Hard freeze hits Midwest and Northeast fruit trees

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:36 PM GMT on March 27, 2012

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Large portions of Michigan, Ohio, and Pennsylvania shivered through a hard freeze (temperatures below 28°F ) this morning, and cold temperatures will cause widespread damage to flowering plants fooled into blooming by last week's unprecedented "Summer in March" heat wave. Growers of apples, pears, peaches, nectarines, plums, and cherries worked during the night and early morning to minimize the damage by running large fans and propane heaters in their orchards in an attempts to keep temperatures a few degrees warmer. While freezing temperatures for an extended period will not kill the trees, they will destroy the flowers and fragile buds that are needed to produce fruit later in the year. I expect that this morning's freeze was severe and widespread enough to cause tens of millions of dollars in damage to the fruit industry, but it will be several weeks before the extent of the damage is known. It would take several nights of temperatures in the 20s to cause a more significant billion-dollar disaster, such as occurred in 2007. A warm spell in March that year was followed by cold temperatures in early April that were 10 - 20 degrees below average, bringing killing frosts and freezes to the Midwest and South that caused $2.2 billion in agricultural damage, wiping out apple, peach, winter wheat and alfalfa crops.

During the remainder of this week, temperatures are expected to be much warmer than they were this morning, so the freeze damage will be limited compared to 2007. However, we still have two more months to go this spring when temperatures commonly fall below freezing. Plants will steadily grow more susceptible to cold temperatures in the coming weeks as the growing season progresses, and the odds of more destructive frosts and freezes for the Midwest and Northeast fruit industry are high.


Figure 1. Low temperatures this morning dipped below 30 degrees over Eastern Michigan, Northeast Ohio, Northern West Virginia, and much of Pennsylvania, in regions where spring bloom was well-advanced due to last week's record "Summer in March" heat wave. Widespread agricultural damage likely occurred in these areas.

History of billion-dollar U.S. freezes
Freezes can cause big damage to agriculture. According to NOAA's National Climatic Data Center, there have been six billion-dollar U.S. freezes since 1980, accounting for 5% of all billion-dollar weather-related disasters. Five of these freezes affected California or Florida; one hit the Midwest. Ranked by damages (in 2011 dollars), here are the six billion-dollar U.S. freeze events since 1980:

1) California Freeze of December 1990. Severe freeze in the Central and Southern San Joaquin Valley caused the loss of citrus, avocado trees, and other crops in many areas. Several days of subfreezing temperatures occurred, with some valley locations in the teens. $5.9 billion in direct and indirect economic losses, including damage to public buildings, utilities, crops, and residences.

2) Florida Freeze of December 1983. Severe freeze central/northern Florida; about $4.5 billion damage to citrus industry.

3) California Freeze of December 1998. A severe freeze damaged fruit and vegetable crops in the Central and Southern San Joaquin Valley. Extended intervals of sub 27° F temperatures occurred over an 8-day period; $3.5 billion estimated damages/costs.

4) Florida Freeze of January 1985. Severe freeze in central/northern Florida; about $2.5 billion damage to citrus industry.

5) East/Midwest freeze of April 2007. Widespread severe freeze over much of the East and Midwest (AL, AR, GA, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, MS, MO, NE, NC, OH, OK, SC, TN, VA, WV), causing significant losses in fruit crops, field crops (especially wheat), and the ornamental industry. Temperatures in the teens/20's accompanied by rather high winds nullified typical crop-protection systems. Over $2.2 billion in damage/costs.

6) California Freeze of January 2007. For nearly two weeks in January, overnight temperatures over a good portion of California dipped into the 20's, destroying numerous agricultural crops, with citrus, berry, and vegetable crops most affected. $1.5 billion estimated in damage/costs; 1 fatality reported.

Scotland records its all-time warmest March temperature
The ridge of high pressure that brought "Summer in March" to the U.S. last week moved over Western Europe over the weekend, bringing sunny skies and record-breaking high temperatures to the U.K. Scotland broke its record for hottest March temperature on record on Sunday, when the mercury hit 22.8°C at Fyvie Castle, Aberdeenshire. The record lasted only one day, as a new high of 22.9°C was recorded in Aboyne, Aberdeenshire, on Monday. That record also lasted just one day, as Aboyne, Aberdeenshire has hit 23.4°C today. The previous March record in Scotland was 22.2°C at Gordon Castle (Morayshire) in March 1957, and at Strachan (Kincardineshire) in March 1965.

