Summer in March peaks in U.S. and Canada; record late snow in Oregon

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 1:17 PM GMT on March 22, 2012

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A spring heat wave like no other in U.S. and Canadian history peaked in intensity yesterday, during its tenth day. Since record keeping began in the late 1800s, there have never been so many temperature records broken for spring warmth in a one-week period--and the margins by which some of the records were broken yesterday were truly astonishing. Wunderground's weather historian, Christopher C. Burt, commented to me yesterday, "it's almost like science fiction at this point." A few of the more remarkable records from yesterday:

Pellston, MI: record high broken by 32°F
Pellston, Michigan in the Northern Lower Peninsula is called "Michigan's Icebox", since it frequently records the coldest temperatures in the state, and in the entire nation. But the past five days, Pellston has set five consecutive records for hottest March day. Yesterday's 85° reading broke the previous record for the date (53° in 2007) by a ridiculous 32°, and was an absurd 48°F above average.

Low temperatures beat the previous record high for the date at two stations
The low temperature at Marquette, Michigan was 52° yesterday, which was 3° warmer than the previous record high for the date! The low at Mt. Washington, NH yesterday (44°) also beat the previous record high for the date (43°.)

Canadian cities break all-time April record for warmth in March
Not only was yesterday the warmest March day in recorded history for many of Canada's major cities, it was also warmer than any April day at St. John, New Brunswick. The city hit 25.4°C (78°F.) Not only did this crush the record high for March (previous record: 17.5°C), it is well above any temperature ever measured in April (extreme April temperature on record: 22.8°C.) Halifax, Nova Scotia hit 25.8°C yesterday, beating their all-time March record of 25.6°, and falling just short of their all-time April record of 26.3°C, set on April 30, 2004. As of 1 pm today, Halifax was at 27°C, beating their all-time April record. Other major cities in Canada that set all-time warmest March records yesterday included Ottawa (27.4°C), Montreal (25.8°C), Windsor (27.8°C), Hamilton (25.6°C), London (26.4°C), and Fredericton (27.1°C).


Figure 1. The intensity and scope of Summer in March is clearly visible in this data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on the Terra satellite. The map depicts temperatures on March 8 - 15, 2012, compared to the average of the same eight day period of March from 2000-2011. Areas with warmer than average temperatures are shown in red; near-normal temperatures are white; and areas that were cooler than the 2000-2011 base period are blue. These land surface temperatures are distinct from the air temperatures that meteorological stations typically measure, and indicate how hot the surface of the Earth in a particular location would feel to the touch. From a satellite vantage point, the “surface” includes a number of materials that capture and retain heat, such as sand in the desert, the dark roof of a building, or the pavement of a road. As a result, daytime land surface temperature are usually much higher than air temperatures—something that anyone who has walked barefoot across a parking lot on a summer afternoon knows instinctively. Image credit: NASA Earth Observatory.

Summer in March warmth crushes records in Michigan
Yesterday, nearly every major airport in Michigan's Lower Peninsula broke the record they set the previous day for their hottest March temperature, including Detroit (84°), Flint (86°F, just 2° below their all-time April record), Saginaw (87°F, just 2° below their all-time April record), Grand Rapids (87°), Muskegon (82°), Lansing (86°), Alpena (87°), Gaylord (83°, which was 26° above the average high for the date), Pellston (85°), Houghton Lake (85°), and Traverse City (87°, which was which was 45°F above the average high for the date, and was the fifth consecutive day they tied or broke their record for hottest March temperature, and just 3° below their record high temperature of 90° for April.) In Michigan's Upper Peninsula, Sault Ste. Marie's 83° (26° above the average high for the date) crushed the previous March record by 8°, and was only 2° shy of the warmest temperature ever measured in April. Cities in states neighboring Michigan that broke all-time March records for warmth yesterday included:

Indiana:
Fort Wayne (87°) and South Bend (86°)

Ohio:
Columbus (85°), Toledo (85°), Cleveland (83°), and Mansfield (82°)

Wisconsin:
Milwaukee (84°), Madison (83°), and Green Bay (82°). The NWS office in Madison notes that in July of 2009, Madison only had seven days of 80 degree temperatures, and the highest temperature for the whole month was 82. This March, Madison has had five days of 80 degree temperatures, with a high temperature for the month of 83. Prior to this year, there had been only five March 80°F+ days in Madison's history, going back to 1869.

