March 2012: warmest in U.S. history

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:12 PM GMT on April 10, 2012

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Not only was March 2012 the warmest March in the U.S. since record keeping began in 1895, it was also the second most extreme month for warmth in U.S. history, said NOAA yesterday, in their monthly "State of the Climate" report. The average temperature of 51.1°F was 8.6 degrees above the 20th century average for March, and 0.5°F warmer than the previous warmest March in 1910. Of the more than 1,400 months that have passed since the U.S. weather records began in 1895, only one month--January 2006--had a larger departure from its average temperature than March 2012. A remarkable 25 states east of the Rockies had their warmest March on record, and an additional 15 states had a top-ten warmest March. Only four states were cooler than average, with Alaska being the coldest (tenth coldest March on record.)


Figure 1. Temperature rankings for March 2012 in the Contiguous U.S. Twenty five states set records for warmest March in the 118-year records (red colors.) Image credit: NOAA.

March 2012: most daily records broken of any month since July 1936
A wunderground analysis of weather records from NOAA's National Climatic Data Center temperature record database reveals that more daily high temperature records were broken in March in 2012 than for any month except July 1936, going back at least 100 years. Fully 11.3% of all daily high temperature records for the month of March in the U.S. are now held by the year 2012, for the 550 stations in NOAA's National Climatic Data Center database that have weather records extending back at least 100 years. The only month in U.S. history holding a higher percentage of daily temperatures records is July 1936. That month holds 14.4% of all the U.S. high temperature records for the month of July. That month occurred in the great Dust Bowl summer of 1936, the hottest summer in U.S. history.



Summer in March 2012: records not merely smashed, but obliterated
Among the 15,000 daily records for warmth set in March 2012 were 21 truly astonishing ones: cases where the low temperature for the day beat the previous high temperature for the day. It is quite rare for a weather station with a 50+ year period of record to break a daily temperature record by more than 10°F. During "Summer in March, 2012", beating daily records by 10° - 20°F was commonplace, and NOAA lists 44 cases where a daily record was broken by more than 22°F. Extraordinarily, four stations broke a record for the date by 30°F or more. Canada holds the most surreal record of this nature during the "Summer in March, 2012" heat wave: Western Head, Nova Scotia hit 29.2°C (85°F) on March 22, breaking their previous record for the date (10.6°C in 1969) by 18.6°C (33.5°F.) Canada also had several stations break their all-time warmest April temperature records in March.



Last 3 months and 12 months were the warmest on record
The previous 12-month period (April 2011 -March 2012), which includes the second hottest summer (June-August) and fourth warmest winter (December-February), was the warmest such period for the contiguous United States. The year-to-date period (January - March) was also the warmest on record. NOAA's U.S. Climate Extremes Index, an index that tracks the highest 10 percent and lowest 10 percent of extremes in temperature, precipitation, and drought, was 39 percent, nearly twice the long-term average and the highest value on record for the January - March period. The predominant factor was the large area experiencing extremes in warm daily maximum and minimum temperatures.

Analyzing the "Summer in March, 2012" heat wave
Dr. Martin Hoerling of NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder has posted a thorough analysis of the heat wave, which he calls, "Meteorological March Madness 2012". He explains that the event was probably a natural phenomenon, one that was predicted more than a month in advance by NOAA's long-range CFS model. A similar, though not as intense heat wave occurred in March 1910. However, he notes that the approximate 0.5 - 1°C warming in the Ohio Valley/Midwest U.S. in recent decades--due to human-caused emission of heat trapping gases like carbon dioxide--has significantly increased the odds of major heat waves occurring. He speculates that the odds of a 1-in-40 year heat wave in the Midwest may have increased by about 50% due to human-caused global warming, but that we really don't know how much global warming may have increased the odds of the March 2012 heat wave, saying "This issue of estimating reliable statistics of extreme, rare events continues to be a matter of active research." He estimates that human-caused global warming likely increased the intensity of the March 12 - 23, 2012 heat wave by about 5 - 10%, and concludes by saying, "The probability of heatwaves is growing as [human-caused] warming continues to progress. But there is always the randomness."