Canada's 1926 all-time March temperature record questioned
I reported last week that the 29.2°C (85°F) measured at Western Head, Nova Scotia on March 22, 2012 was the third warmest temperature ever recorded in Canada in March. Environment Canada lists the hottest March temperature as a 31.1°C at Beaver Creek on Vancouver Island, BC on March 29th, 1926. However, weather records researcher Maximiliano Herrera has looked into this record, and concluded that it is likely bogus. A station just a few miles away at Port Alberni measured a much cooler high temperature of 23.3°C that day, and the temperature range between the high and low temperature at Beaver Creek was almost 30°C, which is far too great for a station so close to the ocean. Such large differences between min and max temperature on sunny days usually commonly imply poor siting of the temperature instrument. He maintains that the highest March temperature in Canada should be the 29.4°C in 1921 at Wallaceburg, with the second highest being the 29.2°C (85°F) measured at Western Head, Nova Scotia on March 22, 2012.

Jeff Masters

Pink Springtime! (gardner48197)
Pink Springtime!
Pretty little blossoms (colamom)
all in a row. I don't remember this old Redbud tree ever having all the little clusters of blooms on the branches. I thought it was pretty.
Pretty little blossoms
()

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Quoting sunlinepr:


Jet streak over or close to PR aids in the wet pattern we have been enduring in a normally dry March.
Member Since: April 29, 2009 Posts: 75 Comments: 14252
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Cyclone2012:
Eloquent weather over here this afternoon!


Where are you? As I have been posting before,PR has seen above normal rainfall for this time of the year.
Member Since: April 29, 2009 Posts: 75 Comments: 14252
I just got this video of a raging river in interior Puerto Rico that flooded a town (Orocovis) And we are supposed to be in the dry period.

Link
Member Since: April 29, 2009 Posts: 75 Comments: 14252
Quoting nigel20:

Hopefully 2012 is not as active and deadly as last year
I personally hope its quite active.
Member Since: July 22, 2010 Posts: 1 Comments: 3842
Joel Taylor - Storm Chaser
Such an interesting news week with the healthcare case in front of the Supremes and the murder/self-defense case in Florida. Plus the next major severe weather event looks to be approaching this weekend! A lot to keep track of.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32023
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

I hope not either, but we're definitely not off to a start with an already estimated >$2 billion in damage and 56 deaths.

Yeah...it's already off to a bad start...hopefully it taper off
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8023
Dr. Greg Forbes
MON APR 2
Numerical models are not on full agreement on the details, but the potential is there for a widespread severe thunderstorm outbreak on Monday.
Severe thunderstorms and isolated tornadoes in east and south OH, extreme
west PA, western WV, KY, TN, north GA, north, central, and southwest AL, MS,
LA, south and east-central AR, upper coastal TX.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32023
Quoting Patrap:
BREAKING: Obama Administration To Establish Strong Carbon Pollution Limits For New Power Plants
By Brad Johnson on Mar 26, 2012 at 10:14 pm


In one of the most significant reversals of Bush-era policy, the Obama administration plans tomorrow to issue greenhouse pollution limits for new power plants, a major step in the fight against global warming. The new rule %u2014 which will go into effect in 2013 %u2014 confirms the end of the era of dirty coal-fired power plants:

The proposed rule %u2014 years in the making and approved by the White House after months of review %u2014 will require any new power plant to emit no more than 1,000 pounds of carbon dioxide per megawatt of electricity produced. The average U.S. natural gas plant, which emits between 800 and 850 pounds of CO2 per megawatt, meets that standard; coal plants emit an average of 1,768 pounds of carbon dioxide per megawatt.

Since the late 1990s, %u201Cnatural gas has been the fuel of choice for the majority of new generating units,%u201D and in the 2000s, wind power generation also grew significantly. With the high cost of its toxic pollution from mine to plant, coal has been losing out to cleaner sources of fuel in the electric utility sector. Although few new coal plants have been built in the last twenty years, aging plants %u2014 some built in the 1930s %u2014 still produce about 40 percent of U.S. electricity, and about 80 percent of carbon pollution from the power sector.

