events were incredibly intense and numerous during 2010 - 2011. It boggles my mind that in 2011, the U.S. saw 14 - 17 billion-dollar weather disasters, three of which matched or exceeded some of the most iconic and destructive weather events in U.S. history."


Figure 1. Women who work on a tea farm in Assam, India hold up a dot in honor of Climate Impacts Day (May 5, 2012), to urge people to connect the dots between climate change and the threat to their livelihood. Chai is one of the most consumed beverages in India, but a prolonged dry spell and extreme heat has affected tea plantations in Assam and Bengal with production dropping by 60% as compared to the same period in 2011. Image credit: 350.org.

May 5: Climate Impacts Day
On Saturday, May 5 (Cinco de Mayo!), the activist group 350.org, founded by Bill McKibben, is launching a new effort to "connect the dots between climate change and extreme weather." They've declared May 5 Climate Impacts Day, and have coordinated an impressive global effort of nearly 1,000 events in 100 countries to draw attention to the links between climate change and extreme weather. Their new climatedots.org website aims to get people involved to "protest, educate, document and volunteer along with thousands of people around the world to support the communities on the front lines of the climate crisis." Some of the events planned for Saturday: firefighters in New Mexico will hold posters with dots in a forest ravaged by wildfires; divers in the Marshall Islands take a dot underwater to their dying coral reefs; climbers on glaciers in the Alps, Andes, and Sierras will unfurl dots on melting glaciers with the simple message: "Melting"; villagers in Northeastern Kenya will create dots to show how ongoing drought is killing their crops; in San Francisco, California, aerial artist Daniel Dancer and the Center for Biological Diversity will work with hundreds of people to form a giant, moving blue dot to represent the threat of sea level rise and ocean acidification; and city-dwellers in Rio de Janeiro hold dots where mudslides from unusually heavy rains wiped out part of their neighborhood. I think its a great way to draw attention to the links between climate change and extreme weather, since the mainstream media coverage of climate change has been almost nil the past few years. A report by Media Matters for America found out that nightly news coverage about climate change on the major networks decreased 72% between 2009 and 2011. On the Sunday shows, 97% of the stories mentioning climate change were about politics in Washington D.C. or on the campaign trail, not about extreme weather or recent scientific reports. You can check out what Climate Impacts Day events may be happening in your area at the climatedots.org website.


Figure 2. Front Street Bridge on the Susquehanna River in Vestal, NY, immediately following the flood of September 8, 2011. Image credit: USGS, New York. In my post, Tropical Storm Lee's flood in Binghamton: was global warming the final straw? I argue that during September 8, 2011 flood, the Susquehanna River rose twenty feet in 24 hours and topped the flood walls in Binghamton by 8.5 inches, so just a 6% reduction in the flood height would have led to no overtopping of the flood walls and a huge decrease in damage. Extra moisture in the air due to global warming could have easily contributed this 6% of extra flood height.

Also of interest
Anti-coal activists, led by climate scientist Dr. James Hansen of NASA, are acting on Saturday to block Warren Buffett's coal trains in British Columbia from delivering coal to Pacific ports for shipment overseas. Dave Roberts of Grist explains how this may be an effective strategy to reduce coal use, in his post, "Fighting coal export terminals: It matters".

The creator of wunderground's new Climate Change Center, atmospheric scientist Angela Fritz, has a blog post on Friday's unveiling of the new Heartland Institute billboards linking mass murderers like Charles Manson and Osama Bin Laden to belief in global warming. In Heartland's description of the billboard campaign, they say, "The people who still believe in man-made global warming are mostly on the radical fringe of society. This is why the most prominent advocates of global warming aren't scientists. They are murderers, tyrants, and madmen." The Heartland Institute neglected to mention that the Pope and the Dalai Lama are prominent advocates of addressing the dangers of human-caused climate change.

Jeff Masters

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 55 - 5

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22Blog Index

Quoting jeffs713:

What you described was a pretty utopian vision.

Think about it... no need for cars (reduced expenses), you are close to work/school, less pollution, more greenery, better lifestyles.... and completely irrational and nigh impossible to implement given the complexity of today's society.


Not really. It is happening in a lot of places. Some places people still plan and innovate and want a better future.... instead of whining and saying how it can't happen because of some emotional proclivity.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Negative NAO
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting greentortuloni:


Actually you bring up a good point about the financial and health benefits of cycling. You should look it up, the numbers are amaazing.
Oh, I know. My wife and I went bike riding last night, actually.