Record March warmth continues in the Northeast U.S.
For the second consecutive day, temperatures across much of Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine yesterday were the warmest on record for so early in the year. Hottest March temperatures on record occurred at Bangor, Maine (83°F), Houlton, Maine (79°F), Caribou, Maine (75°), Mount Washington, New Hampshire (54°F), and Buffalo, NY (82°).


Figure 2. The jet stream pattern features a large, southwards dipping bulge over the Western U.S., creating a trough of low pressure with cold and snow, and a large, northwards looping bulge over the Central U.S., creating a record-strength ridge of high pressure. The Western U.S. trough has cut off into a "cut-off low" that is slowly drifting eastwards.

Remarkable late-season snow storm on West Coast
The convoluted jet stream pattern that brought Summer in March conditions to the Eastern U.S. and Canada is also bringing record snows to Oregon. Eugene, Oregon picked up 7.5 inches of snow yesterday, the largest snowstorm this late in the year on record. The previous record was a 7.6" snow storm on March 5 - 7, 1951. Snow amounts as high as 32" have been recorded in the Oregon Cascades over the past few days. A loop in the jet stream has created a large upper-level ridge of high pressure that is stuck in place over the Eastern U.S., and large upper-level trough of low pressure over the Western U.S. Since the jet stream acts as the boundary between cold air to the north and warm air to the south, and the large loop in the jet places its axis far to the north of the eastern U.S., summer-like warmth has developed over the eastern half of the U.S. Conversely, colder than average temperatures have developed over the western third of the U.S. behind the southwards-dipping loop of the jet stream. This jet stream pattern was too extreme to be stable, and the big loop over the Western U.S. has broken off to form a giant eddy. The resulting area of low pressure is known as a "cut-off low", because it is cut off from the jet stream. The cut-off low is drifting slowly eastwards, and will bring an end to "Summer in March" over the Eastern half of the U.S. by Friday.

Jeff Masters

Warm Looking Sunrise (Ralfo)
Warm Looking Sunrise
March? (visionaire)
Spring has sprung too early--flowering seems like April or May. Temperatures like June! Japanese Gardens, St. Louis, Missouri.
March?

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Good evening all
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting drought:


No internet for August, September or October young man!


You cant make me! lol
Quoting washingtonian115:
If that was me you'll be so sorry...


LOL you wouldnt do notin. I have a nerf aresenal consisting of:

Longshot CS-6 Rifle

Longstrike CS-6 Rifle

Barricade RV-10 Blaster

Bandolier Kit

4 Spare magazines

Over 135 bullets

And each are always locked and loaded!!(im looking at saving my money for a Nerf Vulcan EBF-25. has a band of 25 dart holders, and can go through them in 8 seconds)

Quoting JNCali:
"Wait 'til your father get's home!"


he already home and didnt do notin so you lose xD
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..video Blogging killed the Media Star...
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 421 Comments: 127676
Quoting SteveDa1:


I am interested in your explanation as to why you think CO2 isn't to blame at all.

On a lighter note, I think I still like this statement more than Margusity's bizarre theory.


CO2 adds a small amount of warming over the long term (1-2 watts/m^2 if you double). The rest of the globe is below normal now, because of this La Nina. CO2 probably accounted for a 1-2F to this heat in March, if that.

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting JNCali:

Don't think it would be the rich folks surviving.. it would be the military


sorry but the miltary is the first to go
its the largest consumer of oil and gas by far
take away the oil and gas and all your left with is foot soliders
Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53308
Barometer Bob is cool, thanks AussieStorm!

They discussed my question extensively, very friendly show.
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.
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Quoting JNCali:

Don't think it would be the rich folks surviving.. it would be the military

Never count out the smart people. ;)
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Quoting SPLbeater:
I just got my mom with my nerf gun LOL. emptied all 10 whistlers on her xD
Has she retaliated yet??
Member Since: September 9, 2010 Posts: 5 Comments: 1034
HurricaneKing come out from hiding.
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Quoting BobWallace:


We can look at some facts that we do have at hand.