In March 2001, newly elected President George W. Bush reversed a campaign pledge to limit greenhouse pollution from power plants, the source of 40 percent of United States global warming pollution. In 2008, Bush White House officials refused to open an email sent by its own Environmental Protection Agency which called for action against man-made climate change.

%u201CThis is the third major executive action launched by the Obama administration to reduce carbon pollution,%u201D writes Center for American Progress senior fellow Daniel Weiss. %u201CWith growing evidence that the serious impacts of climate change are already here, President Obama deserves credit for this new standard. We must urgently adopt and implement these new pollution reduction standards for power plants.%u201D




BTW, I have a question about this move I'd like to answer, will this regulation effect electrical output and thus effect our electric bills as a result? I'm just wondering because I haven't heard how carbon emissions regulations on electrical plants will effect electrical energy output from the plants after the regulation is implemented.


Furthermore I've came across some information about wind power which makes me wonder if its worth it. From what I know maintenance is expensive and a lot of birds die from wind plants.

Also how is natural gas in terms of CO2 or other pollutants as apposed to coal?


I think solar power seems like the best alternative in the future right now. Of course the best of all would be nuclear fusion but that's beyond our reach right now. I would also think from what I know about energy that its possible to harness energy from the sun in orbit and beam it to Earth. I'm not sure how much of that is practical or if its another option that is similar to nuclear fusion in that its beyond reach?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Josihua2:
guessing by your comments earthquakes are not common there? well at least 3.0 and higher
No, ones that size and smaller are very common there; that's why I made the wisecrack about my aunt sleeping through two feelable ones. ;-)
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13527
Quoting nigel20:

Hopefully 2012 is not as active and deadly as last year

I hope not either, but we're definitely not off to a start with an already estimated >$2 billion in damage and 56 deaths.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32023
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Hopefully 2012 is not as active and deadly as last year
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8023
Tight rotation with this supercell in Texas.

The upper left box depicts base reflectivity, the upper right base velocity, the bottom left storm relative velocity, and the bottom right VIL, a measure of hail in a storm.

Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32023
Quoting Gearsts:
Dry season?


Yeah,what dry season? Records of rainfall are being broken almost every day.

CLIMATE...MARCH 2012 CURRENTLY RANKS AS THE THIRD WETTEST MARCH
ON RECORD THE SAN JUAN OFFICIAL CLIMATE STATION WITH A TOTAL OF
6.31 INCHES. THE WETTEST MARCH ON RECORD WAS 1927 WHEN 9.38 INCHES
WERE MEASURED.

FOR ST. THOMAS...MARCH 2012 CURRENTLY RANKS AS THE FIFTH WETTEST
MARCH ON RECORD WITH 3.24 INCHES OF RAIN THUS FAR. THE WETTEST
MARCH ON RECORD WAS 1961 WHEN 4.37 INCHES WERE MEASURED.

FOR ST. CROIX...MARCH 2012 CURRENTLY RANKS AS THE FOURTH WETTEST
YEAR ON RECORD WITH 2.92 INCHES OF RAIN THUS FAR. THE WETTEST
MARCH ON RECORD WAS 1985 WHEN 4.15 INCHES WERE MEASURED.
Member Since: April 29, 2009 Posts: 75 Comments: 14252
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
BULLETIN - EAS ACTIVATION REQUESTED
TORNADO WARNING
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MIDLAND/ODESSA TX
403 PM CDT TUE MAR 27 2012

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN MIDLAND HAS ISSUED A

* TORNADO WARNING FOR...
SOUTH CENTRAL PECOS COUNTY IN SOUTHWEST TEXAS...

* UNTIL 430 PM CDT

* AT 359 PM CDT...NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE METEOROLOGISTS DETECTED A
SEVERE THUNDERSTORM CAPABLE OF PRODUCING A TORNADO OVER CENTRAL
PECOS COUNTY...OR 25 MILES SOUTH OF FORT STOCKTON...MOVING
SOUTHEAST AT 10 MPH.

* THE TORNADO WILL AFFECT THE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS...
SOUTHERN PECOS COUNTY...

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A TORNADO MAY FORM AT ANY TIME... TAKE COVER NOW. ABANDON MOBILE
HOMES AND VEHICLES FOR MORE SUBSTANTIAL SHELTER. AVOID WINDOWS.