Jeff Masters

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Quoting BahaHurican:
Hydrus,

I saw a couple that came up from the Car, made it all the way to the Brownsville area of the GoM coast, then skirt the coast all the way back east to the Mobile area before heading NE and exiting anywhere from St. Aug. to Charleston....

Seemed to be something about the atmospheric circulation between 1830 and 1850 that made this an observable pattern.
I remember the one you are talking about, but it was a long time ago while I was doing some research..I have discovered that hurricanes can take some VERY unusual paths. I have pictured some pretty ridiculous paths in my mind, turns out there were in fact storms that took very similar tracks in real life. Gordon comes to mind as one of the most recent of the wild tracks..
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my 2 penna cents, i can understand ignoring, why let people you will never meet, make you angry? because they do not believe what you believe? let those , that chose to learn , come and say, hey,, you taught me something i did not know,, after 4 years here on this blog,, i have learned, and grateful, the trolls, i just find them fun, like a snickers bar, or poptarts,, no tornados , april 16th 2011, was enuff,, play fun, and, stay safe
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Quoting kwgirl:
Good afternoon all. I just wanted to share my happiness. My granddaughter was born on Monday weighing 6 lbs 13 oz. Beautiful little girl. This is my first and maybe last one. But I only need one to spoil!


CONGRATS!!!! I hope all will be well
Member Since: June 17, 2011 Posts: 11 Comments: 6461
Quoting biff4ugo:
Has anybody put 2 and 2 together yet to predict a powerful drought this year for the US?

Wacky snow fall with evaporation cranked up early and persistently, El Nino blocking Tropical Storm formation relief, etc.

Someone please tell me I am wrong.

The good news is cold Alaska means more ice area in the Arctic.
Will that be enough to stop continued blocking patterns in the jet?

The nicest thing I can say is the smoke from wildfires IS giving us some shade.


It's a definite possibility, as it has been quite dry in my area for the past few months. Hopefully April showers will bring May flowers which bring Pilgrims :P
Member Since: September 3, 2011 Posts: 13 Comments: 3468
Good afternoon all. I just wanted to share my happiness. My granddaughter was born on Monday weighing 6 lbs 13 oz. Beautiful little girl. This is my first and maybe last one. But I only need one to spoil!
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Loving the cooler-ish weather here.

77 and mostly cloudy in Nassau today!
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quoting 66. aspectre

I haven't been following this blog long enough to identify the trolls. I certainly do not encourage this type of behavior on the internet (in real life it's fun to a point, however!) especially when talking about important subjects.

These guys are on my "mental list" and will not argue with them anymore. ;)

Skeptic33, Chucktown, swampdooogggg
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Hydrus,

I saw a couple that came up from the Car, made it all the way to the Brownsville area of the GoM coast, then skirt the coast all the way back east to the Mobile area before heading NE and exiting anywhere from St. Aug. to Charleston....

Seemed to be something about the atmospheric circulation between 1830 and 1850 that made this an observable pattern.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Has anybody put 2 and 2 together yet to predict a powerful drought this year for the US?

Wacky snow fall with evaporation cranked up early and persistently, El Nino blocking Tropical Storm formation relief, etc.

Someone please tell me I am wrong.

The good news is cold Alaska means more ice area in the Arctic.
Will that be enough to stop continued blocking patterns in the jet?

The nicest thing I can say is the smoke from wildfires IS giving us some shade.
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Quoting StormTracker2K:


I've tagged 90 back in Late February in Orlando while the offical reporting site OIA hit 90 back on 3/2/2012. Infact it's 87 right now with 46% humidity.

Yeah, but he's in Trinidad... the real one, not the one in CO.... lol... Anyway, in Trini they don't generally see the extremes of temps we do north of the Tropic of Cancer. So 90 in April is somewhat of a departure for them.

I'm just glad we still have a cold snap going on here. Prolly the last set of low 80s we'll see for a while.
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Quoting StormTracker2K:


I've tagged 90 back in Late February in Orlando while the offical reporting site OIA hit 90 back on 3/2/2012. Infact it's 87 right now with 46% humidity.


