Summer in March peaks in U.S. and Canada; record late snow in Oregon

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 1:17 PM GMT on March 22, 2012

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A spring heat wave like no other in U.S. and Canadian history peaked in intensity yesterday, during its tenth day. Since record keeping began in the late 1800s, there have never been so many temperature records broken for spring warmth in a one-week period--and the margins by which some of the records were broken yesterday were truly astonishing. Wunderground's weather historian, Christopher C. Burt, commented to me yesterday, "it's almost like science fiction at this point." A few of the more remarkable records from yesterday:

Pellston, MI: record high broken by 32°F
Pellston, Michigan in the Northern Lower Peninsula is called "Michigan's Icebox", since it frequently records the coldest temperatures in the state, and in the entire nation. But the past five days, Pellston has set five consecutive records for hottest March day. Yesterday's 85° reading broke the previous record for the date (53° in 2007) by a ridiculous 32°, and was an absurd 48°F above average.

Low temperatures beat the previous record high for the date at two stations
The low temperature at Marquette, Michigan was 52° yesterday, which was 3° warmer than the previous record high for the date! The low at Mt. Washington, NH yesterday (44°) also beat the previous record high for the date (43°.)

Canadian cities break all-time April record for warmth in March
Not only was yesterday the warmest March day in recorded history for many of Canada's major cities, it was also warmer than any April day at St. John, New Brunswick. The city hit 25.4°C (78°F.) Not only did this crush the record high for March (previous record: 17.5°C), it is well above any temperature ever measured in April (extreme April temperature on record: 22.8°C.) Halifax, Nova Scotia hit 25.8°C yesterday, beating their all-time March record of 25.6°, and falling just short of their all-time April record of 26.3°C, set on April 30, 2004. As of 1 pm today, Halifax was at 27°C, beating their all-time April record. Other major cities in Canada that set all-time warmest March records yesterday included Ottawa (27.4°C), Montreal (25.8°C), Windsor (27.8°C), Hamilton (25.6°C), London (26.4°C), and Fredericton (27.1°C).


Figure 1. The intensity and scope of Summer in March is clearly visible in this data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on the Terra satellite. The map depicts temperatures on March 8 - 15, 2012, compared to the average of the same eight day period of March from 2000-2011. Areas with warmer than average temperatures are shown in red; near-normal temperatures are white; and areas that were cooler than the 2000-2011 base period are blue. These land surface temperatures are distinct from the air temperatures that meteorological stations typically measure, and indicate how hot the surface of the Earth in a particular location would feel to the touch. From a satellite vantage point, the “surface” includes a number of materials that capture and retain heat, such as sand in the desert, the dark roof of a building, or the pavement of a road. As a result, daytime land surface temperature are usually much higher than air temperatures—something that anyone who has walked barefoot across a parking lot on a summer afternoon knows instinctively. Image credit: NASA Earth Observatory.

Summer in March warmth crushes records in Michigan
Yesterday, nearly every major airport in Michigan's Lower Peninsula broke the record they set the previous day for their hottest March temperature, including Detroit (84°), Flint (86°F, just 2° below their all-time April record), Saginaw (87°F, just 2° below their all-time April record), Grand Rapids (87°), Muskegon (82°), Lansing (86°), Alpena (87°), Gaylord (83°, which was 26° above the average high for the date), Pellston (85°), Houghton Lake (85°), and Traverse City (87°, which was which was 45°F above the average high for the date, and was the fifth consecutive day they tied or broke their record for hottest March temperature, and just 3° below their record high temperature of 90° for April.) In Michigan's Upper Peninsula, Sault Ste. Marie's 83° (26° above the average high for the date) crushed the previous March record by 8°, and was only 2° shy of the warmest temperature ever measured in April. Cities in states neighboring Michigan that broke all-time March records for warmth yesterday included:

Indiana:
Fort Wayne (87°) and South Bend (86°)

Ohio:
Columbus (85°), Toledo (85°), Cleveland (83°), and Mansfield (82°)

Wisconsin:
Milwaukee (84°), Madison (83°), and Green Bay (82°). The NWS office in Madison notes that in July of 2009, Madison only had seven days of 80 degree temperatures, and the highest temperature for the whole month was 82. This March, Madison has had five days of 80 degree temperatures, with a high temperature for the month of 83. Prior to this year, there had been only five March 80°F+ days in Madison's history, going back to 1869.