IF YOU ARE CAUGHT OUTSIDE... SEEK SHELTER IN A NEARBY REINFORCED
BUILDING. AS A LAST RESORT... SEEK SHELTER IN A CULVERT... DITCH OR
LOW SPOT AND COVER YOUR HEAD WITH YOUR HANDS.

&&

LAT...LON 3049 10247 3032 10275 3056 10291 3066 10274
TIME...MOT...LOC 2103Z 325DEG 8KT 3053 10277

$$

That kind of came out of nowhere... I don't think we were expecting tornadoes in SW Texas today.
Member Since: February 11, 2012 Posts: 83 Comments: 7779
Quoting Neapolitan:
There was one at the same location two hours ago, as well (a 1.9). I called my aunt who lives two miles from the center of the 3.5; she was napping and didn't feel any of them. Old people... ;-)
guessing by your comments earthquakes are not common there? well at least 3.0 and higher
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting hydrus:
I do not believe we will look like Venus any time soon either....Wiki....Venus is the second planet from the Sun, orbiting it every 224.7 Earth days.[10] The planet is named after Venus, the Roman goddess of love and beauty. After the Moon, it is the brightest natural object in the night sky, reaching an apparent magnitude of −4.6, bright enough to cast shadows. Because Venus is an inferior planet from Earth, it never appears to venture far from the Sun: its elongation reaches a maximum of 47.8°. Venus reaches its maximum brightness shortly before sunrise or shortly after sunset, for which reason it has been known as the Morning Star or Evening Star.

Venus is classified as a terrestrial planet and it is sometimes called Earth's "sister planet" owing to their similar size, gravity, and bulk composition. Venus is covered with an opaque layer of highly reflective clouds of sulfuric acid, preventing its surface from being seen from space in visible light. Venus has the densest atmosphere of all the terrestrial planets in the Solar System, consisting mostly of carbon dioxide. The atmospheric pressure at the planet's surface is 92 times that of the Earth. Venus has no carbon cycle to lock carbon back into rocks and surface features, nor does it seem to have any organic life to absorb it in biomass. Venus is believed to have previously possessed oceans,[12] but these evaporated as the temperature rose owing to the runaway greenhouse effect.[13] The water has most probably dissociated, and, because of the lack of a planetary magnetic field, the hydrogen has been swept into interplanetary space by the solar wind.[14] Venus's surface is a dry desertscape with many slab-like rocks, periodically refreshed by volcanism.Venus has an extremely dense atmosphere, which consists mainly of carbon dioxide and a small amount of nitrogen. The atmospheric mass is 93 times that of Earth's atmosphere while the pressure at the planet's surface is about 92 times that at Earth's surface—a pressure equivalent to that at a depth of nearly 1 kilometer under Earth's oceans. The density at the surface is 65 kg/m³ (6.5% that of water). The CO2-rich atmosphere, along with thick clouds of sulfur dioxide, generates the strongest greenhouse effect in the Solar System, creating surface temperatures of over 460 °C (860 °F).[38] This makes the Venusian surface hotter than Mercury's which has a minimum surface temperature of −220 °C and maximum surface temperature of 420 °C,[39] even though Venus is nearly twice Mercury's distance from the Sun and thus receives only 25% of Mercury's solar irradiance. The surface of Venus is often said to resemble traditional accounts of Hell.[40]

Studies have suggested that several billion years ago the Venusian atmosphere was much more like Earth's than it is now, and that there were probably substantial quantities of liquid water on the surface, but a runaway greenhouse effect was caused by the evaporation of that original water, which generated a critical level of greenhouse gases in its atmosphere.[41] Although the surface conditions on the planet are no longer hospitable to any Earthlike life that may have formed prior to this event, the possibility that a habitable niche still exists in the lower and middle cloud layers of Venus can not yet be excluded.[42]

Thermal inertia and the transfer of heat by winds in the lower atmosphere mean that the temperature of the Venusian surface does not vary significantly between the night and day sides, despite the planet's extremely slow rotation. Winds at the surface are slow, moving at a few kilometers per hour, but because of the high density of the atmosphere at the Venusian surface, they exert a significant amount of force against obstructions, and transport dust and small stones across the surface. This alone would make it difficult for a human to walk through, even if the heat and lack of oxygen were not a problem.[43]