The issue is that our hunger for more space to live and our materialistic culture pretty much defeats large-scale cycling. I live near the 4th largest city in the country, and I drive *only* 17 miles to work daily. My wife used to drive 34 (now she is 2 miles from my office). I'm in school to be a nurse, and the nearest hospital to my house is 4 miles - right on the edge of reasonable biking distance. (and that hospital is crap, too)

But I have a gas station literally around the corner, and 3 grocery stores within 5 miles.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting RTSplayer:


If everyone walked to work, productivity would go down severely, and they'd even have to live on site in many cases, away from their family.

So either way, you'd hurt productivity and family life of everyone.


Productivity is not a sustainable business model. That should be obvious to you after the 2008 crash. Resources end. This time it was bank loans. Next time it will be water. The time after that, if there is one, there will not be enough air. Pretty basic math.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting RTSplayer:


If everyone walked to work, productivity would go down severely, and they'd even have to live on site in many cases, away from their family.

So either way, you'd hurt productivity and family life of everyone.


Not really. The main problem with telecommuting is that current TC jobs are built around traditional roles in a company. New companies that take advantage of new methods work just fine with the above scenario.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting wxmod:


I would not even imagine creating utopia. Your words, not mine.

What you described was a pretty utopian vision.

Think about it... no need for cars (reduced expenses), you are close to work/school, less pollution, more greenery, better lifestyles.... and completely irrational and nigh impossible to implement given the complexity of today's society.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting PedleyCA:


Morning Nigel, Hows the weather?

Generally fair with afternoon showers as a result of day time heating. What's up pedley?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting jeffs713:

While you are busy creating a Utopia, please be sure to add the part about money on these trees that will grow, and the end to all disease. Thanks.


Actually you bring up a good point about the financial and health benefits of cycling. You should look it up, the numbers are amaazing.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting nigel20:
Good morning all....thanks Dr. Masters


Morning Nigel, Hows the weather?
Member Since: February 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 6221
Quoting jeffs713:

While you are busy creating a Utopia, please be sure to add the part about money on these trees that will grow, and the end to all disease. Thanks.


I would not even imagine creating utopia. Your words, not mine.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting wxmod:


The universe goes in cycles, the latest one may be 13.74 billion years. We have no idea how many cycles there have been. The Earth has a measurable history of about 4.5 billion years, but we have no idea how long it was here before the moon broke free and the surface was replace by volcanic activity.


If the entire universe or at least the earth went in cycles, we wouldn't have this problem.

...or electric cycles if you live in a hilly area.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
May 3, 2011

May 3, 2012
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting wxmod:


If everyone walked to work, all the jobs would be close to home. They would pay based on community income and I bet people would have pretty good lifestyles as inner cities would quit being polluted, noisy paved over wastelands. Trees would eventually eat through all that worthless pavement.


If everyone walked to work, productivity would go down severely, and they'd even have to live on site in many cases, away from their family.

So either way, you'd hurt productivity and family life of everyone.
Member Since: January 25, 2012 Posts: 33 Comments: 1520
Good morning all....thanks Dr. Masters
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Tribucanes:
lots and lots words


"Down with capitalist society!" wait.. that isn't right.

Umm.. "Don't listen to the man!" whoa... who is "the man"?

Oh, I got it!
"Tin foil hats for sale!"

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting wxmod:


If everyone walked to work, all the jobs would be close to home. They would pay based on community income and I bet people would have pretty good lifestyles as inner cities would quit being polluted, noisy paved over wastelands. Trees would eventually eat through all that worthless pavement.

While you are busy creating a Utopia, please be sure to add the part about money on these trees that will grow, and the end to all disease. Thanks.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting RTSplayer:


Not really, walking to work is physically impossible for most people, due to commute distance, and the fact you can't just up and move whenever you want either. If a couple works 30 minutes to an hour in opposite directions from their home, there is no "eco-friendly" solution.

What? Walk 8 hours per day to and from work?


There are eco-friendly solutions.

1) Public transportation
2) Car pooling
3) EVs/PHEVs/more efficient gasmobiles

and for some there's the possibility of working from home one or more days per week.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting RTSplayer:


Not really, walking to work is physically impossible for most people, due to commute distance, and the fact you can't just up and move whenever you want either. If a couple works 30 minutes to an hour in opposite directions from their home, there is no "eco-friendly" solution.

What? Walk 8 hours per day to and from work?