Definitely going to get toasty with the high sitting offshore the big bend area.
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Quoting StormTracker2K:


I've tagged 90 back in Late February in Orlando while the offical reporting site OIA hit 90 back on 3/2/2012. Infact it's 87 right now with 46% humidity.



It's the most comfortable 83 I've ever been inI
Member Since: June 17, 2011 Posts: 11 Comments: 6461
Quoting BahaHurican:
I did some interesting reading yesterday, regarding pre-1851 storm seasons. While storm reports from that period are nowhere near what we have today, this doesn't mean there were no reports at all. It was interesting to observe the frequency of storms that traversed the GoM coast from west to east in August and September. Additionally, many, many observed CV type storms went up the middle between Bermuda and Cape Hatteras. And yes, there were storms that obviously formed in the areas we've noted. My point being, there is quite a lot in our historical record that DOES, obviously, represent the typical behaviour of the basin. I think we can say quite realistically that if it HAS happened before, it's quite likely to happen again, given similar circumstances.

The weakness, of course, is in the understanding of what HASN'T happened so far in our record. But let's not act like the record is meaningless.
A powerful hurricane struck Florida that year......Wiki.....Hurricane Four
Category 3 hurricane (SSHS)
Duration August 16 %u2013 August 27
Intensity 120 mph (195 km/h) (1-min), 960 mbar (hPa)

The fourth known tropical cyclone of the season, also known as the San Agapito Hurricane and the Great Middle Florida Hurricane of August 1851, the storm was first observed on August 16 about 775 miles (1250 km) east of Barbados. It tracked west-northwestward, attaining hurricane status on August 17 as it approached the Lesser Antilles. Shortly thereafter, the hurricane passed between Antigua and Saint Kitts and later south of Saint Croix. On August 18 it brushed the southern coast of Puerto Rico, though it affected the entire island due to a large size of the storm. The next day it made landfall on the southern coast of the Dominican Republic. The cyclone rapidly weakened to tropical storm status over Hispaniola, though it regained hurricane status as it paralleled the southern coast of Cuba just offshore. Late on August 20, the cyclone crossed western Cuba, briefly weakening to tropical storm status before again regaining hurricane status in the southeastern Gulf of Mexico. It quickly strengthened and reached peak winds of 115 mph (185 km/h) early on August 23 about 215 miles (345 km) south-southeast of Pensacola, Florida. Turning northeastward, the hurricane moved ashore near Panama City, Florida at peak intensity, with an estimated barometric pressure of 960 mbar. It accelerated across the Southeastern United States, weakening to a tropical storm before exiting North Carolina into the Atlantic Ocean on August 25. On August 27, it was last observed over Newfoundland as a weak tropical storm.

The hurricane passed near Saint Lucia on August 17, where high tides and rough seas were reported. Flooding was reported in northern Puerto Rico during its passage. Impact is unknown in Hispaniola and Cuba. The hurricane produced an estimated storm tide of 12 feet (3.7 m) at Saint Marks; the combination of waves and the storm tide flooded coastal areas, destroying 50% of the cotton crops in some areas.[4] Rough seas destroyed a brig, killing 17 people, and another person drowned due to a shipwreck. Many ships were expected to have been lost in the storm, resulting in fear of potentially hundreds of deaths. The storm caused heavy damage along the coastline, and in Apalachicola the winds destroyed the roofs of all but two or three buildings. Dog Island Light was destroyed, resulting in five deaths. Further inland, many houses were blown over in Tallahassee, totaling $60,000 in damage (1851 USD, $1.5 million 2008 USD). Heavy damage was reported in Alabama, including destroyed crops and damaged houses; damage in the state was less than in Florida.Hurricane force winds extended into southwestern Georgia, while tropical storm force winds were reported along the coastline. In Savannah, the winds damaged many houses and downed many trees. In North Carolina and Virginia, winds from the storm destroyed crop fields and small buildings; in the region, it was described as the worst storm in 30 years.Storm damage was reported as far north as Cambridge, Massachusetts. It must have been large, it did a lot of damage to S.W. Florida while recurving.August 16 13 August 27
Intensity 120 mph (195 km/h) (1-min), 960 mbar (hPa)
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Quoting BahaHurican:
Hey, dude.... didn't know u guys did 90s down there, especially in march....