Record March warmth continues in the Northeast U.S.
For the second consecutive day, temperatures across much of Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine yesterday were the warmest on record for so early in the year. Hottest March temperatures on record occurred at Bangor, Maine (83°F), Houlton, Maine (79°F), Caribou, Maine (75°), Mount Washington, New Hampshire (54°F), and Buffalo, NY (82°).


Figure 2. The jet stream pattern features a large, southwards dipping bulge over the Western U.S., creating a trough of low pressure with cold and snow, and a large, northwards looping bulge over the Central U.S., creating a record-strength ridge of high pressure. The Western U.S. trough has cut off into a "cut-off low" that is slowly drifting eastwards.

Remarkable late-season snow storm on West Coast
The convoluted jet stream pattern that brought Summer in March conditions to the Eastern U.S. and Canada is also bringing record snows to Oregon. Eugene, Oregon picked up 7.5 inches of snow yesterday, the largest snowstorm this late in the year on record. The previous record was a 7.6" snow storm on March 5 - 7, 1951. Snow amounts as high as 32" have been recorded in the Oregon Cascades over the past few days. A loop in the jet stream has created a large upper-level ridge of high pressure that is stuck in place over the Eastern U.S., and large upper-level trough of low pressure over the Western U.S. Since the jet stream acts as the boundary between cold air to the north and warm air to the south, and the large loop in the jet places its axis far to the north of the eastern U.S., summer-like warmth has developed over the eastern half of the U.S. Conversely, colder than average temperatures have developed over the western third of the U.S. behind the southwards-dipping loop of the jet stream. This jet stream pattern was too extreme to be stable, and the big loop over the Western U.S. has broken off to form a giant eddy. The resulting area of low pressure is known as a "cut-off low", because it is cut off from the jet stream. The cut-off low is drifting slowly eastwards, and will bring an end to "Summer in March" over the Eastern half of the U.S. by Friday.

Jeff Masters

Warm Looking Sunrise (Ralfo)
Warm Looking Sunrise
March? (visionaire)
Spring has sprung too early--flowering seems like April or May. Temperatures like June! Japanese Gardens, St. Louis, Missouri.
March?

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387 ScottLincoln: I would just love to see the study that shows the hypothetical, physically-based mechanism by which randomly dispersed debris in the ocean can cause enough statistically-significant warming to produce a massive heatwave....
But I guess if they are actually going to try and find evidence to substantiate their assertions, more power to them.


More or less what I wanted to say -- ie at least Margusity's hypothesis is interesting*enough to be testable from the margins -- though I doubt very much that Margusity (et al) is going to put in the effort needed to prove his proposition.

Certainly didn't mean to imply that I thought that "debris field instead of greenhousing" makes any sense. BUT the GreenhouseEffect in-and-of itself doesn't determine where the weirdest weather generated by the greenhouse-trapped extra energy is going to assert itself.
So it seems a natural to check whether a unique debris field with a main body the size of California has a connection with the steering of that greenhouse weirdness to create a unique weather situation over NorthAmerica.

BTW, apparently even Margusity says that his proposition is a long shot.

* ie Doesn't contain obvious false-or-unprovable assertions or glaring errors in assumptions that can be found through simple "back of the envelope" calculations.
Member Since: August 21, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 4860
did everyone go
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Quoting SPLbeater:


but i NEED this!

I seen videos of it and read how fast it go and i want it baaad...besides...who says a teenager cant act 8 agains n visit the toy store? :D


Considering I occasionally do the same and I'm 21, nobody. :P
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GOODNIGHT ALL. be back tomorow morning...sometime.
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Already mapping my route to the closest toysrus from me....now all i gotta do is act like a sweet boy and persuade my grandmother into taking me up there...and letting me empty what cash i have lol
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Quoting 47n91w:
This afternoon, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reported that a 1.5 magnitude
earthquake struck early Tuesday morning in Clintonville. The earthquake struck
shortly after midnight. Officials with the USGS say loud booming noises have
been known to accompany earthquakes and it is possible the strange sounds
residents have been reporting at night might be related to the earthquake.

Wisconsin Emergency Management has been working with Waupaca County
Emergency Management Director Andrew Carlin and other local officials in regards
to the strange booming noises that have occurred this week.