There's a tremendous amount of carbon stored in permafrost. Melt the permafrost and that carbon can be added to our atmospheric blanket. (We saw a big hunk of 'permafrost' burn last year.

There's a lot of cold-trapped methane that increased warming can release. Methane is very effective at short term warming and converts to CO2 for long term additional warming.

There's a possibility of drying out (or bug-killing) massive amounts of existing forests, having them burn, and adding more CO2 to our atmosphere.

There are other factors that come into play as things heat up. The carbon stored in topsoil (humus)gets converted quickly to CO2, for example.

Any/all of these events increase warming far beyond what we've caused by burning fossil fuels. This is the "too late" risk. It would create a climate in which it would be difficult for humans to exist in other than small, well provided for numbers.

Think biospheres for a few very rich folks.

--

Is there any guarantee that we would go there?
There are only educated guesses.

Does it make sense to run that experiment with us as the lab rats?


Don't think it would be the rich folks surviving.. it would be the military
Member Since: September 9, 2010 Posts: 5 Comments: 1034
Quoting Birthmark:

It might well be the case that we have gone too far, and it might not be the case. No one knows with a lot of confidence one way or the other. Statements either way at this point probably say more about the person than they do about what's coming.

With that in mind, I'll say that I do think it's too late to avoid some extremely difficult challenges in the next couple of decades. But again, that's just my opinion.


Actually that's not quite correct. The research indicates that we have surpassed the "point of no return". Even if we stopped producing CO2 entirely, the planet would continue to warm. Several papers have demonstrated that the additional warmth will be enough to trigger several positive feedbacks which will further warm the planet (permafrost, clathrates, etc.).

It remains to be seen if anything will be done about it. But if you want to get a good idea of whether or not something is up, just keep your eyes on the insurance companies. :P
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Quoting SPLbeater:
I just got my mom with my nerf gun LOL. emptied all 10 whistlers on her xD
"Wait 'til your father get's home!"
Member Since: September 9, 2010 Posts: 5 Comments: 1034
Reading your comments has made me decide that I've got much more reading, reflecting and listening on the subject before I can express valid opinions.
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4.7 mag Quake, Mexico
Member Since: July 3, 2005 Posts: 421 Comments: 127676
Quoting SPLbeater:
I just got my mom with my nerf gun LOL. emptied all 10 whistlers on her xD
If that was me you'll be so sorry...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Xyrus2000:


It is quite likely we will survive, and I on't believe anyone except for the extreme nuts are saying anything otherwise. But it will be far more than just "a few ordeals".

We depend on a stable climate to be able to grow the massive amounts of produce needed to support our population. Warmer temperatures means more pests, more invasive species, disease migration, and possible desertification of arable land. Combined with lack of genetic diversity of most crops it wouldn't take much to wreck havoc on our agricultural sector. A serious 5 year drought or an invasive species (like the bark beetle out in Colorado) in this country's bread basket would have devastating consequences for example.

This doesn't even consider the increased energy consumption, rising sea-levels, and other effects a rapidly warming planet will bring.

Increased socio-economic pressures will likely lead to more wars over resources, mass migrations, and other such events.

In the end, humans will survive, though the manner of our survival remains to be seen.

I think that the probable negative results from genetic modification of our food crops ranks right up at the top of the unintended consequences list
Member Since: September 9, 2010 Posts: 5 Comments: 1034
Quoting SPLbeater:
I just got my mom with my nerf gun LOL. emptied all 10 whistlers on her xD


No internet for August, September or October young man!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
I just got my mom with my nerf gun LOL. emptied all 10 whistlers on her xD
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Xyrus2000:


It is quite likely we will survive, and I on't believe anyone except for the extreme nuts are saying anything otherwise. But it will be far more than just "a few ordeals".

We depend on a stable climate to be able to grow the massive amounts of produce needed to support our population. Warmer temperatures means more pests, more invasive species, disease migration, and possible desertification of arable land. Combined with lack of genetic diversity of most crops it wouldn't take much to wreck havoc on our agricultural sector. A serious 5 year drought or an invasive species (like the bark beetle out in Colorado) in this country's bread basket would have devastating consequences for example.