If everyone walked to work, all the jobs would be close to home. They would pay based on community income and I bet people would have pretty good lifestyles as inner cities would quit being polluted, noisy paved over wastelands. Trees would eventually eat through all that worthless pavement.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
36. bwi
Quoting RTSplayer:


Not really, walking to work is physically impossible for most people, due to commute distance, and the fact you can't just up and move whenever you want either. If a couple works 30 minutes to an hour in opposite directions from their home, there is no "eco-friendly" solution.

What? Walk 8 hours per day to and from work?


Biking can be faster than driving in Washington DC area. Plus you get your workout while you commute! Lowers stress too, not having to fight traffic. Not for everyone, perhaps, but it's annoying that so little effort and funding goes into providing safe bike routes given the multi-billions we spend on car-only roads. Better planning is the solution.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting wxmod:


The universe goes in cycles, the latest one may be 13.74 billion years. We have no idea how many cycles there have been. The Earth has a measurable history of about 4.5 billion years, but we have no idea how long it was here before the moon broke free and the surface was replace by volcanic activity.



Measuring anything before human history is rather, iffy.


Educated guess is pretty much the limit, actually, I shouldn't say educated guess, I should say educated estimation. But it isn't fact, there is no way to know for sure.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Show me someone who routinely walks to work as the only appropriate response to AGW, and I will show you someone who 'gets it' - and will be ignored or ridiculed by everyone else.


Not really, walking to work is physically impossible for most people, due to commute distance, and the fact you can't just up and move whenever you want either. If a couple works 30 minutes to an hour in opposite directions from their home, there is no "eco-friendly" solution.

What? Walk 8 hours per day to and from work?
Member Since: January 25, 2012 Posts: 33 Comments: 1520
Happy Star Wars Day! May the 4th be with you.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
If No. 4 collapses (6 days straight with M4 quake and above in Fukushima), that will be the end of global warming....

We will call it nuclear warming instead....

Caldicott: If Spent Fuel Pool No. 4 collapses I am evacuating my family from Boston (VIDEO)

Arnie Gundersen Interview
KGO Radio’s Pat Thurston April 15, 2012

There’s more cesium in that [Unit 4] fuel pool than in all 800 nuclear bombs exploded above ground…

But of course it would happen all at once. t would certainly destroy Japan as a functioning country… Move south of the equator if that ever happened, I think that’s probably the lesson there.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
"A report by Media Matters for America found out that nightly news coverage about climate change on the major networks decreased 72% between 2009 and 2011."

An accurate measure of how much We the People actually give a [deleted] about this issue. The major media types are about making money, and they ain't dumb, they ain't about to give airtime to folk - like scientists who dare to tell the truth - to people and issues that don't help them raise money.

Even the scientists are resorting to propaganda techniques (crede expertum, I was just at a meeting where this was the main topic) in a desperate attempt to stay visible. This should scare you. Because it means that We will only hear what we want to hear. Show me someone who routinely walks to work as the only appropriate response to AGW, and I will show you someone who 'gets it' - and will be ignored or ridiculed by everyone else.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting jrweatherman:
No doubt that global warming is real. Human caused, na. In the 1970's scientists said we were heading for the next ice age. I find it impossible to believe that in 25 short years that humans have altered the earths climate forever for an earth that is 15 billion years old.


That's a myth, the majority of scientists at the time either thought the earth was warming and would continue to do so or that there was no discernible trend. A few papers were published that suggested it would get colder. The media jumped on the later and falsely claimed that "scientists" thought an ice age was coming.

Myth completely debunked by a paper published by the American Meteorological Society.

<>a href="http://scienceblogs.com/stoat/Myth-1970-Glob al-Cooling-BAMS-2008.pdf
" target="_blank">The Myth of the 1970's Global Cooling Scientific Consensus


Member Since: Posts: Comments:
RTS, you are quick with judgment. i'd hold off on a finalized notion of DM, were I you. heck, i advise everyone to understand that our perceptions of this universe are in a constant state of flux, relative to and inherent by the language used to express. mathematics is not a flawless language; it is very heavily dependent upon its' constructs. best fit models will always be the theory of choice... a 'flavor of the month'
..something that will always change
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting RTSplayer:


Ironically, the fact that they have less stringent codes on emissions means that the pollution from China has a high amount of sulfur and particulates, which actually produces a temporary cooling effect. Unfortunately, CO2 has a much, much longer shelf life than these other pollutants.