According to Tom Evans, Assistant Director with the Wisconsin Geological and
Natural History Survey (WGNHS), Wisconsin has experienced about a dozen minor
events attributed to low seismic activities in the last 100 years. He says Wisconsin
sits on a relatively stable part of the continent. Details about the earthquake are
available at the USGS website, http://earthquake.usgs.gov

This report is provided to you on behalf of the State of Wisconsin's Emergency
Operations Center.
its the rapid heating of the marble crust that is cracking and popping from the sudden extreme temp rise of the last ten days

sometimes in the winter if it is mild then a sudden drop to lets say -20 -25c i hear popping creaking sounds in the building its from the rapid expansion and contraction of the concreate and rebar with falling and rising temps
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Quoting KoritheMan:


I doubt they're even open.


but i NEED this!

I seen videos of it and read how fast it go and i want it baaad...besides...who says a teenager cant act 8 agains n visit the toy store? :D
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Quoting VAbeachhurricanes:


You should be happy, you could still be there. :p


XD true
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Go NC



Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Good night all....I'm off to bed
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8323
Quoting KoritheMan:


:(


You should be happy, you could still be there. :p
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Quoting VAbeachhurricanes:


WALMART IS!


:(
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Quoting KoritheMan:


I doubt they're even open.


WALMART IS!
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Quoting SPLbeater:
Yeah...i really need to go to ToysRus


I doubt they're even open.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Yeah...i really need to go to ToysRus
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
Quoting aspectre:
170 ScottLincoln[quoting the ChicagoTribune]: Accuweather: Japanese tsunami debris caused wamer-than-average temperatures across the US by warming the Pacific.
Margusity
... [even offered] up a retroactive long shot theory for the warm winter and recent heat wave: the drifting debris field from last year's devastating Japanese tsunami seems to be sending warm air aloft above the Pacific Ocean, which could be contributing to warmer temperatures here..."

Don't know whether there is any merit to the hypothesis, but I like it... as just the "outside of the box" thinking that needs to be tested because "It's crazy, but is it crazy enough to be true?"
Like the grounding of US flights after 9/11 created the opportunity to gather some data inregards to the effects of contrails on weather, the tragedy in Japan affords the opportunity to study the affects of man-made debris on SeaSurfaceTemperatures, etc.

Separating the effect of that floating debris from those of longer-term floating plastic and Chinese soot deposition is going to be difficult, yet appears to be computationally solvable to at least a crude-but-usable degree.


I would just love to see the study that shows the hypothetical, physically-based mechanism by which randomly dispersed debris in the ocean can cause enough statistically-significant warming to produce a massive heatwave of 10s of degrees over a super short timeframe all while a highly radiative greenhouse gas known for over a century apparently can't be responsible for global climate change over decades.

But I guess if they are actually going to try and find evidence to substantiate their assertions, more power to them.
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Quoting KoritheMan:


Nature has a way of balancing itself out. It'd probably better to have an active Cape Verde season rather than a quiet one, as convectiveless tropical waves will propagate westward and develop at more opportune longitudes. In turn, that will reduce the prospects of recurvature.

And with La Nina gone, we aren't going to see a big trough set itself up over the eastern US west of the axis of the Bermuda High.

You're on to something right there, I guess we will have to wait and see
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8323
Quoting txag91met:


CO2 adds a small amount of warming over the long term (1-2 watts/m^2 if you double). The rest of the globe is below normal now, because of this La Nina. CO2 probably accounted for a 1-2F to this heat in March, if that.



No, No, and No.

From NOAA/NCDC http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/

The combined average temperature over global land and ocean surfaces for February 2012 was the 22nd warmest in the 133-year period of record and coolest since 2008, at 54.57°F (12.47°C), which is 0.67°F (0.37°C) above the 20th century average of 53.9°F (12.1°C). The margin of error associated with this temperature is ±0.20°F (0.11°C).
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Quoting nigel20:

Yeah....you are definitely right and and with a below average eastern atlantic we are likely see a below average cape verde season...especially if the NAO remains positive


Nature has a way of balancing itself out. It'd probably better to have an active Cape Verde season rather than a quiet one, as convectiveless tropical waves will propagate westward and develop at more opportune longitudes. In turn, that will reduce the prospects of recurvature.

And with La Nina gone, we aren't going to see a big trough set itself up over the eastern US west of the axis of the Bermuda High and recurve everything. Already, the synoptic pattern seems to be responding as large-scale troughing develops over the Rockies and central United States. We've had a lot of rain where I live since February (I'm in Louisiana), which is completely opposite to the last two years, where drought was a major issue (in fact, had Lee not curbed it, we would've likely been stuck in a severe drought last year). This kind of setup favors Gulf Coast strikes, and depending on the exact setup (the troughs need to be a little farther north), the east coast is at appreciable risk as well.