This doesn't even consider the increased energy consumption, rising sea-levels, and other effects a rapidly warming planet will bring.

Increased socio-economic pressures will likely lead to more wars over resources, mass migrations, and other such events.

In the end, humans will survive, though the manner of our survival remains to be seen.


I think that's a pretty good estimate of the situation. That assumes, of course, that we actually address the problem in a meaningful way. If we don't...
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Quoting SteveDa1:


I guess you're right, it does come down to personal opinion. There isn't really any conclusive evidence telling us what sort of consequences we are up against.

I'm naturally optimistic and analytical therefore my opinion reflects that...


We can look at some facts that we do have at hand.

There's a tremendous amount of carbon stored in permafrost. Melt the permafrost and that carbon can be added to our atmospheric blanket. (We saw a big hunk of 'permafrost' burn last year.

There's a lot of cold-trapped methane that increased warming can release. Methane is very effective at short term warming and converts to CO2 for long term additional warming.

There's a possibility of drying out (or bug-killing) massive amounts of existing forests, having them burn, and adding more CO2 to our atmosphere.

There are other factors that come into play as things heat up. The carbon stored in topsoil (humus)gets converted quickly to CO2, for example.

Any/all of these events increase warming far beyond what we've caused by burning fossil fuels. This is the "too late" risk. It would create a climate in which it would be difficult for humans to exist in other than small, well provided for numbers.

Think biospheres for a few very rich folks.

--

Is there any guarantee that we would go there?
There are only educated guesses.

Does it make sense to run that experiment with us as the lab rats?

Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting Cyclone2012:


Indeed; fingers crossed.


Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53308
Quoting SteveDa1:


I'm wondering what you guys mean by quick enough. Quick enough for what? What sort of catastrophes are you predicting? We asked for it but nothing will be too extreme for us not to be able to handle accordingly. Sure, we will face unpredictable extreme weather events all over the globe the next couple of decades but clean, abundant energy is on the horizon.

The way you imply "quickly enough" sounds like this is it, we have gone too far, and there is no turning back. This is not the case, not even slightly so.

As a species we have gone through much much harder times in the past. We are just going through a very fast and changeable period in the history of homo sapiens and I am confident we will adapt with "few" ordeals.


It is quite likely we will survive, and I don't believe anyone except for the extreme nuts are saying anything otherwise. But it will be far more than just "a few ordeals".

We depend on a stable climate to be able to grow the massive amounts of produce needed to support our population. Warmer temperatures means more pests, more invasive species, disease migration, and possible desertification of arable land. Combined with lack of genetic diversity of most crops it wouldn't take much to wreck havoc on our agricultural sector. A serious 5 year drought or an invasive species (like the bark beetle out in Colorado) in this country's bread basket would have devastating consequences for example.

This doesn't even consider the increased energy consumption, rising sea-levels, and other effects a rapidly warming planet will bring.

Increased socio-economic pressures will likely lead to more wars over resources, mass migrations, and other such events.

In the end, humans will survive, though the manner of our survival remains to be seen.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting AussieStorm:
The Barometer Bob Show this week March 22, 2012
Guest will be Greg Carbin, Warning Coordinating Meteorologist at the Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Oklahoma. Greg will Skype into the show Live from the Lead Forecast Desk tonight. Go here to watch.


I don't know the Barometer Bob show. I'll check it out, thanks!
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting washingtonian115:
Irene is the only one I think that may get retired.I don't think any other storms really had that much of an impact that Irene had.


MA is right, your wrong. Jose and Don are probably going to be retired. Same with Franklin
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting bappit:
Send a wumail if you want to hold a private conversation.



I don't want to hold a private conversation. It also occurs to me that you could have followed your own advice and sent me this missive in email so apparently you don't want to either. You'd rather diss me in public. Why didn't you tell Pat the same thing? Your post got a plus 5. Go figure.
Member Since: July 25, 2006 Posts: 0 Comments: 553
A record I missed yesterday -- just noticed it in looking over the SE Michigan regional summary a little bit ago. The NWS lists co-op sites below all of the ASOS sites.