I've tagged 90 back in Late February in Orlando while the offical reporting site OIA hit 90 back on 3/2/2012. Infact it's 87 right now with 46% humidity.

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Quoting pottery:
Trinidad...
90F, 55% humidity, Heat Index 96F, wind 14mph east.

Hot !
Hey, dude.... didn't know u guys did 90s down there, especially in march....
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Quoting NEwxguy:


On this blog history repeats itself over and over and over again.
I think it's a climatology thing...
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Trinidad...
90F, 55% humidity, Heat Index 96F, wind 14mph east.

Hot !
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Quoting BahaHurican:
WADR, Chuck and others... but could we please NOT have the oil debate again today? We did that several times already this past 7-day period....

TIA...

Afternoon, everybody, BTW [forgot my manners!]


On this blog history repeats itself over and over and over again.
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I did some interesting reading yesterday, regarding pre-1851 storm seasons. While storm reports from that period are nowhere near what we have today, this doesn't mean there were no reports at all. It was interesting to observe the frequency of storms that traversed the GoM coast from west to east in August and September. Additionally, many, many observed CV type storms went up the middle between Bermuda and Cape Hatteras. And yes, there were storms that obviously formed in the areas we've noted. My point being, there is quite a lot in our historical record that DOES, obviously, represent the typical behaviour of the basin. I think we can say quite realistically that if it HAS happened before, it's quite likely to happen again, given similar circumstances.

The weakness, of course, is in the understanding of what HASN'T happened so far in our record. But let's not act like the record is meaningless.
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Quoting BahaHurican:
U mean after last year, with 3 or 4 of em?? lol

Anything is possible here. But given the early warming, plus the climatology that gives a number of June storms a start in this area, I wouldn't be surprised.


That was my thoughts too
Member Since: June 17, 2011 Posts: 11 Comments: 6461
Quoting thunderbug91:


Excellent observation. I agree...


We got gipped last week in regards to storms but there is more hope on the horizon. I know this is long range (ie next week) but you get the idea that things may actually get active rain wise over FL in about 9 to 10 days.

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Quoting weatherh98:


Do u think the Bahamas will get a development over them
U mean after last year, with 3 or 4 of em?? lol

Anything is possible here. But given the early warming, plus the climatology that gives a number of June storms a start in this area, I wouldn't be surprised.
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Quoting weatherh98:


Those two storms are just perfect storms
Their are plenty good examples I can put down.
Anita
Gloria
Charley
Allison
Dolly
Gustav
Humberto
Andrea
Carla
Alma
Ella
Cindy..and much much more
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Quoting ncstorm:


Oh I wont leave..I am just going to take advantage of the ignore system, something I refuse to do in the past but it looks like I am going to have to. I will be back later though.


Sorry ncstorm:/
Member Since: June 17, 2011 Posts: 11 Comments: 6461
Quoting MississippiWx:
Morning/afternoon, everyone.

The weather pattern so far this year has me a little worried about the hurricane season. Thankfully, we shouldn't have as many storms thanks to El Nino. However, the ones that do develop could be a problem. The map of the Euro that I posted below has been a common setup this year. If the past several seasons are any indication, the patterns we deal with in Spring like to stick around for a while into hurricane season (they are difficult to break). We have seen this persistent high pressure in the Western Atlantic, which is leaving the door wide open to the Gulf of Mexico. There has also been a persistent break in the ridging in the middle of the Atlantic, however, with storms not developing until closer to home this year it might not matter as they could slip right under the break into the Caribbean. This is obviously just speculation at this point, but just an observation that I've made early on...



Excellent observation. I agree...
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Quoting washingtonian115:
Please don't whimp out and leave the blog like some people have.You can do it!