Above the dense CO2 layer are thick clouds consisting mainly of sulfur dioxide and sulfuric acid droplets.[44][45] These clouds reflect about 60% of the sunlight that falls on them back into space, and prevent the direct observation of the Venusian surface in visible light. The permanent cloud cover means that although Venus is closer than Earth to the Sun, the Venusian surface is not as well lit. Strong 300 km/h winds at the cloud tops circle the planet about every four to five earth days.[46] Venusian winds move at up to 60 times the speed of the planet's rotation, while Earth's fastest winds are only 10% to 20% rotation speed.[47]

The surface of Venus is effectively isothermal; it retains a constant temperature not only between day and night but between the equator and the poles.[2][48] The planet's minute axial tilt (less than three degrees, compared with 23 degrees for Earth), also minimizes seasonal temperature variation.[49] The only appreciable variation in temperature occurs with altitude. In 1995, the Magellan probe imaged a highly reflective substance at the tops of the highest mountain peaks which bore a strong resemblance to terrestrial snow. This substance arguably formed from a similar process to snow, albeit at a far higher temperature. Too volatile to condense on the surface, it rose in gas form to cooler higher elevations, where it then fell as precipitation. The identity of this substance is not known with certainty, but speculation has ranged from elemental tellurium to lead sulfide (galena).[50]

The clouds of Venus are capable of producing lightning much like the clouds on Earth.[51] The existence of lightning had been controversial since the first suspected bursts were detected by the Soviet Venera probes. In 2006–07 Venus Express clearly detected whistler mode waves, the signatures of lightning. Their intermittent appearance indicates a pattern associated with weather activity. The lightning rate is at least half of that on Earth.[51] In 2007 the Venus Express probe discovered that a huge double atmospheric vortex exists at the south pole of the planet.[52][53]

Another discovery made by the Venus Express probe in 2011 is that an ozone layer exists high in the atmosphere of Venus.[54]
Magnetic field and core
Size comparison of terrestrial planets (left to right): Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars

In 1967, Venera-4 found that the Venusian magnetic field is much weaker than that of Earth. This magnetic field is induced by an interaction between the ionosphere and the solar wind,[55][56] rather than by an internal dynamo in the core like the one inside the Earth. Venus' small induced magnetosphere provides negligible protection to the atmosphere against cosmic radiation. This radiation may result in cloud-to-cloud lightning discharges.[57]

The lack of an intrinsic magnetic field at Venus was surprising given that it is similar to Earth in size, and was expected also to contain a dynamo at its core. A dynamo requires three things: a conducting liquid, rotation, and convection. The core is thought to be electrically conductive and, while its rotation is often thought to be too slow, simulations show that it is adequate to produce a dynamo.[58][59] This implies that the dynamo is missing because of a lack of convection in the Venusian core. On Earth, convection occurs in the liquid outer layer of the core because the bottom of the liquid layer is much hotter than the topVenus orbits the Sun at an average distance of about 108 million kilometers (about 0.7 AU) and completes an orbit every 224.65 days. Venus is the second planet from the Sun and it revolves round the Sun approximately 1.6 times (yellow trail) in Earth's 365 days (blue trail)



Great post on Venus :)
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
BULLETIN - EAS ACTIVATION REQUESTED
TORNADO WARNING
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MIDLAND/ODESSA TX
403 PM CDT TUE MAR 27 2012

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN MIDLAND HAS ISSUED A

* TORNADO WARNING FOR...
SOUTH CENTRAL PECOS COUNTY IN SOUTHWEST TEXAS...

* UNTIL 430 PM CDT

* AT 359 PM CDT...NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE METEOROLOGISTS DETECTED A
SEVERE THUNDERSTORM CAPABLE OF PRODUCING A TORNADO OVER CENTRAL
PECOS COUNTY...OR 25 MILES SOUTH OF FORT STOCKTON...MOVING
SOUTHEAST AT 10 MPH.

* THE TORNADO WILL AFFECT THE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS...
SOUTHERN PECOS COUNTY...

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A TORNADO MAY FORM AT ANY TIME... TAKE COVER NOW. ABANDON MOBILE
HOMES AND VEHICLES FOR MORE SUBSTANTIAL SHELTER. AVOID WINDOWS.