It will be even worse if we get longwave troughs that form underneath a highly amplified synoptic regime. A progressive upper air pattern would be better for recurvature.
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Quoting KoritheMan:


That's pretty much my exact thinking, except I think it'll be after. Still, there should be enough Pacific warm warmth by the summer to deter tropical cyclone activity somewhat, even if oceanic conditions aren't officially in an El Nino state. Remember, El Nino is simply what we label prolonged warming of the equatorial Pacific waters. It doesn't take a full-fledged El Nino before we start feeling the effects.

I mean it's probably not going to give us a below average season, but I think you'd be hard-pressed not to at least expect convective inhibition in the form of westerly vertical shear on a small scale during the peak months.

Yeah....you are definitely right and and with below average SST's in the eastern atlantic we are likely see a below average cape verde season...especially if the NAO remains positive
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8323
Quoting LRC:
Probably already talked about as I do not see all blogs, but Eastern Europe has had a very different type of winter then NA.
Link
Link


If there's ridging upstream, there will be troughing downstream.
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381. LRC
Probably already talked about as I do not see all blogs, but Eastern Europe has had a very different type of winter then NA.
Link
Link
Member Since: September 6, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 25
Quoting SteveDa1:


The way you imply "quickly enough" sounds like this is it, we have gone too far, and there is no turning back. This is not the case, not even slightly so.


Actually, it could be. Many environmental systems related to climate might see near irreversible damage. Extinctions cannot be undone. Even if climate stabilizes, it will take centuries for sea ice to return as it once did, if at all. Even if climate stabilizes, the extreme weather and changes to the hydrologic cycle won't revert back unless the climate reverts back. That will require greenhouse gases to mix out back to pre-industrial levels, after which we will have decades at a very minimum before the inertia of the climate system catches up.

Considering the fact that we cannot even slow down the rate of growth of greenhouse gases let alone stabilize them, the prospects for reducing them to pre-industrial levels very very improbable.
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Quoting nigel20:


It's showing a warm neutral that transitions to an el nino by at or after the peak of the hurricane season


That's pretty much my exact thinking, except I think it'll be after. Still, there should be enough Pacific warm warmth by the summer to deter tropical cyclone activity somewhat, even if oceanic conditions aren't officially in an El Nino state. Remember, El Nino is simply what we label prolonged warming of the equatorial Pacific waters. It doesn't take a full-fledged El Nino before we start feeling the effects.

I mean it's probably not going to give us a below average season, but I think you'd be hard-pressed not to at least expect convective inhibition in the form of westerly vertical shear on a small scale during the peak months.
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Quoting KoritheMan:


Isn't the CFS based on climatology? If so, then something about that forecast seems off. A third year without at least a warm neutral seems unlikely from a purely climatological standpoint (the only immediate exception that comes to mind is 1988-1990 period).

I don't exactly expect an El Nino either (at least, not until late in the fall or early into the winter). However, if the CFS indeed bases its forecasts off climatology, then...


It's showing a warm neutral that transitions to an el nino by or after the peak of the hurricane season
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8323
Although I will say that the one good thing about my department is that a good chunk of my time is spent in the freezer, especially during the holidays since people buy so much milk. This enables me to fill milk while listening to music. One thing I'll probably miss when I transfer.
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Quoting VAbeachhurricanes:


Yeah may I have 10 gallons of milk please? And can you carry them for me?


Haha, I can actually see that happening as we approach Easter.
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Quoting BobWallace:


It may be that Lutz has just had his 'road to Damascus' moment. Let me copy over this post (with permission).



Perhaps Bob Lutz will now reconsider his stance on global warming. If conservative Republican talkers were lying about his Volt, he might question whether they were lying to him about climate change.


Perhaps. IME it's unlikely, but there's no particular reason to believe that my experience is representative of the world at large.
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Quoting KoritheMan:


It's not particularly hard to do better than the mangers at my store when they just sit in the ad office all day. The CSMs aren't much better.

And the dairy. I am thinking of trying to transfer in May.


Yeah may I have 10 gallons of milk please? And can you carry them for me?
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This afternoon, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reported that a 1.5 magnitude
earthquake struck early Tuesday morning in Clintonville. The earthquake struck
shortly after midnight. Officials with the USGS say loud booming noises have
been known to accompany earthquakes and it is possible the strange sounds
residents have been reporting at night might be related to the earthquake.