The Lapeer 2W, Michigan Co-op site reached a high temperature of 90 yesterday. That is the warmest temperature ever recorded in the state in the month of March. From what I've read, the record was 89 degrees, also set in Lapeer on March 27, 1910. That 1910 record, , like a lot of the extremely high all-time records from that era, seems spuriously high when looking at temps that day elsewhere in SE Michigan (i.e. at Detroit and Saginaw). NCDC is currently down for maintenance, so I haven't been able to access the actual observations from 1910 for Lapeer, Detroit, or Saginaw to verify this information. But from the NWS White Lake website, the record at Detroit for that date is only 81 and was set in 2007 and at Saginaw is only 79 and set in 1945. At least with yesterday's 90 degree reading, there were a number of sites reporting temps in the upper 80s across Michgian. There doesn't seem to be any support for upper 80s in late March 1910 anywhere in SE Michigan.

In addition, today, the ASOS at Detroit Willow Run Airport in Ypsilanti reached a high temperature of 89, which itself would tie the old Lapeer record. It will be interesting to see the co-op temps tomorrow to see if there were any other 89/90 degree readings posted.
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
The fate of 2017's naming list is upcoming next week.
Irene is the only one I think that may get retired.I don't think any other storms really had that much of an impact that Irene had.
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hey guys sorry if this is late but the almost if not all of the ITCZ is up above 0N so wet season soon starts
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Quoting SteveDa1:


Wow... and I find my city crowded :O I'm gonna have to rethink that.

I think I also know that this is not the issue but the way people make this so dramatic it sounds like survival of the species is on the table.

When you look at the Black plague, both world wars, great european famines, etc., this pales in comparison. We can adapt very quickly nowadays and unless we didn't do anything for the next 100 years then I just don't see why there has to be so much drama involved.


Its the urge to leave the planet a better place than when you left it. Will the human race become extinct? Probably not, however life will not as comfy as we have grown accustomed to (which has other implications). In addition, it will lead to human suffering. Most would agree that we should live in a way that has the least amount of suffering possible. We are not on the right track for that objective.
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Stunning show tonight at aurora skystation.
Hi all, Barb
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Quoting TropicalAnalystwx13:
The fate of 2017's naming list is upcoming next week.

We'll likely see Jose retired from the list. Don is a possibility also but he may fall just short.
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Quoting Birthmark:

It might well be the case that we have gone too far, and it might not be the case. No one knows with a lot of confidence one way or the other. Statements either way at this point probably say more about the person than they do about what's coming.

With that in mind, I'll say that I do think it's too late to avoid some extremely difficult challenges in the next couple of decades. But again, that's just my opinion.


I guess you're right, it does come down to personal opinion. There isn't really any conclusive evidence telling us what sort of consequences we are up against.

I'm naturally optimistic and analytical therefore my opinion reflects that...
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting dfwWxDude:
OK, now I feel really bad about owning a gas guzzling vehicle.

Jupiter is melting, scientists say
Link

(sniff sniff) Did I do this? Is it now Inter-Global Warming?


Um...perhaps you didn't read the article but the "melting" has nothing to do Jupiter's climate. It has to do with the internal mechanics of it's core (Jupiter produces it's own heat).
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Quoting bappit:

I don't think survival of the species is the issue. In fact, survival seems pretty easy to attain. After all, people survive here:



(The image may be chopped off on the right. Here is the link.)


Wow... and I find the city that I live in crowded :O I'm gonna have to rethink that.

I think I also know that this is not the issue but the way people make this so dramatic it sounds like survival of the species is on the table.

When you look at the Black plague, both world wars, great european famines, etc., this pales in comparison. We can adapt very quickly nowadays and unless we didn't do anything for the next 100 years then I just don't see why there has to be so much drama involved.
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Quoting FatPenguin:


I don't suppose you have any data to back that up, do you?


No. But I have seen it.
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Quoting SteveDa1:
The way you imply "quickly enough" sounds like this is it, we have gone too far, and there is no turning back. This is not the case, not even slightly so.

It might well be the case that we have gone too far, and it might not be the case. No one knows with a lot of confidence one way or the other. Statements either way at this point probably say more about the person than they do about what's coming.