Sulphur dioxide and particulates also suppress the lapse rate making cloud buildup less likely, making drought and trapped heat on the surface. Polluting the atmosphere is NO solution to global warming!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting FatPenguin:


Hope you're joking. Otherwise, you don't come across as someone who really takes the time to study the issue they are talking about.
what are YOU talking about, this person knows more about the Earth than any one else... heck, even knows about those ~11 billion years worth of Earth history that pesky scientists keep covering up!!
:P
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting jrweatherman:
No doubt that global warming is real. Human caused, na. In the 1970's scientists said we were heading for the next ice age. I find it impossible to believe that in 25 short years that humans have altered the earths climate forever for an earth that is 15 billion years old.
Think about the advancements in science since the 1970's in forecasting.  It's night and day.    Earth is 15 billion years old??? When did this happen? lol
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting weatherh98:


The earth is 4.5 billion years, the universe is 13.74 billion years old


I had a longer post, but suffice it to say, most of the "science" behind those numbers has been heavily fudged and even debunked lately.

Don't expect your text books to be updated any time soon, though.

Dark Matter does not exist either.

A recent survey failed to detect any evidence of significant amounts of "extra mass" beyond visible matter in the Milky Way on local scales, within 1000 light years, even though DM is supposedly 80% of the mass and should be present in this area.

Why does it matter?

Because it totally debunks the current version of the BB hypothesis as well as present understanding of gravity and time over long distance scales, though getting anyone to actually admit that won't be easy.
Member Since: January 25, 2012 Posts: 33 Comments: 1520
22. DDR
Good afternoon
The rain is down in parts of Trinidad.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
21. bwi
I think many people are starting the realize that the sensible weather has gone weird, but they don't really know what to do about it, or don't feel like anything they do could possibly make a difference.

I have a suggestion: consider volunteering for a local planning board. Many towns, suburbs, neighborhoods have citizen boards that give recommendations on local development proposals. This can range all the way from crosswalk alignments in front of schools to large-scale redevelopment or building plans. These boards are usually advisory, but they can have an impact on lawmakers' and public officials' decisions.

If we're going to stabilize or even reduce CO2 emissions, we're going to have to re-think our transportation habits. Planning boards can help with this. For example, our suburb is bisected by 6-lane arterial strip roads (we call them traffic sewers) that are hazardous to cross on foot or bike. The stores along these roads are surrounded by vast, mostly unused parking lots. The combination of ultra-wide roads and vast parking deserts makes it all but impossible to walk or bike to the stores, even from residences just across the street.

Fortunately, developers are starting to wake up to the fact large single-use planning "pods"(huge malls, office parks, subdivisions etc. that are only really accessible from each other by car or bus) are failing. Finally, developers are getting on the side of sustainability experts -- they are starting to actively advocate for "mixed" use planning (housing and workplaces and commercial areas on smaller footprint and in close proximity). Old-style car-only development areas are failing, malls are closing or being repurposed, drive-to office parks are vacant, mono-culture housing zones are underwater.

Planning boards can help work with developers to rebuild decaying car-only zones into mixed use neighborhoods with "complete streets" that have better landscaped sidepaths and bike lanes, so that a much larger fraction of people can use their own power instead of burning fossil fuels to get around.

Ultimately, more people using their own power will help relieve congestion for people who do need heavy vehicles to get around (although it's hard to persuade drivers of this sometimes -- it really is true).

Planning boards can also help reduce the impact of minimum parking requirements (the source of most suburban parking deserts). More controversially, boards can help run the traps for "lane diets", which reduce overbuilt roads so there is more room for sidewalks and bike lanes and landscaping. (Our lane diets have worked fine so far -- congestion and crashes have actually gone down.) Also, there is a school of planning scholarship that advocates more appropriate pricing for public street parking, or for gradual shift from on-road parking to off-road (with lane space opened up for transportation instead, either full-traffic lanes, or sidewalks or bike lanes).

These are tough issues politically (no one wants to give up a parking place outside their storefront), but overtime, conversion to more pleasant, walkable complete streets has proved better for businesses and much nicer for residents. Property values go up and crime goes down when people, not just cars, can enjoy streets.

Since the scientific evidence is so strong and the sensible effects are becoming more obvious, people will gradually realize that we need to address lifestyle changes and CO2 emissions reductions to try to buy time to adapt to the perhaps inevitable (at this point) climate changes. But we need to be constructive about it. It's not all about windmills (although they can help!). It's also about neighborhoods and making them less car dependent.