Wisconsin Emergency Management has been working with Waupaca County
Emergency Management Director Andrew Carlin and other local officials in regards
to the strange booming noises that have occurred this week.

According to Tom Evans, Assistant Director with the Wisconsin Geological and
Natural History Survey (WGNHS), Wisconsin has experienced about a dozen minor
events attributed to low seismic activities in the last 100 years. He says Wisconsin
sits on a relatively stable part of the continent. Details about the earthquake are
available at the USGS website, http://earthquake.usgs.gov

This report is provided to you on behalf of the State of Wisconsin's Emergency
Operations Center.
Member Since: Posts: Comments:
Quoting nigel20:

That's what the CFS is predicting


Isn't the CFS based on climatology? If so, then something about that forecast seems off. A third year without at least a warm neutral seems unlikely from a purely climatological standpoint (the only immediate exception that comes to mind is 1988-1990 period).

I don't exactly expect an El Nino either (at least, not until late in the fall or early into the winter). However, if the CFS indeed bases its forecasts off climatology, then...
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Quoting VAbeachhurricanes:


Well I always walk into a walmart and point out all the things I could do better than the high school drop out managers. What department are you in?


It's not particularly hard to do better than the mangers at my store when they just sit in the ad office all day. The CSMs aren't much better.

And the dairy. I am thinking of trying to transfer in May.
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Quoting Cyclone2012:


Neutral for the peak months. GOOD to see.

That's what the CFS is predicting
Member Since: November 6, 2010 Posts: 11 Comments: 8323
Quoting KoritheMan:


Sometimes it's okay. The day managers are generally fine. But I work until 9:30 most nights, and so I have to deal with the obnoxiously loud night management. They seem to forget that we lost two people over the last 30 days, and I'm working alone after 7 PM. I can't run the entire department myself, especially not one as busy as mine. And I'm surprised they don't see that. Wait, no I'm not. I'm convinced you literally have to be mind-numbingly stupid to be a manager at Walmart, assistant, customer service, store, or otherwise.


Well I always walk into a walmart and point out all the things I could do better than the high school drop out managers. What department are you in?
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Quoting Birthmark:
drg0dOwnCountry, thanks for making it clear that Lutz is a lousy scientist in addition to being a lousy CEO.


It may be that Lutz has just had his 'road to Damascus' moment. Let me copy over this post (with permission).




It must be a shock to strongly believe in conservative ideology (I understand that) and then slowly realize that leading conservative talking heads in the media and politics spout lie after lie… after lie.

We’ve seen it happen on a number of issues and with a number of people, such as with conservative D.R. Tucker, who realized the deep tragedy and ignorance of global warming denial once he dug into the science; or Republican MIT atmospheric scientist Kerry Emanuel, who’s had himself and his wife threatened for expressing how ashamed he is of the anti-science focus of current Republican politicians; or Republican Congressman Bob Inglis of South Carolina who is shocked at most of his party’s global warming denial and its policy of basically ousting politicians from office who try to do something about this pressing matter or support clean energy too much.

Now, it looks like you can add Bob Lutz to this group. Before getting into this story though, a few quick points:

Ever heard about a gasoline-powered car bursting into flames? Of course you have.

Aware that you should not smoke at a gas station and that gasoline is highly flammable? Of course you are.

Aware that a Chevy Volt battery caught fire weeks after the Volt was deliberately destroyed in safety tests in very rare circumstances, and that the result was the company addressing the issue so that it won’t happen to a Chevy Volt driver (even though it would be extremely unlikely to happen anyway)? I hope you’re aware of those details, but I wouldn’t be surprised if you aren’t, since they weren’t exactly reported on clearly by most media agencies.

Aware that conservative media and politicians have absurdly acted as though the Chevy Volt is dangerous and flammable because of that single safety test, and that they do not even try to put the issue in context or show how much safer the Volt is than a conventional vehicle? Would be hard to have missed that — one of the favorite anti-cleantech talking points these days (yep, they don’t have much to legitimately complain about when it comes to cleantech).

Now, conservative Bob Lutz, as a former Vice Chairman at GM, is intimately familiar with the Volt. And as a former upper level manager at GM and several other car companies, Bob knows cars, in general. Also, from his high prestige and conservative ties, he has tried hard to inform conservative media and talking heads of their errors when it comes to the Volt. Guess what — no success there.