Oh I wont leave..I am just going to take advantage of the ignore system, something I refuse to do in the past but it looks like I am going to have to. I will be back later though.
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Quoting ncstorm:


I wish someone would..this blog is hard to tolerate most of the time and best believe when hurricane season starts, the climate change discussion wont.."THEY" did it last year.. I have never put anyone on ignore except the pornography and spam people but I think this season I am going to have too make a change. Most of the people who discuss climate change never win an argument. All they do is post articles after articles with not a soul conceding defeat or acknowledgment of the others point. I will be back later if action starts in OK or Texas. I have been here longer than most and I have earned my "say" on this blog but some of the climate change people I am really starting to consider as TROLLS!
Please don't whimp out and leave the blog like some people have.You can do it!
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Quoting washingtonian115:
Yes that's very possible.I think development situations like Katrina and Rita may happen this year. Yes that's why I said they will go more westward.


Those two storms are just perfect storms
Member Since: June 17, 2011 Posts: 11 Comments: 6461
Quoting weatherh98:


Do u think the Bahamas will get a development over them
Yes that's very possible.I think development situations like Katrina and Rita may happen this year.
Quoting StormTracker2K:


There may not be a lot but the ones that do form may find themselves traversing the Caribbean.
Yes that's why I said they will go more westward.
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Quoting washingtonian115:
So anybody wanna talk about the pattern we have seen thus far this year out over the Atlantic?.


I wish someone would..this blog is hard to tolerate most of the time and best believe when hurricane season starts, the climate change discussion wont.."THEY" did it last year.. I have never put anyone on ignore except the pornography and spam people but I think this season I am going to have too make a change. Most of the people who discuss climate change never win an argument. All they do is post articles after articles with not a soul conceding defeat or acknowledgment of the others point. I will be back later if action starts in OK or Texas. I have been here longer than most and I have earned my "say" on this blog but some of the climate change people I am really starting to consider as TROLLS!
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Quoting washingtonian115:
I really don't see a lot of cape verde type hurricanes this year.But even if we do get cape verde hurricanes they may go more west than the last two years where the storms have gone out into the ocean.


There may not be a lot but the ones that do form may find themselves traversing the Caribbean.
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Quoting MississippiWx:
Morning/afternoon, everyone.

The weather pattern so far this year has me a little worried about the hurricane season. Thankfully, we shouldn't have as many storms thanks to El Nino. However, the ones that do develop could be a problem. The map of the Euro that I posted below has been a common setup this year. If the past several seasons are any indication, the patterns we deal with in Spring like to stick around for a while into hurricane season (they are difficult to break). We have seen this persistent high pressure in the Western Atlantic, which is leaving the door wide open to the Gulf of Mexico. There has also been a persistent break in the ridging in the middle of the Atlantic, however, with storms not developing until closer to home this year it might not matter as they could slip right under the break into the Caribbean. This is obviously just speculation at this point, but just an observation that I've made early on...



This has been the case the last few years but then when you think were doomed a trough comes out of nowhere and sets up near the eastern US basically steering everything away (except Irene). I agree though this year will be interesting as i think we may have several storms targeting the US from the Caribbean. It could be a pattern where the CV storms go further south this year due a stronger Bermuda setting up in the C Altantic (instead over the eastern US to just east of bermuda) and end in the Caribbean before either recurving up toward the US coast or ramming into C America.
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Quoting washingtonian115:
I really don't see a lot of cape verde type hurricanes this year.But even if we do get cape verde hurricanes they may go more west than the last two years where the storms have gone out into the ocean.


Do u think the Bahamas will get a development over them
Member Since: June 17, 2011 Posts: 11 Comments: 6461
.
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Quoting weatherh98:


I would
I really don't see a lot of cape verde type hurricanes this year.But even if we do get cape verde hurricanes they may go more west than the last two years where the storms have gone out into the ocean.
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Quoting Gearsts:
MOAR!