IF YOU ARE CAUGHT OUTSIDE... SEEK SHELTER IN A NEARBY REINFORCED
BUILDING. AS A LAST RESORT... SEEK SHELTER IN A CULVERT... DITCH OR
LOW SPOT AND COVER YOUR HEAD WITH YOUR HANDS.

&&

LAT...LON 3049 10247 3032 10275 3056 10291 3066 10274
TIME...MOT...LOC 2103Z 325DEG 8KT 3053 10277

$$
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32023
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32023
The Soaps are still on, over on the West Coast so, yeah..

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Patrap:





Doom ?

..or just Tuesday regla Doom?
There was one at the same location two hours ago, as well (a 1.9). I called my aunt who lives two miles from the center of the 3.5; she was napping and didn't feel any of them. Old people... ;-)
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13527
Quoting Patrap:
BREAKING: Obama Administration To Establish Strong Carbon Pollution Limits For New Power Plants
By Brad Johnson on Mar 26, 2012 at 10:14 pm


In one of the most significant reversals of Bush-era policy, the Obama administration plans tomorrow to issue greenhouse pollution limits for new power plants, a major step in the fight against global warming. The new rule — which will go into effect in 2013 — confirms the end of the era of dirty coal-fired power plants:

The proposed rule — years in the making and approved by the White House after months of review — will require any new power plant to emit no more than 1,000 pounds of carbon dioxide per megawatt of electricity produced. The average U.S. natural gas plant, which emits between 800 and 850 pounds of CO2 per megawatt, meets that standard; coal plants emit an average of 1,768 pounds of carbon dioxide per megawatt.

Since the late 1990s, “natural gas has been the fuel of choice for the majority of new generating units,” and in the 2000s, wind power generation also grew significantly. With the high cost of its toxic pollution from mine to plant, coal has been losing out to cleaner sources of fuel in the electric utility sector. Although few new coal plants have been built in the last twenty years, aging plants — some built in the 1930s — still produce about 40 percent of U.S. electricity, and about 80 percent of carbon pollution from the power sector.

In March 2001, newly elected President George W. Bush reversed a campaign pledge to limit greenhouse pollution from power plants, the source of 40 percent of United States global warming pollution. In 2008, Bush White House officials refused to open an email sent by its own Environmental Protection Agency which called for action against man-made climate change.

“This is the third major executive action launched by the Obama administration to reduce carbon pollution,” writes Center for American Progress senior fellow Daniel Weiss. “With growing evidence that the serious impacts of climate change are already here, President Obama deserves credit for this new standard. We must urgently adopt and implement these new pollution reduction standards for power plants.”



I highly doubt President Obama is doing this because he actually wants to, it sounds like a political move to gain votes. Whatever, at least its being done, regardless of the amount of heart and soul involved.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Neapolitan:
But what about the 3.5 a minute before?

quake





Doom ?



..or just Tuesday regla Doom?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Levi32:
Good afternoon.

I have a new post up on the upcoming Atlantic hurricane season:

Tropical Tidbit for Tuesday, March 27th, with Video

Thanks Levi
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8023
Dry season?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Patrap:
2.6 Mag Quake

San Bernardino

But what about the 3.5 a minute before?

quake
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 13527
Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Both.

The fire has burned at least 4,500 acres and is still burning out of control due to the very strong and dry conditions there.



Not many wet places across the country these days.


Member Since: Posts: Comments:
113. txjac
Quoting MrMixon:


The winds yesterday were atrocious... very gusty. Humidity was something like 3%. Combine that with steep terrain, narrow roads, and our driest March on record and we are basically in a situation where the fire is impossible contain without help from mother nature. Luckily the winds have been lighter today, but it's still dry as a bone here and fires this size tend to kick up their own, unpredictable winds. It's not a good situation at all. I have officially lost my Spring Fever - I miss winter...


Very sorry to hear this, will be in my thoughts and prayers
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting LargoFl:
good morning..global warming has changed into global cooling..another ICE AGE has occured....ok what happens now? ......Another ice age would result in very large ice caps covering the Northern Latitudes & the Southern Latitudes and this would cause the almost 7 billion people of planet Earth to live closer together in a smaller area that which we are spread out now. As an example, all of Canada would be covered by an ice cap, as would Great Britain, Scandinavia, Nothern Russia & all of Alaska.