With that in mind, I'll say that I do think it's too late to avoid some extremely difficult challenges in the next couple of decades. But again, that's just my opinion.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting SteveDa1:

I don't think survival of the species is the issue. In fact, survival seems pretty easy to attain. After all, people survive here:



(The image may be chopped off on the right. Here is the link.)
Member Since: May 18, 2006 Posts: 10 Comments: 5961
The fate of 2017's naming list is upcoming next week.
Member Since: July 6, 2010 Posts: 113 Comments: 31561
Quoting WatchingThisOne:


That's a fascinating site. I was surprised a bit where I ended up at the end of the test, but as I ponder matters I think the assessment was accurate. Thanks for the link.


I think the choices for answers needs a "Neither agree nor disagree" option, probably because the way some of the questions were worded didn't see the best.

That being said, I pretty much ended up where I expected. :)
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Quoting Xyrus2000:


The answer to the big question is no. Quick enough would have been about two decades ago. :P

Sometimes I just don't like to agree! It goes against the grain but all this awareness is at least 2 decades too late.
Any measures taken now will help but they will only slow down the inevitable rise in global temps and even then the slowing will be minuscule.
What we have to contend with is not the nature of the "detonator," anymore but the potential of the explosive devise it is connected to? Once the problem moves from 393 PPM CO2, to methane release then its going to be quite another ball game. I am more and more of the opinion that damage limitation may be all we can hope for with this warming thing and maybe, just maybe when the problem becomes undeniable Nations will work together to survive its global effects.
Member Since: January 21, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 2066
UNPRECEDENTED!!!!
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Quoting Xyrus2000:


The answer to the big question is no. Quick enough would have been about two decades ago. :P


I'm wondering what you guys mean by quick enough. Quick enough for what? What sort of catastrophes are you predicting? We asked for it but nothing will be too extreme for us not to be able to handle accordingly. Sure, we will face unpredictable extreme weather events all over the globe the next couple of decades but clean, abundant energy is on the horizon.

The way you imply "quickly enough" sounds like this is it, we have gone too far, and there is no turning back. This is not the case, not even slightly so.

As a species we have gone through much much harder times in the past. We are just going through a very fast and changeable period in the history of homo sapiens and I am confident we will adapt with "few" ordeals.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
The Barometer Bob Show this week March 22, 2012
Guest will be Greg Carbin, Warning Coordinating Meteorologist at the Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Oklahoma. Greg will Skype into the show Live from the Lead Forecast Desk tonight. Go here to watch.
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This storm has had some neat looking clouds, I'll try to post some pics later.
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Member Since: July 15, 2006 Posts: 169 Comments: 53308
Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
That song about JFV? He he
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 20547
Quoting BobWallace:


I see our largest hope coming from economic forces.

Already the wind industry has grown large enough to send windy-state Republican governors to Washington seeking continued support for wind farms.

Places like Texas that have a lot of wind generation on their grids are finding that the cost of electricity is dropping. Cheap wind causes more expensive fossil fuel generation off the grid in merit order pricing markets.

Electric cars seem to be only a few years from being as affordable and functional (adequate mileage range) as gasmobiles. Charging an EV costs about the same per mile as driving a 40MPG gasmobile with $1.20/gallon fuel. Once people find they can save $100+ a month by driving an EV we will quickly move off oil as our major personal transportation fuel.

Solar is on its way to <10 cents per kWh. At that point a lot less natural gas will be burned in peaker plants. And a lot of coal plants will simply close.

Residential solar is now down to ~$2.50/W, installed in Germany. It's about $6.40/W in the US. (Those prices include no subsidies.) Once we figure out how to be as efficient as the Germans we're going to see a residential solar 'goldrush'.

Battery storage is starting to appear at the grid level. As storage prices fall it will be cheaper to store cheap nighttime wind for daytime use and even more coal and gas will stay in the ground.

There's a chance that weird weather will scare the American public into demanding political action. But even if that doesn't happen I think economic forces will get us off fossil fuels.

The big question is whether it will be quick enough....



The answer to the big question is no. Quick enough would have been about two decades ago. :P
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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