Even though it can seem hopeless out in the car-clogged suburbs, our community just won a state grant for a bike sharing feasibility study! So progress is possible, even here. What's happening in your neighborhood?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting weatherh98:


The earth is 4.5 billion years, the universe is 13.74 billion years old


The universe goes in cycles, the latest one may be 13.74 billion years. We have no idea how many cycles there have been. The Earth has a measurable history of about 4.5 billion years, but we have no idea how long it was here before the moon broke free and the surface was replace by volcanic activity.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting FatPenguin:


Hope you're joking. Otherwise, you don't come across as someone who really takes the time to study the issue they are talking about.
Facts would get in the way of his political beliefs. Can't have that.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting jrweatherman:
No doubt that global warming is real. Human caused, na. In the 1970's scientists said we were heading for the next ice age. I find it impossible to believe that in 25 short years that humans have altered the earths climate forever for an earth that is 15 billion years old.


Hope you're joking. Otherwise, you don't come across as someone who really takes the time to study the issue they are talking about.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting jrweatherman:
No doubt that global warming is real. Human caused, na. In the 1970's scientists said we were heading for the next ice age. I find it impossible to believe that in 25 short years that humans have altered the earths climate forever for an earth that is 15 billion years old.


Where do you live? In my neck of the woods I see the human impact of climate change every day. Huge forests that are thousand of years old are being replace all of a sudden with brush patches. The ag planting season is lengtening. The sky, crystal clear when I was a kid, is now hazy, hundreds of miles from a major city.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Member Since: July 17, 2009 Posts: 71 Comments: 27208
Quoting RitaEvac:


That's most of America....
excellent point
Member Since: June 17, 2011 Posts: 11 Comments: 6539
Quoting weatherh98:


That's a parent being an idiot


That's most of America....
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting jrweatherman:
No doubt that global warming is real. Human caused, na. In the 1970's scientists said we were heading for the next ice age. I find it impossible to believe that in 25 short years that humans have altered the earths climate forever for an earth that is 15 billion years old.


The earth is 4.5 billion years, the universe is 13.74 billion years old
Member Since: June 17, 2011 Posts: 11 Comments: 6539
Interesting result of a search for "Flag Alphabet":
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:ICS_India.svg
"I'm altering my course to Port"
Then there is the distress flag signal:
Black square over black dot.
Member Since: January 1, 2008 Posts: 187 Comments: 4733
Quoting RitaEvac:


The only messages getting across are political debates, dancing with the stars, kardashians, who's doing what in the NFL, NBA, MLB, stock prices, and the latest update on Facebook.

Manmade catastrophic doomed to fail society is in full swing

Here's one example:


Baby dies after being left in the back of hot pickup truck in Houston


That's a parent being an idiot
Member Since: June 17, 2011 Posts: 11 Comments: 6539
Quoting wxmod:
Another polluted day in China, part of the cumulative impact of man on Earth's climate. This view is about the size of the state of Oregon. MODIS satellite photo today.



Ironically, the fact that they have less stringent codes on emissions means that the pollution from China has a high amount of sulfur and particulates, which actually produces a temporary cooling effect. Unfortunately, CO2 has a much, much longer shelf life than these other pollutants.

===

Unrelated:

Does anyone know when the Daily Arctic Sea Ice map sit is going to be back to working properly? It screwed up around the 28th, and hasn't worked properly since. It appears to search for random days and years, instead of what you put in, and generally is just glitchy.
Member Since: January 25, 2012 Posts: 33 Comments: 1520
The media today: Bread and Circuses my friends... But mostly circuses
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
No doubt that global warming is real. Human caused, na. In the 1970's scientists said we were heading for the next ice age. I find it impossible to believe that in 25 short years that humans have altered the earths climate forever for an earth that is 15 billion years old.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting AtHomeInTX:
Thanks DRM. Interesting indeed and clever. Literally connecting the dots may help put it in some perspective. Whatever way to get the message across I'm all for.


The only messages getting across are political debates, dancing with the stars, kardashians, who's doing what in the NFL, NBA, MLB, stock prices, and the latest update on Facebook.

Manmade catastrophic doomed to fail society is in full swing

Here's one example:

Baby dies after being left in the back of hot pickup truck in Houston
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Another polluted day in China, part of the cumulative impact of man on Earth's climate. This view is about the size of the state of Oregon. MODIS satellite photo today.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
In before the denialists.

Climate change is real. How much impact humans have on the climate is debatable, but we absolutely can do things to be more responsible. The impacts of being responsible are painful, but the impacts of sticking our head in the sand will be more painful (but slightly less profitable).
Member Since: Posts: Comments:

Viewing: 55 - 5

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22Blog Index

Top of Page

About

Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

Local Weather

Overcast
31 °F
Overcast

JeffMasters's Recent Photos

Lake Effort Snow Shower Over Windsor, Ontario
Sunset on Dunham Lake
Pictured Rocks Sunset
Sunset on Lake Huron