The result? Lutz has essentially given up on his conservative colleagues altogether. Here’s a full piece by Lutz published this week in Forbes (remainder of this article is from Bob Lutz via Forbes):

I’ve expended a lot of effort trying to point out the truth about the Chevy Volt fires, knowing I might not reach a broad audience but might get the chief disseminators of misinformation (Rush Limbaugh, Bill O’Reilly, et al) to say “Wow! I guess I didn’t realize that no Volt, (other than ones deliberately destroyed), ever showed as much as a wisp of smoke! I guess I had better retune my rhetoric!”

Such were the musings of my politically naive brain, especially since I knew O’Reilly has seen my writing because “his people” talked to me.

What happened, instead, was more cruel disappointment:

In his nationally syndicated column Saturday, the intellectually gifted and highly respected Charles Krauthammer, my hero-figure on the Right, joined the rest of the prevaricators. The topic was Obama’s failed energy policy, and the litany of drilling bans and incomprehensible failure to approve the eminently useful Keystone Pipeline. So far, so good.

But, just as I was savoring Krauthammer’s prose, I see … WHAT!? … the Volt cited as yet another example of Obama’s misguided, interventionist energy policy. To make matters worse, Krauthammer could not resist attaching the adjective “flammable” to the Volt.

Now, Krauthammer is a smart, highly educated and well-informed individual. I have to assume he knows the truth. The fact that he persists in the myth of Volt combustibility and Obama-conception of the vehicle cannot be in error.

I am, sadly, coming to the conclusion that all the icons of conservatism are (shock, horror!) deliberately not telling the truth!

This saddens me, because, to this writer, conservatism IS fundamental truth. It only damages its inherent credibility with momentarily convenient fiction.

So, Mr. Krauthammer joins the list of right-wing pundits I no longer take seriously. After all, how do I know they’re telling the truth when the subject is one I’m not as familiar with as the Volt?

That does leave everyone’s trusted favorite, though. The disarmingly modest, low-key, warm, fuzzy, dependable, kind of your favorite uncle when you were growing up … the Reverend Huckabee! He wouldn’t unjustly attack the most celebrated example of American engineering of the last 30 years — or would he?

The other night on Fox, he, too, had his way with the Volt!

So who am I going to believe now?




Perhaps Bob Lutz will now reconsider his stance on global warming. If conservative Republican talkers were lying about his Volt, he might question whether they were lying to him about climate change.

Member Since: February 22, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 1344
366. skook


Link


Watched this top gear episode for about the 5th time tonight, its truly amazing. If you ever have a chance, i would recommend picking it up just for the scenery, or lack of.
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I might need to make a run to ToysRus
Member Since: August 4, 2011 Posts: 46 Comments: 4488
364. Skyepony (Mod)
Quoting Cyclone2012:


LOL. True. However, I'm not one of 'em. Are you an aisle-stocker or a cashier?


The former. I'm only there because I need to be (school). However, I have plans of trying to get into management if I stay long enough.
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Quoting VAbeachhurricanes:


How's hell?


Sometimes it's okay. The day managers are generally fine. But I work until 9:30 most nights, and so I have to deal with the obnoxiously loud night management. They seem to forget that we lost two people over the last 30 days, and I'm working alone after 7 PM. I can't run the entire department myself, especially not one as busy as mine. And I'm surprised they don't see that. Wait, no I'm not. I'm convinced you literally have to be mind-numbingly stupid to be a manager at Walmart, assistant, customer service, store, or otherwise.
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Quoting Cyclone2012:


Stop that! It's not THAT bad. I was by there yesterday morning. It is surprisingly tolerable during the week.


It's always tolerable if you're a customer (well, unless you're those super picky types that like to ***** about everything).
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Quoting KEEPEROFTHEGATE:
you should take a camera too work and get people of wal mart photos :)lol


I already bring a camera, but I never thought of doing that. :p
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Quoting KoritheMan:


Oh shut up lol


How's hell?
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Quoting KoritheMan:


Oh shut up lol
you should take a camera too work and get people of wal mart photos :)lol
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Quoting TomTaylor:
He's busy getting whipped at Waaaaal maaaart.

Gosh I love that place so much!


Oh shut up lol
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Jeff co-founded the Weather Underground in 1995 while working on his Ph.D. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters from 1986-1990.

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