Sea levels would drop almost 400 feet depending upon the strength of the Ice Age. There would be a much reduced area to grow food and definitely not nearly enough to feed 7 billion people. Nuclear War would very likely break out over the best areas to live and to survive and this in itself could cause manking to become an extinct species.

Source(s):



Global Cooling? I myself may be skeptical of certain aspects of Climate Change, but one thing I will tell you is that we are not experiencing Global Cooling, and there is no sign that we will. If you really believe so, how did you come to your conclusion?


All scientific evidence tells us that we need to do away with fossil fuel because continuing to add massive amounts of CO2 is quite harmful to the Climate. Although I doubt we will be "baking" in 20 years, disrupting the balance of the Earths Climate isn't exactly good, this is our home, after all.

Not only should fossil fuels be done away with, but we need to move towards overall improved environmental responsibility. We need to be care takers of the Earth, not destroyers of it.

I won't incite panic over the problem, but ignoring the problem is even worse.


BTW I probably live within 3 or 4 miles of you seeing that your name is LargoFl, so listen carefully :) lol
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
2.6 Mag Quake


San Bernardino

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting txjac:


I dislike seeing pictures like these ...brings back memories of last year when things were more dry here. Hopefully they have it under control soon. Are there reasons that it is taking so long to get it under control? Is it in an area that is hard to get to or just not enough manpower?


The winds yesterday were atrocious... very gusty. Humidity was something like 3%. Combine that with steep terrain, narrow roads, and our driest March on record and we are basically in a situation where the fire is impossible contain without help from mother nature. Luckily the winds have been lighter today, but it's still dry as a bone here and fires this size tend to kick up their own, unpredictable winds. It's not a good situation at all. I have officially lost my Spring Fever - I miss winter...
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Quoting txjac:


I dislike seeing pictures like these ...brings back memories of last year when things were more dry here. Hopefully they have it under control soon. Are there reasons that it is taking so long to get it under control? Is it in an area that is hard to get to or just not enough manpower?

Both.

The fire has burned at least 4,500 acres and is still burning out of control due to the very strong and dry conditions there.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32023
Quoting Cyclone2012:


Oh, I'm sorry, I thought you did. Since I hear you talking about the tropics so much.

I live on the southeast coast of North Carolina.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32023
106. txjac
Quoting JNCali:
Colorado Fire Update


I dislike seeing pictures like these ...brings back memories of last year when things were more dry here. Hopefully they have it under control soon. Are there reasons that it is taking so long to get it under control? Is it in an area that is hard to get to or just not enough manpower?
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Cyclone2012:


What a flip-flopping model, it behaves the SAME way during hurricane season. Which is what makes it so EXTRAORDINARILY unreliable.


LOL! You can't be serious about the Euro being unreliable. Models have been all over the place yes but I think this is largely due to the fact that La-Nina has basically moved to nuetral. Infact all the models are all over the place right now.


Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Colorado Fire Update
Member Since: September 9, 2010 Posts: 5 Comments: 1034
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Quoting Neapolitan:
The heat wave is on again in Europe, and even stronger than it was yesterday or the day before. Temperatures reached 71 in Kristiansand, Norway, today, breaking the old record for the day by 16 degrees. Scotland set a new national all-time March high temperature record for the third straight day, this time reaching 23.6C (74.5F) in Aboyne. And meanwhile, much of the rest of the UK made it into the mid and upper 60s today, while parrts of France climbed well into the 70s.

Closer to home, the Lower North Fork Fire southwest of Denver is raging out of control spurred on by extremely dry air and winds gusting to 90. So far, two people are confirmed dead, a number of homes have been destroyed, and owners of thousands more have been given pre-evacuation notices. The fire is at 4,500 acres and is 0% contained.


The haze over the front range is pretty clear from my window right now from the fire, but nothing like the smoke we could see yesterday with the strong SW winds. Drainage winds tonight might bring some smoke towards the city later tonight. At least the winds have calmed down enough that they can get the planes up there today. Might try and drive up into the foothills a little bit towards sunset and snap some photos if I have time.
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Good afternoon.

I have a new post up on the upcoming Atlantic hurricane season:

Tropical Tidbit for Tuesday, March 27th, with Video
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:

Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, Missouri, Arkansas, and after that, it's kinda blurry.