Yes,another spring day with plenty of rain here.
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Hmmm.... Our official station - the Nassau airport - is saying 84 degrees, but I've got three other non-airport sources at 76, 78, and 79....

And it's getting more overcast here. I thought the wx wasn't supposed to change again until Thursday...
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Quoting weatherh98:


You no what that means




ALIENS

No nobody's gonna die this isn't a movie.


Incorrect. Global warming is expected to have a notable death toll, mainly in underdeveloped nations not capable of handling the changes. Droughts, floods, disease migrations, pest migrations, etc. will take an ever increasing toll on the world's population.

It won't be the end of the world. Everyone isn't going to die. But there will be consequences
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Quoting washingtonian115:
So anybody wanna talk about the pattern we have seen thus far this year out over the Atlantic?.


I would
Member Since: June 17, 2011 Posts: 11 Comments: 6461
So anybody wanna talk about the pattern we have seen thus far this year out over the Atlantic?.
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Quoting Xyrus2000:


You can't seriously be using this kind of argument. By that logic, you shouldn't worry about a cancer diagnosis since it's "just a few cells" when compared to the rest of your body.

You're justification has absolutely zero scientific basis.



It has zero scientific basis because Chucktown is trolling, and getting LOTS of bites. I was only mocking him in my response.
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Quoting BahaHurican:
WADR, Chuck and others... but could we please NOT have the oil debate again today? We did that several times already this past 7-day period....

TIA...

Afternoon, everybody, BTW [forgot my manners!]



I'll try my best!!
Member Since: June 17, 2011 Posts: 11 Comments: 6461
Quoting aspectre:
463 GeorgiaStormz [inre swampdooogggg]: I havent seen anything trolly yet, are you sure you havent made a rush to judgement?

Yes. There is a troll who is repeatedly permabanned and repeatedly comes back under a new pseudonym. (And no, Internet address blocks can't work except on honest people.)
The modus operandi is always the same: attempt to turn normal conversations (usually about predictions) between regulars into flamewars.
1) Act fawning toward one regular while dissing another.
(More often than not, when that fawning and dissing reaches the "attempting to start a flamewar" level, it's targeted at Neapolitan).
2) Totally mischaracterize the degree of disagreement.
From blog2066:
257 StormTracker2K: I hope the Eastern Half of the US is ready for the Deep Freeze that's coming early next week. This could be crippling and maybe the coldest April cold wave since April 2007.
310 StormTracker2K: I keeper they just don't want to believe it on here. Well guys it's coming and this will rival the April 2007 Cold Wave. This will likely send freezes deep into the south. 540 Line near Atlanta on the 12Z GFS.
323Neapolitan: I reckon we'll see. As I've said more than once, it's not that it couldn't happen this year; it's just that it'll take an extraordinarily powerful blast of cold air to make it happen this month. The April 2007 event did come on the heels of a warmer-than-normal March (though not nearly as warmn as it was this year), and it did cause several billion dollars in crop failures, with several nights of temperatures into the 20s across Alabama, Georgia, and the Carolinas.
But, again, we'll see whether it materializes...
As you can see, here was nothing that could be even vaguely described as heated there. It was just a polite exchange of ideas.

There are other spoor marks which denote the troll's signature, but I'm not gonna list them lest they tempt other wannabees into doing the same.


Nothing heated at all is correct. I was posting the models that day showing the cold and he was imputing his ideas of why he felt it wouldn't be all that bad. It was a nice discussion which other participated as well.
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Quoting Chucktown:


That's exactly right - 117 years, thats all.

Link


You can't seriously be using this kind of argument. By that logic, you shouldn't worry about a cancer diagnosis since it's "just a few cells" when compared to the rest of your body.

You're justification has absolutely zero scientific basis.


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WADR, Chuck and others... but could we please NOT have the oil debate again today? We did that several times already this past 7-day period....

TIA...

Afternoon, everybody, BTW [forgot my manners!]
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Quoting jeffs713:

Did you bring enough to share with everyone?

I'm actually a little worried about my peaches this year. Last year, I had 2 dozen VERY sweet and juicy peaches (albeit somewhat small) from my back yard. This year, the blossoms have been very sparse, and the tree is already leafing out (last year, the blossoms all popped at once, and the leaves came out afterwards). I suspect my peach harvest will be rather lacking this year.


I hope not!!!
Member Since: June 17, 2011 Posts: 11 Comments: 6461
Good grief. Hurricane season needs to start soon before everyone goes crazy from the wait.

Here's an interesting article to pass the time with-
Gravity Is Climate': 10 Years of Climate Research Satellites GRACE
Member Since: September 18, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 239
Quoting weatherh98:



That is a lie that ur second grade teacher told you, they never thought the world was flat, the Greeks calculated the circumference of the earth to a couple of miles using a lunar eclipse, they simply thought the world was smaller.


The greeks overall were right, but they weren't trusted until the age of colonialism.

The europeans were very superstitious about the world and there were fears about that it was flat "because god made it so". "Greeks were so long ago, how could they be right?"

Christopher Columbus thought it was roughly 1-2,000 miles to Japan from the Canaries when he set sail for his first voyage because of the different measuring systems used since the Greeks made the calculation.
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463 GeorgiaStormz [inre swampdooogggg]: I haven't seen anything trolly yet, are you sure you haven't made a rush to judgement?

Yes. There is a troll who is repeatedly permabanned and repeatedly comes back under a new pseudonym. (And no, Internet address blocks can't work except on honest people.)
The modus operandi is always the same: attempts to turn normal conversations (usually about predictions) between regulars into heated arguments, then into flamewars.
1) Acts fawning (and/or "protective") toward one regular while dissing another. (More often than not, when that reaches the "attempting to start a flamewar" level, it's been targeted at Neapolitan).
2) Totally mischaracterizes the degree of disagreement.
From blog2066:
257 StormTracker2K: I hope the Eastern Half of the US is ready for the Deep Freeze that's coming early next week. This could be crippling and maybe the coldest April cold wave since April 2007.
280. Neapolitan: Not very likely. Consider this:
--It's April, so the sun is already more than halfway to the summer solstice. That means far longer days than you'd see in winter, and with the sun at a much higher angle.
--As someone else noted, there's almost a complete absence of snow cover well into Canada; all that open land has a huge modifying effect on Arctic air masses.
--The Great Lakes are themselves ice-free, and warming nicely; that, too, will work to modify any cold masses headed across them.
I've gone back and looked at some of the record cold April weather in the mid-Atlantic; all of them occurred after cold winters with large accumulations of snow extant into April. That's not to say your "deep freeze" won't materialize--but it will take an extraordinarily large and deep Arctic air mass to make it happen.

310 StormTracker2K: ...keeper, they just don't want to believe it on here. Well guys it's coming and this will rival the April 2007 Cold Wave. This will likely send freezes deep into the south. 540 Line near Atlanta on the 12Z GFS.
323 Neapolitan: I reckon we'll see. As I've said more than once, it's not that it couldn't happen this year; it's just that it'll take an extraordinarily powerful blast of cold air to make it happen this month. The April 2007 event did come on the heels of a warmer-than-normal March (though not nearly as warm as it was this year), and it did cause several billion dollars in crop failures, with several nights of temperatures into the 20s across Alabama, Georgia, and the Carolinas.
But, again, we'll see whether it materializes...
As you can see, there was nothing that could be described as even vaguely approaching a heated argument or a strong clash there. It was just a polite exchange of ideas.

There are other spoor marks which denote the troll's signature, but I'm not gonna list them lest they tempt other wannabees into doing the same.
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Quoting weatherh98:



Thus years louisiana strawberrys are possible the best I've ever had....

Did you bring enough to share with everyone?

I'm actually a little worried about my peaches this year. Last year, I had 2 dozen VERY sweet and juicy peaches (albeit somewhat small) from my back yard. This year, the blossoms have been very sparse, and the tree is already leafing out (last year, the blossoms all popped at once, and the leaves came out afterwards). I suspect my peach harvest will be rather lacking this year.
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MOAR!
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.