It's still kinda blurry for the locations I mentioned above.

Ah, thanks. I hope it doesn't happen, we don't need anymore destruction or anything.

So, like, nothing in Northen Illinois, right? I have really bad astraphobia, sooo... Thanks for your help!
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Quoting Neapolitan:


Closer to home, the Lower North Fork Fire southwest of Denver is raging out of control spurred on by extremely dry air and winds gusting to 90. So far, two people are confirmed dead, a number of homes have been destroyed, and owners of thousands more have been given pre-evacuation notices. The fire is at 4,500 acres and is 0% contained.


I snapped this photo of the Lower North Fork Fire on my way home last night. It's really disheartening to have such a destructive (and now deadly) fire so early in the season...

Lower North Fork Fire (32/366)

(Click image to embiggen)
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Quoting 7080734:
No offense, but could you be more specific? Like, states? Thank you.

Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, Missouri, Arkansas, and after that, it's kinda blurry.

It's still kinda blurry for the locations I mentioned above.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32023
Quoting Cyclone2012:


What a flip-flopping model, it behaves the SAME way during hurricane season. Which is what makes it so EXTRAORDINARILY unreliable.

I'm not saying it's always good or anything but it's the most reliable model there is...
Member Since: February 11, 2012 Posts: 83 Comments: 7779
No offense, but could you be more specific? Like, states? Thank you.
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Quoting Cyclone2012:


I thought you lived in Miami, FL.

What? No..
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32023
Quoting Neapolitan:
The heat wave is on again in Europe, and even stronger than it was yesterday or the day before. Temperatures reached 71 in Kristiansand, Norway, today, breaking the old record for the day by 16 degrees. Scotland set a new national all-time March high temperature record for the third straight day, this time reaching 23.6C (74.5F) in Aboyne. And meanwhile, much of the rest of the UK made it into the mid and upper 60s today, while parrts of France climbed well into the 70s.

Closer to home, the Lower North Fork Fire southwest of Denver is raging out of control spurred on by extremely dry air and winds gusting to 90. So far, two people are confirmed dead, a number of homes have been destroyed, and owners of thousands more have been given pre-evacuation notices. The fire is at 4,500 acres and is 0% contained.

The Weather Channel just reported that this number has went up to 3 fatalities...sad indeed.

Quoting 7080734:
Where was (or is) that Outbreak supposed to take place, exactly?

Central Plains into Mississippi Valley in the early/middle portions of next week.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32023
Really?? Why can't it stay warm?

SPECIAL WEATHER STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WILMINGTON NC
322 PM EDT TUE MAR 27 2012

NCZ105-280400-
INLAND PENDER-
INCLUDING THE CITY OF...BURGAW
322 PM EDT TUE MAR 27 2012

...PATCHY FROST POSSIBLE OVERNIGHT...

ALTHOUGH FREEZING TEMPERATURES ARE NOT EXPECTED...SOME OF THE
TRADITIONALLY COLDER SPOTS IN PENDER COUNTY COULD SEE READINGS
DROP INTO THE MID 30S AFTER MIDNIGHT. THIS COULD LEAD TO THE
DEVELOPMENT OF PATCHY FROST...ESPECIALLY ON ELEVATED SURFACES LIKE
AUTOMOBILE WINDSHIELDS AND ROOFS. ESPECIALLY COLD-TENDER
VEGETATION MAY BE SUBJECT TO DAMAGE.

$$
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 32023
Quoting Neapolitan:
The heat wave is on again in Europe, and even stronger than it was yesterday or the day before. Temperatures reached 71 in Kristiansand, Norway, today, breaking the old record for the day by 16 degrees. Scotland set a new national all-time March high temperature record for the third straight day, this time reaching 23.6C (74.5F) in Aboyne. And meanwhile, much of the rest of the UK made it into the mid and upper 60s today, while parrts of France climbed well into the 70s.

Closer to home, the Lower North Fork Fire southwest of Denver is raging out of control spurred on by extremely dry air and winds gusting to 90. So far, two people are confirmed dead, a number of homes have been destroyed, and owners of thousands more have been given pre-evacuation notices. The fire is at 4,500 acres and is 0% contained.

So sad, sorry to hear that
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8023

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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.